10 Negotiable Ways To a Fatter Wallet

by Amy B. Scher on 26 September 2007 48 comments
Photo: iStock photo

Growing up in a typical small Jewish family, I assumed everyone knew the I’m-smart-but-not-cheap tactics I was raised with. But as I’ve gotten older (yeah, it had to happen sometime), I realized some people don’t know the one steadfast golden rule of financial success, stability and contentment: EVERYTHING is negotiable. But, you have to ask!!

There are some obvious things I won’t list in this article like that you can bargain for a car. I’m pretty sure everyone knows that. If not, for now, remember to act like you don’t need one and then e-mail me for further help.

Here are some hints for a fatter wallet and maybe even enough money at the end of the day to buy a new purse to hold it in. These are in no particular order of importance:

  1. Rent

    If the place has been on the market for a bit, you can offer less rent for a longer lease. Also, you can often bargain less rent if you have a trade to offer like great gardening skills or something else that would improve the property and be less work for the owner. It’s a win-win. Note: you won’t have much luck with this if you are going through a property management company as you’d be cutting out on their profits.

  2. Farmer’s Market

    The price listed is not the price you have to pay. Always try to round the pounds to a near dollar. So, if peaches are $1.50 per pound and you weigh in at 2.89 pounds, say “I’ll give you $4.” They’ll be happy to get the $4 and you’ll get the extra peach. Note: if you go toward the end of the day, you can usually buy larger quantities for less. Most likely, the vendor doesn’t want to shlep everything home. Just ask!

  3. Get a discount for a scratch, stain or other imperfection on a purchase

    Almost all retail stores will give 10-15% off of glassware, clothing and other items if it is damaged, especially if it’s the only in the store of the kind (your size or that color). Of course they don’t advertise this so you have to ask at the register. Just know that once you get your discount, it becomes non-returnable merchandise.

  4. Hotel comps for an unpleasant stay

    Hotels aim to please. And if you were lying awake all night because your were placed next to a room full of rowdy children under 5, then the receptionist didn’t do a good job. First thing is, you have to call them when it happens. Then, the next morning, call again and ask to speak to the manager. Tell them you realize this wasn’t at all their fault but it really put a damper on your stay and you’d like to see “what they can do for you.” Often they’ll offer a percentage off the room or a free breakfast. At the least, you can get a late check-out because you need to make up some sleep before you hit the road.

  5. Animal adoptions

    In love with a $25 puppy someone has advertised in the newspaper? Don’t pick him up with your carrying crate so fast! Tell the owner you’d love to have him and give him a great home but you need to pick him up after he’s gotten his initial shots. It’ll save you a trip to the vet and all the costs associated with it. Trust me, you’ll have plenty of other chances in your new buddy’s life to accompany him on these costly outings.

    ARTICLE CONTINUES BELOW
  6. Get new purchases delivered FREE!

    This is one of the bargaining points furniture salespeople have available to make a sale. Use it. If you feel like you need an excuse, tell them because you have to wait a day, they don’t have your color in stock (or whatever applies), you’d love if they could waive the delivery fee. They usually won’t want you going down the street where they might have it in stock and you can get it today. Furniture can be an impulse buy and if you walk out the door, they could lose you.

  7. Frame your own pictures

    This is a big one. Never get a picture professionally framed unless you have a ton of money to blow, or you want something very specific. It can be hundreds and hundreds of dollars. Order a print from www.posters.com or wherever, and then go to Kmart, Target or Michael’s (craft store), buy something with another picture or poster in it, remove it and slip yours in. It’ll already have nice matting and frame and you won’t be too broke to buy nails to hang it.

  8. Free dessert for celebrations

    A lot of restaurants will do a birthday dessert for free if you let them know it’s someone’s birthday at the table. Some charge though so make sure they aren’t saying “yes” they do it, but forgetting to say “and it’ll also cost you $4.95.”

