HMO http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/11335/all en-US 5 Vital Things to Remember When Buying Health Insurance http://www.wisebread.com/5-vital-things-to-remember-when-buying-health-insurance <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-vital-things-to-remember-when-buying-health-insurance" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/doctor_and_patient.jpg" alt="hospital patient" title="hospital patient" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Thanks to the <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/signing-up-for-obamacare-in-2015-heres-whats-new">Affordable Care Act</a> (or &quot;Obamacare&quot;), now every individual has access to affordable health insurance. All new health care plans include 10 <a href="http://obamacarefacts.com/essential-health-benefits/">Essential Health Benefits</a>, but there are other important factors to consider when choosing a plan. Here are the top five.</p> <h2>1. HMO or PPO?</h2> <p>There are generally greater limitations when selecting an HMO, but plan premiums are typically lower due to these very restrictions &mdash; such as being required to obtain a referral from your primary care physician (PCP) before receiving any health care services other than emergency.</p> <p>Conversely, PPOs typically carry higher premiums. But, they allow more physicians to participate in the network, offer a larger number of in-network hospitals and clinics, and most likely will not require a PCP referral before you can receive services. Generally speaking, PPO plans are better-suited for people with more regular or intensive medical needs, whole HMOs are best for persons who limit their use of health care services.</p> <h2>2. Networks</h2> <p>Your insurance provider can specify in-network, out-of-network, and preferred networks for the services you receive. You should check to see which services are covered within your network, and if there are any out-of-pocket costs for going outside of it. It can mean a difference of thousands of dollars.</p> <h2>3. Deductibles and Co-Pays</h2> <p>Paying a higher deductible brings down the cost of your monthly premium. But there are other benefits: High-deductible plans can also be combined with health saving accounts (HSAs), which are medical savings accounts that allow you to pay for deductibles, premiums, prescriptions, medical supplies, and other qualifying health expenses using pre-tax dollars.</p> <p>To save on insurance costs, check your plan's copay for routine office visits and prescription drugs. If you think you'll use these services regularly, make sure the plan offers a reasonable copay. Or, consider signing up for an HSA to help defray the cost.</p> <h2>4. Drug Benefits</h2> <p>Most insurance providers retain the right to only cover generic or less expensive prescription drugs when available, and require you to visit a pharmacy within your network. Read through the provider's drug benefits to make sure your desired level of prescriptions are covered.</p> <h2>5. Short-Term Coverage</h2> <p>Short-term plans provide coverage from 30 days up to one year. Use this type of plan only if you are in between plan options. Keep in mind that short-term coverage does not meet the ACA's essential coverage requirement, and as such, is still subject to penalties. In other words, these plans are <em>not </em>protected under ACA. You can be denied coverage, denied due to pre-existing conditions, and cancelled at any time.</p> <p><em>What factors do you consider when shopping for health insurance?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/qiana-chavaia">Qiana Chavaia</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-vital-things-to-remember-when-buying-health-insurance">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/still-without-health-insurance-here-s-how-much-the-penalties-will-cost-you">Still Without Health Insurance? Here’s How Much the Penalties Will Cost You</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/health-insurance-how-to-fight-back-against-4-common-claim-denials">Health Insurance: How to Fight Back Against 4 Common Claim Denials</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/new-job-dont-make-these-7-mistakes-with-your-benefits">New Job? Don&#039;t Make These 7 Mistakes With Your Benefits</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-health-insurance-benefits-youre-probably-not-using">6 Health Insurance Benefits You&#039;re Probably Not Using</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-to-spend-your-last-minute-health-care-fsa-funds">8 Ways to Spend Your Last-Minute Health Care FSA Funds</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Health and Beauty Insurance affordable care act health care HMO obamacare PPO Wed, 18 Mar 2015 13:00:03 +0000 Qiana Chavaia 1345719 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Examine Your Healthcare Plan and Save http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-examine-your-healthcare-plan-and-save <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-examine-your-healthcare-plan-and-save" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/istock_0000010408102.jpg" alt="Examine documents" title="Examine documents" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="188" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>I&rsquo;ve been examining healthcare plans for a couple of decades, starting with sticker shock when I signed up for COBRA coverage in 1986 (over $300 per month). Since then, I&rsquo;ve been covered under employer-based plans and private individual plans, spending close to zero all the way to thousands of dollars each year for insurance coverage and medical bills.