grandparents http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/10508/all en-US 11 Great Life Hacks Your Grandparents Forgot to Share With You http://www.wisebread.com/11-great-life-hacks-your-grandparents-forgot-to-share-with-you <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/11-great-life-hacks-your-grandparents-forgot-to-share-with-you" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/housewife_watering_plant_000018649549.jpg" alt="Woman learning life hacks her grandparents forgot to share " title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Times may change, but people will always find ingenious ways to solve life's little problems. These days we call them &quot;<a href="http://www.wisebread.com/22-lessons-every-20-something-should-learn">life hacks</a>,&quot; but your grandparents probably called them something else; perhaps &quot;grandma's secrets.&quot; But whatever they were called, some of them are just as awesome today as they were all those years ago. Here are 11 of the best.</p> <h2>1. Make Cheap Coffee Taste Gourmet With Salt</h2> <p>Coffee is a multi-billion dollar business, and you can really spend some serious money on expensive brands. But, you don't have to. Buy the cheap, pre-ground, store-brand coffee. Then, stir a <a href="http://drinks.seriouseats.com/2012/12/should-you-put-salt-in-your-coffee-reduce-bitterness.html">pinch of salt into the coffee</a> grounds in the filter basket, and brew as normal. There is science at work here. The salt reduces bitterness, fooling the brain into believing the coffee is smoother and creamier than it actually is. This also cuts down on the need to rely on creamers and sugar. Try it. You will be surprised.</p> <h2>2. Water Your Plants With Yarn</h2> <p>Do a search for &quot;automatic plant watering system&quot; and you'll see lots of expensive new products, such as the very popular <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B012WC1804/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=B012WC1804&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=GJDXHNYILSRR5QFQ">self-watering probes</a>. However, this clever new idea isn't new at all. The basic system has been around for many decades, and works on the same &quot;capillary action&quot; principle &mdash; which is the ability of a liquid to move through a narrow space without gravity. Simply place a bucket of water at a level above the plants you want to water, and then drape strands of yarn from the bucket to the soil in the plant pot. Your plants will get an adequate supply of water while you are away, without over watering. Or you can simply set this system up if you're not interested in watering your plants everyday by hand.</p> <h2>3. Keep Eggs Fresh for up to Six Months</h2> <p>This is another life hack that came from necessity over a century ago. What do you do to preserve the many eggs your hens are laying for the coming months, especially without refrigeration? Well, if you have a cooler (one of those <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000JWEF00/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=B000JWEF00&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=Y6CZZSJLFV4FASET">cheap Styrofoam coolers</a> will do), a big bag of rock salt, and some grease (shortening works well), you can <a href="http://hubpages.com/food/How-to-Store-Raw-Eggs-in-Grease-and-Salt-An-Illustrated-Guide">store hundreds of eggs</a> for up to six months. Simply put a layer of rock salt on the bottom of the container, then coat the eggs in grease and bury them. Continue layering like this until your container is full, and keep it in a cold, dry place like a basement or cellar. Then, remove eggs when you need them, wash off the grease, and enjoy. The older the eggs get, the less versatile they are. But, they're still edible.</p> <h2>4. Cool a Wine Bottle Without Ice</h2> <p>You're having a big party, or you just want a nice chilled glass of wine with dinner, but&hellip; you're out of ice, and it will take ages to cool it in the freezer or fridge. Well there is a solution, from the days when automatic ice makers were not readily available. Wrap your wine bottle in a tea towel, place it in a bucket or container in the sink, and then let the water from the cold faucet run over it for about 10 minutes. Then you should have a cold bottle of wine, ready to serve.</p> <h2>5. Relieve Earache With Olive Oil</h2> <p>Some of you may actually remember this from your childhood. I remember it well. If I had an earache as a child, my grandma would put a few drops of warm <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B003VKQT9C/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=B003VKQT9C&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=35GPY5RRXX64ZGWF">olive oil</a> inside my ear, then put a cotton ball in there to stop it oozing out. The oil serves as a lubricant, and it also has properties that help fight infection. It won't cure it, but if you have nothing else at hand, it's a good way to provide some comfort.