  9. Room upgrades at hotels (or higher floors)

    If a hotel isn’t booked, they will often give you a complimentary upgrade for a birthday, anniversary, etc. Just kindly tell them that you are there for a special occasion. Always show them that you aren’t being demanding by saying something like “I’m sure the standard room we have is great, but if you aren’t too full and there is any way you can put us on a higher floor or something with a nicer view, I’d really appreciate it.” They will if they can. Often asking to speak with a manager will give you a better chance. And no, it’s not rude or pushy ever to ask for a manager.

  10. Keep it cold at no cost

    Many hotels will charge $10 for an in-room refrigerator but most will waive the fee if you have to keep medication cold, so just ask when you check in. I’m staying out of the ethics on this one so it’s up to you to decide if it’s worth the lie of saying you having medication when you don’t just to keep your dinner leftovers cold so you don’t have to pay for breakfast in the morning. I really do need one for my medication so I use this all the time and they never question it. Note: Most kitchens at hotel restaurants will re-heat something for you if you go downstairs and ask. That way, you aren’t stuck with a fridge full of stuff you won’t eat.

Good luck and just remember, no one offers anything for free. You have to ask. The worst possible thing that can happen is someone will say “no.” If they do, big deal. If not, cha-ching!

Tagged: Art and Leisure
0
No votes yet
Your rating: None
ShareThis

comments

48 discussions

Add New Comment

CAPTCHA
This test helps prevent automated spam submissions.
Guest's picture
Brad

Something regarding hotels that will save you money up front is to ask the price. Most hotels have a set price for the night, a rack rate (lowest possible) and a few in between. The biggest mistake you can make is to say "Well, I have AAA or AARP" right off the bat, because most hotel employees are told that in that situation they are to give out the regular price and refer to it as discounted. This isn't the best practice, but for some of the workers schleping away for minimum wage, they don't argue. Often, they make commissions, so higher prices work for them, too. If you get a price, then mention such-and-such discount, they have to either explain why they were telling you a price and then not adjusting if they honor a discount. Most of these are only a 10% discount, but that is still a few bucks you can save by changing the order of your reservation.

Another point is that remember to be reasonable when you complain about the noise or whatever problem may come up. Basically, the person there is trying, and they have set rules about how to handle disturbances, but I've watched people throw temper tantrums and call the local police to file a noise complaint while not even realizing the noise was something legitimate (like someone coming to their room the first time and the doors shutting under their own power). Given, if there is a problem, complain. Understand, though, that not every person working there can give you a discount (there are some things that do have to wait until morning) - great post though, all the advice is wonderful...

Brad

amybscher's picture

Great comment about not mentioning AAA right off the bat. Often the "walk-in" rate is the cheapest. People spend all this time researching and reserving online beforehand, when it's often cheaper to just walk in (barring it's not some huge holiday weekend).

Also, thanks for pointing out about being reasonable. You have to assume hotels will have some noise. I was only suggesting not to be shy about complaining if you have a legitimate problem. Bitching only to get a break and make the staff crazy is just bad karma.

Guest's picture

You should negotiate everything over a certain dollar amount. The rich do it all the time...it's expected...only the middle class and the poor think that "negotiating" is a dirty word! Go in with a wad of cash for your next purchase or service (yes, I negotiated down our cost of lawn treatment too)...I don't have the money you say...then, you probably should not be putting it on your credit card in the first place!

