Can Acetone Dramatically Increase Your Gas Mileage?

By Will Chen on 16 April 2007 (Updated 8 June 2011) 303 comments

Can acetone dramatically increase your gas mileage? Wise Bread reader Kip Kay told us that by adding pure acetone into his gas tank, his car now gets 10 extra miles per gallon.

Take a look at Kip's proof for yourself (jump to 1:07):

Acetone is the active ingredient in nail polish remover. It is relatively cheap and therefore the idea that it can dramatically increase gas efficiency is very appealing. (See also: How to Cut Car Ownership Costs)

However, Tom and Ray of NPR's Car Talk say that claims of acetone increasing gas mileage is completely bogus:

It's worse than useless — it's also harmful. Acetone is the primary ingredient in nail-polish remover. And while it will burn and is a high-octane material, it's also a very powerful solvent. So while it's in your fuel system, it'll be eagerly dissolving all of your rubber components...like gaskets and O-rings.

I generally trust Tom and Ray, but as someone pointed out on the Snopes forum, Tom and Ray were following the advice of an oil industry expert, who could hardly be considered an objective source of information.

Acetone as a Fuel Additive

Acetone has also been repackaged as a fuel additive by various inventors. Do a simple Google Patent search for "acetone fuel efficiency" and see the results for yourself. Here's one example:

Roger Crawford, a businessman and independent researcher in Midland, Tex., takes a different approach to fuel economy. He has just begun marketing a gas additive he calls "XtraMPG." He says it boosts octane, burns cleaner and enables motorists to get better fuel economy and buy less expensive grades of gas — saving 10 to 15 percent overall on gas.

What's in XtraMPG? "Most of us know it as nail polish remover," Crawford says. "It is simple acetone, a nonhazardous organic chemical...rated at 150 octane."

Crawford says he'd be happy if everyone bought acetone and added it to their gas tanks. But since people seem reluctant, he's packaging it as XtraMPG.

The EPA hasn't tested XtraMPG. But the EPA's Chandler warns that consumers need to beware what gadgets and fuel additives they add to their cars — especially with today's computer-controlled fuel-injection systems. "There are other, more practical ways to save fuel," he says.

Source: Washington Post

While I found no conclusive proof that acetone can safely boost your gas mileage, there is abundant evidence that acetone is an active ingredient in many "engine cleaners" and "fuel boosters." If you are the adventurous type you might consider doing further research and try formulating your own acetone-based fuel booster — which is probably smarter than handing your money to people like Roger Crawford.

Kip's video also mentions many other wonderful gas-saving tips besides acetone. Make sure you watch the whole video and also check out our articles on gas efficient driving and other gas saving ideas.

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Guest's picture
Ryu

OMG. Honestly. Please don't start a political debate on a forum like this. I mean, do you really think that American policy-makers are regular commentors on this site? I'm pretty sure neither anyone in Congress, nor major auto execs are going to read your comment. Shoot, if I knew how to build an ultra-efficient vehicle from scratch, I'd do it, but I, like 95% of the people in the world, don't have that kind of mechanical talent nor the time or money to buy the parts. Otherwise, I've just gotta hope that I win the lottery or get rich so I can afford a Prius. I drive a Hyundai, btw, and most Europeans wish they could afford an American SUV. Hell, I do too.

As far as acetone goes -- I'm very interested in trying it, but everyone seems to agree that it doesn't work with an ethanol blend. I haven't checked on the laws, but I'm willing to guess that every pump here in CA requires "up to 10% ethanol", since I haven't seen one that doesn't have the sticker.

I'd also like to see the results of some of these people who posted months ago and haven't been back on since.

Now as for that HHO website people have been posting - I think it's complete BS.

First off, the manual is extremely expensive ("marked down" from $297? Sounds scammy to me).

They say "similar systems are from $900+" I've never heard of a "similar system". Most hydrogen cars I've seen are extremely expensive. If Honda and GM can't afford to mass-produce these things yet, how the hell can I make my own for under $150? These things cost hundreds of thousands of dollars last I checked - and as popular as saving gas is nowadays, any car manufacturer who can build a car that can a) run on alternative fuel while b) still getting comparable performance and driving range and c) cost no more than a luxury car -- they would be pushing out these cars as fast as they can build them!

Finally, if this stuff worked, someone would've bought the kit manual, completed the conversion, and freely distributed the information ALL OVER the internet by now. An example: electric bikes. With a little mechanical know-how, some electric tape, batteries, and a motor, you can convert a bicycle or an old motorcycle frame to run on a battery and actually get decent speed (easily 30mph - faster if you buy bigger batteries). Only thing is, this relatively simple innovation costs several hundred dollars, even if you already have a bike. (most people spend $3-500 or more to make their own, and between $900-2000 to buy one assembled)

Until someone shows me MUCH more proof, I'm waiting for acetone results!

Guest's picture
Mike792

No reason to be a dikc head. We don't have the same options as you. My mom had a diesel VW Rabbit (1980?)which was fine around town, but try to merge in traffic in a larger city and Watch out!

Europe has had the benefit of diesel vehicles we could only dream about.

I recently purchased a 2005 E320CDI CPO(I could not afford a new Benz) and it is awesome, almost 40mpg highway. Our diesel options are severly limited here and for a family/business car that is about our only option.

The only other option presented to us is the Jetta which is far too small to take clients out for lunch or even family outings in. Being well over 6' tall and my sons even taller, pieces of crap like the festiva, jetta are NOT an option.

So, STFU unless you know what you are talking about(which you obviously do not)

Guest's picture
Guest

If you Talking about Hows to stretch your gas milege extra 20-25 percent more in you gas tank you can visit my wesite at http://fuellegacy.com/moneyongas and see and watch the movie the product that is 100 percent all natural that give better milege and gives you Cleans combustion chamber deposits Decreases or eliminates engine knocks. Extends engine life. ,Restores lost engine performance ,Reduce maintenance costs ,Works well in all fuels, in all climates in all seasons ,Protects the environment

Guest's picture
Andrew

Wow, I thought this thread had dried up like, well..acetone on a hot driveway. I agree with #160 regarding HHO.. good recent article in Popular Mechanics magazine debunking gas saving devices. The idea of releasing energy from the hydrogen trapped in water will always be attractive, but in reality the realized energy will never be more than the quantity expended to release it. It's one of Newton's Laws. I just call it, "No Free Lunch"

Guest's picture
Guest

yup in a 1988 cadillac devile with 225k miles on it i was getting 18mpg on the highway. then i read on the internet acetone can increase your gas mileage(3oz to 10 gallons) i had an 18 gallon tankl so i just put in 6 ounces. up to 32MPG!! IN A V8 4.5 Liter

Guest's picture
Andrew

Unfortunately it appears I will never be able to enjoy the increased mpg from acetone with the E-10 fuel in my area. So why can't "we the people" start a petition for acetone-blended fuel and a ban on ethanol?

Guest's picture
dc910

MANY things to consider here. I am going to be a little off-topic, however, I'd like to CLARIFY the many mis-conceptions that I've been reading.

1) You gotta love people who comment on something they have NO idea about. HHO systems DO work. There are NUMEROUS videos on YouTube so do some RESEARCH before claiming it's "BS".

EVERYBODY is hung up on the theory that you can't get more output than what you input. WRONG!!

First of all, you have to build a COMPLETE system. IF you don't, you WON'T see any significant MPG gains. You NEED to CONTROL the O2 sensor with a device called an EFIE (Electronic Fuel Injection Enhancer), BECAUSE you will have EXTRA oxygen hitting the O2 sensor which ADDS EXTRA fuel BECAUSE it's doing it's job.

Then you NEED to CONTROL your air/fuel ratio by regulating either the MAP (Manifold Absolute Pressure) sensor OR the MAF (Mass Air Flow) sensor BECAUSE when you make and burn hydrogen ON demand, you will be able to REDUCE the amount of gasoline you are burning BECAUSE you are now adding hydrogen.

Then you NEED another device called a PWM (Pulse Width Modulator) that will ALLOW to to CONTROL the current needed to run your HHO generator.

Now that you have taken steps to adequately CONTROL your O2 sensor, your MAP or MAF sensor AND controlled the current draw on your system, you can NOW start to see an INCREASE in MPG.

OUTPUT vs. INPUT:
You are SIMPLY running the HHO generator from the EXTRA power available from your alternator. So, how is that a problem???
The HHO generator doesn't draw any more current than a 500 or 1000 watt stereo IF the system is built as I have outlined above BECAUSE "you" have FULL CONTROL of it. A PROPERLY built HHO generator should draw NO more than 20 AMPS. Most A/C systems draw 25-35 amps.

EVERYBODY wants to build a cheap, "partial" system and then complain that it's not working and it's all a scam. PLAN on spending AT LEAST $150-250, IF you want GOOD results. Anything less than that and you are MOST CERTAINLY forgetting a KEY component to the system and WASTING your time AND money.

Those ANCIENT laws of thermodynamics, Newton's law and all the rest of it, DO NOT APPLY here.

Do your research FIRST (join/visit/contribute to forums on the topic), view the multitude of YouTube videos on the topic, BEFORE spending ANY money and when you UNDERSTAND the theory as to WHY it works, you will be knowledgable with your generator and satified with the results.

BEFORE I make a decision to put acetone in MY vehicle, I am doing MY research thoroughly, which is how I found this forum.
I'm practicing what I preach... I am making a contribution to this forum with SOUND advice that will hopefully benefit someone.

If I decide to try acetone, I will log my results and post them here. For the most part, my biggest concern is the inside of fuel pump. I need to find out exactly what parts are in my fuel pump that could be potentially damaged, seals, etc. The rest of the fuel system is steel lines all the way up to the carburetor so I don't expect any acetone related failures there.

If you use 2 ounces of acetone per 10 gallons as a recommended starting point, that is a 640:1 (fuel to acetone) ratio.
If you use 2 1/2 ounces per 10 gallons, that's a 512:1 ratio.
If you use 3 ounces per 10 gallons, that's a 426:1 ratio.

Obviously, it's a very low ratio in any of the above concentrations.

What I find the most interesting as a possible variable for consistant results, is the potential evaporation rate of acetone.
That right there warrants some timed experimentation before drawing any viable conclusions. It's quite possible that depending on the vehicle year and emission system type (old vs. newer), that the gas cap ventilation system could be allowing a substantial amount of acetone evaporation to occur over time.

For instance: Someone drives 40 miles per day to work and back (200 miles per week), fills their tank on monday (20 gallons of gas with 4 ounces of acetone), it's quite possible that by the end of the week, it's reasonable to assume that they might experience a reduced MPG benefit with EACH passing day, IF acetone does have a significant evaporation rate.

If the above scenario were true, this person would most likely then come to the conclusion that the acetone doesn't work in their vehicle or it's probably the 10% ethanol in the gas of a number of other possible reasons WHY it's not working for them.

