SaveUp Giving Away $1000 to Wise Bread Readers

By Ashley Jacobs on 10 February 2012 (Updated 13 March 2012) 319 comments

Editor's note: The contest has ended! Congratulations to Adena DeMonte ($500 SaveUp prize), Dianne ($400 Comment Prize), and MCJunkie ($100 Twitter Prize). Please respond to us within 3 business days. For more giveaway goodness, check out SaveUp's new TurboTax giveaway this month!

Most rewards programs try to get you to spend money. Wouldn’t it be great if a program actually rewards you for saving money instead?

That’s the innovative idea behind SaveUp, a free program that rewards consumers with SaveUp credits when they do something good, like adding money to their savings accounts or paying off their debt. The credits can be used to win a ton of cool prizes, like a new Prius, a Hawaii vacation, or a life-changing $2 million jackpot.

At Wise Bread, we’re all about giving you the best financial tips to live large on a small budget. So now, why not get rewarded for all your hard work and have a little fun at the same time?

That’s why Wise Bread and SaveUp have teamed up to help you stay motivated with your 2012 financial goals. SaveUp is giving away $1,000 exclusively to Wise Bread readers and 200 free bonus credits to anyone who join SaveUp via Wise Bread.

How to Enter:

We have three different prizes ($500, $400, $100) for three different contests. You can enter all three to increase your chances of winning.

1. Exclusive Wise Bread Prize on SaveUp: $500

SaveUp wants to keep you motivated and reward you for your good financial actions with a special $500 prize  exclusive to Wise Bread readers only. To enter:

  • Join SaveUp via this link (this is 100% free), and
  • Go to SaveUp's homepage, click on the “Wise Bread Prize” and then on the “Play Now” button. You’re all set!

As a bonus, anyone who signs up using our link during the contest period will also get 200 free game credits. 200 credits will give you 20 different chances to win a ton of cool prizes.

2. Leave a Comment: $400 Prize

To enter the comment contest, leave a comment below answering this question: What motivates you to save? (Or if you’re not saving, why not?)

Your comment must be at least two sentences long to qualify. You can enter one comment per day.

3. Twitter Entry: $100 Prize

To enter the Twitter contest, simply:

You may tweet once per day.

Contest Details:

  • Contest ends Monday, March 12 at 11:59 pm Pacific. Winners are randomly selected. Winners will be announced after March 19th on the original post. Winners will also be contacted via email. Winners have 3 business days to respond. If you do not respond within 3 days we reserve the right to select new winners.
  • You must be 18 and US resident to enter. Void where prohibited. No purchase necessary. Prizes may be distributed as Amazon, Visa, or MasterCard gift cards.
  • You can enter all three contests to increase your chances of winning. But you can only win one prize.

How to Spend Your 200 Free Credits

SaveUp prizes are mostly lottery-style instant scratcher games. Each prize costs 10 credits to play. So with 200 free credits you can play 20 times! Personally I like to go for the prizes with the highest values. For example, these are my favorite:

SaveUp has some other great prizes that can fulfill awesome fantasies:

Join SaveUp.com via this link and get your free 200 credits today.

About SaveUp

Here’s a message from our contest sponsor:

Unlike traditional rewards programs that focus on driving consumer spending, SaveUp rewards users for performing positive financial actions, such as contributing to their savings or retirement accounts; paying down their credit cards, mortgages or other loans; and engaging with SaveUp’s financial education content on the site.  Americans who bank at more than 18,000 US financial institutions nationwide can register their financial accounts on SaveUp and immediately begin earning SaveUp credits every time they save money or pay down their debts. The credits users earn can be redeemed for chances to win instant prizes and entries into weekly and monthly drawings.

SaveUp’s prizes range from the exciting (retail gift cards, consumer electronics) to aspirational (luxury vacations, home or wardrobe make-overs) to life-changing (a new car, money for college tuition, debt pay-off, or a $2 million jackpot).

