etiquette http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/10337/all en-US It's Time to Drop These 6 Rules of Money Etiquette http://www.wisebread.com/its-time-to-drop-these-6-rules-of-money-etiquette <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/its-time-to-drop-these-6-rules-of-money-etiquette" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_holding_cash_516174758.jpg" alt="Woman dropping rules of money etiquette" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Good manners are important to me. Over the years, I have made a habit of reading Miss Manners, Emily Post, Letitia Baldridge, and other etiquette experts to make sure my politeness game is on point. But as committed as I am to the many etiquette rules that help to make life more considerate, there are some rules that should be retired.</p> <p>Specifically, money etiquette rules have not necessarily kept up with the changing economic times. The following six rules now cause more social awkwardness and embarrassment than they prevent &mdash; and that's why it's time to drop them. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-rules-of-etiquette-we-wish-were-still-around-today?ref=seealso" target="_blank">8 Rules of Etiquette We Wish Were Still Around Today</a>)</p> <h2>1. The man pays for the first date</h2> <p>The standard of a man paying for a first date is based on the assumption that he's the higher earner. But that's hardly the case in the modern world. Today's romantic pairings very likely include women who far outearn their dates &mdash; not to mention the fact that this old-timey rule excludes same-sex couples.</p> <p>A better rule, and one that Miss Manners has always promoted, is for the person who issues the invitation to pay for the outing. That being said, the invitee should always be prepared to pay for him or herself, just in case.</p> <h2>2. Salary discussions are always off limits</h2> <p>While it will never be considered polite to straight-up <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-money-questions-you-never-have-to-answer" target="_blank">ask someone how much they make</a>, the limitation on salary discussions does need to be lifted. For one thing, not discussing compensation has helped to entrench the gender wage gap. You might recall <a href="http://us11.campaign-archive1.com/?u=a5b04a26aae05a24bc4efb63e&amp;id=64e6f35176&amp;e=1ba99d671e#wage" target="_blank">Jennifer Lawrence's essay</a> on Lenny Letter about how shocked she was to discover that her male co-stars in the movie <em>American Hustle</em> made significantly more than she did. The only reason she was aware of the pay discrepancy was because of the Sony email hack.</p> <p>But there is more at stake than just the gender wage gap. When you don't know what other people with commensurate skills and experience are paid, then your employer always has the upper hand in salary negotiations. This is called &quot;information asymmetry,&quot; wherein one party in a transaction has more information than the other. The only way to tilt hiring and salary negotiations in your favor is to talk openly about salary with your colleagues and friends.</p> <p>That being said, it's still a tough topic to bring up. The best way to go about it is to ask a trusted colleague if you can talk about money, and be willing to take no for answer.</p> <h2>3. The bride's family pays for the wedding and the groom's family pays for the rehearsal dinner</h2> <p>This rule is a holdover from when financially dependent brides went directly from their parents' home to their new married life, and the tradition has even older and more offensive roots. Back in the day, a bride's family would pay a dowry to the groom in order to compensate him for taking over financial responsibility for their daughter.</p> <p>While the origins of the tradition that the groom's family will pay for the rehearsal dinner are not as clear, the upshot of this rule was that it gave the new husband's parents an opportunity to host a portion of the wedding celebration.</p> <p>For both of these rules, the assumption was that the parents of the bride and groom &mdash; rather than the new couple themselves &mdash; are hosting the wedding.</p> <p>A better rule would be for couples to plan on paying for their own nuptials rather than assuming their parents will cover the costs. This way, any parental offers of money to go toward the wedding can be treated as a gift rather than an obligation. This will prevent any unpleasant surprises if the couple's expectations don't match their parents' financial abilities (and vice versa), and can ensure that the couple gets the wedding they want.</p> <h2>4. Parents pay for family dinners out</h2> <p>When adult children go out to dinner with their parents, there's an expectation that the parents will pick up the check. This etiquette rule seems to reflect habit rather than true politeness, and it's a habit you should grow out of as your parents age. Adult children in the thick of their careers are likely to have more disposable income than retired parents on fixed incomes, and you should keep this in mind rather than simply assuming that your parents will always pay.</p> <p>However, changing this dynamic can be a little tough, even if you make it clear ahead of time that you're inviting your parents out to eat and that it will be your treat. A good way to make sure there's no scuffle over the bill is to let your waiter know ahead of time that you're paying. You can get up just before dessert and hand over your credit card so the meal is truly your treat.</p> <h2>5. Tip waiters 15 percent for normal service, 20 percent for exceptional service</h2> <p>The 15 percent tip was the gold standard for dining out through much of my childhood and young adulthood. I was taught to calculate my tip as 15 percent of the pretax amount of my food. This rule most definitely needs to change because the federal minimum wage for tipped employees has been stuck at $2.13 per hour since 1991.</p> <p>While your server's hourly wage may be higher depending on where you live, since different states have <a href="https://www.dol.gov/whd/state/tipped.htm" target="_blank">different minimum wage regulations</a>, the bottom line is that wait staff <em>depend upon tips to make a living</em>. Continuing to tip 15 percent on your pretax bill could make a big, negative difference on your server's finances.</p> <p>These days, tipping 20 percent on your whole bill (after tax) for normal service is a better rule of thumb. You can always up your tip to 25 percent or more if the service is extraordinary.</p> <h2>6. Don't mention gifts on an invitation</h2> <p>One of the diciest etiquette land mines has to do with the expectation of gifts for weddings and birthdays. The old rules require you to say nothing about gifts, other than profuse thanks for any that are given. According to these rules, guests can ask about what the birthday child or bridal couple or expectant parents would like when they RSVP for the event.</p> <p>Miss Manners has expressed her horror at both the proliferation of gift registries and the inclusion of the words &quot;no gifts, please&quot; on an invitation. According to her, a gift should be an expression of affection from the giver to the recipient, and any mention of gifts on an invitation sullies the joy of gift-giving.</p> <p>While disdain for clear gift-grabs is absolutely warranted &mdash; no one wants to feel like they have only been invited to a party to increase the number of presents &mdash; the hard-and-fast rule of no mentions of gifts on invitations has become outdated.</p> <p>In general, most wedding guests want to have some idea of what the bride and groom would like or need, and most parents of birthday-party-aged children would like to turn off the onslaught of stuff that accompanies a modern childhood. Bridal (and baby) registries make life much easier for friends and family who would not otherwise know what to give. Spelling out these expectations helps diminish confusion, resentment, and waste at gift-giving occasions.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fits-time-to-drop-these-6-rules-of-money-etiquette&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FIts%2520Time%2520to%2520Drop%2520These%25206%2520Rules%2520of%2520Money%2520Etiquette.jpg&amp;description=Its%20Time%20to%20Drop%20These%206%20Rules%20of%20Money%20Etiquette"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/Its%20Time%20to%20Drop%20These%206%20Rules%20of%20Money%20Etiquette.jpg" alt="It's Time to Drop These 6 Rules of Money Etiquette" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/emily-guy-birken">Emily Guy Birken</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/its-time-to-drop-these-6-rules-of-money-etiquette">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-living-on-a-tight-budget-makes-you-happier">How Living on a Tight Budget Makes You Happier</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-parenting-mistakes-to-avoid-when-teaching-kids-about-money">4 Parenting Mistakes to Avoid When Teaching Kids About Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-when-youre-rich-dream-buys-that-arent-that-great">5 &quot;When You&#039;re Rich&quot; Dream Buys That Aren&#039;t That Great</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-terrible-money-moves-to-avoid-on-the-first-date">6 Terrible Money Moves to Avoid on the First Date</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-millennials-are-changing-marriage">4 Ways Millennials Are Changing Marriage</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Budgeting Lifestyle budgeting etiquette money etiquette money rules saving money Spending Money Wed, 19 Jul 2017 08:00:17 +0000 Emily Guy Birken 1986887 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Terrible Money Moves to Avoid on the First Date http://www.wisebread.com/6-terrible-money-moves-to-avoid-on-the-first-date <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-terrible-money-moves-to-avoid-on-the-first-date" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_rejecting_a_geek_boy_in_a_blind_date.jpg" alt="Woman rejecting a geek boy in a blind date" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Dating is tough, and first dates can be particularly awkward if you don't know anything about the other person. What you say and do can determine whether there's a second date, so it's important to present your best self. You shouldn't expect perfection, so don't stress too much about stumbling over your words or moments of silence. Chances are, these won't make or break the night. But you might shoot yourself in the foot if you make a few terrible money moves.</p> <p>Want to improve the odds of seeing this person again? Here are six money moves to avoid on the first date. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-to-save-on-a-first-date-without-looking-cheap?ref=seealso" target="_blank">8 Ways to Save on a First Date Without Looking Cheap</a>)</p> <h2>1. Announcing that you're splitting the check</h2> <p>If I've said it once, I've said it a million times: There's nothing wrong with going Dutch on a first date &mdash; just don't be a jerk about it. If you initiated the date, pick up the tab. Conversely, if the other person initiated the date, you can expect that they'll pick up the tab, but don't assume that's the case. Offer to pay half, and make your decision on whether you want to have a second date based on their willingness to accept your offer, or if they cover all of it.</p> <p>If the date was a mutual decision, make a good impression by offering to pay. If your date insists on paying half, there's nothing wrong with that, and nobody should get their feelings hurt about it. But don't force the issue or make your date feel uncomfortable. In fact, don't mention splitting the bill at all until they offer. It's just bad form. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/who-should-pay-for-the-first-date?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Who Should Pay for the First Date?</a>)</p> <h2>2. Taking advantage of your date's generosity</h2> <p>If your date picks up the tab for the night, go easy on his or her pocket. There might be wiggle room in the budget for dinner, drinks, and maybe dessert, but this doesn't give you the green light to order the most expensive item on the menu or suggest costly activities that leave your date broke. Not to say you should only order a cheap salad and water, but be reasonable.</p> <h2>3. Overspending to impress your date</h2> <p>In an effort to impress your date, it's easy to go a little overboard to create a memorable night. You should have fun, but not at the expense of your bank account. Check your finances and determine how much you're able to spend for the night, and then recommend a restaurant or activities within your budget.</p> <p>You don't have to break the bank to impress the other person. If that&rsquo;s what it takes to guarantee a second date, this isn't the person for you. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-much-should-you-actually-be-spending-on-a-date?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How Much Should You Actually Be Spending on a Date?</a>)</p> <h2>4. Asking personal financial questions</h2> <p>If you have a firm grip on your personal finances, you will likely seek a partner with a similar financial mindset. It's important to have financial discussions with a significant other to avoid surprises down the road. But the first date isn't the time or the place to get into all that nitty-gritty. If anything, your date might consider personal financial questions intrusive, which sets a negative tone for the night.</p> <p>Likewise, if you pry or inquire about your date's income, this person might assume you have an ulterior motive. And if you ask about their debt or credit score, they might feel you're getting too close to soon, which can scare them away.</p> <p>Give it some time. Wait until you have mutual feelings for each other. Only then should you sit down and have an honest discussion about your financial lives so you can make the best decisions for yourselves moving forward.</p> <h2>5. Bragging about your salary</h2> <p>Not only should you avoid asking your date personal questions about their financial life, avoid sharing too much information about your financial life too soon. Maybe you're proud of your job, your accomplishments, and your strong financial background. Or maybe you feel dropping salary information will amaze the other person and keep them around. But bragging can be a turn off.