With the evaporation rate being an issue, it would also be logical to assume that the greatest benefit of adding acetone would be realized if added on an as needed basis (DAILY if deemed necessary) to minimize the possible negative effects of evaporation.

Until you can effectively eliminate or at least reduce the possible negative effects of evaporation from the equation, it's going to be difficult to evaluate your results.

In doing so, we may discover that it may NOT be the 10% ethanol causing the acetone to be ineffective after all.

Based on this thought process, it sounds like the best time to add the acetone would be in the morning (DEFINITELY NOT the night BEFORE you plan on using the vehicle, or it could be subject to 8 hours of evaporation).

Well, I'm glad I found this forum. If anyone wants to test my "evaporation" theory and post the results, I'm sure we would all welcome the feedback. In the meantime, I'll be giving this some more thought and updating as needed.

KEEP those results coming!!

Sorry for the long post but when you're on a roll, you just have to go with it... :)

Best Regards,

Guest's picture
Guest

There are states out there, such as my own (NJ) that pressure check the gas cap as part of the motor vehicle inspection. If little time is wasted in adding the acetone to the fuel, evaporation should not be too much of an issue. In addition, today's cars will usually get the check engine light if there is too little vaccumn pressure in the fuel tank.

I have an '01 Audi with 115k miles that I am going to start adding Acetone to the gas. I also have to get the car inspected this month, so we'll see how I do.

Guest's picture
Andrew

1) You gotta love people who comment on something they have NO idea about
No, you don't

Guest's picture
dc910

RE:

Now as for that HHO website people have been posting - I think it's complete BS.

First off, the manual is extremely expensive ("marked down" from $297? Sounds scammy to me).

They say "similar systems are from $900+" I've never heard of a "similar system". Most hydrogen cars I've seen are extremely expensive. If Honda and GM can't afford to mass-produce these things yet, how the hell can I make my own for under $150? These things cost hundreds of thousands of dollars last I checked - and as popular as saving gas is nowadays, any car manufacturer who can build a car that can a) run on alternative fuel while b) still getting comparable performance and driving range and c) cost no more than a luxury car -- they would be pushing out these cars as fast as they can build them!

Finally, if this stuff worked, someone would've bought the kit manual, completed the conversion, and freely distributed the information ALL OVER the internet by now.

*********************************************

Just because YOU don't want to spend the $97 for the 2 ebooks doesn't mean it's BS. Check the Clickbank sales for this product.
It's one of the HIGHEST selling products in the Clickbank marketplace. IF it were BS, Clickbank would've pulled the plug on it.

Now, IF you had done ENOUGH RESEARCH and watched ENOUGH videos on YouTube, you would've discovered that you DON'T have to pay $97 for the 2 ebooks, as there are MANY other comparable info products available that cost FAR less, in fact, you could LEARN EXACTLY "how" to build one WITHOUT paying ANYTHING for the "info". But DOING that takes EFFORT and you prefer to comment on a subject that you "think" is BS. AMAZING...

It's NOT that the auto manufacturers can't "afford" to "mass-produce" these hydrogen vehicles, they most certainly CAN and WILL at some point in the future. It may not be Honda or GM but there is a Japanese car company right now that made a 100% water TO hydrogen full-sized van. Yes, they open the rear van door and pour WATER in a storage tank and DRIVE it!! The "technology" WORKS.

Here's the problem with the car manufacturers. EVERYTHING they make is EXPENSIVE!! So WHY would this technology be ANY different? WHEN they do get around to mass-producing this, it TOO will be EXPENSIVE AND they will make damn SURE that it is SO COMPLICATED that the owner will NOT be able to work on it or even buy replacement parts for it. It's just yet ANOTHER way for the dealers to take money from you.

When you have a problem with your new AND WAY OVERLY DESIGNED hydrogen system, you'll be forced to take it to the DEALER to have it DIAGNOSED AND SERVICED BECAUSE "you" won't have a clue AND won't have the necessary computerized equipment to "diagnose" it let alone service it. NOBODY ELSE WILL EITHER and FORGET ABOUT taking it to your "local" mechanic, he won't have the SPECIALIZED EQUIPMENT to diagnose it either.

Then when they tell you the ENTIRE system needs to be replaced for like $5,000-10,000, what are you going to do then?

That's WHY the average person doesn't buy auto parts from the dealer, they're too damned EXPENSIVE.

This IS a SIMPLE system to build and IS relatively simple to install IF you are somewhat mechanically inclined and have some basic hand tools. If YOU build your system, YOU will understand how to fix it when you are having a problem. Plus, if you are having a problem, you SIMPLY turn the system OFF until you have the time to fix it as if it was never installed.

quote
[Finally, if this stuff worked, someone would've bought the kit manual, completed the conversion, and freely distributed the information ALL OVER the internet by now.]
end quote

Yes, in a perfect world, it would be great if the experimenters that have built, TESTED and perfected "their own" systems (often at great expense in BOTH time and money) to then hand it to you on a silver platter by "sharing" their system with the entire internet but unfortunately that's not usually how it turns out.

Eventually, after some builders are done testing their systems, they discover that they have come up with a system that they can sell.

However, IF you watch enough videos, (RESEARCH) you can EASILY gather enough info to start working on your own system WITHOUT actually "buying" the info.

If you build "your" system, install it and you are not getting the results you expect (typically a 25-50% increase in MPG), then there's a logical reason. If you have been contributing to the forums, you can reach out to the more "well-known" builders and they can help you locate the problem.

I'm just wondering how a "Hydrogen On Demand System" will work with acetone...

Anyway, enough for now, more later as time permits...
Regards,

Guest's picture
dc910

RE:

Now as for that HHO website people have been posting - I think it's complete BS.

First off, the manual is extremely expensive ("marked down" from $297? Sounds scammy to me).

They say "similar systems are from $900+" I've never heard of a "similar system". Most hydrogen cars I've seen are extremely expensive. If Honda and GM can't afford to mass-produce these things yet, how the hell can I make my own for under $150? These things cost hundreds of thousands of dollars last I checked - and as popular as saving gas is nowadays, any car manufacturer who can build a car that can a) run on alternative fuel while b) still getting comparable performance and driving range and c) cost no more than a luxury car -- they would be pushing out these cars as fast as they can build them!

Finally, if this stuff worked, someone would've bought the kit manual, completed the conversion, and freely distributed the information ALL OVER the internet by now.

*********************************************

Just because YOU don't want to spend the $97 for the 2 ebooks doesn't mean it's BS. Check the Clickbank sales for this product.
It's one of the HIGHEST selling products in the Clickbank marketplace. IF it were BS, Clickbank would've pulled the plug on it.

Now, IF you had done ENOUGH RESEARCH and watched ENOUGH videos on YouTube, you would've discovered that you DON'T have to pay $97 for the 2 ebooks, as there are MANY other comparable info products available that cost FAR less, in fact, you could LEARN EXACTLY "how" to build one WITHOUT paying ANYTHING for the "info". But DOING that takes EFFORT and you prefer to comment on a subject that you "think" is BS. AMAZING...

It's NOT that the auto manufacturers can't "afford" to "mass-produce" these hydrogen vehicles, they most certainly CAN and WILL at some point in the future. It may not be Honda or GM but there is a Japanese car company right now that made a 100% water TO hydrogen full-sized van. Yes, they open the rear van door and pour WATER in a storage tank and DRIVE it!! The "technology" WORKS.

Here's the problem with the car manufacturers. EVERYTHING they make is EXPENSIVE!! So WHY would this technology be ANY different? WHEN they do get around to mass-producing this, it TOO will be EXPENSIVE AND they will make damn SURE that it is SO COMPLICATED that the owner will NOT be able to work on it or even buy replacement parts for it. It's just yet ANOTHER way for the dealers to take money from you.

When you have a problem with your new AND WAY OVERLY DESIGNED hydrogen system, you'll be forced to take it to the DEALER to have it DIAGNOSED AND SERVICED BECAUSE "you" won't have a clue AND won't have the necessary computerized equipment to "diagnose" it let alone service it. NOBODY ELSE WILL EITHER and FORGET ABOUT taking it to your "local" mechanic, he won't have the SPECIALIZED EQUIPMENT to diagnose it either.

Then when they tell you the ENTIRE system needs to be replaced for like $5,000-10,000, what are you going to do then?

That's WHY the average person doesn't buy auto parts from the dealer, they're too damned EXPENSIVE.

This IS a SIMPLE system to build and IS relatively simple to install IF you are somewhat mechanically inclined and have some basic hand tools. If YOU build your system, YOU will understand how to fix it when you are having a problem. Plus, if you are having a problem, you SIMPLY turn the system OFF until you have the time to fix it as if it was never installed.

quote
[Finally, if this stuff worked, someone would've bought the kit manual, completed the conversion, and freely distributed the information ALL OVER the internet by now.]
end quote

Yes, in a perfect world, it would be great if the experimenters that have built, TESTED and perfected "their own" systems (often at great expense in BOTH time and money) to then hand it to you on a silver platter by "sharing" their system with the entire internet but unfortunately that's not usually how it turns out.

Eventually, after some builders are done testing their systems, they discover that they have come up with a system that they can sell.

However, IF you watch enough videos, (RESEARCH) you can EASILY gather enough info to start working on your own system WITHOUT actually "buying" the info.

If you build "your" system, install it and you are not getting the results you expect (typically a 25-50% increase in MPG), then there's a logical reason. If you have been contributing to the forums, you can reach out to the more "well-known" builders and they can help you locate the problem.

I'm just wondering how a "Hydrogen On Demand System" will work with acetone...

Anyway, enough for now, more later as time permits...
Regards,

Guest's picture
dc910

RE:

Now as for that HHO website people have been posting - I think it's complete BS.

First off, the manual is extremely expensive ("marked down" from $297? Sounds scammy to me).

They say "similar systems are from $900+" I've never heard of a "similar system". Most hydrogen cars I've seen are extremely expensive. If Honda and GM can't afford to mass-produce these things yet, how the hell can I make my own for under $150? These things cost hundreds of thousands of dollars last I checked - and as popular as saving gas is nowadays, any car manufacturer who can build a car that can a) run on alternative fuel while b) still getting comparable performance and driving range and c) cost no more than a luxury car -- they would be pushing out these cars as fast as they can build them!

Finally, if this stuff worked, someone would've bought the kit manual, completed the conversion, and freely distributed the information ALL OVER the internet by now.

*********************************************

Just because YOU don't want to spend the $97 for the 2 ebooks doesn't mean it's BS. Check the Clickbank sales for this product.
It's one of the HIGHEST selling products in the Clickbank marketplace. IF it were BS, Clickbank would've pulled the plug on it.