</p> <h2>6. Slice Bread With a Hot Knife</h2> <p>You know, bread didn't always come pre-sliced. We often take it for granted, but your grandparents will tell you tales of whole loaves, and the difficulty involved in making sandwiches. That's where this tip comes from. If you have to cut a whole loaf into slices, take your serrated knife and submerge it into boiling water. Dry it off with a tea towel, and start to cut. The hot knife will make it much easier to cut thin slices from your loaf.</p> <h2>7. Use a Cold Onion on a Mosquito Bite</h2> <p>So, obviously it's important to have an onion in the refrigerator for this tip. Some people already do this, but if you don't, and it's mosquito season, leave one in there. If you get bitten (which I did constantly this summer) take out the onion and cut a slice. Apply it to the bite, and it will draw out the mosquito's saliva (which is what causes the itch). Plus, the cold temperature of the onion slice is also soothing.</p> <h2>8. Remove a Splinter With a Piece of Bacon</h2> <p>If you have a stubborn splinter that just will not come out, don't dig at it with a pin or needle. Instead, use a trick that many grandmas, including my own, used back in the day. Before you go to bed, put a small piece of bacon fat over the splinter, and then cover with a band-aid. In the morning, the splinter will have risen to the top of your skin and can easily be removed. In some instances, it will actually transfer into the bacon fat, which can be easily discarded.</p> <h2>9. Bring Cut Flowers Back to Life With Boiling Water</h2> <p>You want to make that bouquet of flowers last as long as possible, but eventually, they will start to wilt and die. However, a tip from your grandparents can extend the life of those flowers for several extra days. When they start to wilt, boil some water in a saucepan. Let it cool for a few minutes, and while it's cooling, cut a 45-degree angle in the stems of the flowers, and also make a slit up through the center of each stem. Then, dip the ends of the stems in the hot water for about 30 seconds, before placing them back in a vase of room temperature water. Within a few hours, your flowers will be revived.</p> <h2>10. A Lemon Can Remove Salt Stains From Shoes</h2> <p>When winter comes around, your leather boots and shoes will get those dreaded salt stains. I have a pair right now that look ready for the scrap heap, but I'm going to use the old lemon trick. Cut a fresh lemon in half, and apply it to the stained areas. You may need to press down and hold it for several seconds. Rinse with a damp cloth, and repeat a few times. The salt stains should be gone. Now, you can apply polish as usual, and your shoes or boots will be ready for another outing.</p> <h2>11. Remove Ink Stains With Milk</h2> <p>There are many products on the market that are designed to remove ink stains, including <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000JF2SWO/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=B000JF2SWO&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=TVDJQMGYWZ7J7XOD">Stain Devils</a>. However, your grandparents did not have access to those products, but they still found a way; a cheaper way. All you need to do is soak the stained article of clothing in a bowl of milk, preferably overnight. If it's a really stubborn ink stain, adding a little vinegar to the milk bath will help. In the morning, the stain will be gone.</p> <p><em>Did your grandparents teach you any other brilliant life hacks? Let us know in the comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-great-life-hacks-your-grandparents-forgot-to-share-with-you">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-smart-new-uses-for-hair-clips">15 Smart New Uses for Hair Clips</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-best-cities-for-starting-over">The 5 Best Cities for Starting Over</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-surprisingly-valuable-uses-for-a-penny">15 Surprisingly Valuable Uses for a Penny</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-yoga-can-teach-you-about-money">5 Things Yoga Can Teach You About Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/flashback-friday-the-82-best-spring-cleaning-hacks-we-ve-ever-shared">Flashback Friday: The 82 Best Spring Cleaning Hacks We’ve Ever Shared</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Life Hacks Family boomer generation grandparents life hacks life lessons Thu, 10 Dec 2015 22:22:32 +0000 Paul Michael 1619232 at http://www.wisebread.com 10 Financial Lessons We Learn From Our Grandparents http://www.wisebread.com/10-financial-lessons-we-learn-from-our-grandparents <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/10-financial-lessons-we-learn-from-our-grandparents" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/family_gardening_000036914124.jpg" alt="Child learning financial lesson from grandparent" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Depending on your age and circumstances, it's likely your grandparents' relationship with money was forged by some different (and probably tougher) financial times. My own grandparents have been gone for decades now, but their lifestyles were studies in frugality and sharp financial management that I remember to this day. In honor of all the grandmas and grandpas out there, here are ten financial lessons we've learned from our grandparents:</p> <h2>1. Pay Cash</h2> <p>My grandmother never owned a credit card. She paid cash for everything and tracked every nickel in little paper passbooks. We found dozens of them when she died. She was meticulous. She was frugal. And she was always in the black.