In addition to making SaveUp fun and rewarding, we employ bank-level encryption to make sure our program is safe and secure for our users.

 

SaveUp's Special Tax Season Rewards

During this tax season, SaveUp wants to reward you for filing your taxes with the opportunity to win great prizes sponsored by TurboTax.

How it works:

1.     File your FREE Federal Return with TurboTax

2.     Log in to SaveUp and enter your TurboTax order number (Top right side of the page)

3.     Automatically get entered into six $1,000 drawings

4.     Earn 500 SaveUp credits (In addition to the 200 you earned as a Wise Bread reader) 

Use your credits for the opportunity to win great prizes:

  • $10,000 “Double Your Tax Refund” sponsored by TurboTax

  • $10,000 “Pay My Taxes” sponsored by TurboTax

  • Vacations, cars, electronics, and cash up to $2 Million

Ready to win some prizes? Remember you have 3 ways to enter!

  • Leave a comment below answering the question: What motivates you to save? (Or if you’re not saving, why not?)

Good luck!

Tagged: Banking, Giveaways
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Guest's picture
Cate

i grew up in a family where money was a constant source of stress and as an adult, and now a mother of two, we save diligently. much of it is for comfort of knowing we won't have to work forever, and our kids' college costs won't be so overwhelming to them, but mainly, i do it so i never have to worry the same way my single mother did.

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Selene Montgomery

I've become momtivated to save by keeping track of the things I save on and setting that money aside. So easy, and even small amounts add up.

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Sonja Johnson

I save so that I can be financially independent some day.

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Karen

My children motivate me to save. I don't want my two daughters to graduate from college with tens of thousands of dollars in student loan debt, like I did. I want to give them a debt-free start in life.
Karen

Guest's picture
Amy

I am motivated to save by my uncertainty of the future. I'll be graduating from college soon, and I don't have a job waiting for me. Not knowing where I'll be going or what I'll be doing means that I don't want to be sitting on an empty bank account when the time comes to start paying off my student loans.

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Guest

To tide through rainy days and buying things value for money :)

Guest's picture
Guest

My baby boy motivates me to save. I want him to have a yard to play in someday. I also want to model wise financial decisions for him, so he doesn't end up deep in debt like so many people in this country.

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amybeth

My baby boy motivates me to save. I want him to have a yard to play in someday. I also want to model wise financial decisions for him, so he doesn't end up deep in debt like so many people in this country.

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Bob

The thought of not being able to provide for my family.

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LissaRhys

My motivation to save is multi-part; though of course there is are the standard reasons such as stability and and peace of mind, for me there is an even bigger reason. All my life I've wanted to write for a living. Now I'm finally making a living as a freelance writer and knowing how to save is the only way I'll be able to keep doing what I love in a feast or starve field.

Guest's picture
lostAnnfound

Right now we're just saving in our emergency fund. We used it up with some unexpected repairs to our vehicle. That is a big motivator for us to save in an EF - we did not have to worry about where to get the money to pay for the mechanic.

Other than, not saving too much else right now while we continue to pay down debt.

Guest's picture
Nancy

The most motivating reason for me to save is to have freedom from any debt, so that I can make choices about how I want to spend my time. Right now I work 8 to 5 but I hope to not have to do that forever and I hope to retire as well at some point.

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nico

My motivation is to save a foundation for investment. Every little extra adds up, especially in long term.

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Kim

What motivates me to save is wanting to retire early at athe age of 55. I have seen too many people who have to work into their late 60s and early 70's and then health problems and lack of finances prevent them from enjoying retirement. I want to travel and enjoy family and grandkids when I am in my 60's and not working a job.

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Molly

Because seeing the raw sum of money in my various accounts is awesome.

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Rob

My family is my motivation to save. I know that I need to support them no matter what happens, so if I loose my job or something else happens I will have money in the bank to get us through it.

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Danielle

I am motivated to save by my children. With this economy, I want to make sure I have a solid way to feed and house everyone. Too many people are facing very difficult choices right now.

