Job Interview http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/11428/all en-US How to Have a Successful Skype or Video Job Interview http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-have-a-successful-skype-or-video-job-interview <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-have-a-successful-skype-or-video-job-interview" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-656378092.jpg" alt="" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>We all had a good laugh over the British journalist <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mh4f9AYRCZY" target="_blank">being upstaged by his kids</a> while trying to give a BBC video interview. All laughs aside, it did bring up an important subject: How do you conduct a great video interview for a new job?</p> <p>It's now possible to interview for positions all over the country, if not the world, using modern technology. It's also easy to get distracted or interrupted. If you're getting ready to jump online for your next interview, follow these steps for success.</p> <h2>1. Clean up the area</h2> <p>It's imperative that you have everything you need at hand before starting the video interview, including a clean home office. Organize your workspace thoroughly, clean the desk, and tidy up the room. You may look the part, but a messy, disorganized background can send red flags to the interviewer.</p> <p>If you really don't have the time or ability to clean up the space behind you, consider a backdrop. Something as simple as a plain bedsheet (nothing patterned or &quot;loud&quot;) hung from the ceiling can work. Black or gray works best, but as long as it doesn't distract, it will do the job.</p> <h2>2. Look directly into the camera</h2> <p>This cannot be emphasized enough &mdash; the camera lens should be treated like the eyes of the person interviewing you. If you don't focus your attention there, you're not making eye contact with the interviewer, and that can come across just as rude as if you were doing it face-to-face.</p> <p>There are a few steps you can take to make this easier. First, you could place something next to the camera, like a bright sticky note (you can even draw eyes on it as a reminder). Throughout the interview, that will prompt you to focus your gaze there.</p> <p>Another option is to turn off the webcam preview that shows you what your interviewer is looking at &mdash; you. It's in our nature to look at ourselves, and when we see that little window with our picture in it, our eyes immediately wander there. By turning that off, you'll be much more inclined to look at the camera.</p> <h2>3. Go to the bathroom first</h2> <p>It may sound like a no-brainer, but before you know it, you're shifting in your seat five minutes into a one-hour interview. This is not good. Not only will the interviewer pick up on how uncomfortable you are, but it will totally hamstring your performance. You won't be able to think clearly, your responses will be rushed, and you might even start sweating.</p> <p>Do yourself a favor: Go to the bathroom beforehand, even if you're not feeling the need. And don't drink a lot of water right before you start.</p> <h2>4. Keep the interview room off-limits</h2> <p>If there's one thing we can take from the poor journalist being interrupted by his kids, it's that he should have found a way to secure the room. If you have the ability to lock the door, do it. If you don't, consider putting a bolt on the door, or use something to block the entrance (as long as it isn't showing on camera).</p> <p>Take it a step further and ask the people you live with if they'd be willing to step out of the house when the interview is scheduled. Even if the room is secured, noises from outside the room can still be very distracting. Ideally, you want a quiet room in an empty house.</p> <h2>5. Do your homework</h2> <p>Just like any other interview, you need to have your ducks in a row. With a video interview, your facial expressions are actually more apparent, because that is all the interviewer will be focusing on. So, when you're stumped on a question, or struggling to find a reply, it will really show.</p> <p>To avoid that, spend time studying the company. Prepare a series of questions to ask the interviewer. Do a practice run with a friend or colleague. Make sure you know as much as you possibly can, and then, practice a great response for questions that really will stump you.</p> <h2>6. Check the equipment thoroughly</h2> <p>Any time anyone does something live, they fear gremlins in the works. Technological glitches are common, and they can happen to anyone. Life being what it is, they often happen at the worst possible times.</p> <p>So, do everything you can to test your equipment thoroughly the day before the interview. Make sure the camera is working, and focused. Check the microphone. Check the sound levels. Check the cables. Do a test run, record yourself, and play it back. By doing this a day before, you give yourself plenty of time to fix the issues without risking missing your interview.</p> <h2>7. Dress for success</h2> <p>A video interview is no excuse to wear casual clothing and look like you've just gotten out of bed. This is not a phone interview. You are presenting yourself to your potential employer, and you want to look the part.</p> <p>That means dressing for the occasion, and that can differ between industries. If you're in a corporate career, you'll need to dress for business. If it's a more creative profession, you can obviously be a little less formal, but you'll still need to look the part. And of course, you need to look fresh and camera-worthy. Hair, makeup, clean teeth, clean nails, the works. Treat this just like you'd treat a regular interview, and give yourself plenty of time to get ready.</p> <h2>8. Remember you're on camera</h2> <p>The interviewer can see you, and you can see them. But if you're sitting in front of a computer that doubles for your personal use, it can be easy to forget, and slip into a more comfortable position. Gradually, you may start to slouch, scratch your nose (or pick it &hellip; disaster), divert eye contact, or even start flicking through messages on your phone.