</p> <h2>2. Take Care of Your Stuff</h2> <p>Today, we live in a throw-away culture where it's easy and relatively cheap to replace most things we own. Not so for our grandparents. Every item was considered an investment, and therefore, everything was diligently cleaned, waxed, oiled, painted, patched, and repaired. Their stuff lasted forever &mdash; and that saved money.</p> <h2>3. Have Practical Skills</h2> <p>Doesn't it seem like our grandparents' generation was filled with renaissance men and women? My grandfather farmed, raised livestock, built his own house, repaired machinery, and &mdash; I kid you not &mdash; divined for water using the twigs of a willow tree. With that level of skill, I wonder if he ever needed to hire anyone to do anything. Today, developing <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/20-great-frugal-skills-and-how-to-get-them">frugal skills</a> is still a great way to build self-reliance and save money.</p> <h2>4. Get Creative</h2> <p>Folks who grew up during the Great Depression had to channel their inner creativity to survive. Their ingenuity helped them feed their families, earn an income, keep their kids clothed, and maybe stash a few bucks on the side. It's the same today; discovering <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/25-ways-to-boost-creativity">ways to boost creativity</a> can still positively impact our budgets and keep us engaged and inspired.</p> <h2>5. It's Better to Own</h2> <p>With few exceptions, it's better to own than rent, especially during tough economic times. Access to money-producing assets (land, a house, a paid-off car, and the like) helped many generations survive and build wealth.</p> <h2>6. Save for a Rainy Day</h2> <p>No offense Suze Orman, but our grandparents and great grandparents invented the emergency fund. The idea of saving up for a rainy day is just smart financial strategy. Because our grandparents lived through some very lean years, they never allowed themselves to be lulled into thinking that today's prosperity guarantees tomorrow's.</p> <h2>7. Get Dirty</h2> <p>Our grandparents taught us that, if we're lucky enough to have a little plot of land, we better put it to work by planting a garden. Gardens stretch our grocery budgets, promote healthier eating, and get us moving in the great out-of-doors. Few activities pack such a holistic health punch. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-only-4-things-a-vegetable-garden-needs?ref=seealso">4 Things a Vegetable Garden Needs</a>)</p> <h2>8. Live Together</h2> <p>No&hellip;not in that way. In earlier generations, it was more common for households to include mom and dad, their kids, and grandma and grandpa. More people living under one roof through these multi-generational arrangements meant more child care resources, more household help, and more sources of income.</p> <h2>9. Keep Your Wants Under Control</h2> <p>Slowly creeping wants can easily choke our budgets. Our grandparents were able afford what they needed by keeping their wants modest and entirely flexible.</p> <h2>10. Small Luxuries Are Still Luxuries</h2> <p>Even our grandparents' generation knew it: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-little-luxuries-that-go-a-long-way">little luxuries</a> now and then are good for the soul. But pampering doesn't have to cost a fortune. An afternoon off, a leisurely meal out, a mid-day nap all sound quaint by today's standards. But with the right frame of mind, they can still feel indulgent and be entirely therapeutic.</p> <p>The weird thing is, we are (or will soon be) the grandparents of tomorrow. The economic times we've recently weathered have already left their mark on how we spend, save, and invest.</p> <p><em>What money lessons will you pass along to your grandchildren? Which ones are all your own and which have been revived from your grandparents' generation?