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Guest

I think that my upbringing -- always feeling that sense of 'lack -- motivates me to save every extra penny today.

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tami

my family motivates me to save! we are saving for an addition to our home (especially since we have an addition to our family coming soon) and for a minivan (for same reason). also, i am a true immigrant's daughter, so saving is really important to me "just in case..."

Guest's picture
tami

i tweeted!
https://twitter.com/#!/TinyJerseyMama/status/167979375504015362

Guest's picture
Stacy

I am saving so that I can change jobs. Right now I commute over 100 miles a day and I stay at this job for the $. Once I pay down my debt I can afford to take a pay cut for a better quality of life.

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Tim

I'm motivated to save for my family. With a young child I need to be extra vigilant about my finances.

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Diana S

Saving gives me the validation to know I'm being responsible to my family. The money put aside allows me piece of mind to know I'm insuring myself against loss.

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Matt D

I'm saving up to buy a new car. At the same time, I'm trying to build a rainy day fund, because I always seem to need one when I don't have it!

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Amber

My husband and I have about 6 months of living expenses in our emergency fund, so our savings end up being for stuff. We don't want to buy a house or have kids and our retirement funds are growing steadily. So we are saving for a round-the-world backpacking trip. We can't get there until our student loans are paid off ($20k and falling... from something like $150k) but as soon as they are, we are fast-track to a trip.

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Patti

I'm motivated to save because you'll never know what the future will bring. I want to make sure I have enough money to put 20% down on my future home, money for my future children, and in case something unexpected happens, I won't have to resort to putting it all on my credit card. Saving money gives me peace of mind.

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thrifty_writer

Partly fear (the thought of not being able to pay rent now, or when I'm 60 is kind of scary), partly pride (being able to stand on my own 2 feet) and partly wanting to take care of my parents as they get older.

Guest's picture
Long

Freedom motivates me to save. Knowing that I have a chance at a secure retirement and living a debt free life inspires me to be conscious about saving money. I see too many people that are tied to their jobs because they have too much debt and not enough savings. I want to be able to pursue the things that I love and be free to travel; basically doing what I want for a change!

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guest

The best motivation to save has always been freedom: to travel, to not work a certain job, to be mobile.

Guest's picture
Tiana

My parents both retired in their early 50s (they're now in their early/mid 60s). Seeing them happy, healthy, traveling the country and the world, volunteering, exploring new hobbies and interests, and spending enormous amount of quality time with friends and family are incredibly motivating in terms of saving. I'd like to be like them someday, and that's why I save.

Guest's picture
David

I am motivated to save because I have a daughter on the way. I want her to have a life of comfort!

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Lauren Bayles

Avoiding the stress of being crushed by debt, as I have been in the past, motivates me to save.

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J. Martin

I save so I can travel sometime next year. I plan on visiting Spain and Morocco.

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Tiffany

My car has 189,000 miles on it and it died on me while on a trip with just me and the kids. My husband drove to get us and towed it back home but I know at some point we will have to replace it. I am motivated to save by never wanting to go through that again.

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Danielle garrison

I am saving to buy a house.

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Jason

I have two things that motivate me to save. First, a ring for my girlfriend, and second, to pay off college debt. It's important stuff!

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Manny

I have many factors that motivate me to not only save, but save efficiently, two of them are paying off my student loans before I graduate from college and the other is to own my home before I am thirty. This is a tall order, but with sound investments, I can use my profits to circulate through CDs, that mature and recycle every six months. Another way that I save for my goals is actually simple, every Friday, I put twenty dollars in a stash, and my pocket change in the bank. This may seem trivial, but I always have a cushion, either for emergencies or gift shopping for my family.

It is quick, easy, and I rarely have to worry about my money, I let it do the work for me.

