How to Answer 23 of the Most Common Interview Questions

By Paul Michael on 4 October 2007 (Updated 19 November 2013) 271 comments

[Editor's note: If you recently lost your job, take a look at Wise Bread's collection of tips and resources for the recently laid off.]

Let's face it; no one likes the interview process. Well, certainly not the people being interviewed anyway. You have to be on your best behavior, you only get one chance to get it right, and it's like taking your driving test all over again. Over the years I've been to countless interviews. To get my first job out of college I attended some 15-20 interviews a week. Whether it was in Britain or over here in the States, the questions never really seemed to change from job to job. Not only that, but the answers to them are usually the same, with your own personal interpretation of course. Here I present 23 questions you're likely to be asked, and how I have learned to answer them. Why 23? Because I had more than 20 and less than 25. Remember, being interviewed is a skill, and if you do the preparation you should ace it every time. (See also: 12 Unique Ways to Score a Job Interview)

1. So, tell me a little about yourself.

I'd be very surprised if you haven't been asked this one at every interview. It's probably the most asked question because it sets the stage for the interview and it gets you talking. Be careful not to give the interviewer your life story here. You don't need to explain everything from birth to present day. Relevant facts about education, your career and your current life situation are fine.

2. Why are you looking (or why did you leave you last job)?

This should be a straightforward question to answer, but it can trip you up. Presumably you are looking for a new job (or any job) because you want to advance your career and get a position that allows you to grow as a person and an employee. It's not a good idea to mention money here, it can make you sound mercenary. And if you are in the unfortunate situation of having been downsized, stay positive and be as brief as possible about it. If you were fired, you'll need a good explanation. But once again, stay positive.

3. Tell me what you know about this company.

Do your homework before you go to any interview. Whether it's being the VP of marketing or the mailroom clerk, you should know about the company or business you're going to work for. Has this company been in the news lately? Who are the people in the company you should know about? Do the background work, it will make you stand out as someone who comes prepared, and is genuinely interested in the company and the job.

4. Why do you want to work at X Company?

This should be directly related to the last question. Any research you've done on the company should have led you to the conclusion that you'd want to work there. After all, you're at the interview, right? Put some thought into this answer before you have your interview, mention your career goals and highlight forward-thinking goals and career plans.

5. What relevant experience do you have?

Hopefully if you're applying for this position you have bags of related experience, and if that's the case you should mention it all. But if you're switching careers or trying something a little different, your experience may initially not look like it's matching up. That's when you need a little honest creativity to match the experiences required with the ones you have. People skills are people skills after all, you just need to show how customer service skills can apply to internal management positions, and so on.

6. If your previous co-workers were here, what would they say about you?

Ok, this is not the time for full disclosure. If some people from your past are going to say you're a boring A-hole, you don't need to bring that up. Stay positive, always, and maybe have a few specific quotes in mind. "They'd say I was a hard worker" or even better "John Doe has always said I was the most reliable, creative problem-solver he'd ever met."

7. Have you done anything to further your experience?

This could include anything from night classes to hobbies and sports. If it's related, it's worth mentioning. Obviously anything to do with further education is great, but maybe you're spending time on a home improvement project to work on skills such as self-sufficiency, time management and motivation.

8. Where else have you applied?

This is a good way to hint that you're in demand, without sounding like you're whoring yourself all over town. So, be honest and mention a few other companies but don't go into detail. The fact that you're seriously looking and keeping your options open is what the interviewer is driving at.

9. How are you when you're working under pressure?

Once again, there are a few ways to answer this but they should all be positive. You may work well under pressure, you may thrive under pressure, and you may actually PREFER working under pressure. If you say you crumble like aged blue cheese, this is not going to help you get your foot in the door.

10. What motivates you to do a good job?

The answer to this one is not money, even if it is. You should be motivated by life's noble pursuits. You want recognition for a job well done. You want to become better at your job. You want to help others or be a leader in your field.

11. What's your greatest strength?

This is your chance to shine. You're being asked to explain why you are a great employee, so don't hold back and stay do stay positive. You could be someone who thrives under pressure, a great motivator, an amazing problem solver or someone with extraordinary attention to detail. If your greatest strength, however, is to drink anyone under the table or get a top score on Mario Kart, keep it to yourself. The interviewer is looking for work-related strengths.

12. What's your biggest weakness?

If you're completely honest, you may be kicking yourself in the butt. If you say you don't have one, you're obviously lying. This is a horrible question and one that politicians have become masters at answering. They say things like "I'm perhaps too committed to my work and don't spend enough time with my family." Oh, there's a fireable offense. I've even heard "I think I'm too good at my job, it can often make people jealous." Please, let's keep our feet on the ground. If you're asked this question, give a small, work-related flaw that you're working hard to improve. Example: "I've been told I occasionally focus on details and miss the bigger picture, so I've been spending time laying out the complete project every day to see my overall progress."

