Reader Story: Saving the American Way…and the Bulgarian Way

This guest post from Rya is part of the “reader stories” feature at Get Rich Slowly. Some stories contain general advice; others are examples of how a GRS reader achieved financial success — or failure. These stories feature folks from all levels of financial maturity and with all sorts of incomes. Rya writes a Bulgarian personal-finance blog called kadebg.com. My name is Rya. […]

Three Great Money Podcasts

For those of you new to Free Money Finance, I post on The Bible and Money every Sunday. Here's why. I'm a fan of podcasts. There's almost never a time that I'm not listening to either a podcast or a book on CD while in the car. […]

Convincing Yourself That a Want Is Really a Need – and How to Stop It

For my work purposes, I have a desktop computer and a laptop computer. The desktop computer is the central machine, with a big external hard drive attached to it to back up my files. My laptop is the machine I use when I’m not able to be in my office, and it just syncs all of the files I need with my desktop computer. Both of these computers are PCs. […]

The Best of Get Rich Slowly: March 2011

Whew! For the first time in three months, I’m not feeling stressed about work. I’m caught up on blog posts, my articles for other sites are written, and I don’t have any other pressing tasks. I love being able to take long vacations to other continents, but the preparation and clean-up for these trips is a bear! And I can’t rest too long. My next column for Entrepreneur magazine is due soon. […]

Ten Pieces of Inspiration #13

Each week, I highlight ten things each week that inspired me to greater financial, personal, and professional success. Hopefully, they will inspire you as well. 1. A big sister comes into her own Our daughter has been struggling with the role of being a big sister to her baby brother. She had been the baby of the family for years, then suddenly there was a new little one around. […]

How to Throw the Most Fabulous (and Frugal) Baby Shower of all Time

One of my very best friends in the whole world is having her first baby this August and I’m excited to help her celebrate by throwing the best baby shower of all time. While I’d like to say the sky’s the limit as far as budget goes, unfortunately, my funds are actually quite limited. […]

Don't Retire: Keep Significant Goals

The following is a guest post from Marotta Wealth Management. Most Americans fail to plan adequately for retirement and consequently miss out on opportunities to enjoy the last third of life. […]

How to Reward Friends Who Help You Move

I miss college. I never thought I'd say that — I'm not a "the best years of my life have gone by" kind of gal. But here's what I miss: owning the right size car and the right amount of stuff so that, whenever it came time to move out of the dorm, I could do it myself. […]

Two ways to pay down a mortgage up front: Which is better?

Saw this question over at the Money Stack exchange site: Bigger mortgage downpayment vs. paying extra on the first regular payment? […]

Creative Ways To Fight Debt: A Debtor’s Advice

Desperate times call for desperate measures sometimes. Despite our best attempts, everything has gone wrong for me financially. My computer and car needed emergency repairs and I did not qualify for heating assistance by mere dollars. Instead of paying off debt, I found myself covering repair bills and paying an astronomical oil bill. […]

Mortgage Payoff Progress For March With Chart

In February of 2010 my wife and I purchased our very first home.  We have a conventional 15-year mortgage and our plan is to pay it off in less than 10 years.  Our stretch goal is to pay it off in less than 7. As of March 31, 2011, we have made 13 regular mortgage payments – and several additional principal-only payments. When I posted last month’s update, we had paid off 5.72% of our mortgage deb […]

Financial Literacy Month 2011

Though April is no longer officially recognized as National Financial Literacy Month in the U.S., many states and organizations still treat it as such. […]

Baseball Statistics for Player Salaries

If you love baseball, you might also love statistics. I suppose analyzing players’ performance numbers gives spectators something to do during long at-bats. Very few other sports engage fans by providing scorecards, and learning how to score a game is like learning a language or a code. […]

The Adoption Tax Credit

For the first time ever, the adoption tax credit is refundable. This is a great change for parents who have adopted children in the past few years, because it means they could file their 2010 taxes and receive a bigger-than-expected refund. […]

Dinner With My Family #12: Slow Cooker Jamaican Red Bean Stew

Each week, I’ll present a low-cost meal (or a meal that demonstrates a lot of options for cutting costs) that my family eats for dinner and enjoys. […]

Routinely Missing Personal Goals

Amy writes in: I have no problem setting goals for myself. I follow the steps you suggest: make them realistic, make them numerical so I can keep track of them, write them down, and so on. The problem is that when I come up with a plan to reach them, that plan completely falls apart within a week, every single time. […]

Free Money Finance March Money Madness, Championship

Here we go with the championship round of Free Money Finance March Money Madness (to follow all the action click on my March Money Madness category link and scroll down to read all the posts involved in this subject.) I've listed each "game" (one post versus another) in segments along with the wording provided by the author when the post was submitted. […]

PenFed Credit Cards Review

Even though you’ve probably seen hundreds of commercials for Discover, Citibank, Chase, Capital One, Bank of America and American Express, the best credit card issuer continues to be Pentagon Federal Credit Union, and their line of three — only three — credit cards. PenFed is a credit union designed to focus on members of the military, but anyone can apply and be approved. […]

Your Take: General Electric’s Tax Rate

Last week, one of the biggest stories in the news was how much General Electric paid in federal taxes. The genesis of the story was a New York Times article in which the third paragraph said: Its American tax bill? None. In fact, G.E. claimed a tax benefit of $3.2 billion. GE responded, tweeting: GE paid significant U.S. […]

Ask the Readers: A Fool and His Money…

It’s April Fool’s Day, one of my favorite days of the year at Get Rich Slowly. It’s the day I get to share the story of some foolish thing I’ve done with money in the past. This year, though, April Fool’s Day falls on a Friday, which is when I traditionally field reader questions. So, I thought it would be fun to mix things up. […]