</p> <p>If you spend the majority of the night patting yourself on the back and revealing how much you earn and/or spend, your date could conclude that your ego is too big and run for the hills, or only stick around because of what you bring financially to the table.</p> <p>It is common and acceptable to ask about occupations on a first date, but don't get into detail about salaries.</p> <h2>6. Airing your dirty laundry</h2> <p>Bringing up negative aspects of your financial life on a first date can be just as disastrous as bragging. Remember, the idea is to make a great impression, not come off as a liability. If you mention your poor credit history, excessive credit card debt, or poor financial outlook, yet your date has a tight handle on their finances, this person could make assumptions before getting to know you and presume you're irresponsible.</p> <p>You shouldn't hide these issues, but you should get to know each other before airing your dirty laundry.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/mikey-rox">Mikey Rox</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-terrible-money-moves-to-avoid-on-the-first-date">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/its-time-to-drop-these-6-rules-of-money-etiquette">It&#039;s Time to Drop These 6 Rules of Money Etiquette</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-millennials-are-changing-marriage">4 Ways Millennials Are Changing Marriage</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/this-is-how-americans-spent-their-money-in-the-1950s">This Is How Americans Spent Their Money in the 1950s</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-much-should-you-actually-be-spending-on-a-date">How Much Should You Actually Be Spending on a Date?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-it-pays-to-stay-single">6 Ways It Pays to Stay Single</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Budgeting Lifestyle Dating etiquette first date money conversations money moves relationships Spending Money Tue, 13 Jun 2017 09:00:08 +0000 Mikey Rox 1964080 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Ways to Be a Good Guest When You're Broke http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-be-a-good-guest-when-youre-broke <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-ways-to-be-a-good-guest-when-youre-broke" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-598713568.jpg" alt="how to be a good house guest" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Staying with friends can be a great way to save money while traveling. But keep in mind that an invitation to visit does not equal an offer to fully support you during your stay. In fact, you should be spending time and effort to <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-host-house-guests-without-going-crazy" target="_blank">thank them for the free lodging</a>.</p> <p>Two traditional ways of thanking hosts are bringing a nice gift from home and treating the host to dinner out. But what if most gifts and restaurants would strain your budget? There are still ways to show your appreciation and leave as one of those visitors your host will invite back, again and again.</p> <h2>1. Put Extra Thought or Effort Into the Gift You Bring</h2> <p>Lack of funds never excuses arriving empty-handed. One of my favorite gifts from an arriving guest was a woolen hat that she had finished knitting on the flight. If you can't make something or buy something, bring a book from your bookshelf, inscribed to the host.</p> <h2>2. Share the Work and Expense of Meals However You Can</h2> <p>The host may invite you to take most meals with the family, or offer to share the occasional meal with you. Don't let this hospitality go unreciprocated. If you go out to eat together, pick up your host's check. If you can't afford to do that, don't eat out together, or only go to restaurants where you can afford to treat.</p> <p>If your budget allows absolutely no restaurant meals during your trip, you can still display good manners by contributing groceries to host meals and by offering to cook one or more meals for your host. When your host is cooking, do everything you can to help &mdash; within your host's comfort range. Some people don't like sharing their kitchens, so ask before pitching in on food prep. At the very least, offer to clear and wash the dishes, and take out the trash.</p> <p>Also, don't assume that your host wants to share every meal while you're in their house. A good way to broach this topic is to ask if you can keep a few groceries in the fridge. If your host invites you to join her on a grocery run, do not just watch her buy groceries. Take the hint that you should buy some for yourself, or better yet, pay for everything in your host's cart.</p> <h2>3. Be an Asset to the Household</h2> <p>Beyond mealtime, how can you make your presence a positive? Can you keep children occupied, or baby-sit while your hosts enjoy a date night? Walk the dog? Run an errand?</p> <h2>4. Think of Your Host While You're Out and About</h2> <p>If you go out sightseeing while your host is at work, bring back any affordable or free goodies you can. You treated yourself at a famous bakery? Bring back a brownie. You found an intact sand dollar on the beach? Present it to your host's child. These inexpensive gestures are a way of acknowledging that your host made your fun possible.</p> <h2>5. Be Good Company</h2> <p>Don't fill your days with so much tourism that you don't have time to sit down and talk with your host, who presumably invited you because they wanted to see you. Offer to do something your host enjoys, whether it's playing a board game, watching baseball on TV, or taking a stroll through the neighborhood. Laugh at your host's jokes. And for goodness sake, don't keep your host up so late that they're exhausted at work the next day. Notice when your host is ready to go to bed and take the cue to retreat to your own space.</p> <h2>6. Don't Let Your Host Spend Money on You If You Can't Reciprocate</h2> <p>There are some relationships &mdash; parent and child, for example, or employer and employee &mdash; when it's okay for one party to pay for everything. But for most friendships, even if your host has more money to spend than you do, it's bad form to let them pay for everything. At the very least, you should warn your host if you can't chip in.</p> <p>For instance, if your host offers to drive you to a number of distant places, or let you borrow their car, you should warn them if you can't fill the car with gas. Better yet, come up with a more affordable way to get places on your own, or restrict your travels to locations you can reach on your own dime.</p> <p>In the end, if you can't afford to contribute anything to your upkeep and transportation while on vacation, you probably can't afford to <em>go</em> on vacation. But by being open with your host and making extra effort to be thoughtful, a budget traveler should be able to visit friends without taking advantage.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="//www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F6-ways-to-be-a-good-guest-when-youre-broke&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F6%20Ways%20to%20Be%20a%20Good%20Guest%20When%20Youre%20Broke.jpg&amp;description=6%20Ways%20to%20Be%20a%20Good%20Guest%20When%20You%26%23x27%3Bre%20Broke" data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-config="above" data-pin-color="red" data-pin-height="28"><img src="//assets.pinterest.com/images/pidgets/pinit_fg_en_rect_red_28.png" alt="" /></a> </p> <!-- Please call pinit.js only once per page --><!-- Please call pinit.js only once per page --><script type="text/javascript" async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/6%20Ways%20to%20Be%20a%20Good%20Guest%20When%20Youre%20Broke.jpg" alt="6 Ways to Be a Good Guest When You're Broke" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/carrie-kirby">Carrie Kirby</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-be-a-good-guest-when-youre-broke">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-simple-rules-of-excellent-houseguest-etiquette">11 Simple Rules of Excellent Houseguest Etiquette</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/25-secrets-from-the-worlds-most-frugal-frequent-travelers">25 Secrets From the World&#039;s Most Frugal Frequent Travelers</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-affordable-destinations-for-people-who-love-to-fish">8 Affordable Destinations for People Who Love to Fish</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-most-affordable-beach-towns-in-mexico">8 Most Affordable Beach Towns in Mexico</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-live-the-location-independent-lifestyle">How to Live the &quot;Location Independent&quot; Lifestyle</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Frugal Living Travel broke etiquette host house guest travel etiquette travel tips Tue, 27 Dec 2016 10:00:12 +0000 Carrie Kirby 1860476 at http://www.wisebread.com 5 Ways to Ease Into a Day Job After Freelancing http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-to-ease-into-a-day-job-after-freelancing <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-ways-to-ease-into-a-day-job-after-freelancing" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_47841776_MEDIUM.jpg" alt="easing back into a dayjob after freelancing" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Freelancing gives you the freedom to set your own hours and work at your own pace. Some people consider this the ideal situation, and after making the switch <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/can-you-really-make-a-living-as-an-ebook-writer">from employee to freelancer</a>, they vow never to return to the workplace. Of course, anyone's professional situation &mdash; the amount of money coming in to keep you fed and sheltered &mdash; can change in the blink of an eye, and some of us have to get a &quot;real&quot; job again. Sound familiar? Then listen up! Whether you're looking for steady, predictable income, or you're making a switch because you need benefits like health care, these are the ways to ease back into a regular daytime gig with minimal stress.</p> <h2>1. Find a Job You're Passionate About</h2> <p>Freelancers enjoy a freedom unlike any other, and after years of working for yourself, it can be difficult to ease back into a routine of punching a time clock and having a boss breathing down your neck. Getting a regular day job might be a necessity and not a choice. But even if you can't change your overall circumstances, you can be choosy when it comes to accepting a position. The transition from freelancer to 9-to-5 employee will be harder if you hate what you do. On the other hand, if you find a job that excites and challenges you, it'll be easier to get up in the morning and leave your house.</p> <h2>2. Seek Opportunities That Offer Flexibility</h2> <p>Nowadays, it's not unusual to see employers advertising flexible positions. Some employers recognize the benefit of telecommuting, and they allow certain personnel to work from home or only come into the office a couple days a week. If you prefer the stability of a steady paycheck, but you want the ability to work independently, seek opportunities that provide the best of both worlds.</p> <p>If telecommuting isn't an option, it'll also be easier to ease back into a regular day job if you find a position that lets you work at times when you're most productive. Maybe you perform better when able to start your workday in the late morning or the afternoon. Although a 9-to-5 work schedule is common, it's not the only option, and you'll find that many companies offer their employees a variety of schedules.</p> <h2>3. Split Your Time Between a Regular Day Job and Freelancing</h2> <p>Another option is splitting your time between a regular day job and freelancing. A regular job can provide the income stability you need, but enjoying this stability might not require a full-time gig. Rather than jump head first into the full-time grind, work a few hours with an employer and freelance for the remainder of the day to supplement your income. For this approach to work, you'll need a few regular freelance clients who can provide a steady stream of work. Easing into a day job is easier when you're only working four hours a day.</p> <h2>4. Pace Yourself</h2> <p>Successful freelancers are hard workers and they wear many hats. They spend their days working on projects, hunting for new clients, invoicing, handling client issues, and some freelancers have multiple income streams to make ends meet. It's a busy, hectic life, and it's easy to develop a pattern of always being in work-mode and constantly hustling.</p> <p>Working at this pace can become a normal part of your daily routine &mdash; to the point where you forget how to work at a slower pace. As you ease back into a regular day job after years of freelancing, you may bring a few bad habits with you, such as working until you're numb, never taking a break, or thinking you have to accept every opportunity you're offered.</p> <p>While you'll want to be a team player and take the initiative on your new job, you have to remember that the company's success doesn't lie on your shoulders. Pace yourself or else you'll burn out.</p> <h2>5. Stick to a Regular Sleep Schedule</h2> <p>Some freelancers don't start their workdays in the morning. Instead, they begin working in the late morning, afternoon, and some don't work until the evening hours. If you're a night owl and used to sleeping in, the transition from freelancer to employee is especially challenging when you have to rise early and be at a desk by 8 a.m.</p> <p>This doesn't mean you have to hit the sheets by 8 p.m. after getting a regular day job, but you will need to get enough sleep to wake up on time and function during the day. Being in a constant mental fog because you didn't get enough sleep, and running late every morning only prolongs the adjustment period.</p> <p>Easing into a fixed, eight-hour schedule after years of a flexible, non-fixed schedule can leave you physically and mentally exhausted. Getting plenty of sleep and staying active makes a difference. Walk on your lunch break or pace your office for a couple minutes every hour. Activity can increase your energy and improve your mental and emotional health, which can be the mood booster you need to accept your changed circumstances.</p> <p><em>Have you recently made the transition from freelancer back to a more structured position? How has the transition been? Share with us in the comments below.