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/kentin-waits">Kentin Waits</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-financial-lessons-we-learn-from-our-grandparents">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/flashback-friday-the-95-best-ways-to-get-fit-for-free">Flashback Friday: The 95 Best Ways to Get Fit for Free</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-negotiation-mistakes-that-will-destroy-your-deal">10 Negotiation Mistakes That Will Destroy Your Deal</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-money-moves-to-make-when-you-move-back-home-with-your-parents">6 Money Moves to Make When You Move Back Home With Your Parents</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/flashback-friday-the-60-best-ways-to-use-food-other-than-eating-it">Flashback Friday: The 60 Best Ways to Use Food Other Than Eating It</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/flashback-friday-the-76-best-life-lessons-you-should-learn-by-30">Flashback Friday: The 76 Best Life Lessons You Should Learn by 30</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Frugal Living family grandparents lessons saving money Tue, 05 May 2015 11:00:29 +0000 Kentin Waits 1407934 at http://www.wisebread.com A 94-Year-Old's Take on Making Good Decisions http://www.wisebread.com/a-94-year-olds-take-on-making-good-decisions <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/a-94-year-olds-take-on-making-good-decisions" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/sunflowers_and_woman.jpg" alt="Woman in front of sunflowers" title="Woman in front of sunflowers" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="166" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>I&rsquo;ll admit it: I&rsquo;ve spent too much money, I&rsquo;ve said things I regret, and I&rsquo;ve made bad choices. To be fair, I&rsquo;m sure everyone&rsquo;s guilty of some bad choices, but it made me wonder &mdash; who am<em> I </em>to be giving advice on how to make good ones? So I decided to go out and get some advice from someone with a lot more life experience &mdash; my grandmother, who at 94 is as independent, effervescent, and opinionated as ever. I knew she&rsquo;d have some ideas for me, but boy was I surprised by her perspective. Here are some of her thoughts on making decisions. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-frugal-lessons-from-great-grandmother">7 Frugal Lessons From&nbsp;Great-Grandmother</a>)</p> <h2>Be Grateful That You Have Choice</h2> <p>It&rsquo;s natural to dread having to make a tough choice &mdash; I know I often do. But what if you thought of that choice as a privilege? My grandmother grew up at a time in which women just weren&rsquo;t given much say; she was raised to listen to her parents and then later, all the big decisions went to her husband. Now that she&rsquo;s all on her own, she relishes doing what she wants, even at the cost of sometimes making choices she regrets. So next time you&rsquo;re struggling with a decision, remember that you&rsquo;re actually indulging in a luxury that has not always been available to everyone &mdash; and that in some parts of the world still isn&rsquo;t.</p> <h2>Do the Best You Can</h2> <p>How can you ever know if you&rsquo;re making the right decision in a given situation? The answer is, you don&rsquo;t. My grandmothers says all you can do is your best, because what often determines the turnout is unknown. She also told me she thinks life is a gift. I take that to mean you have to learn to love it, even when it doesn&rsquo;t always turn out the way you had hoped.</p> <h2>Do What You Want</h2> <p>As an active and able 94-year-old, my grandmother relishes being able to do whatever she wants. Maybe some of that&rsquo;s a luxury of old age, but she&rsquo;s also learned that you just can&rsquo;t make everyone happy, so it&rsquo;s best not to try. Going with the flow can often be a way of taking the easy way out. Make the decisions that are right for you.</p> <h2>Try to Be Deliberate</h2> <p>When it comes to shopping, my grandmother admits that she sometimes has a hard time <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/impulse-shopping-a-controllable-handicap">saying &ldquo;no&rdquo; to something she wants</a>. As someone who grew up and lived most of her life with very little more than the basics, I think she&rsquo;s probably the only one who sees her purchases as indulgences. Still, she says it&rsquo;s important to learn to think hard about what you want. Not so much so that you can make the right choice, but so that you can make ones that you won&rsquo;t regret.</p> <h2>Take Advice From Other People</h2> <p>My grandmother has more friends and family than anyone I know, and she often turns to other people for their <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-good-advice">opinions and advice</a>. She&rsquo;s not afraid to say she doesn&rsquo;t have the answers, or to seek out someone who can help, whether it&rsquo;s with filing her taxes or fixing her dryer. If you&rsquo;re struggling to make a decision, remember that you don&rsquo;t have to go it alone. Reach out to those around you for both help and support.</p> <p>I can&rsquo;t say I&rsquo;m a pro at decision-making, but my grandmother was quick to say that despite having more experience, she doesn&rsquo;t have the answers. But through all the decisions she has made &mdash; both good and bad &mdash; my grandmother is still as hopeful and spirited as ever. And that&rsquo;s a choice too.