Guest's picture
Katie

I was with you up until the puppy negotiation part. At least you weren't suggesting to bargain with a pound or other way of holding animals until they have to kill them b/c there are too many. The person holding the dog already had to endure a lot of it - bathroom, walks, hair, dirt, scolding, etc. Normally they will get the shots, and if you're lucky, the dog will be spay by then. But come on. You're getting a dog. It's not a peach at the Farmers Market. And even those prices are always low. In order for the market people to show up there to sell you a cheap but juicy peach, they need a few more of your pennies. Otherwise, you're contributing to the oversaturated market of tasteless fruit from China to WallMart.

amybscher's picture

Fair enough. Maybe I should have left this one out. But, I do want to clear up that I'm NOT in any way referring to shelters or pounds. They are saviors. I've just seen way too many private parties selling puppies for an "adoption fee" without shots in the first place only for the new owner to have a not so healthy puppy for their great deal. Most people "endure" all the raising of puppies either because they choose to breed, or they didn't get their animal fixed in the first place. I think I'm more of the ideal that a well cared for puppy will often come to you with the first set of shots thus saving you money in the long run. And, no, I'm not saying your dog isn't worth lots of vet money because I know mine is. Just something to think about when getting yourself a new buddy.

Guest's picture
Guest

Remember, most people on Craigslist and such are looking to recoup the price they paid for their "beloved fido that we just don't have enough time for". So, negotiate. Alternatively, they really do want to make sure that fido is going to a good home, so offer to show your home and make a visit to negotiate the price down.

Guest's picture
jcscar21

I often go through the electronics section of Walmart looking for items that are almost sold out except for the one on display. Displays work just fine. And if you get a manager chances are you will get a discount. Walmart will give you price drops. But you have to get a manager.

I use something along the lines of...
"I've traveled thirty minutes to get this tv I have been eyeballing in your add. However, I see you don't have any in boxes left. I wouldn't mind the display, but I wouldn't want to pay full price for something that is used."

The standard off is 10%. Sometimes if you give them a good story you can get more than that.

Guest's picture
Guest

I would say that 10% off a display model is low for a display. At Target (I work there) we sell displays at 30%, unfortunately we only sell displays when they go clearance.

And you could bring any story you want to me, im not selling you a display TV that is not on clearance. Though if a box is even slightly dented i give 10-15% off just because its easier than arguing whether or not the dent caused any problems with the merchandise.

Guest's picture
Guest

If your traveling and need a hotel that you haven't booked ahead of time. Find a Wi-Fi hotspot and book a room on the internet for that night. Its always significantly cheaper than booking at the hotel. I've walked into a hotel before to ask their price, walked out and used the hotels own WiFi from my car, booked a room and saved 50%.

Guest's picture
Steve

Americans have no shame, noticed this when I went on holiday, everyone talking out loud about their private life. In the UK nobody would dare to bargain, expect in places where its accepted... car boot sale, buying house, certain type of car shops.

Stop being scruffy beggers and stop wasting your time haggling and begging over a few cents, time is money my friends, don't waste your life arguing, get some self respect.

Guest's picture
Granata

Sure, time is money, but how much time does it take to ask for a discount. It's not begging. In fact, I've been places where it was considered rude NOT to haggle with the salesperson.

Guest's picture
Richard Toddar

Dear Friend across the Pond:

Americans may share private things in their lives, but that's part of our charm. You need to see the movie "A Fish Called Wanda."

Archie: You make me feel free.
Wanda: Free?
Archie: Wanda, do you have any idea what it's like being English? Being so correct all the time, being so stifled by this dread of, of doing the wrong thing, of saying to someone "Are you married?" and hearing "My wife left me this morning," or saying, uh, "Do you have children?" and being told they all burned to death on Wednesday. You see, Wanda, we'll all terrified of embarrassment. That's why we're so... dead. Most of my friends are dead, you know, we have these piles of corpses to dinner. But you're alive, God bless you, and I want to be, I'm so fed up with all this. I want to make love with you, Wanda. I'm a good lover - at least, used to be, back in the early 14th century. Can we go to bed?

Guest's picture
Guest

Lol, jealous Brit who doesn't live here. British people are annoying.

Guest's picture
Guest

Haggling is a dance and is actually a good time. Live life as it is around you. If it saves a couple of bucks, even the better. Enjoy what is different, we have more many than you anyway!