</p> <p>There&rsquo;s a lot to consider when looking at healthcare plans, including:</p> <ol> <li><a href="#expense">Guaranteed expense</a></li> <li><a href="#OOP">Annual out-of-pocket maximum</a></li> <li><a href="#choice">Choice of providers</a></li> <li><a href="#pitfalls">Potential pitfalls</a></li> <li><a href="#savings">Savings opportunities</a></li> </ol> <p><a name="expense"></a></p> <h2>Guaranteed Expense</h2> <p>Your guaranteed expense, if you choose to purchase healthcare insurance, is the monthly premium. Over the term of your contract, unless you cancel, you are locked into paying this dollar amount whether you receive healthcare services or not.</p> <p><a name="OOP"></a></p> <h2>Annual Out-of-Pocket Maximum</h2> <p>The annual out-of-pocket (OOP) maximum may seem clearly stated but the numbers often make sense to the insurance carrier and not the insured. There may be an OOP for in-network services and another number for out-of-network services, for example. And, if you&rsquo;ve chosen a plan that covers network providers only but you need to use out-of-network providers, then OOP isn&rsquo;t really capped at a maximum from your perspective. (It pays to read your plan documents when you enroll so that you can choose your plan and providers carefully.)</p> <p>The OOP is not same as the deductible, which is simply a hurdle to clear before becoming eligible for reimbursement of medical claims. And, oddly, the OOP doesn&rsquo;t necessarily represent what you&rsquo;ll pay out of your own funds, such as contributions to monthly premiums. Still, it&rsquo;s a term worth learning about and dollar amount worth noting when you sign up.</p> <p>On the way to the deductible and maximums, you&rsquo;ll be responsible for usage-based costs (also referred to as cost-sharing items), which include:</p> <ul> <li>Co-pays, which are the relatively small payments you make when you visit the doctor&rsquo;s office, <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/cost-comparison-emergency-rooms-vs-urgent-care">urgent care facility</a>, <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-pros-and-cons-of-retail-health-clinics">retail clinic</a>, emergency room, or hospital;<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Coinsurance, which is the percentage of the provider&rsquo;s fee (or fees) that you&rsquo;ll owe in addition to the co-pay amount;<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Other, which may include charges that simply aren&rsquo;t covered for a variety of reasons such as lack of pre-authorization for certain services, fees that exceed &ldquo;usual and customary&rdquo; charges, out-of-network use, and charges for services you may have received or requested but later deemed unnecessary.</li> </ul> <p><a name="choice"></a></p> <h2>Choice of Providers</h2> <p>The selection of in-network, participating, and/or preferred providers, such as primary care physicians, specialists, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants as well as specialized diagnostic, surgical, and hospital facilities, should be scrutinized before purchasing an insurance policy. Often, this provider list is available online but you may need customer or member access to view the provider list, which naturally makes it difficult to evaluate the plan before you enroll; so ask your insurance agent or human resources department for this information if it&rsquo;s not readily available.</p> <p>This information may change periodically or, as happened to me, the various databases of providers in a network (online listings vs. credentialed providers vs. insurance companies&rsquo; listing) are not in sync so that while you might use a preferred provider, the claims department may or may not pay claims appropriately because of inaccurate provider databases.</p> <p>Depending on your plan, you&rsquo;ll get incentives for using specific providers. Generally, you&rsquo;ll get a higher percentage of your fees paid and clear the hurdle to your annual deductible and OOP much faster.</p> <p><a name="pitfalls"></a></p> <h2>Potential Pitfalls</h2> <p>Pitfalls are legion.</p> <p>I&rsquo;ve already referenced a few of the common pitfalls, which generally surface when you use out-of-network providers. Specifically these financial disincentives are:</p> <ul> <li>No payment of certain medical bills at all<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Lower percentage of medical bills paid as compared to percentages paid to in-network providers<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>No payment of charges above usual and customary fees established by the insurance company</li> </ul> <p>(Some plans make no distinction between in-network and out-of-network, participating and non-participating, preferred and non-preferred providers.)