13. Let's talk about salary. What are you looking for?

Run for cover! This is one tricky game to play in an interview. Even if you know the salary range for the job, if you answer first you're already showing all your cards. You want as much as possible, the employer wants you for as little as you're willing to take. Before you apply, take a look at salary.com for a good idea of what someone with your specific experience should be paid. You may want to say, "well, that's something I've thought long and hard about and I think someone with my experience should get between X & Y." Or, you could be sly and say, "right now, I'm more interested in talking more about what the position can offer my career." That could at least buy you a little time to scope out the situation. But if you do have a specific figure in mind and you are confident that you can get it, I'd say go for it. I have on many occasions, and every time I got very close to that figure (both below and sometimes above).

14. Are you good at working in a team?

Unless you have the I.Q. of a houseplant, you'll always answer YES to this one. It's the only answer. How can anyone function inside an organization if they are a loner? You may want to mention what part you like to play in a team though; it's a great chance to explain that you're a natural leader.

15. Tell me a suggestion you have made that was implemented.

It's important here to focus on the word "implemented." There's nothing wrong with having a thousand great ideas, but if the only place they live is on your notepad what's the point? Better still, you need a good ending. If your previous company took your advice and ended up going bankrupt, that's not such a great example either. Be prepared with a story about an idea of yours that was taken from idea to implementation, and considered successful.

16. Has anything ever irritated you about people you've worked with?

Of course, you have a list as long as your arm. But you can't say that, it shows you as being negative and difficult to work with. The best way to answer this one is to think for a while and then say something like "I've always got on just fine with my co-workers actually."

17. Is there anyone you just could not work with?

No. Well, unless you're talking about murderers, racists, rapists, thieves or other dastardly characters, you can work with anyone. Otherwise you could be flagged as someone who's picky and difficult if you say, "I can't work with anyone who's a Bronco's fan. Sorry."

18. Tell me about any issues you've had with a previous boss.

Arrgh! If you fall for this one you shouldn't be hired anyway. The interviewer is testing you to see if you'll speak badly about your previous supervisor. Simply answer this question with extreme tact, diplomacy and if necessary, a big fat loss of memory. In short, you've never had any issues.

19. Would you rather work for money or job satisfaction?

It's not a very fair question is it? We'd all love to get paid a Trump-like salary doing a job we love but that's rare indeed. It's fine to say money is important, but remember that NOTHING is more important to you than the job. Otherwise, you're just someone looking for a bigger paycheck.

20. Would you rather be liked or feared?

I have been asked this a lot, in various incarnations. The first time I just drew a blank and said, "I don't know." That went over badly, but it was right at the start of my career when I had little to no experience. Since then I've realized that my genuine answer is "Neither, I'd rather be respected." You don't want to be feared because fear is no way to motivate a team. You may got the job done but at what cost? Similarly, if you're everyone's best friend you'll find it difficult to make tough decisions or hit deadlines. But when you're respected, you don't have to be a complete bastard or a lame duck to get the job done.

21. Are you willing to put the interests of X Company ahead of your own?

Again, another nasty question. If you say yes, you're a corporate whore who doesn't care about family. If you say no, you're disloyal to the company. I'm afraid that you'll probably have to say yes to this one though, because you're trying to be the perfect employee at this point, and perfect employees don't cut out early for Jimmy's baseball game.

22. So, explain why I should hire you.

As I'm sure you know, "because I'm great" or "I really need a job" are not good answers here. This is a time to give the employer a laundry list of your greatest talents that just so happen to match the job description. It's also good to avoid taking potshots at other potential candidates here. Focus on yourself and your talents, not other people's flaws.

23. Finally, do you have any questions to ask me?

I'll finish the way I started, with one of the most common questions asked in interviews. This directly relates to the research you've done on the company and also gives you a chance to show how eager and prepared you are. You'll probably want to ask about benefits if they haven't been covered already. A good generic one is "how soon could I start, if I were offered the job of course." You may also ask what you'd be working on. Specifically, in the role you're applying for and how that affects the rest of the company. Always have questions ready, greeting this one with a blank stare is a rotten way to finish your interview. Good luck and happy job hunting.

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James

Pff...like this works...I have excellent verbal communications skills, and have "correct" answered many of these questions...on many interviews...and still have not been hired.

After many of the interviews, I would later make a call-back, only to discover that I had been turned-down. When inquiring about *why* I was turned down, without fail, I was told that I did not have enough experience.

I have only three job references at seventeen years of age, two professional, and one personal. All three have given me good references. The skills and experience from said references applied to the jobs I was attempting to acquire, and yet I still could not get a Job.

There seems to be a growing disconnect between teenagers these days, and Corperate America; were Corporate America just "magically" assumes teenagers will suddenly have work experience...despite the fact that Corporate America, each year, is decreasing it's teenage workforce.

Could it be, as time progresses, the Corperations today are requiring greater amounts of experience in potential employees, thus barrign the door to younger generations causing a catch 22?

You must have experience in order to be hired in Corporate America these days (unless you have a College Education...but I digress on even that), but in order to obtain experience, as a teenager, you must first be hired.

The problem lies in the reluctance of businesses today. they do not wish to make a investment in our future, nor take *any* form of risk, consequently they reap no rewards (i.e. a experienced workforce).

This situation greatly angers me, because it highlights one of the founding issues of our society...money. Just as it takes money to make money, it takes experience to get a job...and thus experience.

