Bargaineering

Bargaineering is a blog that chronicles my personal finance life and where I discuss matters of shopping, insurance, investing, retirement, loans, credit cards, mortgages, bargain hunting and other issues in my life.

Latest Posts from Bargaineering (page 218)

States Delaying Tax Refund Checks

Less than two weeks ago, USA Today ran story about how states were going to hold tax refunds for months. Barely a week later, New York announced that it has started delaying income tax refund checks, estimating that delaying refunds until April 1st will “save” the state about $500 million. […]

House Passes Health Care Reform H.R. 3590 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act

As you’ve no doubt heard, last night the House of Representatives passed H.R. 3590 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act in a vote of 219-212. 3590 then heads to President Obama’s desk for his signature into law. The House also passed HR 4872 Reconciliation Act of 2010, which now heads to the Senate for a vote, needing only a simple majority. […]

Best Investments for Retirement Accounts

When I started working after college, it was a bit of a stretch to contribute to both my 401(k), to get my employer match, fully fund my Roth IRA, and build up a small cash cushion (I would later learn these are called emergency funds). I pushed to do it because my parents drilled this lesson into my brain as a young adult – save money today because you never know what will happen tomorrow. […]

Your Take: Why Are You Frugal?

Frugality has become a very hot topic lately because of the recession. In fact, it became the topic of Chris Farrell’s The New Frugality and one that I think was overlooked for far too long. […]

Working Americans Have Almost No Retirement Savings

CNN Money reported last week that 43% of Americans have less than $10,000 in retirement savings, which is a statistic provided by the Employee Benefit Research Institute in their Retirement Confidence Survey (2010 results). If that figure isn’t scary enough, it appears that 27% of workers have less than $1,000. […]

Fun Trivia Facts about the $500 Bill

Nowadays the highest denomination bill you can find is the $100 but back in the early 20th century, the Bureau of Engraving and Printing was printing bills as high as $100,000 (1934-35). There aren’t any high denomination bills left, after printing was officially discontinued in 1969 by President Nixon. […]

When Does Renting Beat Buying?

If experiences appreciate and things depreciate, is there a way for us to separate the experience of a thing away from the thing itself? Of course there is – rent it. If we’re going on vacation, it makes perfect sense for us to rent a car rather than buy it (though in places in Europe, for long “rental periods,” you actually buy the car and sell it back) and we don’t think anything of it. […]

Reminiscences of a Stock Operator by Edin Lefevre

Reminiscences of a Stock Operator by Edin Lefevre was first published many many years ago and tells the first person fictional tale of Larry Livingston, a stock speculator in the early 1900s. […]

How to Buy a Single Share of Stock Certificate

When GM was knocking on the doorstep of bankruptcy (who answered soon after), I thought it would be fun to try to buy a single share as a collectors item. It was under a dollar a share and I really only needed one, so I assumed it probably wasn’t going to cost all that much. […]

What’s My Tax Bracket?

In personal finance, you have to make a lot of decisions with imperfect information. You contribute to a Roth IRA because you like the tax free growth and you believe that you will be taxed at a greater rate in retirement (otherwise it may be better to contribute to a Traditional IRA). […]