</p> <p>Other plan features might take you by surprise are:</p> <ul> <li>Exclusions for certain conditions or treatment protocols<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Non-payment if certain procedures aren&rsquo;t followed, such as primary care physician referrals to specialists<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Riders with additional premiums for pre-existing conditions<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Costs of medications, which may not be covered at all or just partially covered under different rules than the healthcare insurance</li> </ul> <p>You might also encounter the <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/health-insurance-two-other-numbers-to-look-at">lifetime maximum amount</a>, which is the amount that your insurance company will pay over your lifetime; when that limit is reached, then your claims won&rsquo;t be reimbursed. (Some plans offer unlimited coverage with no caps).</p> <p><a name="savings"></a></p> <h2>Savings Opportunities</h2> <p>Start with choosing the right plan based on factors such as your monthly budget, your savings for medical emergencies, your anticipated needs for the coming year, your desire to have choice in physicians and treatment options. You might have access to these types of plans:</p> <ul> <li>HMO (health maintenance organization), which is usually higher on monthly premiums and lower on costs overall with strict control of healthcare services and emphasis on preventive care.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>EPO (exclusive provider organization), which balances premium costs with usage-based costs but is strict on using exclusive providers.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>PPO (preferred provider organization), which should have lower premium costs but higher usage-based costs along with fewer restrictions on providers and claims reimbursement.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>ABHP (account-based health plans), which typically link a high-deductible plan with some form of health account such as an FSA (flexible spending account); HSA (health savings account); and HRA (health reimbursement account); these types of plans tend to have lower monthly premiums but higher usage-based costs and are less restrictive than other types of plans.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Hybrid plans, which combine features of various plans to control costs for the insured and the insurance company.</li> </ul> <p>More ways to use money wisely:</p> <ul> <li>Be careful how much you put in your FSA; balance the tax advantage of funding this account with the possibility of forfeiting money if you don&rsquo;t spend annual contributions by the end of the year.&nbsp;<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Fund your <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-i-heart-my-high-deductible-health-insurance-plan">HSA</a> to reduce your adjusted gross income and your tax liability; monies in this account can be rolled over to subsequent years and even taken out (with a tax penalty) for non-healthcare-related spending.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Participate in wellness programs offered by your employer or insurance carrier to get better rates or an incentive.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Get preventive care offered by your insurance plan.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Find a <a href="http://davisliumd.blogspot.com/2010/04/choosing-good-physician.html">primary care physician (PCP)</a> now so that you can get preventive care, obtain referrals to specialists if you need them, and hopefully <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-about-a-price-list-at-the-hospital-or-doctor-s-office">avoid expensive trips to the emergency room</a>.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Review special rules now so that you can make sound, quick decisions later (check requirements for pre-authorizations or see which hospitals are considered exclusive providers, for example).<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Arrange for necessary screenings, diagnostic tests, and procedures in one year rather than spreading them over a couple years (if feasible) so that you&rsquo;ll meet your deductible, reach the OOP, and get higher rates of reimbursement.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Research options for <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/tips-to-prepare-for-a-health-emergency">emergency care</a> before there's an emergency.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Contact your insurance company before you travel either domestically or out of the country so that you can get a list of accepted providers.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Take advantage of <a href="http://www.irs.gov/newsroom/article/0,,id=204505,00.html">tax credits associated with COBRA.</a></li> </ul> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/julie-rains">Julie Rains</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-examine-your-healthcare-plan-and-save">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-vital-things-to-remember-when-buying-health-insurance">5 Vital Things to Remember When Buying Health Insurance</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-about-a-price-list-at-the-hospital-or-doctor-s-office">How About a Price List at the Hospital or Doctor’s Office?