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/tara-struyk">Tara Struyk</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/a-94-year-olds-take-on-making-good-decisions">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-ways-to-improve-your-decision-making-skills">10 Ways to Improve Your Decision-Making Skills</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-steps-to-improving-your-critical-thinking">7 Steps to Improving Your Critical Thinking</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/heres-how-spending-3-on-you-will-advance-your-career">Here&#039;s How Spending 3% On You Will Advance Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/feeling-stuck-100-ways-to-change-your-life">Feeling Stuck? 100 Ways to Change Your Life</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-self-improvement-apps-to-make-you-smarter-stronger-and-happier">10 Self-Improvement Apps to Make You Smarter, Stronger, and Happier</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Development aging decision making grandparents Thu, 29 Dec 2011 11:36:18 +0000 Tara Struyk 839374 at http://www.wisebread.com Little Old Lady Recipes: Classic Frugal Cooking http://www.wisebread.com/little-old-lady-recipes-classic-frugal-cooking <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/little-old-lady-recipes-classic-frugal-cooking" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/catherine.jpg" alt="Catherine with a casserole " title="Catherine with a casserole " class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="162" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Today I'm thrilled to announce release of my new book &mdash; <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1594745188/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;tag=megbook-20&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;camp=217145&amp;creative=399373&amp;creativeASIN=1594745188"><em>Little Old Lady Recipes: Comfort Food and Kitchen Table Wisdom</em></a>, published by Quirk Books. It's a collection of simple comfort-food recipes; sassy advice; and photos (by the excellent <a href="http://www.michaelreali.com/">Michael Reali</a>) of wonderful women in their kitchens.</p> <p>The recipes in the book came from several different sources, including my own grandmother, the women whose photographs are featured in the book, and bygone cookbooks like the 1921 <em>Atlanta Women's Club Cook Book</em>. But no matter what their source, one thing that I love about all of these these recipes (well, besides the fact that a lot them call for real butter) is that classic &quot;little old lady&quot; cooking is more than simple and tasty, it's also darn frugal. Recipes like chicken and dumplings aren't just aiming to pair delicious chicken soup with bready dumpling goodness, they're using those dumplings to stretch a little bit of meat into an inexpensive, filling meal. Vegetable scraps and leftover meat bones aren't trash, they're what you make fragrant soup stocks out of. And a good weekend pot roast, well &mdash; that will serve you convenient leftovers all week long. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dilutions-of-grandeur-stretch-your-food-at-every-meal">Stretch Your Food at Every Meal</a>)</p> <p>One of my favorite recipes that I had the pleasure of including in the book is my family's baked bean recipe, one of my personal favorite comfort foods. The beans can be made in a crock pot, or they can slowly cook over several hours in the oven (if you use your oven, make this recipe in the fall or winter and turn your house heat down accordingly while cooking so you're not wasting energy). In the evening, you're rewarded with rich, not-too-sweet beans that are great served with another money-saving powerhouse &mdash; coleslaw made from that super-cheap vegetable, the <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/cooking-with-cabbage-ten-cheap-meal-ideas">cabbage</a>.</p> <p>The beans are also fantastic served with Boston Brown Bread. I've included both recipes from the book below, and I very much hope you enjoy them.</p> <blockquote> <h3>Baked Beans Deluxe</h3> <ul> <li>1 qt navy beans</li> <li>1/2 lb salt pork</li> <li>1/2 tbsp dry mustard</li> <li>1 tsp salt</li> <li>2 tbsp molasses</li> <li>3 tbsp sugar</li> <li>1 onion, chopped</li> </ul> <p>Baked beans are best served with brown bread; save your empty coffee cans to steam it in. Although thrift is always a virtue, do not skimp on the salt pork.&nbsp;It's what adds the majority of flavor.</p> <p>Cover beans with cold water and soak overnight. Drain. Pour into a pot or casserole dish with the rest of the ingredients. Add enough water to cover the beans. Cover and bake in a 250&deg;F oven [or crock pot] for 8 hours. Serves 4 to 6, and tastes great with coleslaw.</p> </blockquote> <blockquote> <h3>Boston Brown Bread</h3> <ul> <li>1 egg</li> <li>1/2 cup sugar</li> <li>1/2 cup molasses</li> <li>1 cup sour milk</li> <li>2 tsp baking soda</li> <li>1 tsp salt</li> <li>2 3/4 cups graham flour</li> </ul> <p>Between baked beans and this moist, molassesy bread, they're doing something right up in Boston.