</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/mikey-rox">Mikey Rox</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-to-ease-into-a-day-job-after-freelancing">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-write-a-resume-12-steps-to-your-next-job">How To Write A Resume: 12 Steps To Your Next Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-radical-implosion-can-help-you-get-ahead-at-work-and-everywhere-else">How &quot;Radical Implosion&quot; Can Help You Get Ahead at Work — and Everywhere Else</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/day-job-or-freelance-which-is-right-for-you">Day Job or Freelance: Which Is Right for You?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-to-deal-when-you-work-with-someone-you-hate">8 Ways to Deal When You Work With Someone You Hate</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-smart-ways-to-maximize-desk-space">11 Smart Ways to Maximize Desk Space</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income Life Hacks 9-to-5 career day job etiquette freelancer freelancing full-time job job life hacks Thu, 21 Jul 2016 09:00:12 +0000 Mikey Rox 1756335 at http://www.wisebread.com 10 Ways You're Being a Terrible Neighbor http://www.wisebread.com/10-ways-youre-being-a-terrible-neighbor <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/10-ways-youre-being-a-terrible-neighbor" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_000073263553_Large.jpg" alt="you&#039;re being a bad neighbor" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>After family, friends, and coworkers, neighbors comprise one of our most basic social networks. Good neighbors keep a watchful eye on the community, help older folks live independently, pitch in when there's a local emergency, and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/25-reasons-why-its-good-to-know-your-neighbors">provide many other benefits</a>. That's why being a good neighbor is so important &mdash; and why being a terrible one is so damaging. Blissfully unaware of how you're viewed in the neighborhood? It's time for some critical self-review. Here are 10 ways you're being a terrible neighbor.</p> <h2>1. Moonlighting as a Mechanic</h2> <p>I'm all for saving a few bucks by repairing and maintaining your own car, but there's a limit. If your driveway features a permanent installation of automobiles on concrete blocks, you're probably annoying the neighbors. Remember, pneumatic drills and floodlights have a way of detracting from a neighborhood's charm.</p> <h2>2. Impolite Parking</h2> <p>According to data from U.S. Census Bureau's American Community Survey, only 2.5% of American households <a href="https://www.aei.org/publication/chart-of-the-day-rising-household-vehicle-ownership-over-time-belies-the-middle-class-stagnation-narrative/print/">owned three or more vehicles in 1960</a>. By 2013, that number had ballooned to 19.7%. Today, it's common for a family's fleet of vehicles to fill the garage, driveway, and a few curbside spaces.</p> <p>If you must park on the street, avoid parking directly across from a driveway (it makes backing out difficult for the homeowner). And if you tend to park in front of the same few houses everyday, rotate your cars so your neighbors can catch a glimpse of an empty space every once in awhile.</p> <h2>3. Having Your Own Zoo</h2> <p>It's the trifecta of inconsiderate pet ownership: Allowing pets to run loose, not picking up dog waste during walks, and letting dogs bark at all hours. If you're guilty of any of these offenses, assume that each and every one of your neighbors is hoping you get transferred.</p> <h2>4. Letting Your Lawn Turn Into a Jungle</h2> <p>Sure, we all get busy and sometimes it's difficult to keep up with the pace of nature during the spring and summer months. Still, if you're not mowing consistently or you're letting overgrown branches obstruct sidewalks or streets, you're shirking your duties as a good neighbor. Forget the manicured lawn &mdash; just keep things relatively tidy and safe.</p> <h2>5. Burning Yard Waste</h2> <p>Though many communities have an ordinance against open burning within city limits, it's one of the most commonly-ignored laws on the books. If you're burning yard waste, you're reducing general air quality, bathing the neighborhood in trace amounts of carcinogens, and probably aggravating a few neighbors' chronic respiratory conditions.</p> <h2>6. Spurning the Shovel</h2> <p>If it snows in your part of the country, shoveling sidewalks is fact of life and an essential part of being a good neighbor. If you're not shoveling, you're creating an icy slip-and-slide that's particularly treacherous for young kids and the elderly.</p> <h2>7. Encroaching</h2> <p>Using even a small part of someone else's property creates instant ill will. Make sure your parking habits don't cut into a neighbor's lawn, your festive cookouts don't spill over into an adjoining yard, and your kids' skateboard circuit doesn't include 10 feet of the deck next door.</p> <h2>8. Explosive Celebrating</h2> <p>Legal or illegal, setting off fireworks of any kind won't win you a Neighbor of the Year Award. Fireworks disturb the peace, send pets into anxiety overdrive, set off sensitive car alarms, and fill the air with clouds of sulfur.</p> <p>If you simply must vent your enthusiasm on the 4th of July, on New Year's Eve, or when your favorite sports franchise wins a game, try this: Shut yourself in a closet and blow a kazoo for a few minutes. Seriously. The sound is just about as pleasant and you get to keep all your fingers.</p> <h2>9. Not Securing Trash and Recyclables</h2> <p>Unsecured trash and recycling material gets blown around by the wind and carried off by raccoons. Avoid both by using quality garbage cans with tight-fitting lids and not setting out your trash too early on trash day. Also, promptly retrieve any loose items that the garbage collectors missed. Your neighbors will thank you.</p> <h2>10. Slamming Doors</h2> <p>This one's for all the apartment and condo-dwellers out there. Good neighbors don't let doors slam. Heavy modern doors that access stairwells, condo units, and common areas typically feature closure mechanisms for fire safety. Depending on how they're adjusted, these can cause doors to slam shut if you don't catch them first and soften the impact. No matter what time of day, slamming doors make every resident's life a little less peaceful.</p> <p>Terrible neighbors have one thing in common: They're inconsiderate. They've lost sight of the fact that they're part of a community of folks who may not share their schedule, aesthetic sensibility, tolerance for noise, or appreciation for the fertilizing effects of dog poop. Transitioning from a terrible neighbor to a terrific one just takes a bit of self-awareness, some social graces &mdash; and maybe a kazoo.</p> <p><em>Do you or your neighbors commit any of these unneighborly offenses? What's your biggest pet peeve about the people next door? Share with us!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/kentin-waits">Kentin Waits</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-ways-youre-being-a-terrible-neighbor">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-rules-of-etiquette-everyone-should-know-and-follow">10 Rules of Etiquette Everyone Should Know (and Follow!)</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/13-things-people-with-good-table-manners-never-do">13 Things People With Good Table Manners Never Do</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/18-things-people-with-good-social-skills-never-do">18 Things People With Good Social Skills Never Do</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-small-gestures-that-go-a-long-way-at-work">10 Small Gestures That Go a Long Way at Work</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-best-and-worst-places-to-stash-cash-in-your-home">The Best and Worst Places to Stash Cash in Your Home</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> General Tips Home bad neighbor behavior etiquette manners neighbor neighbor etiquette too much noise Tue, 31 May 2016 10:30:05 +0000 Kentin Waits 1719077 at http://www.wisebread.com 8 Ways You're Being a Terrible Customer http://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-youre-being-a-terrible-customer <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/8-ways-youre-being-a-terrible-customer" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_000030046612_Large.jpg" alt="he&#039;s being a terrible customer" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>We all know the old saying &mdash; the customer is always right. Except, that's totally wrong. The customer is <em>not </em>always right. And if you firmly believe that you, as the customer, are always right &mdash; no matter the circumstances &mdash; then you're probably a terrible customer. Here are nine scenarios in which you're a customer service rep's worst nightmare, and how to be better. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-ways-to-be-the-perfect-customer?ref=seealso">10 Ways to Be the Perfect Customer</a>)</p> <h2>1. You Think the Customer Is Always Right</h2> <p>Let's begin where all customer relations issues are born: with the customer thinking they're always right. We've all heard someone in a retail shop drop this line during a heated discussion with an associate, and we might have even said it ourselves at some point. While I contend that the customer is sometimes right, &quot;always&quot; is a misnomer, and we rely on it too heavily &mdash; even when we know we're wrong.</p> <p>The problem with that mentality is that it inherently implies you're owed something, and in most cases you're not. Especially if you're ranting and raving like a lunatic. Instead, consider the circumstance thoughtfully and think about how it can be resolved without pointing fingers or making demands. I think you'll find that most of the time &quot;blame&quot; doesn't have to be assigned, so long as the situation can find a peaceful and amicable resolution.</p> <h2>2. You're Making Frequent Returns</h2> <p>Not only is making frequent returns ethically, morally, and sometimes legally wrong, it's also incredibly annoying. Sure, every once in awhile you might need to return an item because it's ill-fitting or maybe damaged, but if you're in the same store over and over again to get your money back for purchases that you decide you don't want anymore &mdash; for whatever reason, like you already wore it and you don't have any use for it again, or you couldn't afford it in the first place &mdash; you deserve to get the side-eye. It also affects the retailer's bottom line, which can hit smaller businesses particularly hard.</p> <p>AJ Saleem, a business owner for five years, says frequent returns are one of his biggest peeves.</p> <p>&quot;While I may not say anything, when I receive several notifications of returns from the same person, I often get frustrated,&quot; he says. &quot;Each return costs me a large portion of my profit margin, and when I do not receive any money in return, I have no choice but to write it as a loss. This forces me to raise prices.&quot;</p> <h2>3. You Try to Blame Everything on the Retailer</h2> <p>If a retailer sells you a faulty product and refuses to replace it or refund your money, you have grounds to pursue the issue until you're satisfied with your purchase, or you get your money back. On the other hand, however, there are dozens of other variables that go into your purchase that you need to consider before you start jumping down people's throats, some of which may be your own fault.</p> <p>Devorah Neiger is an owner of an online medical supply retailer, and she has some experience with customers who point fingers without considering their own part in the transaction.</p> <p>&quot;We have countless customers who order the wrong item, don't contact us for a return for months or who don't need the item anymore, and concoct a story about how it's our error to get out of paying for it,&quot; she explains. &quot;This even happens with customers who order directly from our site and never spoke to a rep. Customers should take ownership of their mistakes.&quot;</p> <p>You can't expect the retailer to eat the cost of your laziness, or error in ordering, or lack of need for the item. You also have to recognize that there are return policies in place, and if you file a complaint or try to return an item outside of that window, you might be SOL.</p> <h2>4. You're Flat-Out Lying to Get What You Want &mdash; Like a Refund</h2> <p>I can almost guarantee you that the highest instances of customers lying to get what they want &mdash; especially a refund &mdash; derive from issues with tech products, like mobile phones and the like. You dropped the phone in the toilet when you were two bottles of wine to the wind, you put it in a jar of rice for three days because the Internet told you to, and now you want a new device because your futile attempts to save it failed. Except when the associate asks you what happened, you tell them that it just spontaneously stopped working &mdash; they must have sold you a dud, right? And you deserve a new phone.</p> <p>Mmhmm, I've got your number, but hold it right there. Own whatever mistake you made that damaged or destroyed your product and purchase a new one if that's what it comes down to.</p> <h2>5. Your Standards Are Too High</h2> <p>For some customers, the retailer can't do enough to please them. That's a really poor outlook to have, and if this is how you roll, you're going to be disappointed, like, 90% of the time. You also want to consider that the people behind the counter are people too. Sure, they're working, but keep in mind that they're not specifically working for you. Nobody's a slave to anyone else, so don't treat anybody like they are.</p> <h2>6. You're Downright Rude</h2> <p>&quot;You get more bees with honey,&quot; is what they say, so why is your face screaming vinegar? Here's another one for you: Do unto others as you want them to do unto you, unless you want to be escorted out by security.</p> <p>&quot;We have customers who will call and be extremely rude and condescending to our reps, and we have told our employees that they do not need to put up with that behavior,&quot; Neiger says. &quot;In the same way we demand of ourselves and our team to treat everyone with utmost respect and understanding, no one deserves to be treated that way. Just because we service our customers, does not mean we will allow employees to take abuse. They matter, too, and we will not allow them to be a punching bag for someone's bad day.&quot;</p> <p>Also, you should probably get off your cell phone when you're interacting or speaking with an associate. Your mother taught you better than that.