Guest's picture
KarenFla

In the US there are a lot of people who expect you to bargain and put the price up high. For example tag sales, the little shop owners in Chinatown in NYC. If you just pay the price or decide not to buy because the price is high you don't know the rules of the game

Guest's picture
Ben

There is a difference between haggling and arguing my friend. I bought a display model TV from Walmart for $150 less, just because I asked. It isn't slimy or dirty, it's smart. If you want to pay extra money for some imaginary shred of 'pride', maybe it isn't worth it.

Guest's picture
Guest

I don't know what farmer's market you go to, maybe it's a big-city market where the "farmers" are just ripoff artists selling the same trucked-in-from-California stuff you could buy in the grocery store down the street. Where I live, the vendors at the market are actually local farmers, selling meat and produce from my area. The food is fresh, healthy, and high-quality, and I know they're not making a lot of money. It's hard enough to get by as a small organic farmer without people trying to shave your margins down just a little more.

Guest's picture
SigChat

Regarding the adoption of animals, please don't adopt if you're too cheap to pay for vet bills, or necessary vet check ups. I understand that some people are looking to save money, but if you're the kind that thinks that you can a few corners by having someone else pay for an animal you intend to adopt - let alone thinking that you could save the cost by not taking your pet to a clinic to get checked up or have 'x' operation, I highly advise that you don't adopt a pet. We're not talking about free food or booze, this is an actual life - and there are many idiots who adopt an animal only to either no longer want it because of the expenses involved, or because their children have grown out of the 'trend'.

Guest's picture

Ok as for farmers market I have found the opposite of the actual response here. When I go to places like wallmart and or big stores I seem to be able to buy something for half the price. Yet the disadvantage of going to such places is the quality :(

Guest's picture
Anonymous

All you people who are whining about this article need to realize it was just a starting point of ideas. You morons are so busy looking for someone to hand feed you ideas that you don't realize that if you want to save money all it involves is thinking a little...probably because many of you can't anymore.

RE: Puppies...give it a break loser. If people want a puppy they can get it however they want and many who are getting an animal can't go shoveling money out to take the animal to the vet...they'd perhaps rather spend the money on savings in case the dog gets sick.

Are people so stupid that they need an article to give them everything in such minute detail that they have nothing left to complain about?

amybscher's picture
amybscher

Just want to clear something up. The animal adoption issue wasn't the point of the article. All I'm saying is making sure your animal has its shots MIGHT help you by getting a healthier animal in the first place and save on unecessary costs later (ones that might have been prevented). Of course like humans, any animal can get sick and I'm not arguing that anyone should deny their pets medical care. This article wasn't aimed at or about the "idiots" SigChat mentions who adopt an animal only to grow out of the "trend." Those people probably aren't reading this anyway.

Guest's picture
P

"Often the "walk-in" rate is the cheapest."

this is wrong on so many levels.

walk ins will always get charged the most.

the best thing to do it to use a third party website (orbitz, priceline ect...)

they sell the rooms for the cheapest as they will get paid by the hotel regardless.

"The biggest mistake you can make is to say "Well, I have AAA or AARP" right off the bat, because most hotel employees are told that in that situation they are to give out the regular price and refer to it as discounted."

this is also wrong- there is a set AAA/ AARP rate most nights. On these nights these rates are ALWAYS lower than the walk in rate.

Guest's picture
Guest

How incredibly petty all of this is. The first tip about exchanging services with the landlord is great but the rest is just about making the life of small businesses hell.

Guest's picture
Guest

Great advice here. I'm not sure why so many people are negative about some of it. I don't see anything here about making anyone's life "hell" or "haggling and begging". The whole article seems to be based on asking nicely, and if they say no you're not out anything.

Guest's picture
Derek

Just yesterday I negotiated free shipping on an order with an internet retailer using their Live Chat function. Took 2 minutes and I saved $18. All you have to do is ask.

Guest's picture
Mattacheck

If time is money, how much did you lose typing up the negative feedback? You people are weirdos, you are attacking the fact that this article was written in some cases, not the content itself. Don't read an article about negotiating to save money if you think it's a practice that is below you.