</p> <p>Beat eggs, add sugar and molasses, and then the rest of the ingredients. Mix and place in 3 greased 1-pound cans. Cover tightly. Steam 1 to 2 hours by placing on a steamer over boiling water, letting the water go about halfway up the can. Basically, you just don't want the can touching the bottom of the pot you're boiling in. (You can also steam the bread in a deep oven-safe pan in the oven itself. Just make sure to replenish the water if needed.) Bread is done when a toothpick comes out clean. Makes enough to sop up a lot of delicious bean juice.</p> </blockquote> <p><em>What are your favorite frugal &quot;little old lady&quot; recipes? Share in the comments!</em></p> <div align=center><p><a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1594745188/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=megbook-20&linkCode=as2&camp=217145&creative=399373&creativeASIN=1594745188"><img width="271" height="400" alt="" src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u4/Little-Old-Lady-Recipes.jpg" /></a></p></div><br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/meg-favreau">Meg Favreau</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/little-old-lady-recipes-classic-frugal-cooking">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-ways-to-make-your-own-ice-cream-and-other-frozen-treats">10 Ways to Make Your Own Ice Cream (and Other Frozen Treats)</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/16-simple-kitchen-skills-every-frugal-person-should-master">16 Simple Kitchen Skills Every Frugal Person Should Master</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-high-cost-of-cheap-food">The High Cost of Cheap Food</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/horizon-organic-milk-is-it-all-just-lies">Horizon Organic Milk: Is it All Just Lies?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-best-5-credit-cards-for-groceries">The 5 Best Credit Cards for Groceries</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Food and Drink budget recipes cookbook grandparents Tue, 01 Nov 2011 09:36:18 +0000 Meg Favreau 757703 at http://www.wisebread.com 7 Frugal Lessons from Great-Grandmother http://www.wisebread.com/7-frugal-lessons-from-great-grandmother <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/7-frugal-lessons-from-great-grandmother" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_000006434862XSmall.jpg" alt="Great-Grandmother" title="Great-Grandmother" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="166" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>If there is anything good that came out of the financial disaster we just experienced, it's the general public's attention to frugal living and the realization that money does not, in fact, appear out of thin air. During the boom years of the 90s and the easy credit of the last decade, the whole country seemed to forget how to live below its means. Luckily, we don't have to venture far to find the appropriate way to live. If we just look at our great-grandmother's way of life, we can get insights into how to save money. Here are eight ways that she lived with less.</p> <h3>She did things herself.</h3> <p>She almost always cooked for the whole family (and probably cooked while they were on vacation too), and it doesn't end there. She had no maids, nannies, or even a handyman to call on. She fixed small problems like leaky faucets and non-working toilets while leaving the bigger jobs to her husband.</p> <h3>She saved every condiment, napkin, and anything else unused.</h3> <p>It didn't matter if it was from the occasional takeout or from a dinner out on Mother's Day. She saved everything, taking it out when she needed it next time.</p> <h3>Actually, she would rather not use paper napkins at all.</h3> <p>Anything that's one-time use is a waste. Convenience is great, but saving money and reusability is much more important to her.</p> <h3>She had a clothesline.</h3> <p>Why use a dryer when all it does is ruin the fabric and waste energy? There's really no need to look at the instructions tag if you are drying clothes via fresh air.</p> <h3>She brought drinks from home.</h3> <p>Whenever there would be a family trip, she always brought everyone's favorite drink from the fridge. &quot;Can I buy a can of Coke mom?&quot; &quot;Are you nuts? That costs 5 cents!&quot;</p> <h3>She wasn't addicted to technology.</h3> <p>Not that there were nearly as many gadgets back in the day, but she lived just fine. She had no smart phones, no iPods, no laptops to replace every three years.</p> <h3>She used public services.</h3> <p>She encouraged the kids to use the libraries, didn't have a pool in her backyard when there was a community pool just outside, and certainly would have taken the bus (or walked) instead of buying that fancy car.</p> <p>Few great-grandmothers lived with more resources than we have today, but they managed, on avarage, and with bigger families, too. You may hate the idea of living frugally, but perhaps a more relaxed life will change your mind. Great-grandmothers show us that frugal living is really not a sacrifice.