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Jana

We made several bad financial decisions over the last ten years--turning our old house into a rental instead of selling outright, and then re-financing at the height of the real estate boom. We are currently saving as much as we possibly can so that we can pay off the capital gains tax when we sell this rental property . . . and can be free of all the hassles of rental ownership and simplify our lives.

Guest's picture

Honestly, what motivates me to save are concrete goals (like the fact that I'm traveling every month June-October this year) and fear of the unknown (having my emergency fund, because I'm going credit-free and if I don't have it, I'm hosed!)

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Bryan

I'm motivated to save by a goal. When I reach it, I find a new goal and save some more.

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Mary Beth Conlee

For me, savings are a byproduct of my lifestyle. I get a lot of satisfaction from living a simple lifestyle and trying to consume less and less. Being rich in time and space just seems to painlessly create savings.

Guest's picture
jake

I also grew up like most people that have commented on this string in a stressful situation. I am currently not at a point where i can save, i am struggling to just pay the bills and feed my family. I am becoming very familiar with wise bread to find more ways to live on a frugal budget.

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Jason

The possibility of increasing the quality of life for either myself or my family is why I save and invest money.

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T - Lad

GREED is the basic driver for my savings. My whole life I've spent money as soon as I thought I could get something cool with it. After starting to work and receiving a couple of bonuses, looking at a savings account that to me felt big was exciting and now I can't get enough of watching it grow.

Sure it sets me up with financial security but when that switch triggered in my brain, I think something primal kicked in and I can't help myself anymore.

It's totally a new way of lif for me.

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Kristy OT

What motivates me? Knowledge that I will someday not be able to work anymore. Knowledge that disasters happen everyday. You know, good ole fear.

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Lauren

I'm extremely motivated to save by having clear goals that I KNOW are reachable in the next X amount of months if I save X amount of money. We have been using Mint.com to put pictures and names to these goals and every day we check it to see how close we are getting. Our goals are as early as 4 months from now for our Anniversary trip, and 5 years from now for our first year with a baby or purchasing our first home.

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Peggy Hopkins

I am motivated to save because money means respect. I love to see the look on peoples faces when I make a large purchase (such as a vehicle or property) and they say "lets do the paperwork and we'll get you financed" and I get to say "I don't need financing, I'll be paying cash." When I bought a piece of (investment) property I thought the realtor was going to pass out when I told him I was paying cash. It's also a really, really good feeling when I walk into a store and I know that I can buy what ever I want and I won't be going into debt for it.

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Guest M.A.

Saving, to me, has always been hard! It is something I thought I couldn't do unless or until I made a ton of money. In my 20's I always said "I'll do that when I get a better job" and even though I've gotten better jobs the practice of saving never really developed. Living in NYC for several years I developed "savings" techniques, which I think are pretty common in NYC. These techniques were't actually savings but sacrifices in order to spend money elsewhere. For example I'd bring my lunch to work everyday so I could go out 3-4 nights a week, not to actually put any money in my bank account.

To be honest nothing really motivates me to save but I have been trying to manage my money better over the past few years. On a ski trip to Colorado last year, I overheard a conversation about mindfulness. I was so intrigued I looked for everything I could find on mindfulness and how I could bring this practice in my life. Regarding financial matters it meant changing old habits and most importantly my perspective regarding money.

I sat down and took a look at all the things I wanted in life and how mindfulness came into play. I realized I really enjoyed cooking, I wasn't making any sacrifices bringing my lunch everyday I just really enjoyed cooking. I also noticed that I didn't need everything ever made!!! I could probably reduce everything I have by half a honestly not notice. What I need is what is useful to me. That soda making machine is super cool but I don't really drink soda and my tiny kitchen has no room for that. I drink coffee not soda so what's more useful?