What of those folks attempting to start a business? You have to have MONEY in order to establish credit (and a steady income at that!). you have to have credit in order to get a loan. You need a loan to start a bussines. But in order to get money you need a job. In order to get a job you need experience. In order to get experience you need a job...and it's a viscous cycle that never ends -_-

I feel exasperated, and distraught over the hand us teenagers have been dealt. True, we may live an easy life at home, but at the same token, many of us want to strike out on our own, and be self Dependant, to succeed, and to soar! But all we find is failure and rejection because we are what we are.

Can I help that I have no experience? No. Could I, given a chance? Yes. but who's willing to give me, a teenager, a chance?!
No-one.

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Guest

Show that kind of attitude DURING the interview and you're in ;>

Guest's picture

Hi James,

It's been a bit over a year since you made your post, and hopefully you've had better luck searching for employment. When I was first looking for a job, I was in exactly your position, and even with years of experience as a freelancer I could never get hired. The one factor that did make things easier was the fact that I was a teenager. No mortgage, no bills.

I took advantage of that and to get "proper" experience, I signed on for an internship. That was the best decision I ever made, and I think it had a definite impact on subsequent applications and interviews. Not many people walk in to an interview with reference letters on Congressional letterhead! It didn't matter whether the job was government or private industry: in many cases the fact that it looked impressive was enough. Just like the fluff questions that interviewers ask - it really is all about shmoozing (to an extent) and how graceful you can be under pressure.

If you go to a university, apply for jobs on campus - they usually give preference to students, and that way you can also get "proper" experience. I did that too, and it helped me get teaching experience while I was in grad school. That, in turn, helped other interviewers see I had a demonstrated record of explaining difficult concepts to people in terms they could understand. This came in handy for the IT interviews I went to. It also helped when I changed careers to my present job. One of the questions there was: "How would you explain the concepts of mean, median and mode to someone on the street?"

On my very first interview ever, the interviewer said they wanted someone with more experience. My response was that I was a fast learner because of my previous experience in the field as a freelancer, blah blah blah. They were happy with that. A few jobs later, another interviewer said that (rather rudely too). There were two other people on the panel, and one of them looked surprised. I decided to gamble, so I said (politely), "I must have some decent experience, otherwise I would not be here at this interview." She turned bright red and we moved on to the next question. I didn't get the job because (I found out through the grapevine) they had someone in mind and this was a clumsy way of conveniently eliminating their competition. I also found out the person who asked that question was later fired for violating state HR laws.

The bottom line is this: make use of your situation as best you can, then at an interview, do what politicians do and put a positive spin on it. Best of luck!

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Guest

I got hired following these tips

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Guest

Companies don't hire 17 years olds becuase they either underperform or leave for college. Apply for a high school job and be happy.

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Guest

I've always answered #21 (and its variants) by saying, "I am ready and willing to devote long hours, work, thought, and creative talent to the company. You will rarely see a harder and more loyal worker. But my family comes first. Always has, always will."

Any company that would demand my loyalty to them over my loyalty to family is not a company I would wish to work for, even in the short run.

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Guest

Just one addition, If you are going for a sales job, and they ask what motivates you, the correct answer IS money, and lots of it.

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Jamie

Not true. A job well done, outstanding customer care and as importantly, post sale customer care, and correct attention to detail are primary examples of what motivates you, as well as what you should be selling at the interview.

The final goal with the above combination, means you WILL succeed and make lots of money. Money is not the motivation, money is the result of your motivations.

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Yumi

1. So, tell me a little about yourself.
Why, are you some sort of con-artist?

2. Why are you looking (or why did you leave you last job)?
Because of the $$$, stupid

3. Tell me what you know about this company.
You don't give a f*** about me, why the hell should I give a f*** about yours?

4. Why do you want to work at X Company?
See answer to #2

5. What relevant experience do you have?
Enough experience to know that these questions are lame!

6. If your previous co-workers were here, what would they say about you?
I don't want to visualize that question!

7. Have you done anything to further your experience?
Yeah, hire me and it'll be the answer to this lame question.

8. Where else have you applied?
The job market.

9. How are you when you’re working under pressure?
Stop it with all these questions! Arrgh!

10. What motivates you to do a good job?
$$$, and lots of it!

11. What’s your greatest strength?
I once beat up a nerd...

12. What’s your biggest weakness?
...but was unable to standup against bullies

13. Let’s talk about salary. What are you looking for?
Preferably in the millions but that won't happen unless I win the lottery.

14. Are you good at working in a team?
Sure, if they don't get in my way!

15. Tell me a suggestion you have made that was implemented.
Do what I say and everything will be alright.

16. Has anything ever irritated you about people you've worked with?
Yeah, because I'm right and everyone else is wrong!

17. Is there anyone you just could not work with?
My parents. They never trusted me, you can't work out a deal with them!

18. Tell me about any issues you’ve had with a previous boss.
He was a d***wad

19. Would you rather work for money or job satisfaction?
Are you working for job satisfaction? Yeah right, you'd probably ditch this job if you win the lottery just as I would!