</p> <h2>7. You Look for Faults Instead of Promoting the Positive</h2> <p>I'm convinced that Yelp and other review sites were created specifically for the type of people who never have anything nice to say. While I believe that companies should be taken to task for doing a customer wrong, it's not the end of the world if they make a mistake that they fix. On the flip side, when an employee or the company itself goes out of their way to satisfy you as a customer, it's important to let people know that their customer service game is strong. I see this all the time with restaurants in particular. People want to complain when the food or ambiance missed the mark (in their opinion), but they don't have time to talk about how great something is.</p> <p>A fair and balanced approach to reviewing is necessary, with a focus on the positive.</p> <h2>8. You're Data Mining Associates &mdash; Then Spending Your Money Elsewhere</h2> <p>It's not fair to a retailer &mdash; no matter how &quot;giant&quot; you think they are &mdash; to data mine the associate for product intel or advice and then buy the item elsewhere. This sort of thing is happening more and more. You go into Best Buy and chat up the associate for 30 minutes about TVs, then go home to buy the one you want on Amazon. There's nothing wrong with doing your research, of course, just don't be lazy. Do it yourself instead of taking up the retailer's time by having them do it for you, without any kind of payoff.</p> <p>&quot;When customers go back and forth with us for hours and days to try and find the right product, and once we advise on the correct product, they promptly buy it elsewhere,&quot; Neiger reveals. &quot;Obviously, customers don't owe us to purchase from our store. However, many customers take up a lot of our time without ever having any intention to buy or who take the information to buy elsewhere. We are very competitively priced and have a price match guarantee, so it's not about price. We aim to help customers with our vast knowledge and personal customer service, but many customers take advantage of this.&quot;</p> <p><em>What are some other ways people are terrible customers? I'd love to hear what you have to say about this in the comments below.</em></p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F8-ways-youre-being-a-terrible-customer&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F8%2520Ways%2520Youre%2520Being%2520a%2520Terrible%2520Customer.jpg&amp;description=8%20Ways%20Youre%20Being%20a%20Terrible%20Customer"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/8%20Ways%20Youre%20Being%20a%20Terrible%20Customer.jpg" alt="8 Ways You're Being a Terrible Customer" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/mikey-rox">Mikey Rox</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-youre-being-a-terrible-customer">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-5"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-ways-to-be-the-perfect-customer">10 Ways to Be the Perfect Customer</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-retailers-with-the-absolute-best-customer-service">7 Retailers With the Absolute Best Customer Service</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-effectively-complain-to-the-manager">How to Effectively Complain to the Manager</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/ordering-online-versus-calling-it-in-which-is-better">Ordering Online Versus Calling it In: Which is Better?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-be-the-best-customer">How to be the best customer</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Consumer Affairs Shopping customer customer etiquette customer service etiquette service industry shopping etiquette Thu, 14 Apr 2016 10:31:09 +0000 Mikey Rox 1689970 at http://www.wisebread.com 10 Ways to Be the Perfect Customer http://www.wisebread.com/10-ways-to-be-the-perfect-customer <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/10-ways-to-be-the-perfect-customer" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_000025732617_Large.jpg" alt="being the perfect patrons" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>We drink and eat at bars and restaurants. We stay in hotel rooms, get our hair cut, and take flights. But how many of us actually stop and consider what kind of patrons we're being? Are we good customers? Are we making things easier on ourselves, or harder? Here's how you can make your life as a customer a whole lot better.</p> <h2>1. Tip Your Bartender With Cash Early On</h2> <p>Your bartender is relying on tips to make ends meet. However, if you open up a tab immediately with a credit card, he or she will have no idea how generous you are going to be. And bartenders are not in the habit of just giving away free drinks, or long pours, to just anyone. So, start the evening with cash. Order a drink, hand over a $20, and you will undoubtedly get a bunch of $1s in the change. Drop a couple of those on the bar for your first few drinks, then open up a tab. Your bartender will now be way more open to giving you the occasional double for the price of single, free drinks, and even free apps.</p> <h2>2. Don't Snap Your Fingers or Wave</h2> <p>It may seem like a natural way to get someone's attention, but in a bar, pub, or restaurant, it's actually quite rude. Unlike friends or coworkers, your server or bartender knows that their number one priority is to take care of you. That means they keep an eye on you. They look for small signals, they pay attention to how much of your drink is left, or what's on your plate. They may be very busy, but they will get to you. It's their job. So, clicking, waving, shouting, snapping &mdash; these are all unnecessary, and actually have a negative effect. No one likes to be summoned like a dog. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-lessons-in-manners-from-around-the-world?ref=seealso">12 Lessons in Manners From Around the World</a>)</p> <h2>3. The Customer (You) Is Not Always Right</h2> <p>It's something that is ingrained in American culture, and it has become a very difficult point for establishments to live up to. Whether you're in a restaurant, a hotel, a plane, or even the gym, you may feel very strongly about something, but it doesn't mean you are in the right. So, before making a scene (which, most of us don't do), make sure you have all your facts straight. It could be that the restaurant does not have to honor the coupon you have, which happens often with franchises. It could be that the hotel really is full, and there are no &quot;special&quot; rooms available for friends or famous people. Just be sure. And if you are right, argue your point politely and with respect. It will get you much further.</p> <h2>4. Never Give a Hard Time to People Who Handle Your Food</h2> <p>Or your drink, for that matter. This one is just common sense. After talking with bartenders, servers, and even flight attendants, the dumbest move you can ever make is to treat these people with little-to-no respect. If you do, they have ample time and plenty of motivation to do something unsavory. From spitting in your salad, to wiping the steak around the rim of a toilet bowl (this one was caught on camera), it's never a good idea to be mean to people who are alone with your meal. If you know someone who's been a real bully, and later complained of an upset stomach, you can guess what happened.</p> <h2>5. Give Compliments to the Staff</h2> <p>My nine-year-old daughter was eating her food and told me she loved it. Like, really loved it. I told her she should say something to the server, and she was shy, but agreed to. Not only did she get a big smile and a thank you, but a few minutes later, all the kids at the table got a free scoop of ice cream. So if you're having a great time, eating awesome food, or just love your server's attitude, say something. It will absolutely make their day, and sometimes, you get thanked in the nicest way.</p> <h2>6. Tip Your Server at Least 20%</h2> <p>Unless the service was exceptionally bad, you should tip at least 20% of the final bill. Servers require this amount to <a href="http://www.motherjones.com/politics/2014/05/minimum-wage-tip-map-waiters-waitresses-servers">make a living wage</a>. The 20% amount is a good place to start, because the servers are making less than minimum wage without this. In fact, most servers earn less than $5 an hour, with $2-$3 per hour being quite the norm. When servers get tipped 20%, it brings their hourly wage up past the $10 mark, hopefully to $15-$20 per hour or more. For the amount of work, running around, memorization, and stress, that's a fair wage to say the least. So please, tip 20%, or more if you can afford it. And if you tip less than 15%, or not at all, try and remember that you are getting cheaper food and drink because of the miserly wage the servers get.</p> <h2>7. Know What You Want to Eat and Drink</h2> <p>When you get to your seat, the server will give you some time to settle in, look at the menus, and feel comfortable. The first time they come back, they're going to ask you what you'd like to drink, and perhaps if you want an appetizer. If you need a little more time, that's fine, but don't keep delaying, making &quot;uuuummmmm&quot; sounds, and changing your mind. The server will have a lot of tables to tend, and it's unfair to keep them hanging. Also, restaurants want to &quot;turn&quot; tables in a timely manner. They are not expecting you to take 20 minutes to figure out what you want to eat. Most restaurants and bars these days have menus on their websites, so if you are someone that has a hard time deciding on a meal quickly, look it up beforehand.</p> <h2>8. Remember Names and Make Small Talk</h2> <p>&quot;Excuse me&quot; is fine, but if you say, &quot;Excuse me, John,&quot; you are instantly in a much better place with your server. It may not seem like a big deal, but people like to be treated with respect, and using their first name is a great start. It means you made the effort to ask for it, and remember it, and it will be appreciated. It's also a friendly way to talk, and the more friendly you are, the better you'll be treated. Even better, ask how their day is going. Are they watching the big game that weekend? Do they have any plans for the holiday? Showing an interest in your server or bartender will ensure a better experience for you.</p> <h2>9. Stack Dishes and Glasses if You Can</h2> <p>&quot;Hey, that's not my job, why should I do that?&quot; Well, you really don't have to. You're right, it's not your job. However, it can take a few seconds for everyone at the table to just pitch in and stack the empty dishes. It takes longer for one person, the server or busser, to do it. And if you ease their burden a little, you can expect quicker, friendlier service. On the many occasions I have done this, I have sometimes received a free dessert to say thank you. It obviously doesn't happen every time, but the staff really does appreciate the help.</p> <h2>10. Don't Send Your Drink Back at the Bar</h2> <p>If you're at the bar and you receive a drink that isn't really to your liking, you have three options. One: You can send it back, saying it's not good. Two: You can suck it up, drink it, and order something slightly different next time. Three: You can have a friend drink it, and order something else. Most of the time, if you choose option one, you are guaranteeing a night of poor customer service. Bartenders I talked to agreed that unless the drink was just completely wrong, they really don't care for your opinion on the way a drink was mixed. If it's a busy Friday or Saturday night, and they are working up a sweat, remixing a drink is making their life hell. And next time you want service, you will become invisible. Just be nice.</p> <p><em>Do you have any tips that we all, as patrons, could benefit from? Share them in the comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-ways-to-be-the-perfect-customer">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-youre-being-a-terrible-customer">8 Ways You&#039;re Being a Terrible Customer</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-questions-to-ask-before-buying-refurbished-appliances">4 Questions to Ask Before Buying Refurbished Appliances</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-7-dumbest-big-purchases-people-make">The 7 Dumbest Big Purchases People Make</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-strange-ways-online-shopping-has-changed-the-world">6 Strange Ways Online Shopping Has Changed the World</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-classic-impulse-buys-we-need-to-stop-falling-for">10 Classic Impulse Buys We Need to Stop Falling For</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Consumer Affairs Shopping customer etiquette manners patron shopping shopping etiquette tipping Wed, 09 Mar 2016 10:00:16 +0000 Paul Michael 1669477 at http://www.wisebread.com 10 Small Gestures That Go a Long Way at Work http://www.wisebread.com/10-small-gestures-that-go-a-long-way-at-work <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/10-small-gestures-that-go-a-long-way-at-work" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_000081177621_Large.jpg" alt="this small gesture at work went a long way" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>If you've ever worked in an office environment, you know how hectic things can get. Looming deadlines, departmental goals, staffing issues, and customer service challenges can send stress levels soaring and morale plummeting. If your office needs an attitude adjustment, start your own nine-to-five pay-it-forward program. Not only will it help boost morale, it'll help you get noticed in all the right ways. Here are 10 small gestures that go a long way at work.</p> <h2>1. Tidy Up</h2> <p>Does the break room at your office look like a scene from <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000IKQK7E/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=B000IKQK7E&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=TSNCPNWRUIJVNKLO">Animal House</a>? Take a few minutes to wipe out the microwave, empty the dishwasher, or replenish supplies. If you're brave enough to dig deep into the refrigerator, send an email notifying everyone well in advance and provide a clear deadline for claiming any unmarked items. (People get very attached to the science projects they've got growing in there.)</p> <h2>2. Feed the Machine</h2> <p>My favorite good deed is to make sure there's enough copy paper on hand and topping off the paper trays. The next person with an urgent, large-scale copy job will appreciate interruption-free &mdash; and panic-free &mdash; copying.