One morning I happened to catch Suze Orman on the Today show and she said something I could actually understand. She said we should get as much enjoyment out of saving as we do spending! Simple yet very effective and powerful concept. Eating out all the didn't make me feel good. I often felt like I was wasting money on so so food when I was perfectly capable of cooking for myself. That's not to say I don't really enjoy going out, I do, but I try to go out when it's worth it. When I was shopping all the time, I didn't feel great either. I had yet another thing to stuff into my tiny apartment. Do I need this? Is a question I ask myself all the time and I try to be 100% honest. Again, I do fall victim to a good sale but I'm mindful of what I need and how this item would be useful in my everyday life.

Saving does feel good when it's not looked at as a sacrifice. Instead I feel it is more like doing your due diligence, cleaning the bathroom or washing the sheets. A clean bathroom and clean sheets feel amazing. It's not easy but it's necessary. Taking a mindful approach to spending having a new perspective of money has helped immensely. It's also like most things an ongoing practice.

Guest's picture
B

What motivates me to save is witnessing the struggles of my parents (and other relatives) who never saved. It is really heartbreaking to see. I went to college (on a scholarship) determined to break the cycle of poverty and I have done really well so far. I graduated and starting working right away. My earnings aren't very substantial, but I live within my means and stick to a budget, still contributing the maximum to my retirement plan and placing money into savings every month. I want my own family to start off right, and debt free...beholden to no one.

Guest's picture

Among other things, SaveUp has actually been encouraging me to save! I've been playing there for a few months now and I love it! No wins yet though. :(

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Lauren Bayles

I added a comment earlier, but just realized it had to be at least two sentences! Hoping this comment can replace my earlier one.
I'm motivated to save by knowing the peace that comes from being debt-free. I also know that the stress created by debt plays out in my attitude at home; my children don't deserve an unhappy, preoccupied mom. And, of course, my children's future is a great motivator to save.

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Diane

The short answer is: many things! First is retirement. We are looking to move to a more rural area about an hour away and I want to have a house that's paid for. I have a good bit of equity in our current home, but I want to buy something I can pay off within 10 years. Also, I don't carry a balance on credit cards, so I have several saving funds for car repairs, home repairs, vacation, etc. My goal is to be able to cover expenses as they come up without using a credit card or going into long term savings. Bottom line is that money saved represents freedom & security to me!

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Guest

Poverty in old age motivates me to save. I haven't been able to save much, so I anticipate having to continue working probably into my seventies. The various jobs I've had throughout my career haven't offered retirement plans, so I've tried to save on my own. It's a little harder to do that than I anticipated. Sometimes I feel like I'm on the Sisyphus savings plan. In short, having not enough is motivation to keep trying.

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Christian

My three children motivate me to save. I want them to have the financial freedoms I did not have growing up. I don't want anything to prevent those dreams from becoming realities for my kids.

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Angie W

What motivates me to save is just having financial freedom. If I have a good emergency fund, I will have more mental and financial peace if something bad does happen.

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Ashley

I save because I want to be self-sufficient should anything happen to my job. It makes me feel secure and prepared.

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Valerie Morgan

The possibility of financial independence motivates me to save! I want to have the choice to work or not, not be dependent on my job to survive.

The Happy Homeowner's picture

Financial stability/security while still being able to intelligently spend on my hobbies such as traveling is my main motivation for saving. I've come a long way in my financial journey (paid off over $14K in credit card debt, bought my own home, etc. after having $1 to my name), and I value saving as an integral part of the strong financial foundation I've finally built for myself.

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Rose

I grew up in abject poverty and in and out of homelessness. I developed my skills of financial management completely on my own, and am inspired and motivated to save to understand the power of my own choices and allow for a future with greater freedoms than what my childhood offered me.

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Margaret Davis

My primary motivation for saving is living stress free. A conversation with a friend made me realize just how stressed I am about money - paying bills, earning enough, making the right financial decisions, etc. I know that if I have an emergency fund or cushion I'll be much more relaxed.

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Kaye

At one time we had a decent savings account although we were stupid in our spending. So now we have a small e-fund and are working to pay off debt. I'll already motivated to save just to have a safety net, but need to pay off debts first. I can't wait until we can have a real emergency fund in place!