Now, IF you had done ENOUGH RESEARCH and watched ENOUGH videos on YouTube, you would've discovered that you DON'T have to pay $97 for the 2 ebooks, as there are MANY other comparable info products available that cost FAR less, in fact, you could LEARN EXACTLY "how" to build one WITHOUT paying ANYTHING for the "info". But DOING that takes EFFORT and you prefer to comment on a subject that you "think" is BS. AMAZING...

It's NOT that the auto manufacturers can't "afford" to "mass-produce" these hydrogen vehicles, they most certainly CAN and WILL at some point in the future. It may not be Honda or GM but there is a Japanese car company right now that made a 100% water TO hydrogen full-sized van. Yes, they open the rear van door and pour WATER in a storage tank and DRIVE it!! The "technology" WORKS.

Here's the problem with the car manufacturers. EVERYTHING they make is EXPENSIVE!! So WHY would this technology be ANY different? WHEN they do get around to mass-producing this, it TOO will be EXPENSIVE AND they will make damn SURE that it is SO COMPLICATED that the owner will NOT be able to work on it or even buy replacement parts for it. It's just yet ANOTHER way for the dealers to take money from you.

When you have a problem with your new AND WAY OVERLY DESIGNED hydrogen system, you'll be forced to take it to the DEALER to have it DIAGNOSED AND SERVICED BECAUSE "you" won't have a clue AND won't have the necessary computerized equipment to "diagnose" it let alone service it. NOBODY ELSE WILL EITHER and FORGET ABOUT taking it to your "local" mechanic, he won't have the SPECIALIZED EQUIPMENT to diagnose it either.

Then when they tell you the ENTIRE system needs to be replaced for like $5,000-10,000, what are you going to do then?

That's WHY the average person doesn't buy auto parts from the dealer, they're too damned EXPENSIVE.

This IS a SIMPLE system to build and IS relatively simple to install IF you are somewhat mechanically inclined and have some basic hand tools. If YOU build your system, YOU will understand how to fix it when you are having a problem. Plus, if you are having a problem, you SIMPLY turn the system OFF until you have the time to fix it as if it was never installed.

quote
[Finally, if this stuff worked, someone would've bought the kit manual, completed the conversion, and freely distributed the information ALL OVER the internet by now.]
end quote

Yes, in a perfect world, it would be great if the experimenters that have built, TESTED and perfected "their own" systems (often at great expense in BOTH time and money) to then hand it to you on a silver platter by "sharing" their system with the entire internet but unfortunately that's not usually how it turns out.

Eventually, after some builders are done testing their systems, they discover that they have come up with a system that they can sell.

However, IF you watch enough videos, (RESEARCH) you can EASILY gather enough info to start working on your own system WITHOUT actually "buying" the info.

If you build "your" system, install it and you are not getting the results you expect (typically a 25-50% increase in MPG), then there's a logical reason. If you have been contributing to the forums, you can reach out to the more "well-known" builders and they can help you locate the problem.

I'm just wondering how a "Hydrogen On Demand System" will work with acetone...

Anyway, enough for now, more later as time permits...
Regards,

Guest's picture
dc910

RE:

Now as for that HHO website people have been posting - I think it's complete BS.

First off, the manual is extremely expensive ("marked down" from $297? Sounds scammy to me).

They say "similar systems are from $900+" I've never heard of a "similar system". Most hydrogen cars I've seen are extremely expensive. If Honda and GM can't afford to mass-produce these things yet, how the hell can I make my own for under $150? These things cost hundreds of thousands of dollars last I checked - and as popular as saving gas is nowadays, any car manufacturer who can build a car that can a) run on alternative fuel while b) still getting comparable performance and driving range and c) cost no more than a luxury car -- they would be pushing out these cars as fast as they can build them!

Finally, if this stuff worked, someone would've bought the kit manual, completed the conversion, and freely distributed the information ALL OVER the internet by now.

*********************************************

Just because YOU don't want to spend the $97 for the 2 ebooks doesn't mean it's BS. Check the Clickbank sales for this product.
It's one of the HIGHEST selling products in the Clickbank marketplace. IF it were BS, Clickbank would've pulled the plug on it.

Now, IF you had done ENOUGH RESEARCH and watched ENOUGH videos on YouTube, you would've discovered that you DON'T have to pay $97 for the 2 ebooks, as there are MANY other comparable info products available that cost FAR less, in fact, you could LEARN EXACTLY "how" to build one WITHOUT paying ANYTHING for the "info". But DOING that takes EFFORT and you prefer to comment on a subject that you "think" is BS. AMAZING...

It's NOT that the auto manufacturers can't "afford" to "mass-produce" these hydrogen vehicles, they most certainly CAN and WILL at some point in the future. It may not be Honda or GM but there is a Japanese car company right now that made a 100% water TO hydrogen full-sized van. Yes, they open the rear van door and pour WATER in a storage tank and DRIVE it!! The "technology" WORKS.

Here's the problem with the car manufacturers. EVERYTHING they make is EXPENSIVE!! So WHY would this technology be ANY different? WHEN they do get around to mass-producing this, it TOO will be EXPENSIVE AND they will make damn SURE that it is SO COMPLICATED that the owner will NOT be able to work on it or even buy replacement parts for it. It's just yet ANOTHER way for the dealers to take money from you.

When you have a problem with your new AND WAY OVERLY DESIGNED hydrogen system, you'll be forced to take it to the DEALER to have it DIAGNOSED AND SERVICED BECAUSE "you" won't have a clue AND won't have the necessary computerized equipment to "diagnose" it let alone service it. NOBODY ELSE WILL EITHER and FORGET ABOUT taking it to your "local" mechanic, he won't have the SPECIALIZED EQUIPMENT to diagnose it either.

Then when they tell you the ENTIRE system needs to be replaced for like $5,000-10,000, what are you going to do then?

That's WHY the average person doesn't buy auto parts from the dealer, they're too damned EXPENSIVE.

This IS a SIMPLE system to build and IS relatively simple to install IF you are somewhat mechanically inclined and have some basic hand tools. If YOU build your system, YOU will understand how to fix it when you are having a problem. Plus, if you are having a problem, you SIMPLY turn the system OFF until you have the time to fix it as if it was never installed.

quote
[Finally, if this stuff worked, someone would've bought the kit manual, completed the conversion, and freely distributed the information ALL OVER the internet by now.]
end quote

Yes, in a perfect world, it would be great if the experimenters that have built, TESTED and perfected "their own" systems (often at great expense in BOTH time and money) to then hand it to you on a silver platter by "sharing" their system with the entire internet but unfortunately that's not usually how it turns out.

Eventually, after some builders are done testing their systems, they discover that they have come up with a system that they can sell.

However, IF you watch enough videos, (RESEARCH) you can EASILY gather enough info to start working on your own system WITHOUT actually "buying" the info.

If you build "your" system, install it and you are not getting the results you expect (typically a 25-50% increase in MPG), then there's a logical reason. If you have been contributing to the forums, you can reach out to the more "well-known" builders and they can help you locate the problem.

I'm just wondering how a "Hydrogen On Demand System" will work with acetone...

Anyway, enough for now, more later as time permits...
Regards,

Guest's picture
tool

You are aware that water (H2O) is hydrogen that has already been burned, right?

Guest's picture
GM Engineer

Acetones cleans the fuel injectors and makes them perform at their peak. It has nothing to do with mixing with gas and increase mileage. The injectors are clean and causes them to distribute the gas evenly to each cylinder. That is why you should have the fuel injectors cleaned every 2 years. I am an automotive engineer for 30 years and work on every make and model. I tried everything on the planet and cleaning the fuel injectors is the key to good mileage. This is the truth, so don't let anyone tell you different.

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Guest

so what will cancel out or negate the effects of ethanol, so i can use acetone.

also some people are mixing xylene with acetone, where do you get xylene from???

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Andrew

I believe that too about acetone--the benefit comes from clean injectors, not from changing the surface tension of fuel as I have read. But I decided to give acetone a try. I'm on my second fill up with acetone added (3 oz to 10 gal) in my Ford truck, which normally gets about 14 mpg consistently. On my first tankful with acetone it dipped to about 12, will report on 2nd tankful soon but not too optimistic at this point. Of course all gas in my area is up to 10% ethanol, so this might prove a waste of time and gas.
To the last poster, you can buy xylene at most any hardware store.

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Guest

Long story short it works great for me! 2oz of pure 100% acetone in 10 gals of gas increased the gas mileage in my 86 Porsche 911 turbo from a dismal 12 mpg to 23 mpg. And the difference in the performance of my car is amazing to say the least, BIG difference!
Now after almost 6 months of using it my car averages between 8 and 11 mpg "increase" depending on my driving habits and the brand of gas I used.
My sister got a 5 mpg increase in her late model Jeep SUV and another friend got a 3 mpg increase in his 2008 GTO with the monster corvette engine in it.
As much as I love the increase in gas mileage especially with todays prices, the added performance/power it gave my Porsche makes me smile even bigger...

So don't listen to these naysayers, just try it and see for yourself. At one shot glass per 5 gallons of gas, think about it, the ratio is soooo small there is no way it will hurt anything.

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Andrew

To the last poster, congrats on your results but is this on straight gas or 10% ethanol? Thanks

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Ray Brown

I have a 2000 ford crown vic. police package, and a 2007 ford taurus and I use 2-3 ounces of acetone per 10 gallons of gas.
My best mpg on the taurus has been 38 mpg on a 420 mile trip.
I also use 0-w-20 mobil 1 oil. Mobil 1 oil filter. I run 38psi in my tires, and I run 55 miles per hour. I get 30-32mpg running to work and around town.
I am going to change oil and oil filter and air filter to Amsoil before winter.

I haven't taken the 2000 ford crown for a long trip but I have gotten 25mpg for local driving. I use everything as the taurus in the crown.

I have been using all the above for three months.
I have not had any problems using acetone. The cars run great.

Ray

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NYTrini

I have documented a marked increase in mpg by using acetone at the 3oz/10gal ratio. I have stopped and started and the number can verify the use. I get the best figure with Chevron. Normally low 20s without but get upper 20s with acetone and chevron gasoline.

Guest's picture
Joe

you need to find the correct ratio for your engine

for those that tried the acetone and did not see results
you most likely used to much!

You are supposed to start with 1oz per 10 gals
track your MPGs
move up to 2
track mpgs then to 3
and no more then 3 per 10 gals

if MPG drop off then you need to go down 1/2 an oz at a time
untill you get your max MPGs

using to much raises the octane level to high and makes the fuel harder to burn

acetone is used to reduce surface tension of the gas
and makes it "vaporize" faster, easier and more complete!

and this is where you gain MPGs
and yes! it does work!

Guest's picture
Andrew

Posters, in addition to your results please mention whether the gas you are using contains ethanol or not

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Ray Brown

I just found out that as of 2008, all gas in Illinois has 9-10% ethanol.
My cars are getting better gas mileage using acetone. They also run a lot better.

