8 Ways You're Wasting Electricity Without Realizing It

By Kentin Waits on 8 October 2014 2 comments

With energy prices on the rise and antique power grids patched together with gum and twine, it's time to take some control and get serious about reducing your use of the juice. (See also: 15 Easy Ways to Lower Your Electric Bill)

Here are eight ways you're probably wasting electricity without realizing it.

1. Plugging, But Not Playing

Forget about the zombies; it's much more likely that your home is filled with vampires. Energy vampires are those devices and appliances we tend to leave plugged in 24/7 whether we're using them or not. And — on or off — every item that's plugged in is sucking power vampire-style. According to the U.S. Department of Energy, vampire energy can add as much as 10% to a consumer's monthly energy bill.

Let's use your microwave as an example. How often throughout the day do you use it to prepare food? And yet, it remains plugged in, digitally displaying the time and silently sipping electricity in the process. It's a like a 30-pound clock with a motor and rotating cooking tray. Any appliance that uses energy to do virtually nothing should at least pay you a sincere compliment every time you walk by it (a feature that industrial engineers should diligently be working on, in my humble opinion).

Help drain energy vampires by unplugging electronics and appliances you seldom use. And if you're a gadget hound, read up on the Kill A Watt EZ Electricity Usage Monitor. For around $30.00, this handy little product calculates the energy consumed by keeping any electronic appliance plugged in and forecasts your related costs weekly, monthly, and yearly. Just plug it into an outlet, plug your device or appliance into it, and get a digital read-out. Once you see how the numbers add up, it'll be difficult to leave those vampires alone.

2. Cranking Up the Oven

When it comes to cooking a single item, an oven is often the "nuclear option." That single-serving pizza or leftover tuna casserole could be warmed up in the microwave and then finished in the toaster oven. For little jobs, consider how to cook in stages using smaller appliances that sip electricity instead of automatically gravitating toward the power-sucking behemoths.

3. Getting in Hot Water

According to EnergyStar.gov, simply heating the water accounts for 90% of the total power it takes wash a load of laundry. That's a whole lot of wattage. For regular loads, switch to cold water for a month and see if you notice any difference in the cleanliness of your duds. Reserve warmer water settings for fighting oil-based stains. Your budget will thank you for it.

4. Dish-Drying

Hot water helps your dishwasher do its job, but drying with heat is added energy drain that's largely unnecessary. Today, most dishwashers feature a heated drying option that you can simply choose not to use. And though heated drying does help avoid spots on dishes, you can get the same benefit by adding a rinsing agent.

5. Fighting the Flow

As obvious as it sounds, if your home features a central air-conditioning and heating system, check your vents. Vents have a way of blending into the background of our homes; many get closed inadvertently and that can result in systems that have to work extra hard to do the job. While you're at it, make sure vents, ducts, and any filters are clean and installed properly. If you find dirt or debris that's unreachable, or if you see visible signs of mold, it may be time to have your air ducts professionally cleaned.

6. Lighting Up for the Holidays

Still using your dad's old string of holiday lights from 1975? Well, those incandescent bulbs are using just enough electricity to drain your gift-buying budget. Ditch the old and switch to new LED lights. You'll get hours of twinkling for a tiny fraction of the electric output.

7. Fridge-Gazing

It's a popular pastime, but standing in front of that open fridge trying decide if you have enough ingredients for a decent turkey club isn't doing your electric bill any favors. Ponder before you open the fridge or after you've quickly scanned its contents and shut the door.

And while we're on the subject, make sure you're doing all you can to help your refrigerator last for years.

8. Ignoring Power Hours

Though it might not cut your electricity consumption, reserving energy-intensive tasks for off-peak hours can reduce the rate you pay. Since many power companies offer discounted rates after 8:00 p.m., focus not only on how you do things, but when. Check with your local power company to determine if it offers an off-peak discount and when off-peak hours begin and end. Then, whenever possible, schedule your laundry and dishwashing tasks to fit within that period.

It's easy to think of electricity as a mysterious force coursing through power lines that magically illuminates all we do. But in reality, it's a concrete resource that we have direct control over. Luckily, we don't need to understand electricity to conserve it. So the next time you plug in, charge up, turn on, or warm up, think of ways to do each smarter.

How do you save energy in your home? What methods have the greatest impact on your electricity bill?

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8 Ways You're Wasting Electricity Without Realizing It

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Guest's picture

So true! We recently made a conscious effort to unplug things like cell phone and laptop chargers when they did not actually need to be charging, and our energy consumption decreased by about 3% per month. Onto the microwaves! I can't even remember the last time I used a microwave, and we have not one, but two plugged in all the time. Whoops!

Guest's picture
Jen

I'm terrible about unplugging my cell phone charger when I'm not using it. I'll glance at it and feel guilty, too! :-/ I need to be more aware of the little things that can add up to a whole lot.