20. Would you rather be liked or feared?
Respect mah authorita-h!

21. Are you willing to put the interests of X Company ahead of your own?
Give me controlling stock of your company and I would!

22. So, explain why I should hire you.
You pay more!!

23. Finally, do you have any questions to ask me?
Cut to the chase and give me the d*** job.

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eddie willers

love it!

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Fateh

Love it mate ! I guess, I can take this as my strategy ! ;)

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Guest

Great job! Sure, you come off as a smart**s, but a profound point has been made through the use of satire -- just use some common sense & some creativity, and you should do fine at any worthwhile interview.

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Guest

How do you overcome the nervousness you feel in an interview? I get so nervous that I start to go blank and forget my answers or I just ramble. Either way, I feel like a wreck.

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Ryan

For #23 I would not recommend asking about the benefits...it will make you appear that you care more about what the company has to offer you, then the genuine interest you have for the responsibilities of the job. Instead, say something like "I'm very interested in this position because (fill in the blank). What would be the next step in the interview process?"

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What about those strange interview questions that appear completely unrelated to the job itself such as "If you could be any animal, what would you be?".
Answering Strange Interview Questions

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Guest2443333

1. Is there any possible overtime?
2. Will there be any opportunities to advance within the company?
3. Will I be working alone?
4. If so, what are the other employees like?

I am just a student and we have interviews for a careers class i am taking. i have it tomorrow and i was just preparing myself some more. Cant seem to get over my nervousness!

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Guest2443333

ha ha Yumi! good one!

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Paolo Macuñal

Im an Iinformation Technology student.. and im will be graduating next year 2009...

can anyone of you guys help me to make a Good Resume, just a tip or an example, for me to me to do..

thanks..

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Bill M

Wow, this is very helpful, I can study these to perform my interviews from now on.

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Guest

im veryyyyyyyyyyyyy thankful dear,, i find exactally what i want, Thank you again for this article

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In an Interview, you always want to have an answer to every question asked. Take your time and give specific examples and personal experiences. Sometimes you may not have had a Professional experience with the question at hand, however; find some personal experience to provide a good example. If you are good enough to show a relation of your personal and business experiences it will impress your interviewer.

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Guest

I would rather state a strenght that is also a weakness because its more simple, less confusing, and easier to get rid of the negative aspects of a weakness. Its easier to switch to the positive aspects, and you can actually be honest.

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Siobhan

Hi everyone,

I have an interview tomorrow afternoon and Im very nervous. If the recuitment agency phones my old place of work I cant not see me getting a very good reference as My family use to run the place and have since left!!!!

ANy tips on how I should say this to the agency. should I say nothing and hope for the best????

Thanks

Siobhan

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Guest

Just start singing "We are family" it always works for me. Just kidding

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Guest

Just start singing "We are family" it always works for me. Just kidding

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suresh

be a cool and dont take nervous in your mind

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Guest

Siobhan Magnus? I've never heard that name anywhere else. Very unique and beautiful. :)

Excuse my totally irrelevant comment. ;)

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eddie willers

It's depressing how many of these official answers advise (or imply) that you obfuscate, spin, avoid.. or just outright LIE to your interviewer.
If the truth isn't going to get you hired, you are probably working for crooks,
who lied their way into and to the top of their careers. Only a crook at heart would ask you a loaded question that requires you to LIE to pass.
After several generations of LIARS being the ones who pass this filter process, is it any wonder we have the banks, the mortgage companies, and the GOVERNMENT we see now?

ps- 5 years ago, did YOU see yourself where you are NOW?

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Beatrice

Many common sense answers to common interviewing questions. Thanks. Also found great answers from the Interview Doctor (interviewdoctor.wordpress.com) to tricky and strange questions and behavioral questions. Particularly like the answers to the off the wall questions and what interviewers hate.

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Guest shonda

p://www.wisebread.com/how-to-answer-23-of-the-most-common-interview-questions

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Cindy

Great article. I have enjoyed reading the comments as well.One thing that I found helpful was giving my future employer a direct URL link they could view prior to interviewing me. I created an online profile at www.personavita.com that let me customize my own bio and work history to the job I was interviewing for. I think it helped the interview stay on track because they already knew my goals and qualifications. I would maybe now include some of these awkward questions in my portfolio to help me out even more! Thanks!

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An article I wrote on how to answer these stupid questions the way you always want to answer them.

http://www.examiner.com/x-3040-Minneapolis-Life-in-the-Cubicle-Examiner~...

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Guest

Your advice is excellent, except on the salary answer: "well, that’s something I’ve thought long and hard about and I think someone with my experience should get between X & Y.”

When you say between "x and y" most reasonable people will (and should for their negotiating position) hear "X!" And you have now anchored low (unless your range is totally bloated).

Give a figure which anchors you higher than your walk away position.

If you don't have a number in hand (and you should) or want to delay the conversation say "before we talk about the salary I would like to explore the entire package." This may buy you some time.