Some Casey's gas stations in the Springfield, Illinois area are still telling customers they have gas Without Ethanol. They are also charging .10 cents more for 87 octane they are claiming that has No Ethanol.

Ray Brown

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Jay

After a second fill up w/ acetone I went from 20 MPG to 22 in a 99' Chevrolet Cavalier Z24. I only fill up about once very week and a half so my results take longer to get but I will report back with future findings.
BTW: I told my cousin about this and his Maxima went from using only 91 or better octane while getting 19-20 MPG to now using 87 w/ acetone and getting 22 MPG. Maximas have a knock sensor that will throw a code if using anything but the higher octane but, no codes so far with 87 and acetone.
With all these positive results it may be just a matter of time before it's just added with the gas from the pump and they just charge more :(

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Guest

Acetone is no good, but HHO is! You can seperate HHO from water by running electricity through it (electrolysis). The website www.savinggas4you.com has a DIY kit that will show you how to install an HHO generator on your car. It can increase your mpg by 60% depending on your car! Check it out...

Guest's picture
dc910

I had the same problem when I first started using acetone. I'm using it on a 1990 Astro Van with 290,000 miles. When I researched my gas tank "size", the info I found said I had a 27 gallon tank. I found out the hard way that this was INcorrect. It's more like a 24 gallon tank (because I almost ran out when I was ON "E"), so WHERE ARE my "other" 3 gallons of "reserve"???

Anyway, when I started my first treatment, I added 8.1 oz based on a 27 gallon tank and a ratio of (3 oz per 10 gallons) and filled the tank.

Because the ratio was too high, my milage dropped from 18.5 MPG to 14.5 MPG. So I backed it down to (2 oz per 10 gallons) and I am now getting 23.5 MPG.

I bought my acetone at Home Depot for $6.97/quart. You can get a gallon for $16.50. So now when I get gas, I add 2 oz BEFORE adding my 10 gallons. This has been working well for "me". Your car may need a different ratio. There IS some experimentation needed to get "your" ratio correct. I would start with either 2 or 2 1/2 oz per 10 gallons as this is a good starting point.

It might be a good idea (IF you don't already know your "base" MPG's BEFORE using acetone), to fill up first and then drive for about 100 miles and then fill up again. Now divide the amount of miles by how many gallons you needed to fill up to get your "base" MPG's.
It will be DIFFICULT to monitor your results using acetone without FIRST knowing your "base" MPG's.

After you know your "base" MPG's, the best way to start is to find out for SURE, exactly how many gallons your tank holds. Then I would start with 2 oz per 10 gallons. FILL the tank completely. Drive for about 100 miles and fillup again. Divide the amount of miles you drove by how many gallons you needed to re-fill the tank.

You can add the acetone AFTER you fillup on the 2nd treatment because you will now KNOW how much of an increase you just got. Once you know the NEW IMPROVED MPG's, it is ALWAYS BEST to then add the acetone BEFORE adding any gas so that it mixes better in the tank INSTEAD OF being on the top of the gas where there is a greater chance that it could be suseptible to evaporation.

Acetone DOES evaporate FAST, so don't waste a lot of time when handling it.

Also, I would recommend (due to the fast evaporation rate), that IF you don't plan to use your car during the weekend, that if you plan to get gas on a FRIDAY, you only buy a little, because you will experience a little loss through the gas cap "vent system" over the weekend.
I buy my gas on MONDAY now to minimize the effects of "weekend" evaporation.

If you don't do this, your "ratio" will be OFF somewhat
and you will end up will a LOWER ratio and your MPG's will drop, leaving you to think this doesn't work...

My guess after experimenting, is that you lose about an 1/2 to 1 ounce over the weekend from evaporation. So, if you put in 2 oz and 10 gallons in on friday, you could end up with about 1 to 1 1/2 oz remaining on monday. You could compensate this loss by adding an additional 1/2 to 1 oz to your mix the NEXT time you get gas.

Just something to keep in mind.
Regards...

Guest's picture
rwt75010

I own a 2000 Odyssey with 123,000 miles and it is designed to use either regular or premium. I have always used 87 octane for a few tanks and then run one with 92/93 octane. I had been getting about 19 city and 21 highway using the 87. In recent years I have noticed a decline in power and mileage (about 17 to 18 city/hwy combined) and had attributed it to the 10% ethanol additive. I maintain the vehicle pretty well and use Mobil 5000 10w30 with 1 quart of synthetic Mobil 1.

I first heard of using acetone a few months ago and was concerned, as many others have expressed, that acetone could damage seals. I decided to give it a try anyway. I got immediate results - an increase to 20 MPG city/hwy combo using 87 octane, better than I was getting on 92. While this is not going to make or break me, the van runs significantly smoother and has much more power even than using the 92 oct, making it much more fun to drive. I use 2 to 3 ounces per 10 gallon, but haven't done it properly and measured and tested results using exact amounts.

I also decided to run an experiment to see if it was hard on seals and put an o-ring in a mason jar with about a quarter inch of pure acetone and screwed on the cap. I put it in my garage in the heat of summer, in Texas, and waited a few weeks. When I went back for results, unfortunately, the acetone had all evaporated, so no real validity here. (The o-ring was cleaner than when I put it, but otherwise no change). I only include this because it made me think - I am only using a small amount diluted in gasoline - acetone is safe enough to use on skin and gasoline is not - an o-ring is much tougher than skin - acetone evaporates fairly quickly....you can draw your own conclusion.

One more note, I put some acetone in an old STP gas additive container in preparation for my next tank and it melted the plastic, so it is harder on certain types of plastic. I will also say I saw absolutely NO difference when I added the STP (8 ounce) to my vehicle.

If anyone has any quality info proving that acetone is bad for seals and such, please send to me (and everyone else here!) Otherwise, I will continue to enjoy driving my vehicle again and save 5 to 6 bucks a tank to boot.

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Guest

Submitted by GM Engineer on September 1, 2008 - 18:19.
says it only work by cleaning the injectors.
And you've been a mechanic for 30 years? I'll bet they still have you doing oil changes and flat tire repair. If all it did was clean injectors then NOT adding it to the tank after it WAS added would not result in a drop in mileage. acetone reduces the surface tension of the gasoline which creates a finer mist and a more complete burn.
bonus info: soap does not clean - water cleans - soap reduces the surface tension of water so it can get into smaller spaces and clean better.

its all about the surface tension.

Guest's picture
wildgift

Yes, soap reduces surface tension, but that's not all it does. Soap cleans by emulsifying grease, so it won't stick to surfaces. It also forms suds, and those suds can lift away dirt particles.

Soap cleans.

Now, I don't trust everything you said about acetone.

Guest's picture
Airplane Guy

Back in the 60's I was part of a military experiment that tested all types of fuels for the new multi-fuel vehicles the Pentagon had requested bids for. I hate typing so I will make the two years of results real short. Acetone can only raise the octane of gasoline. Thats it! FINI! I will never forget the slide rulers working like ants to prove something would be better than what we had. They convinced me when they could not. Thats why nothing has changed for all these years.

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Guest

RE: Soap Cleans - wildgift

You should be very careful to argue with an engineer when you are only half right.

Soap is a surfactant. It's main function is to allow water which is polar to come into contact with oil which is non polar. Soap can also allow oil and water to become an emulsion by allowing the two dislike chemistries to interact with each other. If you want to put all the oil into an emulsion, you will need a lot of soap.

Now these suds you speak of, well, you fully defined your knowledge of soap on that comment. Suds or soap foam has nothing to do with the ability of a soap to work well. These are the result of chemicals added to soaps so people such as yourself see/think the soap is working well. You were positively fooled. All the best soaps we use are non foaming. Dishwasher and laundry soap are probably the strongest soaps we use in our homes. Both are non foaming. Hand soap, dish soap, and shampoo are all foaming because people like to see the soap in action.

Still in disbelief, then try using dish soap in your dishwasher or laundry machine and see what happens. (I'm already amused at the thought of you doing this)

Anyway, this sidetrack has little to do with the subject. Back to topic...

Guest's picture
tool

Whether he's "half right" about how soap works or not, his point about the "engineer" being wrong about soap not cleaning is absolutely true.

Guest's picture
Guest

With all due respect to those who criticize the use of acetone without ever having tried it ...

I've been using it for years to significantly boost my mileage. And it does no damage to your vehicle. In fact, it seems to make it run better and more reliably. In fact, I recently cracked 200,000 miles -- and my car runs and strong as ever. Never breaks down. I just perform routine maintenance. having a Honda helps, of course :-)

See the details of my use here:
http://peswiki.com/index.php/Directory:Acetone:Honda:Del_Sol:Robert

And see other acetone users' experiences here:
http://peswiki.com/index.php/Directory:Acetone_as_a_Fuel_Additive

Also see: http://brightgreen.us/lubedev/smartgas/

Parenthetically, While at first I was skeptical about ethanol, I've since changed my tune. Every car produced since the mid 1980s can actually run a 50% mix of regular fuel and ethanol -- right now, without modifications. And for $300, you can modify your car to run on whatever you stick in the tank -- straight gas or 100% ethanol. The advantage is that ethanol is cheap, green, safe, and data shows that vehicles can run longer with less breakdowns when using ethanol. In fact, a vehicle properly tuned for using ethanol can achieve better mileage that when it runs on gasoline. And most importantly ... you can actually (and legally and safely) produce your own ethanol for as little as 50 cents a gallon. What you don't burn driving, you can use to heat or power your home.
For more information, please see David Blume's excellent site: http://www.permaculture.com/

Guest's picture
Guest

I Have been using Acetone (2oz./10gal reg gas) for 2 1/2 years, 32000 miles, in our 2006 Malibu, 4 cyl. with absolutely NO ill effects. When on occasion when acetone is not used (forgot to take it with me) mileage will decrease to previous levels of 36 - 38 mph Highway. Gas mileage with Acetone is 43 - 45 mph. Began using in a new car with approx. 4000 miles on odometer. I store Acetone in a cheap plastic container which is easy to pour and also have tested rubber submerged in it full strength with no ill effects - NO deteriation or softening of any kind. I have since traded to a larger car and will continue to use Acetone.
These are Not assumptions but are Facts.

John Gondek

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Guest

just wondering if anyone has tried this in a motorhome? i have a 01 454 chevy and get 8. i am happy with that but hey every little bit helps. also can it set for 30 days or does it have to be re added? thanks jim

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Guest

if you really wanna know what i think well here it is. i do not doubt that adding actone as an additive to gasoline improves the octane rating, which improves combustibility, which improves gas mileage....to an extent. these ridiculous claims of gas mileage being improved 5-10 mpg, it really seems like adding 2-3 ounces to 10 gallons isnt going to make THAT much of a difference. i really think that its all in your head when you put that stuff in your tank. for instance, you put acetone in your tank and you think its going to give you 10 better mpg, so you drive your car a lot softer, you dont give it much throttle, you drive 5 mph slower, and LOOKY THERE you get 8 mpg better but you just round up to 10 just because it looks better. the acetone just makes you think you are going to get better mpg, when it really doesnt. im not saying it doesnt help out your gas mileage, im sure it does, just maybe not that much.

