Sacrificial Giving

For those of you new to Free Money Finance, I post on The Bible and Money every Sunday. Here's why. On my recent post titled More Thoughts on Tithing there was quite a discussion on the concept of tithing. Most of it was about whether or not a "poor" person should try and give away 10% of their income. […]

Don’t Eat Out as Often (188/365)

The average American eats an average of 4.2 commercially prepared meals per week. In other words, as a nation, we eat out between four and five times a week, on average. This number equates to 18.2 meals in an average month eaten outside the home. When I first heard that statistic, my initial reaction is that the number was high. I eat out perhaps once a week at this point in my life. […]

Ten Pieces of Inspiration #81

Each week, I highlight ten things each week that inspired me to greater financial, personal, and professional success. Hopefully, they will inspire you as well. I spent some time this week working on a presentation designed to encourage people to volunteer their time to causes that they care about. […]

Which is Cheaper: In the Kitchen

Until the end of this week, we’re sharing “audition” pieces from folks interested in being new staff writers at Get Rich Slowly. Your job is to let us know what you think of each of these writers. Pay attention, give feedback, and after a couple of weeks we’ll ask which writers you prefer. This article is from long-time GRS reader Sarah Greesonbach. […]

30 Steps to Great Finances: Steps 25 to 27

Welcome back to our series on 30 steps to improve your finances (if you're just joining us, you can get a full recap from the beginning by starting here.)  So far we have covered 24 steps, and if you have completed them all (which will likely take several years), you’ll be in a great place financially. […]

10 Ways to Save Money on Air Travel

We’ve been enjoying the middle-of-the-week holiday for more than one day, so we’re going to share a guest post from partner site MainStreet.com. By Jeanine Skowronski Airfare certainly isn’t cheap. […]

Watch Less Television (187/365)

Right off the bat, let me make it clear that I don’t think television watching is an inherently bad hobby. My primary concern with it is that it’s an expensive hobby. Let me explain what I mean in detail. For starters, the average American household has approximately three television sets. The average television set lasts around six years, and the average television set costs $400. […]

Microrewarding Yourself

In order to encourage everyone in our family to get outside and exercise as much as reasonably possible this summer, Sarah and I instituted a family program called “Mileage Club.” Here’s how it works. At the start of the summer, Sarah and I made a giant pile of punch cards, each numbered one through twenty. […]

Your Take: Would You Go One-Way to Mars?

Here’s a crazy but cool idea – make a reality television show where you send some people on a one way trip to Mars. The idea is that a round trip would not be feasible but why not take the advertising from a reality TV show and use it to fund a one way trip to Mars, televising the whole process? Mars One will establish the first human settlement on Mars in 2023. […]

Cutting Costs on Transportation (Even When Biking and Walking Aren’t Options)

Until the end of this week, we’re sharing “audition” pieces from folks interested in being new staff writers at Get Rich Slowly. Your job is to let us know what you think of each of these writers. Pay attention, give feedback, and after a couple of weeks we’ll ask which writers you prefer. […]

10 Ways to Save on a Long-Distance Move

Our family launched this summer by packing up our three kids and two cats and relocating from Chicago to the San Francisco Bay Area. Every step of the way, we strove to guard our limited financial and temporal resources without overtaxing our stamina. We saved money on our move, but we could have saved more. Here are the lessons we learned. (See also: 9 Ways to Save on a Move) 1. […]

What Is the Fiscal Cliff?

If you’ve been surfing the web lately, you’ve probably seen the phrase “fiscal cliff” thrown around on finance, business, and political sites. The fiscal cliff refers to a series of fiscal policy changes set to take place at the end of 2012. […]

Best Money Tips: How to Have Fun for Free

Welcome to Wise Bread's Best Money Tips Roundup! Today we found some great articles on how to have fun for free, money saving tips for the average homeowner, and facing your first day like a pro. Top 5 Articles How to Have Fun for Free — Have some free fun by taking your dog for a walk or swapping your old books. […]

Reader Profile: MB

The following is the latest post in my "Reader Profiles" series. Each post in this series details the financial situation and challenges of an FMF reader. […]

Showered With Needs

Until the end of this week, we’re sharing “audition” pieces from folks interested in being new staff writers at Get Rich Slowly. Your job is to let us know what you think of each of these writers. Pay attention, give feedback, and after a couple of weeks we’ll ask which writers you prefer. This article is from Will Crosswell, who says he’s a young guy who’s made some dumb moves financially. […]

Are You Missing the Financial Forest for the Trees?

I routinely write about financial rules of thumb for building wealth and making your money work for you. Without fail, I’m met with comments that argue, “Those rules only apply in certain cases” or “That’s only the case if certain assumptions hold true.” Certainly, financial rules of thumb don’t work 100% of the time, and situations are not always cut-and-dried. […]

Read More (186/365)

Reading is an incredibly inexpensive hobby that provides so many benefits. Most of the time, it requires little or no electricity to engage in reading, so you’re not burning up watts and adding to your energy bill. If you read outside or in a well-lit house, there’s no cost at all during daytime hours. […]

How Do Financial Advisors Earn Their Fee?

The following is a guest post from Marotta Wealth Management. Most of our clients are frugal supersavers. Often they have accumulated their wealth not by earning more but by simply spending less. […]