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/ouch-5-ways-to-make-paying-for-the-dentist-less-painful">Ouch! 5 Ways to Make Paying for the Dentist Less Painful</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-choose-a-health-insurance-plan">How to Choose a Health Insurance Plan</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/health-care-reform-good-for-people-like-me">Health Care Reform: Good for People Like Me</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Consumer Affairs Health and Beauty Insurance account-based health plans EPO healthcare high-deductible health plans HMO PPO Thu, 27 May 2010 13:00:03 +0000 Julie Rains 100354 at http://www.wisebread.com Tips and Tricks for Dealing with a Recalcitrant HMO http://www.wisebread.com/tips-and-tricks-for-dealing-with-a-recalcitrant-hmo <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/tips-and-tricks-for-dealing-with-a-recalcitrant-hmo" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/2245216631_4641bd7ff3.jpg" alt="Doctor&#039;s Office" title="Doctor&#039;s Office" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="164" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>There is a healthcare crisis in this country. Whether you like Obama's proposed resolution to these difficulties or not, the crisis is very real. And HMOs can be the most difficult of the current types of healthcare to deal with. You don't have to search news stories very long to hear about people who were denied essential treatment when their lives were on the line, or had treatment postponed so long because of bureaucratic red tape that their conditioned worsened beyond medical intervention.</p> <p>While many of us won't face these kinds of struggles with our health insurance, most of us will, at one time or another, have to struggle with our insurance company over payment approval, referral approval, or any one of a myriad of other common issues. Here are some tips to help get insurance issues resolved as quickly as possible with a minimal hassle.</p> <h2>Talk to a Person</h2> <p>Many times, the number on the back of your HMO card or the one that's available online will take you to an automated system where it's difficult or impossible to get an actual person on the line. Websites like <a href="http://www.gethuman.com">gethuman</a> will help you figure out how to navigate this system so you can talk to a real, live human being. If your problem is at all unusual or difficult, talking to a person and not a machine is essential, as messages are much easier to lose or ignore than a person with a voice and a story whose questions the employee actually has to answer. If you do choose to leave a message the first time, do not assume that the issue is dealt with. Call back and get a person if you don't hear anything within a couple of days, letting them know that you're following up on your message.</p> <h2>Keep Records</h2> <p>Every time you talk to your HMO, or someone at your doctor's office about your HMO, record the date, day, and time you made your call, whether you got ahold of someone or had to leave a message, the name of the person you spoke to, any different departments they transferred you to, and anything relevant that the people you spoke with said about your problem. This may seem like a chore, but these records can help you in a myriad of ways. You may realize that you're speaking to a person that you've spoken to before, and your notes will tell you whether or not they were helpful last time and whether they followed through with anything they might have said they'd do for you. Records also allow you to say, &quot;Yes, I called on [date] at [time] and [date] at [time], etc.,&quot; which will often let the person you're speaking to know that this is an ongoing problem.</p> <p>These records will also serve you well if you ever have to file an official complaint against the insurance company or contest something they say. If you have records of having called to deal with this issue on certain dates and at certain times, they can often check call records or even recordings to find your calls. If you have records of who you spoke to and what they said they would do for you, the insurance company can further investigate the situation with specific employees.</p> <p>While keeping records won't guarantee that your claims and complaints are handled well, they will help you get the information and give you the leverage that you sometimes need to get things done.</p> <h2>Be Polite</h2> <p>Health insurance companies, like other corporations, are beginning to make notes in files about how cooperative and polite different customers are on the phone. If you're known for having good manners, you're more likely to get the help you need, get passed on to a supervisor if you request it, and deal with people who are willing to go out of their way to help you. It's definitely worth it to develop a good reputation with these companies.</p> <h2>Ask for a Supervisor</h2> <p>If the person who answers the phone can't help you, or if you've spoken to someone at a particular level several times and your issue hasn't been resolved, ask to speak to a supervisor. Sometimes, they will put you through directly. Often, a supervisor has the authority to do things that the ground-level employees cannot do, or they know details of procedures that those employees won't know. </p> <p>Other times, it will be company policy not to send you directly to a supervisor. In these cases, however, the employee you're speaking to will usually be required to forward your request to their supervisor even if you don't get to talk to them. Ask for this and let them do it if they offer, get specifics on when you should hear back from the supervisor's office, and get the supervisor's name. If you have to call back again, you can ask for the supervisor by name, which is often enough for them to let you speak to the person. You can also say, &quot;{Supervisor's Name} was working on an issue for me and I'm following up on it.