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Guest

>as an additive to gasoline improves the octane rating, which >improves combustibility, which improves gas mileage...

You are incorrect.

Increasing octane rating REDUCES combustibility and DECREASES mileage.

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Ford Mondeo 1.8 TDI
I've also tried this, and so far I can not say there is a increasing of km/liter! Yes, the smell of diesel is eliminated.
Frans Tonnaer

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Benefits for everything!

Fuel-Saver In Your Tank to Increase Mileage

Chemical, made by owner of this webside, added to gas tank in small proportion improves the fuel's ability to vaporize completely by reducing the surface tension that inhibits vaporization of some fuel droplets.

In addition to increased mileage Fuel-Saver added to fuel boasts other benefits such as increased power, engine life, and performance. Less unburned fuel going past the rings keeps the rings and engine oil in far better condition.

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Guest's picture
Bob hagan

I have a 1 ton ford with a 390 engine. I put acetone in the tank of the truck and my gas powered 300 amp welder that is mounted on the truck. Truck weighs 11,500.lbs. I'd have to shift into third gear when going up a certain hill after pulling off the main road, before using acetone. I had driven for about a month after addng acetone before going up the hill. I left the main road and proceeded up the hill as usual doing about 25 mph. I left the tran. in 4th gear and just held the gas pedal down, and when I topped the hill I was doing 40 mph and accelerating! Man, what an increase in power! Then I was doing some welding and needed to use my air compressor that is belt driven off my welder. I turned the welder up to max and the compressor puts out 17.5 cfm at 1000rpm. at 150lbs. pressure. I could usually air-arc gouge for a couple of inches before the welder engine slowed down too much to still carry all those amps. After the addition of acetone I could gouge for as long as I wanted till the carbon rod needed to be adjusted again! Man, the power it had! I couldn't believe it! Been using it in everything ever since. My friends have tried it also, and all have had increased gas mileage. I also passed emmissions with my truck and it was the lowest it had ever been. The co and hydrocarbs. were about 1/10th the allowable. What's that tell you? I also tried soaking carb parts like o-rings and fuel lines in 100% acetone, 50-50 acetone and gas, and straight gas. Couldn't see any difference in the parts. When I used fuel stabilizer in my gas, because I didn't drive the truck for 3 mos., I had trouble with the carb. flooding after shutting the engine off. I had to rebuild it, and found some gaskets had gone bad. I don't know if this was from the acetone or the fuel stabilizer. Maybe the 2 mixed togeather caused the problem. After 4 years of using acetone and then one time using stabilizer and having that trouble makes me wonder what happened. Anyway, I'll not use fuel stabilizer again. I never had any problems with gas sitting for a long time before. I just believed all that advertising on TV, and thought I'd better use it. Ha Ha! joke on me!

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Carguy

Ok, I drive a 1989 Ford Bronco II 2.9L V6 5spd 4WD. I use one bottle of acetone based fuel injection cleaner about every 2 months. I also live in Montana, where there are no fuel regulations as to required quantities of ethanol or any other additive. As such each gas station has different gas. Some sell pure gasoline, some sell gas with ethanol and some with alcohol (although they don't tell you).Please note that I'm speaking mostly in terms of city driving as 99% of my driving is in town. I've learned to tell the gas apart. My Bronco II gets 28 city/ 35 highway mpg with pure 87 octane(86 is the recommended octane), while with 85.5 octane it only gets 25 mpg. Gas that has alcohol in it (87 or 85.5) I get about 18 mpg city and I got a lot of water dripping out of my exhaust. Ethanol mixed gas (85.5)blackened the interior of my exhaust pipe with soot and I only got about 19 mpg as well. When the price of gas started going up so did the number of places that added alcohol and ethanol. I found a locally owned station that sells locally produced gas. It was pure and my gas mileage came right back, it has no added anything. I only use the amount of Acetone provided by the Injector cleaner, and that's when I use it. I still own and drive this vehicle. I believe the only benefit you're getting from Acetone is injector and carburetor cleaning, which, by maintaining it in your tank you're clearing out build-up consistently and that's where your extra mileage is coming from. Between your injectors, cylinder head(s)and piston heads as well as your intake manifold the build-up can reduce you gas mileage and engine response. It can also cause hesitation, knocking and rough running. By the way, as acetone is heavier than gasoline, it would sink to the bottom of the tank.

These are my findings after one year of driving this particular car and years of doing automotive work.

Guest's picture
Carguy

Keeping your oil changed will help keep your bearings well lubricated and allow your engine to turn smoothly. This can affect the way your car starts and runs as well as your gas mileage. A dirty air filter restricts air flow into the engine forcing an injected engine to compensate by using more gas. With carburetion, the responsiveness is reduced and can cause hard starts and flooding if the filter is bad enough. I can attest to this as it was this first problem I had with my first car, a 1976 Buick Skylark 231 Oddfire V6 3.8L 2BBL with a 3spd.

Guest's picture
Carguy

By the way, the Octane rating of gasoline shows how combustible it is. Higher Octane= More efficient burn= More power. The more gas in the cylinder that burns increases power not better gas mileage. This is due to the fact that fuel flow on injected engines are computer controlled using information from the oxygen sensor and carburetors are controlled by floats which are adjusted by screw. Less fuel of higher octane in the cylinder will have the same effect as more lower octane fuel. There is not a device on any engine built to date that can tell the difference between premium and regular unleaded. The factory recommended octane rating is given in your owners manual to tell you the performance your engine was designed for. Lower than recommended can cause sluggish response which will make you to push harder on the gas pedal pushing more gas into the cylinders, giving you lower mileage. Higher octane will give you more power which could increase gas mileage because you're not putting so much pressure on the gas pedal to get your car moving.

Change your plugs regularly as a decrease in spark will decrease the amount of gas that ignites resulting in putting more pressure on the gas pedal. Also, check your plug wires as these can affect the amount of spark getting to your plugs. I personally suggest changing your plugs and wire once a year and at the same time. When you do that also check your distributor cap and rotor and replace if needed. I'm sorry for those driving a vehicle using distributorless ignition. When it does go, it's not a cheap fix.

Take care of your car and mind your driving to get the best gas mileage. The only efficient way to get better gas mileage is to buy a diesel, and see if your local fast food places will sell you their old cooking oil cheap. Mythbusters got an improvement in mileage doing this and cooking oil is cheap. There are a lot of people going about it this way and the first I heard of it was here in Montana with a diesel Subaru. That was a couple years ago.

Guest's picture
Andrew

I posted sometime back that I wasn't having much success increasing the mileage of my truck with acetone. I was advised by someone to give it time and experiment with the mixture. So I decided to take the advice and run (drive) with it. Now that the price of gas has plummeted so sharply, I'm not sure anyone is reading this thread anymore.

However, here are my results anyway. These were conducted on a '98 F-150 (4.2 V-6 automatic). I tried to be consistent and drive my normal routes without babying it. Results are all on 87 (E-10 in my area) from mostly the same filling station. I drove until the 22 gal tank's "low fuel" light came on, then refueled. Also, the truck is in good tune etc.

1. Gas only 14 mpg
2. Gas only 14 mpg
3. 3 oz/10g 12.5 mpg
4. Gas only 13 mpg
5. 3 oz/10g 12 mpg* Found tires underinflated
6. 2 oz/10g 13.5 mpg* Inflated tires to correct inflation
7. 2 oz/10g 15 mpg* Took road trip (mostly highway)
8. 2 oz/10g 14 mpg
9. 1 oz/10g 13.6 mpg
10. Gas only 14 mpg

As you can see, my mpg averages around 14 mpg no matter what, which is not so hot but at least it's consistent. Also, I didn't notice the truck running any smoother, stronger, better (or worse) with the acetone mixture. The test was interesting and it didn't seem to hurt anything. But since it didn't seem to do anything I'm not bothering with it anymore, at least not on this vehicle. I might try some in my Cooper S though, and maybe it'll be a different story.

Guest's picture
koden

acetone cant mix with gas have e10 that cause acetone damp when mix with e10..better with pure gas as shell and cheavon

Guest's picture
Undecided

I'm still reading the forum, Andrew. :D Even though gas is cheap, it'll be expensive again soon enough. Driving a pickup, that sucks, but it's my choice.

I wasted over an hour of my day reading this entire forum, top to bottom. My impression? Lots of people who think they know stuff, or have anecdotal evidence, are posting their opinions as facts.

I've seen no sources listed. Sure, such and such says this, and he's an engineer. My dad works for big oil. My favorite DJ's dogs vet's husband is a mechanic. Blah blah blah.

This, in my opinion, is like the global warming argument. In some areas, mean temperature increases. Some, it decreases. Minnesota (my home) had the coldest December in the past decade according to the local news. But some glaciers are melting. What does it mean? Nothing. We can't conclude anything yet, because depending on WHAT evidence you cite, that'll prove your point. My point is, same as acetone. Depending on who you listen to, you'll vindicate your own position.

Whoever suggest the large fleet, double blind test, has the best idea I think. That'll be the most reliable, and most valid.

Guest's picture
Andrew

Agreed, my test was hardly scientific as I ran it for my own verification, but I wanted to share the results anyway.

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Guest

i dont see how adding anything could change the duty cycle of the injectors ,it may run hotter and cause predetonation which i believe would hurt the engine,ive added a few cap fulls of acetone to clean a fuel system and had good results but i do think its against the law nowadays with this emmision laws ,the only way i would think to save gas is lose power ,as always more power more money

Guest's picture
Frank

I've read about adding acetone to gas and tried it on my 2007
Hyundai Entourage. It is too early to submit results, but
after reading all the comments submitted here I get the
impression that the acetone will do no good since all of our
gas here in Central Florida contains 10% ethanol. Am I wasting
my time adding the acetone? I started with 2 oz per 10 gal.
How can we overcome or neutralize the ethanol?

Guest's picture
Bob Scion

This is a very interesting. I'm not going to pretend to have all the answers. I work for the largest EPC company in the US and my division is responsible for refinery projects. I can tell you that petro fuel made the same way from crude oil no matter who is selling it. The ONLY difference between the different oil companies is the additives each uses....which are closely guarded secrets. In fact, there are many legal cases where one has sued another for patent infringments on these additives. This phrase I keep hearing "straight gasoline" is total nonsense. Unless you have a private oil well and your own refinery, your fuel has additives blended. Ethanol is only one of many...most of which are detergents like Techron, VTEK, etc etc.