</p> <h2>3. Brew It Up</h2> <p>Let's all agree &mdash; the world runs on coffee. Help everyone start their day off right by keeping this magic elixir flowing freely. Brew a fresh pot right before a big meeting or when you notice the supply running dangerously low. You'll be an instant hero and it might inspire some copycat kindness. Also, bringing in treats or doughnuts can give your coworkers a morning boost or turn the day around for someone who couldn't grab breakfast before dashing out the door.</p> <h2>4. Raise Your Hand</h2> <p>If your employer participates in charitable giving, volunteer to be the committee point person and spearhead your company's involvement with United Way, Habitat For Humanity, JDRF, or other worthy causes. Besides providing a valuable service, volunteering builds teamwork and taking a leadership role in volunteer activities can enrich your resume and expand your professional network. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-10-best-networking-tips-for-people-under-40?ref=seealso">The 10 Best Networking Tips for People Under 40</a>)</p> <h2>5. Get Social</h2> <p>Help your coworkers blow off some steam and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/13-hacks-to-avoid-burnout-at-work">avoid career burnout</a> by organizing a group get-together. Work with management to schedule an off-site team building event, a potluck, or an end-of-the-quarter celebration. Remember, keep things light and make it fun.</p> <h2>6. Offer Kudos</h2> <p>Public acknowledgement of a job well-done is a simple, free, and powerful motivator. Send an email to your team as a shout-out to a colleague who pulled of a mini-miracle. Take it a step further by giving the coworker a stellar LinkedIn recommendation. Besides being the right thing to do, it's one of many <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-ways-to-act-like-a-leader-and-get-ahead-at-work">ways to act like a leader</a> and move your career forward.</p> <h2>7. Be the Minute Man (Or Woman)</h2> <p>Volunteer to take the minutes at the next company-wide or team meeting. It'll provide a welcome respite for someone and showcase your listening, organization, and communication skills.</p> <h2>8. Offer to &quot;Uber&quot;</h2> <p>Channel your inner chauffeur. The next time your team is scheduled to attend an off-site meeting or event, offer to drive. The commute will spark conversations and relieve a few people of the stress of paying for parking, fighting traffic, or walking long distances.</p> <h2>9. Give a Small Gift</h2> <p>Did a coworker pitch in to help you get a difficult project out the door on time? Show your appreciation with a $5.00 gift card to their favorite coffee or dessert shop. Remember, it's not the amount you give, but the gesture that counts.</p> <h2>10. Express Interest</h2> <p>In the busyness of business, it's easy to forget that we're all human. Though some people prefer to draw a clear line between their professional and personal lives, most appreciate a little blurring of the two. Peek over that cube wall and ask how a vacation went, talk about a shared hobby, or briefly share a funny story. A little interest helps pass the time and makes work feel... well, less like work.</p> <p><em>What small gestures have made the biggest impression on you at work? What do you wish more people did in your office? </em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/kentin-waits">Kentin Waits</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-small-gestures-that-go-a-long-way-at-work">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-4"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/13-things-people-with-good-table-manners-never-do">13 Things People With Good Table Manners Never Do</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-times-you-should-never-feel-guilty-at-work">8 Times You Should Never Feel Guilty at Work</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-you-should-never-say-to-your-boss">10 Things You Should Never Say to Your Boss</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-ways-youre-driving-your-coworkers-insane">12 Ways You&#039;re Driving Your Coworkers Insane</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-ways-youre-being-a-terrible-neighbor">10 Ways You&#039;re Being a Terrible Neighbor</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income General Tips cleanliness etiquette good habits manners small gestures work etiquette Tue, 16 Feb 2016 10:30:22 +0000 Kentin Waits 1655105 at http://www.wisebread.com 5 Ways Good Manners Make You Wealthier http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-good-manners-make-you-wealthier <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-ways-good-manners-make-you-wealthier" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_000045065236_Largew.jpg" alt="her good manners make her wealthier" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Manners maketh the man. They're one of those things in life that cost you nothing, but can bring you great benefits &mdash; like respect. Or a smile from a stranger. And, in some cases, money. Here's how manners can lead you to a wealthier life. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-lessons-in-manners-from-around-the-world?ref=seealso">12 Lessons in Manners From Around the World</a>)</p> <h2>1. They Can Get You Hired</h2> <p>Good manners can help you score a great job. Politeness is a sign of professionalism, which is something every employer wants from their workers. Of course, manners won't compensate for a lack of job qualifications or a negative personal reference. But they can give you that boost you may need to clinch the gig. Likewise, a lack of manners can oust you from the running.</p> <p>According to Tom Keene, editor-at-large at Bloomberg Television and Radio, <a href="https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/20130319181847-205519992-lady-mary-would-you-please-pass-the-salt-and-pepper?goback=%2Empd2_*1_*1_*1_%2F20130319181847*5205519992*5lady*5mary*5would*5you*5please*5pass*5the*5salt*5and*5pepper&amp;trk=prof-post">illiteracy in the table manners</a> department can quickly make a job interview go south. &quot;Memo to all seeking gainful employment: Nothing kills the wine-and-dine interview like not knowing where the knife goes after you cut into the expense account New York strip steak,&quot; writes Keene, who has interviewed his fair share of job candidates. &quot;I have personally seen too many qualified and unfortunate people that will never get ahead because, for whatever reason, they never learned the basics of fork, fork, knife, spoon, spoon.&quot;</p> <h2>2. They Can Help You Move Up the Ladder</h2> <p>If you're after a raise or promotion, don't discount manners as a means of getting you there. All told, 85% of respondents in a recent survey from the staffing firm Accountemps said being <a href="https://www.roberthalf.com/accountemps/blog/top-5-workplace-etiquette-breaches-in-an-open-office-space-infographic">courteous to co-workers</a> has an impact on a person's career prospects. On the flipside, just 14% of participants said that having poor manners at work has no influence on an employee's career success. The study is based on surveys completed by more than 450 employees ages 18 years and older who worked in office culture in the U.S.</p> <p>&quot;Time constraints and external pressures aren't excuses for bad behavior,&quot; says Max Messmer, chairman of Accountemps. &quot;While it takes more than just good manners to rise through the ranks, displaying professional courtesy will only help your career.&quot; Among the biggest work etiquette offenses: Using a speakerphone or talking loudly on the phone, loitering or talking around a colleague's desk, eating foods that have strong odors, keeping a messy or cluttered workspace, and leaving the phone ringer on loud.</p> <h2>3. They Can Help You Succeed at Networking</h2> <p>When you receive a person's business card at an industry mixer, do you take the time to send them a polite email the next day noting that it was great to meet them? Do you take the time to learn the names of the people at the mixer so that you can properly greet them should you encounter them again in the future?</p> <p>These sorts of manners are a step beyond &quot;please&quot; and &quot;thank you.&quot; They take time, consideration, a good memory, and a little forward thinking. But folks who practice these next-level manners, otherwise known as polished social skills, will get ahead in their careers more times than not. That's because they know how to bridge frivolous meet-and-greets into meaningful connections. After all, you never know who might be in a position to help your career in the future.</p> <h2>4. They Can Increase Your Sales</h2> <p>If you work in sales, you likely already know that being kind, polite, and understanding with your customers increases the chances that you will earn their future business &mdash; regardless of what it is that you're selling. If you own a business or work on commission, practicing politeness with customers quite literally translates to more money in your pocket. At the very least, good manners will keep you from being labeled by your customers and co-workers as boorish.</p> <h2>5. They Can Solidify Friendships That Bring You Success</h2> <p>Friends are scientifically proven to make you more successful. Specifically, developing and maintaining friendships with positive, like-minded people. It's these folks who share your drive and goals who can best help you narrow in on your dreams. Now, here's where manners come in: Research shows that saying &quot;thank you&quot; helps people to build and sustain friendships. Truly, minding your manners can make a big difference in the quality of the friends you keep, and your overall success.</p> <p><em>What other manners make you wealthier? Let us know in the comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/brittany-lyte">Brittany Lyte</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-good-manners-make-you-wealthier">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-old-school-manners-we-want-back">8 Old School Manners We Want Back</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-basic-manners-you-must-teach-your-kids">10 Basic Manners You Must Teach Your Kids</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/18-things-people-with-good-social-skills-never-do">18 Things People With Good Social Skills Never Do</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/does-your-net-worth-even-matter">Does Your Net Worth Even Matter?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/if-youre-doing-this-on-your-first-date-youre-not-getting-a-second">If You&#039;re Doing This on Your First Date, You&#039;re Not Getting a Second</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance Personal Development etiquette get rich manners politeness saving money wealth Fri, 05 Feb 2016 12:00:03 +0000 Brittany Lyte 1649809 at http://www.wisebread.com 12 Lessons in Manners From Around the World http://www.wisebread.com/12-lessons-in-manners-from-around-the-world <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/12-lessons-in-manners-from-around-the-world" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_000073416861_Large.jpg" alt="Learning important lessons in manners from around the world" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>&quot;Mind your manners&quot; is an expression many of us heard while we were growing up. But depending on where you're from, those manners can vary greatly.</p> <p>Recently, my kids were watching <a href="http://amzn.to/1JlwleH">Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom</a><em>,</em> and pointed out that it was &quot;disgusting&quot; when the guests belched loudly during the meal scene. But I had to let them know that, in some cultures, this is not rude at all. It's just one of many lessons in manners we can learn from other cultures. Here are 11 more. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-rules-of-etiquette-everyone-should-know-and-follow?ref=seealso">10 Rules of Etiquette Everyone Should Know</a>)</p> <h2>1. The Belching Compliment &mdash; Eastern Culture</h2> <p>Letting a big burp rip after a meal is not considered rude by many people on our planet. In fact, in places like Turkey and Saudi Arabia, it is perfectly acceptable to burp after your meal, which tells the chef you ate plenty and enjoyed every bite. It can even be considered rude NOT to burp in the homes of those who have gone to a lot of effort to make you a great meal. It's a case of don't say it, prove it. And nothing says, &quot;Boy, did I stuff my face,&quot; like a big loud belch and a rub of the tummy.</p> <h2>2. Spit to Say Hello &mdash; Sub-Saharan Africa</h2> <p><iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/DYwyBs15ekI" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <p>This infamous scene from <a href="http://amzn.to/1Jlwf6U">Ace Ventura: When Nature Calls</a> was inspired by the customs of the Maasai Tribe, located in Kenya. While most countries consider spitting very rude and unhygienic (it could very easily transmit disease), the Maasai Tribe use it as a form of affection, good luck, or reverence. They will <a href="https://prezi.com/uehovmis-9kx/anthropolgy-and-the-maasai-tribe/">spit when they greet each other</a> as a sign of respect. A father will spit on his daughter when she is married, to bring good luck and prosperity to the marriage. And the tribe will spit on newborn babies, to ensure the young child will not be cursed. Yes, to us it seems odd, but it's safe to say that many of our ways will seems equally as bizarre to the Maasai.</p> <h2>3. Don't Shake With the Left Hand &mdash; The Middle East</h2> <p>Although most of us shake with our right hands anyway, it would not be considered terribly rude or offensive to extend the left hand in a greeting. But in the Middle East, this is quite an insult. In this culture, the hands have specific functions. The right hand is used for eating, and the left hand is reserved for wiping after using the bathroom. Knowing this, by offering your left hand, you are offering the hand that, even though clean, is associated with an act that is not. If you ever find yourself in the Middle East, and you're left-handed, make sure you lead with the right hand... every time. And of course, don't eat with your left hand, for the same reasons.</p> <h2>4. To Tip Is to Offend &mdash; Japan</h2> <p>In many countries, tipping is not the common practice that it is in America. In my home country of England, for example, you tip when the service is exceptional, or you genuinely like the person who is providing that service. This is because the wages of staff are not based on tips, and so, they do not depend on them.