Best of luck -

j

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drbj

A common interviewing question that is difficult for many people to answer is, "You appear to be overqualified." Most of the outplacement candidates I counseled were overqualified by virtue of their experience or previous salary or both. One of the best ways to answer the "You appear to be overqualified" question is to take the offensive. You can answer, "Yes, absolutely! And isn't that to your benefit?"
That gives you the opportunity to reiterate why you would be such an asset to the company: your experience bringing in revenue, new customers, research, whatever is pertinent to the position you're seeking. Don't apologize for your age, experience or pay grade. Use them as assets. Emphasize your energy, enthusiasm and desire to learn. For more dynamic answers to tough interview questions, check out: http://interview-doctor.blogspot.com. Make a comment if you need the answer to other tough, tricky or sneaky interview questions.

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Guest

how would answer an interview question: When have you felt that you have been treated unfaily in life? What did you do abou it?

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drbj

A colleague shared with me that he thinks trying to be funny lost him a job offer. The interviewer asked, "If you were an animal, what animal would you be." My friend said, "A kangaroo so I would always have a safe place for my computer." He didn't get a second interview.
Not every interviewer has developed a sense of humor. That was an example of the kind of tricky question that interviewers are asking lately. For more on interviewing, check out: Much of What You Know about Job Search Just Ain't So. You can read the first chapter free at Barnes & Noble - http://bn.com

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Subject of your article is very interesting, i have bookmarked it for future referrence
regards kierdincho

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Mr.Tickles

You did 15-20 interviews a week? Jesus Christ.
I've been looking for work for the last two months with zero success and I've had three interviews and three phone interviews, all of which I got rejected from. That's not counting registering at temp agencies, which would only be another five.

How the hell do you get that many interviews? I've done all of the motions and I have a decent "recent university graduate" resume and cover letter. I've applied in person, online, by mail and phone and I'm coming up dry. I'm about to give up and go for a post-grad degree cuz it's better than sitting around wasting time.

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Guest

Most of this is common sense. It's not brain surgery. Good advice for young people who are going out for the first time.

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Birdie

For recent grads, I think that maybe it would be better to apply to work for a temp agency to beef up your resume. That way, you can gain the experience you need and also make time to take continuing education courses that specifically apply to your field. For example, taking non-credit classes at a technical college such as Spanish or Quickbooks can give you that extra edge. And of course, it's a plus that they are so reasonable in comparison to college coursework. Good luck!

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12. What’s your biggest weakness? The best answer... I AM A PERFECTIONIST!

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James Power

I'm trying to get into Air Traffic Control. They absolutely will not ever hire a perfectionist. If you can't make a decision and make it now because you're stalling to try to figure out the perfect answer you'll kill people. In jobs where time is a factor and decisions are needed being a perfectionist will ruin your interview. Surgeon, Firefighter, Cop, Vet, ATC, Pilot, Astronaut... the list is endless.

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chloe

anyone seen problem halved iphone app?

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neverland~

HR always have the same questions as above, and usually when they ask me if i have any question to ask, i ask about the salary, that might be a big problem, next time. i'll be careful.[img]http://www.photosnag.com/img/4713/n09x0302vnsn/clear.gif[/img]

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N

I look at interviews not as interrogations to be nervous about, but just a general meeting to discuss who you are and what you've done. I try to stay as relaxed as possible and talk to the interviewer as an equal.

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Cherrone

I just wanted to say thanks to everyone who commented here.

I have been out of work for a long time. I flubbed a telephone interview for the first time ever ( I thought the interviewers - 2 of them, were asking trick questions concerning vendor-specific nomenclature, only after I hung up did I realize they were just looking for the simple answers.

I found all the input here very helpful and insightful.

Best wishes and employment for everyone,

Cherrone F

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sergi

I recently interviewed a recruiter to find out why do they ask "why should we hire you". I've digged very profoundly into this question, and got some golden gems out of it.

Go and listen to the interview here:
Why Should We Hire You

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Nick

Thank you so much for this excellent advice. I don't know what I would have done without it!

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It's all very well knowing the correct answers but you have to show that you mean what you say because interviewers will see right through it.

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Hi, This is really amazing list of very common questions that are asked.

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Grateful

Thank you! I have an interview tomorrow, and will be practicing these techniques tonight so I will be calm for those (and more) questions throughout the hour-long interview!

I have especially benifited from others' comments.
Thanks everyone!

If I could pass some advice - it's always best to act natural. Don't feel less than worthy or talked down to. Remember they called you for the interview - they want you there. So be comfortable. If you don't get the job, it's not the perfect match for you. Don't get discouraged - the perfect job for you will land in your lap! So be yourself!

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Guest

i hate these question
"when a costumer said Not how you turn NOT into a yes ?????
someone help me pleaseeeeee? or

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Guest

Result of an interview depends upon the preferences and perceptions personals taking the interview.....the same answer may give you a Job and the same answer somewhere else may not........

Just hope each time u r lucky enough...

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Guest

Result of an interview depends upon the preferences and perceptions of the personals taking the interview.....the same answer may give you a Job and the same answer somewhere else may not........

Just hope each time u r lucky enough...

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Jason .H

I end up stumbling myself on most of these questions under pressure, but i try to answer as best i can relating to the work i am actually applying for, good luck to everyone else using this as a guide for questions that you may be asked during an interview you have.