Refineries are highly efficent mini-cities and just about everything going into the site come out of the site in some form. Fuel is the most obvious, but there are many byproducts produced and sold as well. The real question is would the introduction of acetone to fuel on a commercial level change the balance of efficeny in the refinery and therefore impact profits? Acetone in the lab may very improve gasoline, but can it be produced on a commercial level?

Lets say it works with a modest 5% improvement, but capital cost to update the refinery plus the additional production costs of blending acetone cannot be recovered in revenue...then why would they do it? Its a simple matter ROI...not some evil consipracy to make less efficient fuel. The process of an individual going to home depot/lowes and buying a can of acetone, a measure cup, and a funnel...may seem simple to the average person. Imagine the process on a massive scale and you will see why its not in fuel already.

Me personally, I do it 3oz/10gal...I saw a 2.5 mpg gain..but I question whether its from having a clean fuel system or an actual change in combustion. Its likely this is the same conclusion most R&D depts have come at the various oil companies. So if its an effect of a clean fuel system? Well then that is has already been addressed with existing detergent additives in the fuel. I continue to use it in my Scion XB because I would like to keep the fuel system at optimum efficeny.

Guest's picture
Joel Thiese Sr.

I have a 1986 Ford F-150 4.9L 1bb. carb. I will try acetone in my gas and hope for good results. I don't anticipate it will hurt my carburetor especially since its only gonna be just less than 6 oz. in this 19 gallon tank.
I havent checked my gas mileage really since I am driving short distances and warming up the engine before my short trips. But I hope acetone helps me out.

I will reply back to tell evryone what happens

Guest's picture
Joel Thiese Sr.Joel

Ok, it works pretty good. I am very happy. I first gapped my spark plugs wich i hadn't done for 2 yrs. They are supposed to be .044 and they were .085. Wayyy off. So i gapped them. I ran my tank dry and put some 87 unleaded non-ethanol in and mixed at the 3 oz. of acetone to 10 gal. of gas. I drove it and noticed a little more power. I then set the idle mixture screw to where it idles best, it is set a 2 2/3 turns from bottom. And now the engine runs so smooth I cant believe it. There was a ticking sound in the engine before and now it has gone away also. I took a trip about 30 miles and the gas gauge barely moved.
I notice the engine starts easier in the cold mornings too. Almost twice as easy.
I have had trouble with ethanol 2 times in the past with my truck where the engine would sputter and not run, then i had to dump out the carb and fuel tank and get different gas.

I am a farmer in Iowa, and I was always using ethanol and always thinking I was running the best fuel. Now I am thinking differently.

I have a K&N air filter in my truck that i have been using for abour 4 yrs, I noticed more power at the time i installed it.

I am planning to go with Amsoil motor oil on my next oil change. I beleive that it will help the efficiency too.

As far as the idea that the acetone might damage rubber parts in my carb or fuel pump, I will have to wait and see. If it happens, I know how to rebuild my carb myself since i did it 2 or 3 times already before.

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Guest

It's as simple as this. After much experimenting, I can tell you that it DOES work with some cars, DOES NOT work with others, and YES it is affected by wether the gas is pure or not. And for what its worth...OF COURSE it is not more widely used/spoken of/respected etc... as anything that helps with mileage will be squashed by those in the position to do so. I.E. if you sold cough medicine, but knew of an all natural way of cough cessation, would you publicize that info, or do your best to keep that information out of the main stream?

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Joel Thiese Sr.

i am on my 4 th tank using acetone. My fuel pump is going out. I blame the acetone. But acetone worked fine to start with.

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Guest

i tried the acetone in my car and it gave my car a volks wagon jetta 2001 from 250 miles a tank to 400 miles and just remember not to spill it on your car i learned from it

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John T. Bass

I firt tried the acetone in my 2002 Chevy Avalanche. It has a 5.3L engine. No increase in mileage. I tried different mixtures, ranging from 2 to 3 oz of acetone per 10 gal of gas. After several tanks, no increase in mileage, but, I had installed a Hypertech Power Programmer, and was experiencing some minor knocking during hard acceleration, the acetone cured that. I also tried it in my 1989 Chevy S10. It has the 2.8L engine. With a mixture of 2.5 oz per 10 gal of gas it has gotten about 4 more miles per gallon. The truck gets an average of about 19 mpg without the acetone, and gets an average of 23 mpg with the acetone. I also tried it in my 2005 Kawasaki KLR650. I got a drastic increase of about 7 mpg with the acetone, but, it made the bike run hot, really hot. Hot enough that it burned all the paint from the header pipe. I think with some carb rejetting it would solve the heating problem, but the bike gets over 50 mpg without the acetone, so I decided not to use it anymore in the bike. I've been using it in the Avalanche and S10 for over 2 yrs now and have not had any mechanical problems as of yet. The Avalanche has around 84k miles now and the S10 has over 220k miles. Smaller enines seem to respond best to the acetone. The Mythbuster episode used an old Caddy V8 I think. I wish they would try it again using a smaller engine. I read about a Dodge Neon that was getting around 60mpg with the acetone. I have a friend that had one, and tried and tried to get him to try it in the car, but he wouldn't do it afraid it would mess something up. Suppsedly the 4 cylinder engine used in those cars really performs well with a little acetone in the gas.

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Stephen

I saw kipkays video and decided to try it in my 2001 oldsmobile alero. I would like to say that my alero has fuel delivery problems...pressing the gas pedal and the car sputtering slightly until it gets the gas. But when i used the acetone it fixed the fuel delivery trouble and actually helped fuel get to the engine faster so it actually improved performance but not gas mileage...although if i didnt have the fuel delivery trouble i am almost sure it would have helped the gas mileage. Just my $0.02.

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Guest

I'm gonna give it a shot. I got a 98 taurus flex fuel so I'm not too concerned with the o rings and such as I can fill with E85 (85% ethanol 15%gas)

I'll grab a 5 gal can of acetone from work and add it at my next fill up + 87 octane to top it off.

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Guest

seems like with most things the truth is somewhere in the middle with regards to acetone increasing mpg`s either by allowing more efficient fuel burning or simply cleaning injectors...so what about larger motors like fords v10 or small engines like a v-twin briggs & stratton 16hp...also as a professional carpet cleaner for the last 20 years i have extensive experience with "soap"/surfactants they do not simply allow water to break the tension surface as mentioned in earlier post...as for acetone damaging seals etc. i have used acetone on carpets(both very cheap & expensive)as a spotter with no ill effects I can`t see how something that you can soak your hands in for 30 minutes can damage seals or pumps suspect reported pump failures as coincidental

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Guest

I once talked with a mechanic who told me he has used automatic tranny fluid to clean out engines.Something about whatever is in the atf eats up carbon buildup...His method was to drain regular oil fill with atf run for a little bit then drain and perform normal oil change.I`ve never tried this personally but have always wondered if there was any validity to his method also do throttle body spacers really work(even a little).I have not tried acetone admittedly it makes me a bit nervous but I will say that slow takeoffs,red light anticipations staying below 60 mph on freeways does make quite a difference at least in my own personal experience.

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Guest

so i was curious... and i had some acetone that i didn't need anymore.

i average in between 17-19 mpg usually.

and right now, my trip computer is saying i'm in between 15 and 16 mpg...

doesn't seem to work here. i really wish it would have.

91 octane shell (E10), 2.5L turbo charged engine.

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Wade Hawk

I read all the way down to post 179, but I've read enough of this tonight, from several pages. One last comment, to the guy who said it was just the result of clean injectors. Sir no offense but you are wrong. You are forgeting something aren't you in your hyphothesis. If that were true then people wouldn't see an emediate drop in MPG when they stop useing acetone, it's not all of a sudden dirty because you forgot to add your additive bewteen that last tank is it, answer is no. Truth is acetone is 125 octane. Truth is it makes your engine burn that about 30 percent of fuel it wouldn't normally burn. That eguals better gas miliage. I could mirror polish my whole fuel system and add gas and my gas miliage would not improve over what it was when the car was brand new. Yes clean injectors help alote, but they don't increase gas miliage over what it normally would be to begine with. Tonight somewhere else I read some things about acetone and the O2 sensor, this one guy claimes after he got the rite ratio for his car he played around with the exaughst and made a leak so the Sensor read air at regular atmosphere, sucked that in via a leak. He said he ended up with a 400 percent increase in MPG. I don't know if that is true, but before I dismise it I am gonna try everything to duplicate it. Btw, I have the perfect car to do this with. I am currently useing 4 ounces of acitone, and 4 ounces of lucas upper cylinder lubricant. The reason why my car is a perfect candidate is I have a 1996 audi a4 quattro. My car had 10/3/1 compresion. I haven't fined tuned my amount of acetone yet, but I'm within the 2 to 3 ounces they recomend, and with the higher compresion I think I can safelt use more than 2 ounces since I reguire hi test gas anyway. I'm gonna advance my timeing and lower the grade latter and see if it knocks.

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johninlongmont

I get a minimum 10% improvment, and have gotten up to 25% improvement...I use 6oz/30gallons...I don't understand the variance...probably alcohol or other additives in some fuels like some previous poster says

about $1/6oz of acetone...$75/30gallons of gas...10%=$7.50, 25%=$18.75, so it's a pretty good savings

been running it over 2 years and no problems

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vic burns

i am from south africa and have a MX6 with replaced KLZE 200 HP engine it is the HIGH COMPRESION performance engine i am using the acetone/benzine mixture and it DOES work better consumption and POWER regards VIC

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Guest

It depends on your compression ratio and fuel delivery system such as direct injection, throttle body or carburator on what the results would be adding acetone.

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Don Hirschberg

The lead-in video was absolutely complete and utter nonsense. It would take many miles of carefully controlled testing to even detect the small difference in mpg realized by taking things out of the trunk, more tire pressure, etc.

As to acetone there is not the least thermodynamic reason to get more mileage from these acetone additions to gasoline. Like ethanol (CH3-CH2-OH), acetone (CH3-0-CH3) has an oxygen atom - in a sense already partially oxidized (burned)and would have a lower heat of combustion per pound than a hydrocarbon. That's why we get less mpg from ethanol. At the doseages mentioned there would be no detedtable change in mileage.

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Guest

I will give this a try as my mpg has been decreasing on my 2000 Landrover Discovery. The ATF engine flush mentioned above is done all the time by mechanics, usualy on their older babies. Drop out oil, refill with standar ATF fluid. Turn the engine on but DO NOT DRIVE. Let it run about ten minutes. Drain fluid, refill, change filter. Some people reccomend only driving 1000 miles and then changing oil and filter again. Other mechanic will tell you this is bullshit, and if you just use synthetic oil it will slowly dissolve all the crap the ATF would get anyway. Who knows. But I do know my Disco is getting exactly 13.7 mpg now on 80% highway and 20% city, on flat FL roads. I will test and report back although who knows if anyone is reading this anyway.