</p> <p>However, in Japan, tipping is actually considered to be insulting. By tipping, you are basically saying, &quot;Hey, here's some extra money. Go and get some training, because you need it.&quot; If they don't believe you're being rude, they can also be very confused by the extra money, thinking you have overpaid. Whether it's a taxi driver, a server, or a bellhop, don't tip in Japan. It's not good manners.</p> <h2>5. Never Show the Sole of Your Shoe &mdash; Arab Culture</h2> <p>You may remember an incident involving former President George W. Bush and Muntadar al-Zeidi, in which the latter <a href="http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2009/sep/17/why-i-threw-shoe-bush">threw his shoe</a> at &quot;Dubya.&quot; For many of us, the response was one right out of Austin Powers. &quot;Who throws a shoe, for goodness sake?&quot; But, in Arab culture, it was a <a href="http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/middleeast/iraq/3776970/Arab-culture-the-insult-of-the-shoe.html">significant show of disdain</a>. Showing someone the sole of your shoe is highly insulting, be it sitting with one foot perched on your knee, or reclining with your feet facing your host. The shoe is considered unclean, especially the sole, which is why is must be removed before entering places of worship, homes, and other buildings.</p> <h2>6. Slurp Your Food to Express Delight &mdash; China</h2> <p>Noodle dishes are popular everywhere, but how to show your enjoyment of them varies. In Western culture, we eat as silently as possible. Making any kind of noise is considered rude to those around us.</p> <p>In China, it's the opposite. If you are greeted with a delicious noodle meal &mdash; anything from ramen to laksa &mdash; you should slurp for all you're worth. It may even seem difficult to do at first, but it's considered a great compliment to the chef who prepared your meal. Slurping is the equivalent of saying, &quot;This is absolutely delicious. My compliments to the chef,&quot; after your first bite.</p> <h2>7. You Invite, You Pay &mdash; Ghana</h2> <p>Be careful about casual invitations to drinks and meals if you're ever in Ghana. You may say something like, &quot;Hey, you guys want to grab drinks later?&quot; and think nothing of it. But make sure you bring plenty of money to cover it. When you do this, you are saying, &quot;Hey, I'm buying drinks for everyone later, tonight's on me!&quot; If you invite people out and don't pay, it is considered extremely rude, and you may lose a few friends over it.</p> <h2>8. Avoid the Salt Shaker &mdash; Egypt</h2> <p>The chances are, you won't find one on your table anyway. But if you feel the need to ask for salt, you may want to prepare for some mean looks coming in your direction. Asking for salt is telling the chef that he or she didn't season the dish correctly, and you are now going to right that wrong. You may as well slap the host in the face and say, &quot;This tastes awful.&quot;</p> <h2>9. Never Fill Your Own Glass &mdash; Japan</h2> <p>Here, as in most countries, you pour your own drink when you're thirsty. In Japan, this is considered greedy, narcissistic, and even anti-social. In other words, you are being incredibly rude by pouring your beer, wine, or sake into your own glass. Instead, it is <a href="http://www.japan-talk.com/jt/new/how-to-pour-a-drink-in-Japan">proper to pour for other people</a> at the table first, and they will in turn reciprocate the gesture. If you finish your glass before others do, simply top them off, and you will get the same treatment.</p> <h2>10. Be Late, Be Polite &mdash; Venezuela</h2> <p>As someone who tries to get to my destination a few minutes ahead of time, this one baffles me. Being late is something I personally consider rude and selfish; you are literally wasting people's time.</p> <p>However, this is not the case in Venezuela. If you show up on time, or early, you are looked upon as being much too eager; or in the case of an event with food and drink being served, much too greedy. You should plan to arrive 15-20 minutes after the event is scheduled to begin. Unless, of course, it's something like a concert or funeral.</p> <h2>11. Avoid Bringing Wine to a Dinner Party &mdash; France</h2> <p>Bringing a bottle of wine to the party is considered good manners in many places, but not so in France. The home of great wine, and people who know a lot about it, French homes take pride in their wine selection. By bringing a bottle of wine to the party, you are implying that the wine they have to offer simply isn't good enough. Instead, it's advisable to bring some flowers (not yellow, as this suggests an unfaithful partner) or sweets.</p> <h2>12. The &quot;OK&quot; Sign Is Not Okay &mdash; Germany, South America, Turkey</h2> <p>&quot;How are you doing?&quot; is a question that can often be answered with the okay sign: touching your forefinger and thumb together to represent the letter &quot;O.&quot; However, in some countries, this gesture is the height of bad manners, and could get you into a physical altercation. It can be seen as a sign that represents the anus, or it's as insulting as flipping the bird is here. Specifically in Turkey, it is a sign that tells someone they are gay, and not in a nice way.</p> <p><em>Have you encountered interesting manners and customs around the world? Share your stories in the comments below. </em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-lessons-in-manners-from-around-the-world">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-rules-of-etiquette-we-wish-were-still-around-today">8 Rules of Etiquette We Wish Were Still Around Today</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/13-things-people-with-good-table-manners-never-do">13 Things People With Good Table Manners Never Do</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-basic-manners-you-must-teach-your-kids">10 Basic Manners You Must Teach Your Kids</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-signs-you-were-raised-by-parents-with-bad-social-skills">5 Signs You Were Raised by Parents With Bad Social Skills</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-right-thing-to-say-in-20-tough-situations">The Right Thing to Say in 20 Tough Situations</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Life Hacks cultural etiquette etiquette manners other cultures polite Mon, 25 Jan 2016 12:00:08 +0000 Paul Michael 1642990 at http://www.wisebread.com Avoid These 7 Things When Living With Roommates http://www.wisebread.com/avoid-these-7-things-when-living-with-roommates <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/avoid-these-7-things-when-living-with-roommates" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/disagreeing_roomates.jpg" alt="disagreeing roommates who can&#039;t get along" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Until very recently, I've never lived alone. I went from my parents' house to a college dorm room to a fraternity house to various apartments, to a condo of my own &mdash; all of which were occupied by at least one other person. Considering that I'm OCD about everything &mdash; which is perhaps why I find myself currently living alone &mdash; and that I've lived with a couple crap-bag human beings in the past, I'm a bona fide expert in all the things you should never do when cohabitating with someone else.</p> <p>You've been warned.</p> <h2>1. Eat Other People's Food Without Permission</h2> <p>It's important for me to establish that while I've had many roommates over the years who have all done something I didn't like (as I'm sure I did for them, too), most of them weren't particularly offensive. A little annoyance here and there, yeah, but that's par for the course. And we're still friends. But there was one roommate who was so vile, so rude, so throw-up-in-my-mouth disgusting that most of the following anecdotes will be based on my short, six-month experience with him. Like the time he ate my food without permission.</p> <p>But he didn't <em>just</em> eat my food without permission. It's not like a pack of ramen was missing and I lost my ish. Oh, no. This dude and three of his drunken friends ravaged $50 worth of the groceries and snacks I had just purchased the night before. Straight-up murdered the fridge and cabinets. My cheese popcorn never stood a chance. Of course, the next day when I confronted him, he was all apologetic and offered to pay for the pilfered goods. But he never did. Because that's the kind of person he was &mdash; Satan's Spawn (SS), who, admittedly, I should've known was up to no good when he suspiciously smelled like both sweat and Cool Ranch Doritos simultaneously.</p> <h2>2. Fail to Pitch In on Common Household Items</h2> <p>There were three of us living in the Baltimore row house in which SS kept his lair, but only two of us pitched in on household items. Personally, I didn't mind buying cleaning products. I accept that not everyone lives as extreme-clean as I do, and they don't have to. But, when you don't throw in a few bucks for paper towels and toilet paper, and then use half the rolls yourself, you're some special kind of evil. As a result, my other roommate and I started rationing the paper products amongst ourselves and kept them in our respective bedrooms for our own use.</p> <p>And, nope, I'm not even a little bit remorseful about the first time SS discovered our new tactic right after doing his business. Bet he found the cleaning products that day.</p> <h2>3. Bring in a Revolving Door of Randos for Overnight Stays</h2> <p>Surprisingly, SS didn't bring in a bunch of randos. Frankly, we were shocked when anybody at all would stay the night in his bedroom &mdash; because Godspeed to that brave warrior princess and her penicillin prescription.</p> <p>Still, it's never cool to have strangers in and out of the house all hours of the night. Be respectful of your roommates and recognize that perhaps they don't appreciate Tinder &quot;dates&quot; staying over all the time. My personal rule is that non-roommate stays should be limited to no more than 1/3 of the month, which applies to significant others just as much as it does bar-to-bedroom buddies, friends, and family. I didn't sign a lease with those people, so why are they here all the time?</p> <h2>4. Being Consistently Late on Rent and Other Payments</h2> <p>If SS didn't pay me back for the $50 worth of food he scarfed down, then it's probably not hard to believe that he rarely paid his rent. We lived in an equal-payment situation, and our landlord wanted us to help make up the difference. Pfft. Nerp. Hold up, bub. That's not my friend over there drinking top-of-the-line tequila, but who's too house-poor to buy toilet paper. I'm not picking up his slack. Likewise, nobody in your place should be covering for you if you can't make ends meet. In that case, you got to go. Don't let the door hit ya where the good lord split ya. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-money-moments-that-are-awkward-for-everyone?ref=seealso">10 Money Moments That Are Awkward for Everyone</a>)</p> <h2>5. Keep Untidy Spaces</h2> <p>This dude didn't pick up a broom the whole time he lived with us. Couldn't find the Ajax to scrub the tub, or replace the shower curtain when it got grimy. Nary a bottle of Windex or 409 ever touched his hands, and God forbid he wipe down the stove after his Spaghetti-Os splattered everywhere. But while he left his indelible mark on the common areas, it was his bedroom that should have been quarantined. After months of my dishes consistently disappearing, rarely to be seen again, I opened SS's bedroom door one day to take back what was mine. Except they were now science projects, like that time Stephen King touched a meteorite in <a href="http://amzn.to/1Rm7LwC">Creepshow</a> and starting growing alien vegetation all over himself. Thus, they became <em>his</em> dishes, that jerk.</p> <p>Of course everybody has a right to keep their room how they want it. Some people aren't as tidy as others, and that's okay, in your own personal area. But if you're downright filthy, it becomes a household issue, especially as pests and rodents can be problematic. Keep common areas tidy and at least try to keep your bedroom somewhat clean, as well.</p> <h2>6. Partake in &quot;Recreational Activities&quot; Indoors</h2> <p>I use to be a cigarette smoker, but I never smoked indoors in a roommate situation if they didn't like it. I also recognize that some people like to smoke weed, and since that was never my thing, I appreciated when my roommates would smoke elsewhere.</p> <p>If you drink or smoke and your roommate isn't cool with it, then you need to respect that and keep your recreational activities far away from them.</p> <h2>7. Borrow Clothing Without Asking</h2> <p>I didn't have to worry about SS borrowing my clothing without asking, but when I was in college I had a roommate &mdash; one of my fraternity brothers &mdash; who would borrow my clothes on the regular. In all fairness, we borrowed each other's clothing, since we were essentially the same size and build, but I didn't like when he would go into my closet without asking first. It's cool when you're both in the room getting ready for a party and can swap closets in person, but it's a little invasive if you're going through your roomie's wardrobe when they're not there. If this is something you enjoy with your roommates, just remember boundaries. If the other person doesn't know about it, it's stealing. And you better hope you don't get a stain on my shirt... lest you want to be buried in it.</p> <p><em>Tell me: What are some other things to never do when living with a roommate? I'd love to hear some of your roommate horror stories in the comments below.</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/mikey-rox">Mikey Rox</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/avoid-these-7-things-when-living-with-roommates">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-4"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-alternative-housing-options-you-can-afford">5 Alternative Housing Options You Can Afford</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-benefits-of-having-a-roommate-besides-saving-on-rent">The Benefits of Having a Roommate (Besides Saving on Rent)</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-to-score-cheap-rent-without-annoying-roommates">5 Ways to Score Cheap Rent — Without Annoying Roommates</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/should-you-move-to-a-new-city-to-reduce-lifestyle-costs">Should You Move to a New City to Reduce Lifestyle Costs?