Guest's picture
Guest

Have I missed something here?!? It totally looks to me like SaveUp rewards aren't REALLY about saving money. Not the rewards anyway. The rewards are a CHANCE at winning something? Are ya kidding me?

Will Chen's picture
Will Chen

Hi guest! Thank you for your feedback. These games are completely free, and they encourage me to do something positive. I think it is a win-win situation. Now whenever I deposit money into my savings account, I can look forward to playing a little scratcher game that might give me a prize. It adds a fun twist to personal finance (which can often be so dry and boring). I'm not necessarily counting on winning the $2 Million jackpot, but I do enjoy dreaming about it when making my deposits at the ATM. =)

There's other things on SaveUp that helps consumers. You can earn game credits by watching educational videos to increase financial literacy, and you can keep track of your finances to see how your savings and debt accounts are doing.

I hope you give SaveUp a try! They recently won PC Magazine's Top 100 Website of 2011. And I also met Jean Park, (SaveUp's marketing director) at the Financial Blogger Conference. We talked a long time about what motivates people to save money. Jean seems very sincere about her desire to help people save money.

Guest's picture

I am motivated to save by looking at the faces of my children. Knowing that a savings account can help ensure a better future for them is all I need to remember.

Guest's picture

wow cool! What a fun site -- I just signed up. I'm motivated to save so that I can have freedom. Freedom to say, "sure, why not?" to anything that comes up. Having debt burdens me, and getting rid of it and increasing my savings (paying myself) will only increase my freedom and flexibility.

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Sara G

I've recently moved into my own apartment, and have begun saving for things I need for it. I am also saving to take some much need vacations this year...hopefully to see old friends and go places I have never been before.

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Chelsea

I am motivated to save so that I can travel. Whenever I am tempted to buy something I don't need I compare what this would cost to what I could buy with it while traveling.

Guest's picture

Two months ago my puppy had parvo and lived. I barely had enough to pay for the $800 in hospital care. As I looked around the room at the electronic equipment, IV lines, and medical supplies, I realized that my own family was not covered should an emergency come up.

A horrible sense of helplessness came over me. I had loans -a lot of loans- less than one paycheck in my account, and crappy health insurance. I never wanted to feel that sense of dread again so I decided to pay off debt and save. So now I save. I save and share my experiences at Economically Humble.

Guest's picture

I'm motivated by the job market. I love my graduate degree, and I'm learning great things along the way, but the job market isn't great and I don't want $20,000 in debt saddling me if I can't immediately find a job.

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Razorbacks92

I am motivated to save so that I can get enough money together to finally pay off the student loan and get out of debt completely! Then I can start saving even more for home repairs, vacations, and other fun stuff!

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Lisa B.

I desperately need to save. Right now I'm saving for a trip to Japan to visit my in-laws. Wish me luck...

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Keis

I save because you just never know. Life is unpredictable and you have to safeguard your future with cash.

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OFG

I save to keep myself from worrying. The more money in the bank the less concerned I am about paying my bills and living the life I want. If you don't save you waste a lot of time worrying about where you'll find money, how much debt you are in, etc. etc. Ultimately having more money in the bank means that I'll worry less and the less I worry the happier I become.

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Patrick

I save for the freedom it brings, freedom to send my kids to college, the freedom from worries about rainy days, the freedom to travel and one day the freedom to choose to work if I want to.

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Melissa Hansson

What motivates me to save is driving by the house I'd like to buy. It's near our current rental and seeing the house I really want is a great reminder to save our money.

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Jennifer Collard

I'd like to go to Disney. That motivates me to save!

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Guest

I want to save money because I have two boys and the oldest is going on 14. College is just around the corner!

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Max

What motivates me to save is creating financial security for the future. Living paycheck to paycheck can really be stressful, so creating a savings net and investing funds can really provide a sense of relief and control when it comes to your finances.