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Guest

In an old Chevy Nova, the model that looks like a Toyota Corolla, I used a pint of acetone to a 10 gallons of gas and got a lot more performance, as if I used high test gas.

Then I tried a quart of acetone to 10 gallons of gas, and again enjoyed much better performance of my 4 cylinder.

So, then I tried a gallon of acetone to 9 gallons of gasoline.
My headgasket blew the next day while racing around town enjoying the high performance. I don't know if the head gasket blew because of the acetone, but I strongly suspect it was too much octane. I understand acetone has 120 to 150 octane, and regular gas is half of that.

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ratman

i would like to see more testing with fuel from different fuel stations ,whats best ? i have used chevron for many years . i have heard from many people its is the best . but i really wonder if its just the best gas to buy to avoid getting a partial tank of water . i have heard a few other stations have damaged peoples vehicles and repairs were required on those vehicles . i have never had this problem with chevron .i have noticed fuel mileage decreases every winter around October . around here they oxygenate or something like that .it simply means they are adding a lot of methanol to the gasoline , why dont we use 100% methanol ,because in this form it attacks most rubber , if you have buna or viton hoses and o rings you would most likely be OK ,if not first it softens the rubber inside the hoses causing them to become black liquid goo and will clog filters and injectors . next problem is methanol is alcohol and requires more be used with the same amount of air in order to keep the air fuel ratio to avoid a lean out condition . so when they add 10% to 20% or more methanol to the gas what happens on older cars without computers and oxygen sensors is the engine runs leaner ,less power , runs sluggish . your only hope for this fuel to benefit you is if you have a classic muscle car with 12.5 to 1 compression ratio and the carb is jetted rich . then your engine would run well with good power without knocking . unfortunately most of us are not in this situation so what happens to the majority of the vehicles with computers is . the oxygen sensor sees a lean condition because the methanol mixture and sends more fuel to the fire . the end result is less miles per gallon during the time of year when vehicles are cold and not running at the maximum efficiency anyway and some let the vehicle warm up a bit before driving ,etc . this way people can be led to believe the loss in mpg during winter is because you let the engine idle while it warms up . and this does use more fuel agreed but dont you think its kinda convenient for them who are adding the methanol to your fuel to account for your decrease . also why cant some stations offer fuel without the winter blend ? who is the boss that's making the rule that if you wand to drive during the winter months were gonna require you to use more fuel ? and when testing and reporting try to change one thing then give multiple test results before making changes again . example of what I'm referring to is ( dont say i think my vehicle gets 12 mpg so i changed my air filter and gaped my spark plugs changed my fuel filter ,adjusted my timing and added the acetone ,wow it works ,my vehicle runs better and gets 22 mpg the acetone is getting me 10 mpg extra ) be fair do apples to apples testing keep excellent records dont do 6 tests and then realize you have been driving on a flat tire , please . thanks to all who seek truth and share the ideas that work so it can benefit others .

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Guest

Google "Supercarburetors"

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Guest

It work well with my Diesel 1979 car, the smoke reduced and the engine sound quiter. I tried a few different mixture other than the acetone. EG. Toluene, acetone, auto transmission fluid, Trimethylbenzene and the MMT.

Guest's picture
Sylvester Wijesinghe

I live in Srilanka few years ago Magnets for fuel line was imported to this country and fitted tried but that did not give any much of improvement in fuel saving.

Last month one inverter went in very big way Advertising to get motorists to fix GERMAN made two magnets on to fuel line with all modern Electronic testing equpement before and after fitting the unit they do a test owner of the Vehicle has to fill up tank after fixing MAGNETS and their testing meters they do 50 to 60 KM run in heavy traffic and out of traffic free roads then they fill up the tank on their account and do the performance test.

All this cost 150 US Dollars equal to Srilankan Rupees. They guarantee of 10% to 20% saving on a full tank they advice always to check correct Tyre pressure if the owner of the Vehicle like can add (2) two Lbs of more air to rear and (1) Lb for front.

I did not do this as it was costly.

I did a experiment by fitting Computer cooling (3) Three fans into the Air intake after the Air filter element one on to the Air outlet inside the Air filter one angled to that fan to sucked air from the filter to blow into that fan the two fans are from Computer power supplies.

One more powerful Computer server cooling fan was fitted just close to the Throttle cutting the Air inlet hose of the Engine side so I get a Air blowing with an turbulence at the Throttle intake. This intake modification experiment gives me (2) Two
Kilometers for a (1) Liter of Gasoline 90 Octane.

I have just put in Acetone about 3 Ounces for full tank of that is 50 Liters of 90 Octane Gasoline will inform any improvement in Fuel saving.

Can any one give me how to fix Magnet bars to fuel line.?
That is North poles to Fuel pumping side to EFI Fuel bank or other way about how many magnets I have to fix Two or Three All magnets are to same side. I noticed the German magnets comes in a plastic square box like about two Inches long and thy get fitted tight on to the fuel line.

Please advice me the magnets are North North or North South.

Sylvester
(Srilanka)

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Guest

trust this wed site what they say is true

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Sylvester Wijesinghe

On my previous comments I have mentioned all modifications what I have done to my 1300 CC Engine with all above I get at present average about 25% fuel saving definitely 15% more.

Please some one advise me on fitting magnets on the fuel supply side I have fitted three magnets all north poles to one side is it correct? or it has to be two magnets only to fix north magnet to one side south magnet under the fuel supply tube opposite direction. Then magnets attract each other My method magnets do not attract the repel each other.

Sylvester.

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Captain Don

I have been researching this on many sites, but decided to post here because as frustrating as the uninformed arguments are, at least it does give views from both sides. One sided web sites make me wonder why the other opinions are not given a chance for rebuttle. Open and free discussion are the only way we will be able to make informed descisions. The descisions could be the wrong ones, but at least we have been informed of a CHOICES.

So I will attempt to give as many details as I can on my testing.
specs: 1993 Ford Ranger, 140,000 miles.
4.0 V6, Automatic w/overdrive. Also 31 inch tires.(new, properly inflated) Winter temperatures in Indiana.
I bought this vehicle for a daily commute 100 miles each day almost all highway.
My wife got on my case because a truck would not give the mileage her car does, so I have been tracking it. I have gone 2000 miles since purchase and get 16.5 mpg average. Well within stated specs when new.
I waited until I hit 2000 miles for a baseline round number to make math easier. My wife and I both have degrees.(mine accounting, hers engineering) but I want this to be easy for everyone to understand, so I am keeping it as a test that my son can do with me. He's 16 and a math hater! Don't know why!

Yesterday I filled up and added 5 oz. Acetone from Ace hardware. The tank is a 20 gallon tank, so the mixture is 2.5 oz per 10 gal of regular unleaded from Speedway. NO Corn fuel or ethanol mix. I went through this vehicle when I purchased it. Fresh plugs, wires, air filter, oil change, trans fluid treatment from Lucas. Running Castrol GTX 10-40 oil I know that isn't recommended oil, but I like it. since adding the Acetone, I have gone 40 miles and no noticable change yet.
That's all I have for an introduction to my test. If you have questions or would like something else documented, let me know and I will try.
One of the frustrating thing about this site is a bunch of people who were ready to test and then you never heard from them again, so my friends are monitoring my posts to make sure they all get posted. If I post and it disappears, they will be all over it!!!!!!!!!!!!
Wish me luck! I'll keep you updated after fillups.
Don

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Sylvester Wijesinghe

Mr Don,

My last full tank I got 10 Km per liter that is Town and country mixed driving.
I hope to do another full tank in few days will inform you the performance.

I think I get minimum 15% saving with Acetone Magnets on fuel line I want to change the direction of magnets as I had fitted North North to same side of the Fuel line I was told to fix North and South so that magnets will attract to gather and have two more sets of Magnets so there will be three sets in all to same direction so that north to EFI Fuel bank side.
Further more I have three computer fans giving the intake little air boost acting as turbo.

All above experiments had cost me under 10 US$ in Srilanka Tropical country average of 30 C temperature.

Please pardon me in my first post to the list I had written 150.00 US$ as the cost. That is due to wrong calculation because 1 US$ is Srilankan Rupees 115.00.

Will keep writing more experiments on fuel saver I do I want to have cool air intake that is at present air intake is taking warm air from engine compartment which is hot normally engine is running. Will extend the intake to front of the grill near to the buffer. So that normal temperature air on the road will be taken into the filter.

Sylvester.
(Srilanka)

Guest's picture
Greg

A couple of years ago I owned a lincoln TownCar with a computer dash. I added Castle FireBall injector cleaner to the full gas tank. I wanted to run this tank completely out before refilling. The computer would usually show about 22 mpg all the time on the highway. With the FireBall the computer averaged up over 30 mpg over the use of the entire tank. When I refilled the mileage averaged back down to 22 mpg . I know this actually worked because I would normally leave my house and fill up at the same gas station on every trip. This time I went much much further before I needed gas. Maybe FireBall is acetone? This stuff costs too much to make it cost effective at about $10.00 per bottle. Acetone evaporation rate is very fast. I believe it would be best to add only directly to your gas tank. Maybe i would evaporate too off too much if added at the refinery?

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Captain Don

I apologize, I have no usefull data for you right now. As stated, I added the acetone and the next day, I went to work, got hurt and ended up in the hospital emergency room.
While off work for my injuries, my rear drivers side wheel bearing is going out. This weekend, I will replace rear bearings, seals, brakes on both sides of the axle and then I will try again.

NOTE: I do think it has been running stronger and smoother, but that could be the cleaning properties or just my wishfull thinking. I have a couple people who drove the truck a month ago and I will have them test it in my next acetone fillup. That should give me an objective viewpoint.

I have never tried magnets or air intake modifications. One test at a time seems more logical when collecting data.
Thanks for reading and responding. It is encouraging to know that this page is still being followed.

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Guest

so after reading ALL OF THE COMMENTS i decided to give it a shot...i bought my truck brand new w a 100k warranty with 11k left to go...so if it blows up bc of the acetone it better be in the next 10k....i will report back!
anyone compared xilene mixed w acetone here?
i saw something on youtube and the guy mixed the two and got some awsome results...never replied to my emails tho...
here is the link about his experiments:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fnc7M0JDjok
see u guys next time
Tom

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Dan number 100

I didn't see it addressed, but FYI, octane is not equivalent to power, but I see some people seem to think it is. The octane is just a measure of stability of the fuel, at a given altitude.

Just because acetone has higher octane doesn't mean squat, other than it will not "pre-detonate" before the spark plug goes off. My turbo car needs premium not because it's more powerful, but because the compression is so high in the engine regular unleaded will go boom out of sequence(before the spark plug goes off) and hurt things.

