The Simple Dollar

Simple, applicable personal finance advice for the modern world.

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Latest Posts from The Simple Dollar (page 309)

Looking the Wrong Way

A comment I saw recently on the Bucks blog over at the New York Times really stuck in my head. In a post about Americans spending less and less time shopping for a mortgage, CG said: Why is this a surprise to anyone? You USE a car. You USE a house. That’s what you spend the time shopping for. You don’t USE a mortgage. The mortgage or the car financing is just the means to get it. […]

Reader Mailbag: Stephen Strasburg

I’m in a pretty competitive fantasy baseball league this year. During our draft, I made the most controversial pick, drafting Stephen Strasburg (who has yet to make his major league debut) with my fifth pick in the draft. He has been utterly unhittable in the minors. Every day, I get up and look at the sports news, wondering if the Nationals have called Strasburg up yet. […]

Review: QBQ!

Every Sunday, The Simple Dollar reviews a personal finance book or other book of interest. Contemporary culture constantly seems to push us to blame others. It’s the Republicans’ fault! It’s the liberals’ fault! It’s the art department’s fault! It’s your brother’s fault! Guess what? Casting blame on others doesn’t solve any problems. […]

A Weekend Project for You

60% of Americans don’t have a will. When they die, at least some of what they hope of passing on to their loved ones will be eaten up by lawyers and distributed by judges. Pretty amazing what an hour of contemplation and an hour of document preparation can do. 47% of Americans have no life insurance. […]

The Simple Dollar Time Machine: May 15, 2010

Many newer readers of The Simple Dollar haven’t been exposed to the hundreds of great articles in the archives of the site, so this is a weekly series that highlights the five best posts from one year ago this week, two years ago this week, and three years ago this week. […]

Debt Consolidation and the “Orbital of Stupid”

Yesterday, I heard a very interesting story on NPR that focused on Dave Ramsey looking at Greece’s debt situation through a personal finance lens. […]

The Love and Hate of Work

I recently had a conversation with a 66 year old woman who had retired from a fairly lucrative career, only to take on a completely surprising job as her “retirement job.” She’s a grade school lunch lady. Why did she choose to take on such a job? The reason was simple, she told me. Her grandchildren, her grandchildren’s friends, and the grandchildren of some of her friends attended that school. […]

Can You Actually Make Money Chasing Rates?

One common tactic I see on personal finance blogs is what I like to call “rate chasing.” This tactic usually involves carefully watching the yield rates on savings accounts over at Bankrate.com (or a similar service), always signing up for one of the top accounts, and transferring their savings to that highest-yield bank. For me, at least, I don’t find this tactic of much use at all. […]

Reader Mailbag: Packing Books for Trips

My wife and I recently had a long discussion about how many books we should pack for a trip. I usually tend to read more when traveling, so I usually pack one book for every two days’ worth of a trip. So, let’s say we go on a ten day trip. That would mean five books. Does it make sense to tote that many books back and forth? Our idea is this. […]