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denaeva

Thank you for sharing!
I think I will answer professional to my customer.
If everyone need cheaper battery, you can visit my website!
click my name

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Guest

vgrasdyDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD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Bernadette

The best way I find to answer these two questions would be to talk about how efficient and reliant you are in performing your aily duties; comment on your organizational skills; your time management and excellent organizationa skills; outstanding work ethics; team player; ability to wear many hats and going the extra mile to get a job done. As far as weaknesses are concerned, we all have weaknesses. What one is an expert in, you may have a weakness in: for instance, the HR recruiter is an expert in what he/she does and you may not share the same expertise; however, you may be an expert in taking meeting minutes or you may be an expert engineer or doctor and the HR person would have weaknesses in these areas. So my friends, we all have weaknesses when we compare ourselves to one another. Hey, I can't change a flat tire or cook to good, but I am a great at computers and office management. Hope this helps.

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Guest

Hi All,

I have attended so many interviews even i had these kind of experience, once I faced interview in media company there i faced group discussion. So at that time if we don't know about the topic what we have to do.

Actualy that interview was for the post of I Audiance Development, I was well prepared about audience development and about the company. But suddenly they called all other candidates and gave topic to discuss.

1 think i was not knowing about the topic and for every thing they were asking me first. I taught atleast other candidate will speak some thing then i will have some idea so that i can speak.

It was realy very difficult Interview.

You know in some other interview they use to ask what 2 charecter u like in ur dad, mom, your sister, brother, boss and in that what charecter you would like to involve in your charecter these kind of questions.

How was your experience in your previous company? what all changes happened in you.?

So many questions.....

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Guest

this site is very poor, the prints are not visible,please make changes.

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Guest

I recently had a job interview down at the local chip shop, and they asked, "Where would you see yourself in a few years?" and I replied, "Probably working here selling chips and spilling vinegar everywhere but at night i'll be working the street corners and selling drugs." And he laughed and said, "Won't we all." It was perhaps the greatest moment of my life, he then offered me the job on the spot and I told him No thanks, your allright (sarcasm). Then he got all serious and told me to Get the **** into work next week or im gonna burn down your house! (sarcasm also.)

Best interview ever for me. And always will be.

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m65

Web magazine by Frommers (the guide book publisher) focused on budget travel.  Writers post stories on destinations, budget itineraries, tips for finding cheap flights or accomodations, and more.  You can even post your own travel journal, photos or videos, and read others' travel journals.  There's a paper magazine version that you can subscribe to ($20 for 20 issues), if you prefer to read your cheap vacation news in print.

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Guest

wow...that helped,i hope i get the job tomorrow.thanx

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Guest

I have given 2 interview in this week. one question really stuck me when they ask why do you want to left that job and want to join us.(Infact i am woking AS accounts officer and have applied for accountant vacany)

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Guest

This is fantastic, great way to prepare for a good interview.

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Guest

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Guest

o wow i like the facts on the middle ages storys

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Guest

o wow i like the facts on the middle ages storys

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Guest

On a good day, you may get all this correct and get hired. But it all depends on how the interviewer tweaks the questions to get your original self out of you. Having said that, I agree that it is easy to fool them.

http://www.pupilgarage.com

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Guest

The only problem i have with these "canned" questions is that they reflect what the author of the questions wants to know about me, not what the interviewer wants to know. To me, this reflects lazy work on the part of the HR weenie. If you wants to find out anything about the person on the other side of the desk, throw away the canned questions and have an honest conversation with the applicant.

I have an interview tomorrow and expect this kind of nonsense. Sigh.

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samson patrick ubasiGuest

have learn something good that well help me in future

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hakim

please help me i was working as sales man for fashion company so i need the best answer .. so i have 2 Questions :

*1 Please give one specific example from your past experience when you have worked as part of a really good team. Describe the situation, your role, what happened, and what the result was.
*2 Please give one specific example from your past experience when you have provided excellent customer service. Describe the situation, what you did, why you did it, and what the result was.

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hakim

please help me i was working as sales man for fashion company so i need the best answer .. so i have 2 Questions :

*1 Please give one specific example from your past experience when you have worked as part of a really good team. Describe the situation, your role, what happened, and what the result was.
*2 Please give one specific example from your past experience when you have provided excellent customer service. Describe the situation, what you did, why you did it, and what the result was.

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Raymond T

When are we going to see an article covering the do's and dont's for companies posting employment oppotunities? When something on the job posting sites looks like it was written by someone involved in Nigerian Business Investment Scams: "Must Hire! Worker who works goodly!" Or has absurd demands: "Candidate will have a Bachelor of Science Degree in Thermo-Nuclear Sciences, with 5 years of Sub Atomic Particle Re-Atomization experience; and be willing to help clean bathrooms when needed..." I wonder if those companies are being held back by unqualified Personell Directors. If your job posting doesn't look very promising for my future, why the Hell should I be concerned for the financial future of your company? If you can't hire a Janitor for $20K/year because you're that close to the edge of failure, then maybe my time and efforts would be better invested in a more financially stable firm.
Job search websites like Craigslist, Monster, etc. can be cheap forms of entertainment. When companies ask for employees with high skills, and offer $1.00 above minimum wage, I just laugh. The ones that post every week "Must Hire!!! Need 14 Workers!!" makes me wonder: Are you really growing that fast? Or are you such a horrible company to work for, you are changing staff more than most folks change their underwear?
America is the land of opportunity, the more promising the opportunity, the more likely I am to be eager to persue it!

