Mighty Bargain Hunter

I enjoy talking about saving money, finding deals, living frugally, making money, and investing, in addition to talking about current events in the financial world, online and offline. I’ve published articles at this domain name since 2004 and have been blogging since May, 2005.

I also started and manage the Carnival of Debt Reduction, a weekly blog carnival that highlights posts on getting out of debt. Personal debt reduction progress reports and posts about reducing debt are what this carnival is all about!

Latest Posts from Mighty Bargain Hunter (page 6)

The other half of the personal finance battle

A high school friend posted a link to this Mother Jones commentary on an Economist article dealing with education in personal finance. The main point brought out is that “courses in personal finance do not appear to have an impact on adult behaviour.”  The article specifically mentions that financial education had no impact on degree of saving. Knowing is half the battle … I either never learned a […]

The value of your financial data

Free Money Finance was one of the first personal finance blogs I commented on.  This was in 2005, so nearly … TEN years ago?!  Yikes. FMF is very successful, and I’ve had the pleasure of meeting him in real life.  I can attribute what I know of his success to a number of things, and one of those things is that he practices every bit the personal finance he writes about. Seventeen years of year-by- […]

Is the Guitar Center Stick Club a snare?

I’ve been a musician for most of my life.  I play piano in two church services each week.  I doubt I could quit if I wanted to. […]

Seven tips on recurring charges and recurring savings

Businesses love monthly subscription services, also called recurring charges.  Why collect money just once from a customer when you can collect from them again, and again … and again? Even better than that:  Most of the time, the recurring charges just happen, magically, without the customer’s intervention … unless they want to quit, of course.  It’s easy to forget about the charges.  Which, of co […]

Your personal finances are not someone else’s

As humans, we’re very good at putting on appearances, even when they don’t match our reality.  If we have a lot of money, we can appear as if we don’t.  If we are just scraping by, we can “put on a good show” and try to appear more affluent than we are.  Unless your neighbor gives you a peek into his investment portfolio, it can be really difficult to tell how they’re doing financially. The discon […]

Someone’s “dumb deal” is another’s false economy

Personal finance, and the difference between good and bad deals, are always a matter of context.  What could be a great deal in one context could be a lousy deal in another.  Sometimes spending more money is better than spending less; other times, it’s the opposite. When I read this article on Money Talk News which listed ten “dumb deals” that people fall for, I disagreed with most of them on the […]

How much should you spend on your wedding?

As the father of a daughter, I’ll likely be thinking about wedding costs a lot sooner than I want.  I’m reminded of this every day as I watch my baby girl grow up at record speed. Unless tradition reverses course, I’ll be expected to foot the bill.  That’s what happens when the coin toss shows up “female.” The link on the MSN homepage to this article was titled “How much does the average wedding c […]

Want to earn extra money tutoring? Start with Wyzant

If you’re looking to build up a nest egg more quickly, or simply to work toward spending less than you earn, you’ll need to spend less money, make more money, or both.  Welcome to the cold, hard mathematics of personal finance. On the income side, you can get a second job, or start a side business.  Each has its pros and cons. For people who got (maybe) two or three B+’s mixed in with their A’s in […]

Five keys to making a child’s allowance a teaching tool

Giving children solid grounding in money management is crucial.  Budgeting, saving, frugality, and financial planning are important components of living on one’s own and taking responsibility.  It’s unlikely that personal finance skills will be taught in school to any appreciable degree, so it’s up to parents to do this. We give our daughter an allowance.  It’s the same introduction to money manag […]