I also agree with a few of the skeptics here saying that people looking for better fuel economy will drive to make better fuel economy. I bought a used car, and went easy on it for a few weeks because I knew the timing belt was shot, and I've never gotten better fuel economy out of a car. 99 volvo S70, 2.4 l , 5 cyl.(yes, it's a 5 inline) 35 MPG Hwy- I was shocked. But it had nothing to do with fuel, my "new" car, and everything to do with I didn't want to stress the motor. Now it gets about 29, because I drive normally.

If you take statistics they teach you two things, A: Always find out what the standard error is for your sample set B: percentage change is useless unless it is measured against the standard error. more than 2 errors, you might have something, other than that, it's inconsequential.

my .02, have fun in any event

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Guest

Hello, I am a biochemist and I would like to explain that a lot of the destructive properties of the acetone as described is over-rated, acetone is a polar organic solvent,...I.E. it dissolves organic polar and inorganic polar substances(such as water) and non-polar alike. The thing is all the rubber and stuff in the car is make of essentially non-polar organic polymers meaning that they wont dissolve in water and alcohol. Also it means that they may dissolve in organics but considering that gasoline itself is a very powerful organic solvent...the fact that acetone severely harms them must be exaggerated. In-fact I have done systematic tests with acetone previously, under relatively controlled conditions (as controlled as traveling the same 50mile path everyday can be) and found that acetone put in a small amount even 1/640 of the amount of gasoline present in the tank can save me a full two gallons per tank of gas that is say 5 dollars a tank possibly 500 or 700 dollars a year depending on your driving patterns. Also I found that the concurrent use of acetone and toluene can improve gas mileage in my 1999 nissan altima by 10 miles give or take per gallon. as in I was getting a good 43-45 miles per-gallon on a long trip when i was usually getting 30-32 miles per gallon. Do not buy into all of what the gas companies are saying, the recent addition of alcohol to the gas has lowered milages considerably as it has the opposite affect of the acetone, it demotes vaporization of the gasoline. They say they added it because of increased oxygen balance, acetone would also add oxygen to the fuel and has and octane rating of 150, while toluene (if i remember correctly but I could be wrong) has an octane rating of 160. at the amounts of acetone being used in my experiments it was costing me approximately 35 cents per of acetone per tank of gas. Due to the recent addition of ethanol to gas the acetone to gasoline ratio will have to be increased to compensate. Do not let your minds be swayed by what people in power say, try things out for yourselves it really works well even amazingly!!!

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Guest

sorry way off on the toluene it was an octane of 114 or 117

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Guest

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I was very skeptical when I first heard of putting acetone in your gasoline, but have now decided to try it. After reading through most of the post I have noticed that most of the people who are against using the acetone in their car haven't tried it and most of the people who are in favor of using it are or have used it. That says something to me. Also my other fear was that it might damage my truck, but you would think that if there were anybody out there who has had their car damaged by trying this they would be very vocal in letting us know about it and I did not read one post where someone claimed it hurt their vehicle. So the way I see it; it won’t hurt my truck and it might boost my mileage. That makes it a no brainer. I’ll try it.  

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m65

 

I own a small business (very small, it’s just me) and it basically involves doing some writing for advertising, marketing, the web and of course, blogging. None of this will ever replace my full-time career, but it does eat up various costs that my accountant has told me I can deduct from my taxes. And when I looked into it further, I found not just a handful of possible deductions, but a veritable smorgasbord.

Edwin Kyalangalilwa

kamagra acne

 

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Guest

can someone please help~~

i love how my car runs after adding acetone. i followed 30cc/5gl rule, and its beautiful! 

i have a 2k GS300 which requires 91 oct by mfg, with adding acetone, do i still need to get 91? 

if not, will my MPG decrease?   please email me   mike709@gmail.com

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NeoEpoch

i've been lookin around on the net for a while now since i've heard of acetone (100%) in the tank for increased milage. just picked up a quart of 100% acetone for close to $7 at wal mart and bought a cheapie baby medicine spoon/syringe for accurately adding it to the tank. my truck is a 89 ranger, 4cyl with pretty close to 300k miles on it and i bought it cheap a couple months ago. i don't mind experimenting with this on my vehicle as i currently get only about 16mpg around town (needs tune-up and oil change bad, proly O2 sensors as well, haven't gotten around to doing it yet).

i'll see about starting a blog about my findings.

hells_mullet@yahoo.com

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ken

anything new on this??? It' been almost 2 years. I'm very interested...

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Guest

To the negative people you obviously havent tried it. I have been adding acetone to my gas for a couple months and I have an explorer that gets 28mpg on the highway, 22 around town. No joke. I mix 1 ounce per 5 gallons, so only 4 ounces per 20 gallons full tank. This does work. I am proof of that. Give it a try, dont be scared and dont add more than 1 ouncer per 5 gallons!

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Guest

I am trying this on a 2000 ford Taurus wagon ffv. I run gasoline not e85. First fill i see absolutely no difference. I tried to change just this one thing at a time to get more accurate data.
Acetone is an ingredient in may fuel injector cleaners and engine additives so I'm not very concerned about it causing any damage.Anyone doing this should measure carefully and avoid dripping any on the paint. I use a veterinary syringe with a piece of vinyl tubing to measure and put it in the tank. I am using a rate of one ounce per 5 gallon of fuel. Acetone only no xylene at this time. Our gasoline is10% ethanol by law now here.

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Guest

uh, one acetone will eat plastic and rubber, and could hurt aluminum components and brass.. that is sometimes found in engines.. and fuel pumps.. it's also toxic...

We are not only trying to improve gas milage.. but also use cleaner fuels.. using acetone would be useless.. and cost more in the long run, considering maintance..

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Guest

some folks need to learn a few things about chemicals, octane and plastics/rubber...

First, would you pour gasoline into a plastic cup??? No?? Why not?? (ask my teenage son as he did this exact thing a week ago). The cup melted. I looked at him and asked him why in the world he would do such a thing. His reply was "but the gas cans in the garage are plastic". Anyone with an IQ slightly higher than that of a young blowfish can figure this one out.

Octane. Sooo many people make the assumption, or believe, incorrectly, that higher octane means more power from their engine. This is simply wrong. The sole, the only purpose of increased octane is to prevent detonation. The higher the compression ratio the higher the octane needs to be to keep pinging, knocking and detonation from happening. There is no magic "extra" power with higher octane. Gas has a specific amount of energy available when it is burned. Octane does not change that.

We now have ethanol in our gas because the chemical it replaced, methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) was discovered in high concentrations of drinking water in California due to gas spills, leaky underground tanks and it was later shown that MTBE was actually getting deposited on the ground from vehicle exhaust. MTBE is considered a carcinogen and it also mixes easily with water. The purpose of MTBE, and now ethanol, is to act as an oxygenation agent (which helps gas burn more efficiently and reduce emissions) and also as an octane booster.

The problem with ethanol is that it contains less energy than equivalent amounts of gasoline. In other words, the more ethanol in the gas, the lower your mileage will be. Ethanol is also hygroscopic (it absorbs water) which then causes the issue of phase separation in the fuel. 10% ethanol in gas means the fuel will absorb up to 50 times more water than plain gas alone. Water in the fuel system will lead to more problems than adding a few ounces of acetone.

Ethanol is incredibly more expensive to make than MTBE ever was. So, you can in part thank the government for gas price increases because of the mandate to use ethanol.

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Guest

Isn't rubber highly nonpolar? If so, acetone will cause little to no damage to the rubber itself, rendering the nonpolar gasoline more dangerous to the rubber than the acetone itself.

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It is great post.The most recent studies suggest that you will find already cleaners within the gasoline you put in your vehicle and adding a lot more is often very unnecessary. Don't get me wrong, additional preservatives are unlikely to hurt your vehicle either.keep updating information.

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I know people that swing both ways on the acetone issue. As for myself, I abstain. "Acetoners Anonymous" don't you know!

But what if it WERE possible to increase an engine's efficiency without adding anything to your fuel-just make the engine work better? That's what The Gadgetman Groove appears to be doing, in a whole bunch of different applications.

Take a look at their YouTube channel and you'll see what I mean. It's http://www.YouTube.com/GadgetmanGlobal

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Guest

I've been using 2 oz. per 10 gallons of pure acetone in my vehicle for about 3 years, now. My ford windstar is going on 200,000 speedometer miles. I noticed the improvement in her performance, immediately.

My Father and Brothers were automotive and aviation mechanics. I trust them. I do not worry about my plastic and rubber parts. They are fine. Hello, gas cleans off PAINT, and I get an additional 13 miles per gallon.

Good luck all.

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gabriel

since i heard of this and all the bs negitive talk about it. I myself decided to try an experiment to see if it is true or not. Since i have also read noone has done there own research. I took a water bottle (cheapest produced plastic). And several different rubber gaskets, plastic gaskets, rubber hoses. Filled the water bottle half-way with pure acetone and dropped in the rubber and plastic items. Then waited for 2 months and removed then it didnt do anything to the bottle or any of the rubber or plastic gaskets or hoses. So therefore this oil industry rep is WRONG! I myself use it in my suv and get an extra 8 mpg i mix it at 1 oz per 5 gallons. So instead of dissing something why dont you try your own experiment and tests to see for yourself. And also if you think about with some sense most nail polish remover is stored in what?

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Guest

This is a completely arbitrary argument. There are so many variables that can affect fuel economy: driving habits, fuel type, fuel brand (each brand has their own proprietary additives, the fuel itself all comes from the same place), road conditions, vehicle conditions, ambient temperature, compression ratios, variable valve timing, etc. If you really want to know if acetone will do what people say it will then create a scientific method to test it. I suggest getting two identical vehicles (purchased brand new off the factory floor would be the best way), fill them with identical fuel and add acetone to one of the vehicles. Put them on dynamometers side by side and run them under normal driving conditions. Then publish your results and we can talk about it.

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Shane

For vehicles 1996 and newer the computer won't let the car get above a certain gas mileage, but if you put acetone in then run it until the acetone mixed gas is up the the engine then turn off and disconnect the battery for a few minutes, to reset the computer, then reconnect it and run. What will happen is that the computer will read the gas/acetone mix as normal and do what it needs to do to get the tail emissions to the state that it was programmed for. So if you're not getting results give this a try, it worked for me. 99 dodge mini van, 20 mpg before I reset the computer and 25 mpg in town/ 30 mpg highway after.

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eustash

I have a chevy silverado 1500 with a 5.3L engine on it. I drive 1300 to 1600 miles a week due to work. I get about 15/20% increase MPG using acetone. Do not ask and try yourself, this is the best advice. Few important things:
1.- use syntetic oil
2.- keep tires not less than 38psi
3.- when you get the green light, remember that you are in the street and not at the race track.
4.- do your oil change at the right time.
5.- new air filter every 5000/7000 miles
6.- put the acetone in your tank when is empty and fill up your tank then go untill isempty again, that is when you see the big savings.
7.- My truck burns gas and not food(corn)