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Guest

Wats up Mrs.. Mcknight Dawg!!!!!! hahahahhaa lol

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Taynna

SO I must say I have never had a job and I am soooo nervous to get one! I don't really know what I want to do yet I mean Im still in high school but a job is a must seeing how my mother lacks the motivation to get one I cant let my family and house crumble reading all these comments and such helped sooo much thanks ya'll <3

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Jerry

Thank you for the questions and advise. It really help me to think what the empoloyer is thinking and how I should property asnwer these questions. This isn't stuff we learn in school and it's a dam shame. Thank you mr. Michael for your work.

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Gopal Pawar

i want info abt carreer in s/w industry after BCS

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Guest

Some fantastic answers here if you want the rest of the possible interview questions you may be asked hop over to my website for some more examples

http://www.possibleinterviewquestions.net

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Guest

Great Article. This will really help me when I go in for the interviewing process. I do have a few problems though.
1) I cant even talk to most places because of my age (15)
2) everywhere I go I either have to put in an application online, or fill out an application at a kiosk, so theres really no way to get that real 'one on one' with the person hiring.
3) question #5. This would, after all, be my first job, so what can i say? That in the past i have babysat or mowed lawns, i hardly think that counts as work experience. according to the people I have done these thinlgs for i have a great work ethic so would i mention that or not?
4) last but not least is schooling. This year i will be taking the following courses. AP Brit. Lit., Spanish 1, Spanish 2, Algebra 2 Honors, US History Honors, Chemistry, and Computer Apps. (keep in mind that i will be in my junior year of high school and will have just turned 16) i personally think that these classes would be good to mention since they are mainly higher level courses. also i am certified in cpr, and first aid, should i mention it?

Thank you, any help would be greatly appreciated!

Cole

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Guest

Test. Thanks!

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Santosh

Can anybody send me common HR interview questions and its winning answers, please.

thanks and regards,
Santosh
toskg@rediffmail.com

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motis

For question 21, it being such an awful question, I would say an appropriate answer is saying that you believe in win-win relationships.
Nobody wants to sacrifice their life for their job, but sometimes it is important and required to give more to the job. Employers should know that a centered, happy worker will be a better asset to a company than an unhappy, overworked employee.
Saying that you believe in win-win work relations shows that you are willing to put in for the company, but that the company also needs to look after its employees.

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Hey, I just wanted to give you a big thank you. I read this article yesterday, and aced the interview today. Hired on the spot. This helped.

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Guest

this has all helped so so much, i have an interview tomorrow so will try to remember all these answers but make them my own, eeee :)

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I disagree with your answer to the compensation question and here's why. Having been a recruiter for 20 years and most recently the Director of Talent Acquisition for a one of the fastest growing companies in the US, I know that in the screening and interview stages of the selection process, candidates are being compared one against another. So if a job seeker were to give a specific number when asked about expected comp during the screening or interview stages, they will either: 1. Give a number that is too hight (and be KOed while the company moves on to other candidates) or 2. Give a number that is too low which will leave money on the table. It's not UNTIL AND ONLY AFTER the company has decided on a particular candidate, that that candidate should talk compensation. When the company contacts a candidate to have a pre-offer compensation discussion (or actually issues an offer) at that point the organization has talked themselves into one specific candidate and talked themselves out of the other candidates. At that point, the job seeker has the leverage to increase any offer presented by the company.

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Vanessa

I can't say I agree with you Staci. In most applications for mid-level or upper level management it is required to post a range salary in your application. The point is, a prospective employee should do their research as to what salary is appropriate to the level of experience when compared to the level of the position. I recently applied for upper level management from within and was required to list such a range. Odds are that if you took the time to do the proper research, the company has usually done the same and your salary ranges should be somewhat similar.

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Dawn

What is the point of these types of questions in an interview if everyone is going to just say what they think the interviewer wants to hear? I never understood that. lol
I have been told several times that I do really well in interviews...but the people conducting the interviews were supervisers that just talked with me, ie they were interviews conducted by a conversational style of interview, not by HR scripted interviews.

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Guest

I don’t understand the whole process of a job interview…
Why the interviewers always ask the same questions?
Why they hire you based on the same answers they expect to hear?
What happened to uniqueness and the truth why do we have to pretend in interviews?
Why do we have to act and lie in interviews?
Why we cant say the word money?
in the bottom line """We all need a job only for the money!!!!."""

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Jamie

1) Ask same questions?