</p> <p>If these things happened in a face-to-face meeting, you'd be hard pressed to finish the interview. You'd have blown it. It's just the same over video chat. The interviewer will feel insulted and disrespected, and you will have blown any chance of a follow up. If it helps, put a sign next to the camera that says &quot;Smile, you're on camera!&quot; It may sound silly, but it really makes a difference.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-have-a-successful-skype-or-video-job-interview">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/13-ways-to-make-a-good-first-impression-at-your-next-job-interview">13 Ways to Make a Good First Impression at Your Next Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-questions-you-should-ask-at-every-job-interview">5 Questions You Should Ask at Every Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-you-did-wrong-at-your-last-job-interview">10 Things You Did Wrong at Your Last Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-extreme-job-interview-tactics-that-worked">6 Extreme Job Interview Tactics That Worked</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-questions-to-ask-before-you-take-a-job-offer">12 Questions to Ask Before You Take a Job Offer</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Job Hunting Technology conference call distractions Job Interview preparedness skype video chat video interview Mon, 15 May 2017 08:30:06 +0000 Paul Michael 1945044 at http://www.wisebread.com 8 Questions You Should Always Ask in an Exit Interview http://www.wisebread.com/8-questions-you-should-always-ask-in-an-exit-interview <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/8-questions-you-should-always-ask-in-an-exit-interview" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/women_work_discussion_516896268.jpg" alt="Woman asking questions during her exit interview" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Exit interviews are common when someone is leaving a job. And usually, the onus is on the employer to ask the questions. If you're taking a new job offer, they may want to know why you're leaving, or what they could have done to keep you around. If you're being let go, they'll want to make sure you know everything about the package you're receiving, and your legal options.</p> <p>Rarely do people talk about the questions <em>you</em> should ask in your exit interview. Here are eight that can provide invaluable answers.</p> <h2>1. Will my feedback be anonymous?</h2> <p>If you have some important issues to get off your chest, this is a very important question to ask beforehand. You don't want to tear into an awful boss or coworker, only to find out that it has gotten back to them. You may even want to consider if it's worth the risk at all; if you work in similar fields, your paths may cross again in the future.</p> <p>Despite this, you may feel a moral obligation to tell HR all about the problems that certain coworkers caused, for the sake of the people who are left behind. If you must spill the beans, ask this question before you say anything negative or controversial about anyone. You may even want to write something down that can go on record &mdash; minus your name, of course.</p> <h2>2. What did I do well during my time here?</h2> <p>You can phrase this question however you feel most comfortable, but what you're looking for here is feedback on your strengths. What did you do that made a difference to the company? Were you a rock star at certain things? Were you highly prized in areas you didn't even consider?</p> <p>All of this can be great information to take with you to your next job. You may have thought that speaking up in meetings about potential issues with a project was a cause for grief. But it turns out that people really valued you asking those &quot;Devil's Advocate&quot; questions, as it helped with the development of otherwise unconsidered issues. This kind of feedback can really bolster your performance in your next position.</p> <h2>3. Do I have the option to come back here one day?</h2> <p>It may seem like an odd question to ask &mdash; after all, you're probably leaving the company for very good reason. However, &quot;boomerang&quot; employees can be common in some industries, especially if you're leaving to relocate out of state and may one day return. If you're leaving on good terms, this probably won't be an issue. If you're leaving because things went sour with certain people, it may be tricky to return until they, too, have left. If you're being laid off, you should be given the option to apply for other job openings that match your skill-set in the future.</p> <h2>4. What could I have done better?</h2> <p>No one is perfect. Even an employee that is being begged to stay will still have some areas that could use improvement. Now is the time to find out what those shortcomings are, as this will help you become an even better employee for your next company.</p> <p>Don't take any of this feedback personally. You asked the question, and you need to be an adult about the answers you get. Even if things take a turn, and you suddenly find out someone you respected was constantly complaining about you behind your back, just take it in stride. Fix what you think needs fixing, and ignore the petty stuff.</p> <h2>5. Can I use you as a reference in the future?</h2> <p>It may seem like a no-brainer that they'll say yes, especially if you were a good employee, but many companies frown on their staff providing references for ex-employees. If someone from that company provides a glowing reference for a person who turns out to be unreliable, a thief, a sexual predator, or anything else negative, it can come back on the business and bite them.</p> <p>The HR department's job in any company is to look out for the business, not the people who work there. So, if you think you may want to use them as a future reference, ask before you put their name down. Otherwise, they'll typically verify your dates of employment, and that's about it.</p> <h2>6. When can I expect my final paycheck, and how much will it be?</h2> <p>Your final paycheck may not be issued to you on a regular pay period. It may also include unused vacation days, and depending on your company, unused personal days, sick time (although that's rare), and a portion of the annual bonus you were set to receive.