&quot; Unless you're dealing with a particularly difficult triage system, this is usually enough to get you through to someone who will be more helpful than the person who answered the phone.</p> <h2>Ask When to Call Back</h2> <p>End every conversation by asking when you can plan to see some resolution to your issue, or when you can call back to expect an update. You can even ask if the person you're dealing with has a direct number so you don't have to go through the receptionist every time. If you don't see any resolution by the date they gave you, or when it's time to get an update, call back and try to speak to the same person you were speaking with before. Remind them who you are, what the issue was, and what they told you about resolution or calling back. This will streamline your process, and will also let the employee know that you're serious about dealing with the issue and are not just going to let it go.</p> <h2>Call Back Frequently</h2> <p>If the employee you're speaking with refuses to give you a date of resolution or a date to check back, call back anyway. Most companies take about 2 weeks to process any changes, so give them about that much time before you call back. If you do this for a period of time and still nothing is resolved, call back more frequently. Every week, every other day, and even every day are viable options. Sometimes, you just have to keep nagging the insurance company before they'll act on an issue, particularly when acting will cost them money. But the squeaky wheel does get the grease, and if you annoy them enough (politely, of course!), then you're more likely to get some response.</p> <p>Don't use this tactic too early, though. If you make a nuisance of yourself before you've truly given them the benefit of the doubt and not seen a satisfactory response, you'll be labeled a nag and the employees will be less likely to help you. Taking this route involves walking a fine line. Pay attention to the employees' attitudes and the way they speak to you. If they're trying to do their jobs and you're simply not giving them enough time, back off for a week or so.</p> <p>This is also a good technique to use when a particular employee, especially a lower-level one, refuses to give you what you need or pass you on to a supervisor. Call back later that day, after normal business hours, on the weekend, or the next day and, chances are, you'll get a different employee, who may very well be more helpful to you.</p> <h2>Use Names When You Call Back</h2> <p>If you're keeping records, the first time you call should be the only time when you cannot ask for an employee by name. Having a specific person to ask for immediately marks you as someone who cares about your problem, is more likely to be tenacious in getting resolution, and has enough presence of mind to be keeping track of your conversations. All of these characteristics will make you stand out from the crowd, which will make it more likely that you see some resolution.</p> <p>Having a name also helps you develop a relationship with a particular employee or group of employees. Sometimes, resolution can be a product of one employee who knows your problem, some of your story, and begins to care for you beyond the normal customer, enough to go our of their way to see that you get what you're looking for. Asking for an employee by name and discussing your problem with them repeatedly can help develop this kind of relationship.</p> <h2>Resolution</h2> <p>In the end, health insurance companies are all about money. If you want them to spend more money on you than they think they should, you will be facing an uphill battle. While the above ideas don't guarantee a resolution to your problem that you like, they do give you a better chance of finding a happy ending to your problem. I'd love to hear any other tips and tricks you've used when dealing with your HMO, so leave them in the comments!</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/sarah-winfrey">Sarah Winfrey</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/tips-and-tricks-for-dealing-with-a-recalcitrant-hmo">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/simple-ways-to-get-the-healthcare-you-need-without-overspending">Simple Ways to Get the Healthcare You Need Without Overspending</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-examine-your-healthcare-plan-and-save">How to Examine Your Healthcare Plan and Save</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/generic-drug-price-lists-for-six-major-pharmacies">Generic Drug Price Lists For Six Major Pharmacies - Updated</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-i-heart-my-high-deductible-health-insurance-plan">Why I (Heart) My High Deductible Health Insurance Plan</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paying-for-pregnancy-and-birth-without-health-insurance">Paying for Pregnancy and Birth Without Health Insurance</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Consumer Affairs Health and Beauty health insurance HMO Fri, 25 Sep 2009 16:00:24 +0000 Sarah Winfrey 3646 at http://www.wisebread.com