Five Cent Nickel

Written by a man who has been meticulously recording his finances since 1997 (stored in Quicken), Five Cent Nickel is one of the oldest and most respected blogs around. This blog often provides great commentary on—and summaries of—useful financial tips featured by other publications. If you’re too lazy to read every little money article out there, just stop by Five Cent Nickel and get the cream of the crop.

Latest Posts from Five Cent Nickel (page 137)

How and Why to Diversify Your Income

Time and again we hear that investment diversification is a must, and rightly so. Diversifying investments – by investing in a variety of different types of index funds and/or ETFs, for example – is a wise strategy for reducing risk. In contrast, how many of us maintain a similar diversification perspective with respect to our income? […]

Best Places to Invest for Retirement

A reader named KC recently wrote in with a question about investing for retirement: I’m 28 years old with a wife and a six month old baby. We’ve always been money-conscious, but would really like to focus our efforts. We both have Roth IRAs, but are not satisfied with them. They are heavily loaded, and we weren’t that familiar with them when we were advised to set them up. […]

Four Good Ways to Maintain Good Savings Habits After the Recession

This is a guest post from Richard Barrington, who is a banking analyst for MoneyRates.com. Richard previously spent over twenty years as an investment industry executive. Many people got religion about saving money during the recent recession. This reversed a trend of steadily climbing U.S. […]

Saving Money on Car Insurance?

Our homeowners insurance (and now life insurance) agent gave called last week. He wanted to see if we would let him price an auto insurance policy for us as “rates have gotten more competitive.” He seems determined to get us to use him for all our insurance needs. I told him that would be fine; we’re always trying to get a good deal. […]

How to Handle a Missing W-2 Form

This is a guest post from Jim at Bargaineering. If you like what you see here, please consider subscribing to his RSS feed. If you haven’t yet received your W-2 form, which reports your wages for the past year, chances are the post office monster ate it. […]

Don’t Let Short-Term Events Disrupt Long-Term Planning

This is a guest post from Darwin’s Finance. If you like what you see here, please consider subscribing to his RSS Feed. While it’s difficult to overcome the urge to react to unexpected events in our lives, patience and consideration of the facts almost always yields better results than emotional reactions. […]

How to Report Visa and MasterCard Violations

In the past week, I’ve written up the credit card acceptance guidelines for both Visa and MasterCard. But what if a merchant doesn’t follow the guidelines? What recourse do you have? In short, you can report them to Visa or MasterCard and (hopefully) corrective action will be taken. […]

MasterCard Credit Card Acceptance Guidelines

Last week I wrote about Visa’s credit card acceptance guidelines. This week, I thought it would be interesting to take a look at MasterCard’s merchant guidelines. MasterCard credit card rules What follows is a synopsis of MasterCard’s rules regarding card acceptance straight from their merchant guide. […]

Sallie Mae Introduces High Interest Savings Account

This is interesting… Sallie Mae, traditionally a provider of federal and private student loans, has just entered the retail banking world. Their initial products include a high interest savings account and CDs with fairly competitive rates. The current rate on their savings account is 1.35% APY, and their CD rates range from 1.50% APY for 12 months up to 3.00% APY for 60 months. […]

Two Common Mortgage and Housing Mistakes to Avoid

Like millions of other Americans, my wife and I are upside down on our home mortgage – i.e., the amount we owe exceeds our home’s value. If I had it to do over again, rather than buy with $0 down, I would rent, save money, and buy only after it made more financial sense than renting. If only I could go back in time to alter our decision to buy! […]