Guest's picture
Joe

Anyone in this thread that is complaining about people wasting their time trying to save money is a moron. If you spent the time reading this post and peoples comments only to ridicule someone for passing on ideas to people than your the one wasting time. If 'time is money' than the time you spent reading and ranting probably wasted more time (equaling dollars) than I did saving 10% or more on my purchases. The author is right all you have to do is ask. Merchants aren't going to tell you how to save more money. This is business people.

Guest's picture
Guest

Those are some good tips. I'll be smart and stick with the tips . I think everybody should take the advice that serves them the most.

Guest's picture
Johan

IKEA is a great furniture discount store with modern design furnitures and affordable prices (if you won´t to save for it).

Guest's picture
fubek

It's very reasonable to negotiate. If you think the price is too high, ask for a discount. If they want business with you at that price, everyone is happy. If not, so what? The price is too high.

That's not cheapness, that's bein reasonable, folks. While I wouldn't use all of the tips listed here, being upset about them or calling wisebread names just shows how unreasonable you are. Why overpay?

Guest's picture
Guest

I'm surprised nobody here has mentioned fostering pets. Many foster organizations pay for EVERYTHING (food, litter, toys, vet, etc.) It's a great way to experience the joys of puppies (or kittens) without forking over tonnes of money. It's also handy if you're living in an apartment that allows pets, but might move in the future to somewhere where they're banned.

Of course, the downside is that you have to give them up eventually, but you always get new ones, and what better way to save money on pets?

Andrea Karim's picture

I was trying to buy the very last desk at Target, which was the floor model. They wouln't let me have it, and told me that that was policy, that customers are not allowed to buy floor models. Did they lie to me?!?!?!

Guest's picture

Farmer's markets are some of the few places where the true cost of the food is reflected in the actual price. Locally grown, often organic, nutritious food should be prized! You certainly can't get it in the supermarket, where foods have been shipped many miles and subjected to pesticides, genetic modification, and chemical fertilizers. The fact that these foods are so much cheaper hides the true costs to the environment and to our health.

Small farmers have to work very hard to keep going and we should be paying them MORE, not less. Shame on you. Please rethink your approach to spending money. I certainly understand wanting to save money on overpriced items being sold by huge companies with healthy profit margins. Farmer's markets are not the place to do that.

Guest's picture
fubek

Do you understand the concept of market? The small farmers don't _need_ to sell anything to you if they find your offer too low.

Guest's picture
David

What you guys are failing to regognize is that asking for a small discount does not force the vendors to do anything they don't want to do. Want to know how a small farmer really loses money? They grow vegetables that rot before they can be sold. The goal of the vendor is to sell 100 percent of the produce they brought, but not sell out until the last minute, and get as much money as possible per pound. Unfortunately, they lack the resources to be able to be constantantly monitoring supply and demand and adjust prices like a large retailer, so they have to do it a little bit seat-of-the-pants. People also don't like to walk by the stall 30 minutes and see that the prices have gone down, so they'll typically have to stick with a price once they've set it.

But by the time that the day is half done, they'll have a pretty good idea how close they'll be to reaching their goals, and if it looks like they need to move more product, they'll be happy if you offer them a little more money in exchange for a proportionately larger order.

That's why bargaining works. The merchant has some secret information about how much they'd be satisfied making, and the customer has some secret information about how much they'd be willing to pay, and when you bargain a little, everyone ends up happy. If the merchant doesn't want to take the deal you offer, they'll refuse. Don't be so lilly-livered about it.