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/david-ning">David Ning</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-frugal-lessons-from-great-grandmother">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/metal-detecting-for-beginners-patience-and-profit">Metal Detecting for Beginners: Patience and Profit</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-refillable-things-that-will-save-you-cash">10 Refillable Things That Will Save You Cash</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-this-isnt-your-grandparents-economy">Why This Isn&#039;t Your Grandparents&#039; Economy</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-life-is-wonderful-when-youre-debt-free">6 Ways Life is Wonderful When You&#039;re Debt-Free</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-reasons-to-keep-your-money-separated-after-marriage">5 Reasons to Keep Your Money Separated After Marriage</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Lifestyle budget tips grandparents history reusable Fri, 12 Nov 2010 13:00:08 +0000 David Ning 276213 at http://www.wisebread.com Why This Isn't Your Grandparents' Economy http://www.wisebread.com/why-this-isnt-your-grandparents-economy <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/why-this-isnt-your-grandparents-economy" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/4107373910_319256c468_z.jpg" alt="American Gothic" title="American Gothic" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="167" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Why can&rsquo;t we save the way our parents and grandparents saved? Is it just us, or have other factors changed our economic realities to such a degree that saving has been marginalized, or in some cases precluded altogether? It&rsquo;s no revelation that over the past 50 years, the American economic landscape has shifted drastically &mdash; rewriting our personal histories and resetting our goals. But what can we label with relative certainty as the true &quot;game changers?&quot; Looking back at the lives of my own parents and grandparents, I&rsquo;ve identified five categories of economic influencers that are significantly different today than in the 1950s and 60s. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-recession-glossary-1" title="The Recession Glossary">The Recession Glossary</a>)</p> <h2>The Prevalence of Marketing</h2> <p>Marketing has always been a part of American life. In the early and middle parts of the last century, it danced on the margins of our realities, gently suggesting products and services that might make our lives easier or better. Today, the gentle dancer has traded ballet slippers for steel-toed work boots and tromps through nearly every visual and auditory landscape we once called our own. Marketing and advertising have morphed from an art into a science. In the process, it&rsquo;s conflated a product&rsquo;s value with our own personal worth. We no longer buy a car solely because of its safety features or fuel economy. Now we give just as much credence to what the car &quot;says&quot; about us. We buy into a family, a cohort, an identity. This is the genius and the madness of marketing &mdash; and it swirls around us in ways our grandparents could have never imagined.</p> <p>Walk into any given grocery store and the process begins immediately: The shopping cart has an advertising placard, and the handle of the cart is an ad as well. The floors lay advertising at our feet, the freezer doors carry ads, the aisles have coupon-spitting machines, the plastic order divider in the checkout lane has a strip of advertising, &quot;cause marketing&quot; asks for our spare change as we pay for our items, and even the back of our receipts have become one last attempt to market to us. It&rsquo;s amazing we can even find our car after such a staggering commercial onslaught.</p> <p>All of this marketing effort must pay off to some degree; otherwise, budgets would shift to more lucrative avenues. How does this approach and the resulting pay-off affect a person&rsquo;s ability to separate the valuable message from the garbage, be rational with money,&nbsp;and save?</p> <h2>Employment Instability</h2> <p>I&rsquo;m nearly 41. My mother and father worked for the same employer for 28 and 32 years, respectively. So far in my own work life, I&rsquo;m at job number nine. Granted, calculated inconsistency in the pursuit of larger goals is not a bad thing, and some of that inconsistency is born from a better education and more choices. But another piece of that inconsistency comes from the new reality of employment: Companies are sold, off-shored, closed down, and consolidated at an alarming rate. Employer flux creates employee flux. According the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the median employee tenure as of January, 2010 was a mere 4.4 years. It seems as if the only consistent thing we do now is <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-write-a-resume-12-steps-to-your-next-job" title="How To Write A Resume: 12 Steps To Your Next Job">update our resumes</a>. New jobs and the economic challenges in-between jobs create disruptions in our financial lives that can, over time, affect our bottom lines.