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-simple-rules-of-excellent-houseguest-etiquette">11 Simple Rules of Excellent Houseguest Etiquette</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Lifestyle Real Estate and Housing apartment living etiquette life hacks living with roommates rent roommates Fri, 15 Jan 2016 12:00:02 +0000 Mikey Rox 1638028 at http://www.wisebread.com 10 Things You Should Never Do During a Job Interview http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-you-should-never-do-during-a-job-interview <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/10-things-you-should-never-do-during-a-job-interview" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/couple_whispering_000072021719.jpg" alt="People learning what they should never do in a job interview" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Though the U.S. economy is alive and kicking again, the job market still feels a bit sluggish. If you've managed to land an interview, congratulations &mdash; you're doing something right. Build on that success by avoiding common interview blunders. Here are 10 things you should never do in an interview.</p> <h2>1. Don't Arrive Unprepared</h2> <p>Take time to learn about the company and the position you're applying for. Gathering a few basic facts shows motivation and will help you know what questions to ask later. Also, prepare by bringing along extra copies of your resume or CV; some interviewers may be pulled in at the last moment and appreciate your forethought.</p> <h2>2. Don't Show Up Late</h2> <p>No surprise here; don't show up late to a job interview. In fact, pad your schedule by 20&ndash;30 minutes just in case the train is running late or you can't find a parking spot. Arriving to an interview five to 10 minutes early is completely acceptable and gives you time to mentally prepare.</p> <h2>3. Don't Leave Your Phone On</h2> <p>If your phone rings during a job interview, you'd better hope there's an HR director on the other end of the line with a smokin' hot offer. Ringing cell phones and formal job interviews don't mix. As unnatural as it may feel, completely silence or turn your phone off during an interview (and remember, vibrating phones can still be heard and are still a distraction).</p> <h2>4. Don't Sit Down Before You're Invited</h2> <p>Sometimes small courtesies can make a big impression. It's good business etiquette to not sit down until you've been invited or shown to your seat.</p> <h2>5. Don't Slouch</h2> <p>It may sound terribly old-fashioned, but posture matters. Standing tall and sitting up straight not only conveys a sense of maturity and experience to others, it can boost your self confidence. If you're a chronic sloucher, improve your posture with <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/get-and-keep-amazing-posture-by-doing-these-10-stretches-today">10 targeted stretching exercises</a>.</p> <h2>6. Don't Talk Trash</h2> <p>Be honest, but stay positive when it comes to discussing your previous or current employer. The world is smaller than most of us imagine and it's impossible to know the personal or professional connections your interviewer may have.</p> <h2>7. Don't Talk Money</h2> <p>Don't talk money unless you're asked, or an offer has been extended. A premature focus on money and benefits sends the wrong message to your potential employer. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-never-to-bring-up-in-a-job-interview?ref=seealso">5 Things Never to Bring Up in a Job Interview</a>)</p> <h2>8. Don't Mumble</h2> <p>Hold your head up, speak clearly, and make eye contact. Employers shouldn't have to work to hear you and mumblers don't come across as capable, confident employees. Remember, good communication is a skill you can learn. If you've had trouble in the past, explore <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-to-get-people-to-listen-when-you-talk">ways to speak more effectively</a>.</p> <h2>9. Don't Up Talk</h2> <p>Up-talking is that annoying linguistic habit of phrasing statements as if they were questions (&quot;I really enjoy my current position, but I think I'm ready for something more challenging?&quot;). Up-talking implies you're unsure of what you're saying, need approval, and lack confidence. Sure, it seems like everyone is doing it, but up-talking is still the verbal equivalent of nails on a chalkboard.</p> <h2>10. Don't Skip the Questions</h2> <p>Your interviewer is likely to ask if you have any questions about the role or the company. Don't be shy; be ready with a <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-questions-you-should-ask-at-every-job-interview">set of essential interview questions</a>. Speaking up shows that you're interested and have been listening.</p> <p>In our hyper-casual world, paying attention to the details during an interview can help you stand out in all the right ways. Especially for those positions that require interacting with clients or the public, knowing how to navigate a formal interview with grace and refinement is its own unique qualification.</p> <p><em>What's the biggest mistake you've made in an interview? If you've been on the other side of the desk, what advice do you have for interviewees?</em></p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F10-things-you-should-never-do-during-a-job-interview&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F10%2520Things%2520You%2520Should%2520Never%2520Do%2520During%2520a%2520Job%2520Interview.jpg&amp;description=10%20Things%20You%20Should%20Never%20Do%20During%20a%20Job%20Interview"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/10%20Things%20You%20Should%20Never%20Do%20During%20a%20Job%20Interview.jpg" alt="10 Things You Should Never Do During a Job Interview" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/kentin-waits">Kentin Waits</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-you-should-never-do-during-a-job-interview">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-hired-by-your-dream-company">How to Get Hired by Your Dream Company</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/video-resumes-and-5-other-cool-tricks-to-land-the-job">Video Resumes and 5 Other Cool Tricks to Land the Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-to-ace-your-next-phone-interview">7 Ways to Ace Your Next Phone Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-proper-ways-to-discuss-salary-in-a-job-interview">The Proper Ways to Discuss Salary in a Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-keep-your-job-search-a-secret">How to Keep Your Job Search a Secret</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Job Hunting blunders etiquette getting hired interviewing Mistakes professionalism Tue, 13 Oct 2015 17:01:32 +0000 Kentin Waits 1583916 at http://www.wisebread.com 10 Things You Should Never Say in a Work Email http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-you-should-never-say-in-a-work-email <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/10-things-you-should-never-say-in-a-work-email" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_on_computer_000054097782_0.jpg" alt="Woman learning things she should never say in a work email" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>There was a time when email was not a part of your everyday work life. That time has passed. Status updates, memos, internal correspondence &mdash; almost everything comes by email now. This is the paperless office. However, with increased speed and efficiency comes a serious drawback: Everything you write can be monitored, forwarded, or printed out and shown to anyone, at any time.</p> <p>An email is not fleeting, and if you say the wrong thing, it can haunt you. So if you regularly use email at work, here are 10 things you should never say.</p> <h2>1. &quot;I Hate This Place.&quot;</h2> <p>You may very well be seething because of a recent decision, or corporate restructure. However, airing your grievance like this in an email could really come back to bite you. Even if you say it tongue in cheek (&quot;Man, they gave us free donuts again today, I hate this place!&quot;) it could be taken the wrong way. By all means: vent! Share your frustrations with trusted coworkers, and your close family and friends. But never send out an email to someone telling them you hate your employer, or your job. Because when it's time to lay someone off, who better than the person who hates working here anyway?</p> <h2>2. &quot;I'm Calling in Sick Tomorrow.&quot;</h2> <p>Unless you are genuinely sick, and have a feeling you won't make it in the next day, this is not a phrase you want out there. It basically means &quot;I feel like a day off, screw it, I'll just take a sickie.&quot; Although many of us have done this at some point in our careers, it's not professional and it puts other people at work in a bind. They have to cover for your &quot;sick day,&quot; and the company has to pay for it. Flaunting abuse of a sick day is just a bad idea, and if <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-things-you-need-to-stop-asking-hr-for">HR picks up on this</a>, or the person you send it to takes umbrage with it, you could be in trouble.</p> <h2>3. &quot;I'm Looking for Another Job.&quot;</h2> <p>When times get tough at work, or layoffs look imminent, the first course of action for many people is to start looking for another job. There is nothing wrong with that &mdash; your employer will not be the one paying your bills if they dump you, and you need to take care of yourself first. However: looking around is one thing&hellip; but admitting it, especially in an email, is something else. You may think that if people do think you're looking for work elsewhere, they'll do anything to try and keep you around. Maybe even give you a raise, or a promotion. That rarely happens. Most likely you will be looked upon as a troublesome employee who is not giving the job your best effort.</p> <h2>4. &quot;[Name] is So Hot.&quot;</h2> <p>Any kind of talk that could lead to proof of sexual harassment, even if it seems completely innocent to you, is not something you should be putting in an email. You do not want this ever being shown to you as a reason you were inappropriate at work.</p> <h2>5. &quot;That's Not My Problem.&quot;</h2> <p>This may be completely accurate. Someone may give you a task to do, or a problem to solve, and it really isn't your problem. But, don't say that. The instant reaction to that phrase is &quot;Well, that person isn't much of a team player&quot; or &quot;They don't care about the company, just themselves.&quot; If it is something you cannot help with, say it in a more understanding way: &quot;I really wish I could help with that, but it's outside my area of expertise.&quot; If you can help, and it will not eat up too much of your time, then help. But never say &quot;It's not my problem.&quot; You look dismissive and unhelpful.</p> <h2>6. &quot;I Don't Care.&quot;</h2> <p>You may mean it. You may be displaying a little sarcasm. Either way, don't say to anyone that you don't care. At the very least, it makes you look uninvolved, even if you were trying to be nice. &quot;Hey, what color should we use on the new product line?&quot; &quot;Oh, anything is good, I don't care.&quot; Well, you should care, even if you were trying to empower another employee. Find another way to be easygoing, without saying you don't care. And if you mean it in more of a &quot;I don't care about this place or this job,&quot; you should definitely shelve that. Would you want to keep someone around who didn't care about the business or their projects?</p> <h2>7. &quot;I Got Really Drunk Last Night!&quot;</h2> <p>Well, that may be, but a work email is no place to talk about it. These days, especially with social media and everyone having a camera on them at all times, corporations are very wary of how you represent yourself in public. You are, after all, their employee. As such, and it varies from company to company, you are representing them at all times. Being off-your-face drunk may have been a blast, and many of your friends and co-workers may have been there too, but don't admit to this in an email. To be fair, there's really no need to be discussing non-work related events in a company email anyway.</p> <h2>8. &quot;Delete After Reading.&quot;</h2> <p>Whatever you're about to write, if you need to preface it with that, you're on very shaky ground. It's most likely you're about to be disparaging, or to say something very sensitive that could get you and the company in a lot of trouble. Plus, nothing is ever really deleted. Even if you trust the person you're sending it to 100%, copies are kept on servers. There is no such thing as deleting (just ask Beyoncé&hellip; or perhaps even Hillary Clinton). So, don't write that, or anything that needs it as a disclaimer.</p> <h2>9. &quot;Party at My Place!&quot;</h2> <p>Parties. Barbecues. Get-togethers. All of them happen all the time, and many happen with the people you work with. This isn't surprising, we spend more time with our work colleagues than we do with our friends, and even our family. But, using work email to organize a boozy shindig is not a good idea. This is a personal event, it should be organized through personal emails. If anything were to happen at the event, it may also bring the company into the situation. &quot;Was this a company sanctioned event? Why was it organized through your company?&quot; Just leave the invites to Gmail and Evite.</p> <h2>10. &quot;Just Between You and Me&hellip;&quot;</h2> <p>Just stop right there. There is no &quot;you and me.&quot; Whatever you think you can share with someone over the company email, you can't. If it's a personal matter, keep it to your personal emails. If it's a company matter, have a phone call or meet them in person in a closed room. There are obviously times when personal company information must be shared between managers, executives, or other people in the corporation. However, there is a right way to go about it, and a wrong way. Starting an email with that opening is definitely the wrong way.</p> <p><em>Have you gotten into trouble from something you wrote in an email? Have you heard stories about people who have? Let us know.