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Stephanie

Seeing big ticket items I want in the future (weddings, house, etc.) as well as wanting to be secure with a worst-case scenario is what motivates me to save. Thinking about the future, whether it will be awesome or scary, I know I'll be ready as long as I'm saving!

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Paul

What motivates me to save is wanting to pay off debt sooner than expected and live simplistically. It helps me evaluate and re-evaluate my life and values more often.

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Joanne Schultz

I am usually motivated to save by having a goal - a new car, a vacation...

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Margaret Smith

Saving for my kids futures and retirement motivates me to save.

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Margaret Smith

Follow on twitter (peg42) and tweeted: https://twitter.com/#!/peg42/status/168175848652939265

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TC

I'm currently in graduate school and am not saving. For the previous three yearsI was saving for graduate school and paying off my car loan.

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Lynda

wanting a more secure and free future with my husband and wanting future children motivates me to save.

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Marilyn

What motivates me to save is that I want a house. I'm tired of sharing walls & elevators with people. Every time I have to hear them it reminds me to save. :)

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Guest

Right now I am a student, which means money is tight and I do take out some loans to cover tuition and fees not covered by my assistantship. I still save (a nominal amount to many), which I put into savings right after I get paid. I do this because I want an emergency fund and to save for retirement/future. I don't want to "live on the edge" throughout my adulthood.

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Francesca

I want to save money even more today because I was unemployed for almost exactly a year from 2009-2010. Thankfully I had dutifully put aside some money beforehand, so by cutting our budget even more, we were able to survive one year by putting just an additional $3,000 in credit card debt. It took us almost three years to pay off that debt, though, so I really want to build our emergency fund back up!

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Lauren K.

I save because in less than five weeks I am going to be moving out on my own for the first time, to a new area without a solid job lined up, and I want to be prepared for anything that may crop up and cause financial distress. I am going off to be 'independent'- and the last thing I want to do is have to fall back on my parents (for their sake). I have never wanted to live lavishly- but I do want to live comfortably, so if that means keeping my spending 'in-check' so I can be prepared for the inevitable downs, so be it... doesn't mean I can't enough life frugally. :)

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Michelle Fosnaugh

Im a worrier. I always am waiting for something "bad" to happen that will require money. So I always make sure I save as much as I can. Without my car payment now I put that away like I still have it to save even more. It gives me a piece of mind knowing I have money saved

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Sarah

Seeing the path that my parents have taken by overspending and not saving has led me to save money. I don't want to have to worry about living paycheck to paycheck in my future due to overwhelming amounts of debt, so I choose to save money and live frugally.

Guest's picture
Brandon

The biggest motivation for me to save is not having to borrow money. Except for purchasing a home, I don't ever want to borrow money again.

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CRich

What motivates me to save? My retirement and paying off my student loans.

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Therese

I am motivated to save when I think about all the places I'd like to travel. It makes it easier to keep from buying things I want, but don't really need.

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PharmD

I'm motivated to save because I want to pay for my daughter's education, while I'm paying off my own. I don't want her to have to go to college like I had to. I hope that she can start her career off with relatively little debt so that she can save for her own future.

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Erin

I am motivated to save so that I can live my best possible life. It's not about money for me, but rather, what I do with my money. I strive to spend my money according to my values.

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I am currently motivated to save because I have a dream of going into private practice (I'm a counselor). In order to be in private practice successfully, I need to have living expenses saved so I have the funds to "live on" then replenish them as I make money with my career.

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Joanne Schultz

I'm unemployed so I'm not currently saving, although I don't spend a lot either.
When I was working, I put the maximum amount into my 401K including the additional money for being over age 50. Yes I had less money coming in, but at least it will be there when I am 59½ .

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Kelly Schubert

I have made it a challenge to save money and become more frugal. It is something I just made up my mind I was going to do. I love reading sites such as this one with money saving tips and idea

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Adrienne

I'm motivated to save for the feeling of security and the comfort of knowing that even though the roof just started leaking, it won't leave me broke or in debt because I have savings.