They don't. But there are a set of questions (mostly in this list) that will be asked. If you're only applying to one industry however, a lot of the questions are the same because your doing the same thing no matter who the company is. A tower technician is going to ask you at what altitude have you gone the highest. If you are only applying for cellular technician positions, then yes, you will be asked this question a lot. But not once if you hit the retail industry...(1000ft is a good answer, but most probably have not cleared 350 ft. most likely.) In concert with other "like" questions, the interview questions (I promise you) are designed to wade through your BS cookie-cutter responses and find some truth. When I ask what other jobs have you had, and not one answer included a TV company, then chances are you've never been on a tower higher than 500ft, and I know where you were lying....and whom NOT to hire.

2) All the same answers?

I promise the ones not having the same answers in the same way every time, are the ones getting hired.

3) What you choose to say?

Professional HR employees undergo a lot of additional training, for example, body language lie detection, for one easy example. Lie all you want and pretend you know the answers. If you're interviewing for a college degree required position, the reason your interviews have not gone so well is because they know you're lying, even when presented with the easiest "right down the middle" questions you should be able to slam out of the park.

If I know they are asking cookie-cutter questions, and they (including me) will be interviewing 100+ people...then you should probably figure out some answers that aren't being said. If you can't separate yourself from your 99 opponents for the position, that's on you, not HR.

4) Lying in an interview

Do you honestly believe lying on an interview and lying on your application are two different things in terms of what will happen to your employment status even if hired initially?

After every interview I give, I sign the document and the prospective employee signs it, agreeing that the individual is capable of performing the tasks with their provided answers at the minimum. It becomes a contract. So if you get hired through an interview, and you acted and lied your way through it, I guarantee you, you will be unemployed within a week as you start to miserably fail all your "selling points" during the interview process.

Wiser companies that utilize these common questions in the interview process have; a) a 90 day or longer probationary period
b) are at-will companies
c) usually have some type of "working interview" after; an attempt to put into action all of your answers...

5) The word money? Any adult can tell you money AND benefits at the least?

It's a good word, but it should never be;
a) your main focus for success within a company
b) your only reason for coming to a company

Money is a reward, not the reason. You finish a job, any job, all you want is cash? Not a pat on the back, job well done? Just money, no promotion and maybe the opportunity to make MORE money? You can have the money, I'll go with the company that also rewards with I don't know, insurance benefits? 401(k) plan perhaps? Stock options? Go ask 100 people how they met 90% of their friends....but all we want is money from our workplace?

I would advise against saying "I want to make friends" as a reason to get a job, but it's 1000% better than hearing "Money".

What do I hope to get out of this company?

"I need to find a company that will be my second family when I am at work. I have a brother in China and a brother in France, my father lives in Finland. I don't need my family holding my hand every day, but just like my family overseas, they are there when I need them, and vice versa. I will be here for this company, but I want a company that's there for me too, it doesn't need to be all day or every day, but the spirit is there."

One example of an honest answer, that doesn't mention money or promotional desires, but is a great analogy for both. It also states my desire is to grow within the company and like family, this is not something you "quit" or get "fired" from. It's corny, a bit cheesy, but it's also not the same boring old response your interviewer has heard 1700 times today...

At the end of the day, your job in an interview is not to know the correct answers to the questions, but rather know the correct answers that will put you above the rest of your competition. So you can either lie and put up the same responses in an interview you read here, or you can find a creative response that separates you from the rest of the sheep.

Regardless, there seems to be a ...belief in this forum, that getting a job or getting through an interview with honesty and panache, is up to the interviewer. Why complain, expect, or depend on the interviewer to spice up interviews YOU find boring?

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SHER ALI KHAN

Questions: Give me an example of when you had to explain something difficult to someone who did not have your background/ knowledge.

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mariam

this is a good path to start in a job interview some asking me where I see my self in ten years, and the firs question was which are my priorities???
my prioriti right now is to get a job!!!! then if you hire me in then year I will be in your position, is not what we said is the way we came across right!!!!

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Sara

hi. i have an interview with the publishing director of Pearson for a job as an editor in 4 days, & it'd be great of any of you could provide me with some frequently asked questions for this job position. this is my first job interview & i am nervous as hell. haha.

also, how do i tell the interviewer that "i'm actually searching for a place to do a 1-month internship as part of the required credits for the Master's programme i'm currently pursuing, & that if i'm hired, i'd like to do my internship here"?

thank you for your ideas!

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Guest

Paul you're AWESOME I loved it!! Thank's for helping me in my interview.

Cheers Gaby ;)

Paul Michael's picture

You are very welcome Gaby. If this article helps anyone get a job, then it has served its purpose. I wish you the best of luck in your career. Let us know if you bag the job!

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Guest

Seriously, the English language differs around the world... Perhaps you guys with the rude comments should return to school, smh...

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Mega

Thanks for the wonderful questions and suggestions. It's going to help a lot. Too bad I didn't read this before my last interview.

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Guest

Thank you very much. I had an interview lately were I were asked many questions listed here, I wish I saw them earlier would change a lot.

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Thankful Encumbent

Thanks so much for posting this article! I used this page to prep for my job interview. I was asked almost every question on this page. Needless to say, the interview went wonderfully, so well that I was actually offered the job at the interview table! Thanks again for the tips!

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Guest

Now that I've taken out the time to read your tips on how to answer interview questions I feel very confident going into my interview on tomorrow. Thanks