</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-you-should-never-say-in-a-work-email">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-4"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-unmistakeable-signs-youre-slacking-at-work">5 Unmistakeable Signs You&#039;re Slacking at Work</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-tips-for-better-workplace-body-language">7 Tips for Better Workplace Body Language</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-times-you-should-speak-up-at-work">10 Times You Should Speak Up at Work</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-things-to-do-on-your-first-day-at-a-new-job">6 Things to Do on Your First Day at a New Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-healthy-habits-to-take-to-work">10 Healthy Habits to Take to Work</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building etiquette inappropriate job security Office work emails Fri, 04 Sep 2015 09:00:32 +0000 Paul Michael 1545795 at http://www.wisebread.com 8 Old School Manners We Want Back http://www.wisebread.com/8-old-school-manners-we-want-back <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/8-old-school-manners-we-want-back" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/bad_date_000015888248.jpg" alt="Woman wishing her date had old school manners" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Do you groan when you think about manners? Do you remember your cotillion or your mother telling you to chew with your mouth closed? I get it.</p> <p>But the thing is, <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-basic-manners-you-must-teach-your-kids">manners were important</a> to people for a reason. They were based on common courtesies that people wanted to see reflected throughout society. In some cases, when we lost a particular set of manners, we lost the courtesy. And if we can reclaim those manners, we will reclaim the courtesy.</p> <p>Don't worry! I'm not going to go all Emily Post on you (though you get extra points if you don't have to Google her!). But I am going to suggest a fews simple ways we can go about treating each other better. If we can reclaim some of these manners, we'll be happier both as individuals and as a culture.</p> <h2>1. Making Eye Contact</h2> <p>Let me be the first to tell you that I am terrible at making and maintaining eye contact. It makes me nervous, and I'm highly visually distractible, so anything that moves draws my eye. But it's these very reasons that have moved me to focus on making eye contact more often.</p> <p>Looking someone in the eyes tells them that they are important. It tells them that they have your full and complete attention. In this age where so many people are distracted by cell phones, where we text in the middle of meals with friends and take calls in the middle of meetings, stopping and taking the care to make eye contact can change things. People matter. We should let them know.</p> <h2>2. Not Staring</h2> <p>This may seem like it opposes the previous point, so let me explain. Eye contact involves some sort of exchange. In order to look someone in the eyes, they must also be looking into your eyes (or else you end up looking at their forehead). But staring usually involves looking at someone when they are not returning that look.</p> <p>Watching people can be interesting and fun, and I don't think there's anything wrong with that. But there's no need to stare, to watch someone in a way that is overly intense or invasive: it is rude and potentially hurtful. Instead of staring, say hi or offer a smile, then mind your own business.</p> <h2>3. Remembering &quot;Please&quot; and &quot;Thank You&quot;</h2> <p>These words have been nearly deleted from the vocabularies of almost everyone who does not work in customer service. But they shouldn't just be words that we say to give a particular professional impression.</p> <p>Saying &quot;please&quot; and &quot;thank you&quot; isn't just polite &mdash; it can change the ways we think. When we say &quot;please,&quot; it can help us remember that we are asking someone to go out of their way for us. And when we say &quot;thank you,&quot; it can spark actual gratitude in us, can remind us that we have something to be grateful for even in the middle of a day that is mundane or difficult.</p> <p>And these words remind the people we're speaking to that we appreciate them, that they have value to us, and that we honor their presence.</p> <h2>4. Making Conversation</h2> <p>By &quot;making conversation,&quot; I don't mean making small talk. It used to be that learning how to carry on a conversation was considered good manners. This means learning how to ask good, appropriate questions of people you're just meeting or of acquaintances, and how to answer questions, too.</p> <p>We have lost this art. Today, we seem to engage in small talk or we want to go deep. However, it's hard to go deep without some sort of foundation, and making conversation can provide this foundation for the relationships we crave. So, next time you ask someone what they do for a living, follow up by asking them how they got into the field, or why they chose that career, or what their favorite part of the job is.</p> <h2>5. Writing Thank You Notes</h2> <p>I feel like I hear a lot about thank you notes when manners come up, and that can get old really, really fast. But the truth is that a handwritten thank you note expresses more than gratitude.</p> <p>Think about the last one of these that you got and how it made you feel. Taking the time to write out your gratitude says that you see something of the heart behind the gift or action you're expressing gratefulness for, and that you recognize the love behind the gift.</p> <h2>6. Remembering to RSVP</h2> <p>If someone asks you to RSVP to an event, do it. Even if you really don't know if you'll be able to come, let the organizer know that. They will appreciate the fact that you valued them and their invitation enough to let you know.</p> <p>When you RSVP, you honor the fact that someone values you enough to invite you to a special event. Even if you can't go, your response acknowledges the relationship between you and says that you value it.</p> <h2>7. Holding Doors Open</h2> <p>This is not just a call for men to hold doors for women. It's a call for all of us to open our eyes to the world around us, to the other people in our midst, and to help them when they need it.</p> <p>I can't tell you how many times I've been grateful for someone holding a door for me when I've been balancing a screaming toddler, a shopping cart, my purse, and a diaper bag. It's particularly awesome when I don't even have to struggle first, when someone sees that I'm going to need help and jumps in.</p> <p>This simple action has changed my day before, and I've become intentional in trying to notice and change a day for other people. No one wants to struggle with a door, to hold up a bunch of people and create a bottleneck. So notice, and help them out.</p> <h2>8. Making Proper Introductions</h2> <p>I think we all know the awkwardness of finding ourselves in a group conversation where we don't know everyone. I don't think we go into a situation intending to <em>not </em>introduce someone, but we do it all the time. It ends up being disrespectful to almost everyone involved.</p> <p>If you don't have time to prepare an introduction, simply introduce people by name and by their relationship with you. If you do have time to prepare, focus on how people might connect and mention these things in your introduction. No matter how you introduce people, though, they will feel valued and honored that you made the effort.</p> <p><em>Are manners important to you? Which ones are you intentional about incorporating into your life? </em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/sarah-winfrey">Sarah Winfrey</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-old-school-manners-we-want-back">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-5"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-good-manners-make-you-wealthier">5 Ways Good Manners Make You Wealthier</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-basic-manners-you-must-teach-your-kids">10 Basic Manners You Must Teach Your Kids</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/18-things-people-with-good-social-skills-never-do">18 Things People With Good Social Skills Never Do</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/if-youre-doing-this-on-your-first-date-youre-not-getting-a-second">If You&#039;re Doing This on Your First Date, You&#039;re Not Getting a Second</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-ways-youre-driving-your-coworkers-insane">12 Ways You&#039;re Driving Your Coworkers Insane</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Development courtesy etiquette manners politeness Wed, 17 Jun 2015 21:00:28 +0000 Sarah Winfrey 1454505 at http://www.wisebread.com 8 Rules of Etiquette We Wish Were Still Around Today http://www.wisebread.com/8-rules-of-etiquette-we-wish-were-still-around-today <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/8-rules-of-etiquette-we-wish-were-still-around-today" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/friends_at_dinner_000025807764.jpg" alt="Friends using rules of etiquette that we wish were still around today" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>In our age of casual living, is etiquette dead? Have mobile communication, 24/7 schedules, and fast food dining killed the very last vestiges of graciousness and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/3-supposed-etiquette-faux-pas-that-actually-make-you-look-good">good manners</a>? Maybe so. Here are eight rules of etiquette that are quickly fading into history.</p> <h2>1. Bringing a Host or Hostess Gift</h2> <p>When invited to a dinner party, it's polite to bring a token of appreciation for the host or hostess. But the rare few who still follow this fading rule of good etiquette get hung up on how much to spend. Don't worry about price; the real value is in the gesture. A modest bouquet of flowers, a pound of great coffee, a small box of high-quality chocolate, or a bottle of wine are perfectly acceptable options.</p> <h2>2. Digging in Before the Host</h2> <p>Good form dictates that no one should begin to eat until every guest has been seated, served, and the host (or cook) has taken the first bite. The latter part of this rule may only be bent if the host expressly gives permission. Since most of us now eat in front of the TV, mealtime is often a free-for-all. Still, keep this little nugget of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/reclaiming-etiquette-dining-basics-for-young-professionals">basic dining etiquette</a> handy for business or formal occasions.</p> <h2>3. Using Salt and Pepper Properly</h2> <p>There are two simple rules about these most common of condiments. First, it's impolite to add salt or pepper to your food before you've tasted it (the offensive suggestion here is that you expect the food to be bland). Second, when a fellow diner asks you to pass the salt or the pepper, good etiquette requires that both be passed together.</p> <h2>4. Signaling When You've Finished a Meal</h2> <p>At a restaurant or catered event, diners used to communicate to wait staff using their utensils. Though the rules are quickly becoming lost to a more genteel time, well-trained servers still know them. Placing the knife and fork together and parallel at the eleven o'clock position (fork tines up) signals you've finished your meal. Laying the knife on the right side the plate and the fork on the left (tines up) indicates you're just taking a break.</p> <h2>5. Greeting a New Couple</h2> <p>Here's something to remember the next time you're invited to a wedding: It's proper to say &quot;congratulations&quot; to the new groom, but not the bride. Congratulating her implies she's won something (the groom). Instead, &quot;best wishes&quot; is the proper sentiment for a new bride. Not sure if you can keep the rules straight? Choose the safer, universal option and simply offer best wishes to the new couple.</p> <h2>6. Writing Thank-You Notes</h2> <p>It might be difficult to imagine in our hyper-informal world, but writing a thank-you note after receiving a gift used to be a reflex. Birthday gifts and holiday gifts each required a short but sincere hand-written thank you and both young men and young women had reams of stationery at the ready for just such occasions. For parents who want to their kids to stand out for all the right reasons, reviving the tradition of the hand-written thank-you note is a sure-fire way to do it. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-rules-of-etiquette-everyone-should-know-and-follow?ref=seealso">10 Rules of Etiquette Everyone Should Know</a>).</p> <h2>7. Giving Up Your Bus or Subway Seat</h2> <p>Granted this chivalrous move can still be spotted in the wild from time to time, but giving up your bus or subway seat for a pregnant, elderly, or similarly vulnerable person was once the standard. Sadly, seeing someone follow this basic rule of etiquette today is just rare enough to get noticed.</p> <h2>8. Walking in Front of Someone</h2> <p>When I was a student in fifth grade, the rules of etiquette were drilled into my head by an old-school and overzealous teacher. Back then, we were taught that when passing in front someone's line of vision (say, a fellow shopper who's browsing a particular shelf in a grocery store) it's good manners to say &quot;excuse me&quot; or &quot;pardon me.&quot; Rather than a request for the person to move, it's simply an acknowledgement that you've temporarily obscured the shopper's view.</p> <p>Trust me, you can stick a fork in this one &mdash; it's done. Just the other day I offered my polite &quot;excuse me&quot; in a local department store purely out of habit and was met with a quick and scornful &quot;you're excused!&quot; from a twenty-something shopper. Ahh, the times they are a-changin'.</p> <p><em>What fading of rules of etiquette do you still follow? Which ones do you miss the most?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/kentin-waits">Kentin Waits</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-rules-of-etiquette-we-wish-were-still-around-today">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-6"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-lessons-in-manners-from-around-the-world">12 Lessons in Manners From Around the World</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-good-manners-make-you-wealthier">5 Ways Good Manners Make You Wealthier</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-old-school-manners-we-want-back">8 Old School Manners We Want Back</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-rules-of-etiquette-everyone-should-know-and-follow">10 Rules of Etiquette Everyone Should Know (and Follow!)</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/13-things-people-with-good-table-manners-never-do">13 Things People With Good Table Manners Never Do</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Life Hacks customs etiquette manners politeness Fri, 29 May 2015 15:00:10 +0000 Kentin Waits 1433840 at http://www.wisebread.com