</p> <h2>Normalization of Credit</h2> <p>Credit used to be a line of last resort for our grandparents&rsquo; generation. The normalization of credit without any education on the dangers of its unbridled use has arguably been the largest factor in Americans&rsquo; declining personal wealth. Our parents and grandparents may have used credit from time-to-time to take advantage of an unusually good deal, or to secure the purchase of item that would appreciate in value. Now, short-term or long-term credit is used to buy everything from cheeseburgers to cars, from jeans to haircuts. Combined with unstable employment and a boom-and-bust economy, undisciplined credit use has gone from an outlaying danger to a potential catastrophe.</p> <p>Loan payments, interest rate hikes, late fees, and bruised credit ratings are like death by a thousand cuts, threatening our personal wealth and future security. Whether born of real need or simple temptation, credit has become a national addiction spawning new predatory industries and personal hardships.</p> <h2>America&rsquo;s Shifting Industry</h2> <p>Decades ago, America was a manufacturing powerhouse. The goods made here were marketed and shipped all over the world. Somewhere along the line, the target for our products shifted away from the global stage and began to focus more narrowly on the domestic stage. The burden of consumption (and, thereby the majority of our economic health) fell on Americans. Consumption of domestic goods became conflated with patriotism and over-consumption was encouraged in large part because of the relatively limited domestic market. The demand for a higher volume of cheaper goods forced offshore what little manufacturing jobs remained in America and further reduced labor opportunities at home. The broad and deep markets of American goods that our parents and grandparents took for granted shrank and so did our savings.</p> <h2>Starter Homes</h2> <p>Homes are typically our largest investment, and they carry with them the opportunity to make or break our financial success. Gradually our expectations of what constitutes a suitable home have changed. We now embrace the concept of &quot;starter homes&quot; without question and once our children have grown and left the nest, we&rsquo;re expected to &quot;<a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-big-of-a-house-do-you-really-need" title="How Big of a House Do You Really Need?">downsize</a>.&quot; That creates three occasions to buy or sell a home over a person&rsquo;s lifetime (not counting other circumstances like job transfers, divorce, etc). The purchase of a new or different home creates an opportunity to cash out some of our equity, refurnish, upgrade countertops, or move into the newest designer ZIP code. But how did our grandparents approach home ownership? Wasn&rsquo;t their starter home typically their &quot;finisher&quot; home too? What is lost in our constant pursuit of a new (and temporary) satisfaction? How has the notion of upgrading everything from cars to closets only downgraded our leisure time and threatened our real financial independence?</p> <p>These are just some of the broad stripes that have repainted our financial lives. Simplicity and frugality are personal efforts that don&rsquo;t happen in isolation. Society, marketing, personal history, and wider economic realities all make the road more challenging. Our grandparents lived in a time that was harder in many ways, but easier in others. As we pursue our highly individual definitions of independence and financial wisdom, it helps to understand where we&rsquo;ve been as a nation and where we&rsquo;re going in order to decide how to navigate where we are right now.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/kentin-waits">Kentin Waits</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-this-isnt-your-grandparents-economy">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/preparing-for-a-recession">Preparing for a Recession</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/europe-has-the-euro-are-you-ready-for-the-amero">Europe has the Euro. Are you ready for The Amero?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/in-times-like-these-separate-the-want-from-the-need">In times like these, separate the want from the need.</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/is-social-security-just-a-grand-ponzi-scheme">Is Social Security Just A Grand Ponzi Scheme?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/walking-the-tight-rope-of-financial-recovery-the-mental-game">Walking the Tight Rope of Financial Recovery: The Mental Game</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance Economy grandparents history lifestyle changes Thu, 11 Nov 2010 13:00:08 +0000 Kentin Waits 289715 at http://www.wisebread.com