And as for Mr. British, I wouldn't be so haughty about cultural differences. In many parts of the world. people would be embarrassed to pay what the vendor first asks for, because only suckers would do that. In the US, we don't have the culture of bargaining to that extent, and it's certainly true that some people try so hard to strike a bargain that they embarrass themselves and the merchants, but in many cases it's perfectly acceptable, and even expected. Think of it this way, when one big multinational company offers to buy another one (even a British one), they don't just take the first offer. They usually spend weeks negotiating back and forth. Now, it wouldn't be worth your time spending weeks haggling over a new plasma TV, but it should be worth at least fifteen minutes. If Best Buy is willing to throw in free delivery to get your business, then wouldn't it be a win-win?

Guest's picture
Guest

I also disagree with the farmer market advice.
Those are people who should be supported, because they work hard and make little money.
Often times, I even give them some extra money, like I won't take the change.

When it comes to stores, sure, I don't really care about them not making enough money off me, but the local people should be supported and encouraged, because they do a great job.

amybscher's picture
amybscher

I go to farmers market to support the local farmers and don't ever ask for anything unreasonable.....just usually round to the dollar. I have a chronic illness that makes me extra grateful to be able to get great, healthy produce but I still try to save money where I can for my healthcare. And, I don't ever ask for a discount disrespectfully. I hope it came across in my article that you should always ask nicely and they can say no if they aren't comfortable with it. I used to have a friend who sold flowers at a farmers market years ago and they usually set their prices allowing for a bit of wiggle room. Again, if they say no, then I pay full price but it doesn't hurt to ask.

Amy B. Scher's picture

I'm going to pay extra this week for my peaches just for everyone who is so outraged over my post. That way, you can all de-stress and worry about the stuff in your own life - and I serioulsy mean that in the nicest way. :)

Paul Michael's picture

Speaking as a Brit born and bred, I have to disagree Steve. I have haggled for almost everything I could get away with and you're painting us all with the same brush by saying you don't. I also have to wonder why you spend your cearly valuable time reading blogs about how to save money. Do you see the irony in that at all? Even worse is then spending the time to comment on wasting time...that's almost laughable.

Guest's picture
Tephus

At least you didn't mention cutting up credit cards. Or worst, applying for a cash rebate card to get that measly 2% rebate on gas.

Guest's picture
Guest

I suspect hotel rate structures vary from hotel to hotel and chain to chain. The hotel I worked at was a high-end metroplolitan hotel. The cheapest rate available to the public was the "walk-in" rate. It was roughly half the "rack" rate -- which was the highest. We also had various other rates somewhere in between.

Also, the break-even point on a standard room was $48.00. The front desk staff was instructed to rent rooms for as little as $50.00 if a) it was getting late, and b) occupancy was low. Since the "rack" rate on a standard room was $219.00 (and the "walk-in" rate was still $129.00), that's a substantial savings.

But we wouldn't offer the $50.00 rate. A customer would have to haggle for it. $50.00 is how low we would go to keep a customer from walking away.

Guest's picture
Brad

The hotels I have worked at are very similar. Of course, our rates were a lot lower (usually in the 70-120/night) but they were chains in South-East Ohio. If I remember right, we were told the rack was the absolute minimum, the break even cost was usually about $20 less than the rack. There are usually things that warrant discounts, but there are also some that are ridiculous. I believe people have been given discounts because they wanted to stay here and use the pool, even though there were big signs on the doors that said "Pools closed for repair" and they were told that at check-in, they get most of their money back. Of course, these are often people that live in town anyway.

The only other advice I can give is to mention any family you have working at a hotel. I worked for a Super 8 a year or two ago. At the time, my father went to one near Toledo (I think) and they were asking him about discounts. He mentioned that I worked at one and they took 15% off. I know that employees get the family discounts, but this was just him claiming I worked at one, no documentation provided and no questions asked.

For the record, both chains I have worked for charge the same for walk in and phone reservations. I don't know about internet reservations through the chain website, but most come through at the same price. If Orbitz or someone is charging less, they lose money. I believe in most cases they still pay 80-90% of the room costs. I could be wrong about this, but I am pretty sure they pay 70-80 for a room in this town, which means they only make a small margin.

Another thing to do is if you come in late, be sure to ask for the room for day use. We run all paperwork between 3-4am, and after that the room can be sold as day use. Of course, it's the same price, but it allows you to stay in the room after the regular check out time and use it until the next evening. A lot of people argue that a room that goes unsold by 5 am should be sold at bare minimum prices (I had a person offer $5 for the time from 6 am - 12pm). This will probably not help. Offering that low of a price shows that you expect to be given a room, but if you ask for a discount, it usually works. Again, this is not sneaky or against any laws, it is just being polite and asking for the right things. Since I first worked in a hotel, I don't believe I've paid full price at any of them, even when I actually probably should have.

Brad

Guest's picture
Guest

Haggling (or bartering) was common in the country that I grew up in - I'm always surprised how willing Americans are to pay full price for stuff. I feel like a lot of Americans are afraid of appearing like they don't have enough money, which not the issue.

Businesses won't go out of business by giving you a discount on something - if your offer is going to break the bank, they won't sell it to you -s o don't be shy and ignore the idiots on here that seem to think that bartering means that you are ripping a paycheck out of the hands of a starving farmer. One important thing, though, is to repay the businesses who give you a good deal. They're doing so in hopes that you will become a repeat customer - if you get a good deal, go back to them and shop again. Tell your friends about how much you like doing business there.

Guest's picture
KarenFla

Years ago we went on a road trip up and down the length of California with our daughter and our husband's parents. When it got dark, we would stop at a hotel or motel and my husband would ask them if they would give us two rooms for the price of one. It was nighttime, the rooms weren't rented and they all agreed to the deal. One hotel gave us a two bedroom suite for the price of one room. If they had said no, we would have just driven to another hotel. We stayed in some lovely places. My father did the same thing years ago when we would go to Atlantic City in the 1950's-60s. He'd pull into a motel parking lot where there weren't too many cars and tell them we were going to be there for two weeks. Could they give us two rooms for the price of one? There were always people who took him up on it, and we also ate and paid full price in the hotel or motel restaurant, so they made money that way. Nowadays when I make reservations in advance I go online and then I'll call to find out if they give the Entertainment rate for the Entertainment card. A lot of hotels, particularly Holiday Inns, will do that if they have a lot of empty rooms for that night and the rate is lower than AAA or AARP.
As a business person I realize that sometimes it is better to collect less and still have a sale. They recognize the same thing.

Guest's picture
Guest

While Target does sell electronic displays they won't sell furniture displays since they would incur some liability if it breaks.

Guest's picture
Karl

Farmer's deserve the money they get from their product, they got up at 4am to pick that item for you, it's worth an extra 30 cents isn't it?

Also on framing your own picture, it's what I do for a living. Yes, it is expensive, but you recieve the custom built frame, glass, matting, drymount (to prevent sagging and drooping of the picture), fitting and it's all custom mad; by a citizen, someone who earns his living through your community, who's kids go to the schools your kids do, not some cheap frame from Wal-mart that was made by a 10 year child making 20 cents an hour overseas.

Also tell someone you want proof of a pet recieving shots, and you will see the price of the pet in question go up $50.

Guest's picture
Nicole

Actually Orbitz and the like are NOT the cheapest way to get a room. Often it's at the hotel's website directly. Many of the larger chains now offer a Best Rate Guarantee which means you will not find a cheaper rate elsewhere. Also if the room you book allows cancellations up until the day you're staying, keep checking the rates as I've seen them go down closer to your desired stay. In that case book again and then cancel the original order.

Guest's picture
Guest

My wife has a great, free and ethical method of keeping food cool in a hotel. We often have leftovers when we eat out and no fridge at the hotel. Her solution is to a bunch of ice into the ice bucket, place the leftovers on top and then put the lid of the ice bucket (or something else) over the carry-out/leftover box. Keeps it cool until the next day. If you're driving, just toss in a small cooler for snacks while driving and to keep things cool at the hotel.