</p> <p>Not only do you want to ask about the final total, but when you can expect to receive that amount, and whether it will be a live check or a bank deposit. If the numbers don't add up, say something now. If they don't have final totals yet, make sure you have the phone number of the person in the payroll department.</p> <h2>7. Is there any kind of noncompete in place?</h2> <p>If you were given an employee handbook when you first started, this may be covered in there. But, roles and responsibilities within an organization vary greatly between departments, so now is a good time to clarify. It's possible that you will be asked not to have any contact with your current clients or vendors for at least a year or two, especially if you will be looking to poach current accounts from your company.</p> <p>Legally, you may not have anything to worry about, as this is typically more of a courtesy. How you handle this, of course, is entirely up to you. At the end of the day, you have to do what's right for you and your family, and if there's nothing in writing to stop you approaching people, it's your call. And of course, if they approach you without any prompting, that's another ballgame entirely.</p> <h2>8. What about a severance package and health benefits?</h2> <p>If you're being laid off, your company may have a set severance package in place. Many businesses offer two weeks of pay for every year of service, up to a cap of their choosing. Others give you a set figure (anywhere from a week to a year) regardless of your time there.</p> <p>You'll also need to know what's happening with your health benefits. Unlike most other countries, health benefits are tied to employment in the U.S. and losing coverage can be costly (or even deadly). Will the company continue covering your health insurance, and if so, for how long? What about COBRA? These are important questions to ask, and if they won't continue coverage, ask for more money in your severance to help cover the costs.</p> <p>If you are planning to leave your company soon, make sure you have at least some of these questions ready for your exit interview. And if you suffer a layoff, please remember to ask about your severance and benefits. Good luck!</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-questions-you-should-always-ask-in-an-exit-interview">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-fun-ways-to-leave-your-job">10 Fun Ways to Leave Your Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-deal-when-you-hate-your-new-job">How to Deal When You Hate Your New Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-financial-moves-to-make-the-moment-you-get-fired">11 Financial Moves to Make the Moment You Get Fired</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-you-must-do-before-you-quit-your-job">5 Things You Must Do Before You Quit Your Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-career-tips-you-wish-you-could-give-your-younger-self">7 Career Tips You Wish You Could Give Your Younger Self</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income benefits employment exit interview feedback human resources job hunting Job Interview layoffs quitting severance Fri, 28 Apr 2017 08:31:04 +0000 Paul Michael 1936196 at http://www.wisebread.com Flashback Friday: 59 Tips to Help You Nail That Job Interview http://www.wisebread.com/flashback-friday-59-tips-to-help-you-nail-that-job-interview <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/flashback-friday-59-tips-to-help-you-nail-that-job-interview" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_shaking_hands_599255318.jpg" alt="Woman nailing her job interview" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>There are few things quite as stress-inducing as an upcoming job interview. You want to make a good impression, you want to appear confident, and you want to seal the deal in the short amount of time you have. It's not easy, but it is possible. Here are 59 ways you can nail that big job interview.</p> <p><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5171/iStock_000051956032_Large.jpg" width="605" height="340" alt="" /></p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-ace-your-next-coffee-interview?ref=fbf">How to Ace Your Next Coffee Interview</a> &mdash; Many companies are using more informal settings for their interviews. It tends to put both parties more at ease, but it's a job interview, so common etiquette rules still apply. Here's how to walk that fine line.</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-answer-23-of-the-most-common-interview-questions?ref=fbf">How to Answer 23 of the Most Common Interview Questions</a> &mdash; The best way to nail a job interview is to go in prepared. Learn as much as you can about the company. Also practice answering these common interview questions before you go in.</p> <p><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5171/iStock_000061725250_Large.jpg" width="605" height="340" alt="" /></p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-calm-your-nerves-and-ace-your-interview?ref=fbf">6 Ways to Calm Your Nerves and Ace Your Interview</a> &mdash; Nerves and anxiety can really mess with your mind. While it's nearly impossible to get rid of them completely, there are ways ease that stress before you walk into the interview.</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-the-job-without-saying-a-word?ref=fbf">How to Get the Job Without Saying a Word</a> &mdash; No, it's not handing the interviewer a wad of cash and a tray of cupcakes. It's all about posture, eye contact, and body language. These tend to be more noteworthy than just saying the right things. You gotta walk the walk.</p> <p><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5171/man_crossed_arms_000046266010.jpg" width="605" height="340" alt="" /></p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-extreme-job-interview-tactics-that-worked?ref=fbf">6 Extreme Job Interview Tactics That Worked</a> &mdash; These wacky tactics aren't always the best way to go, but they will make you a memorable candidate. And that's the goal, really. You need to stand out from the rest of the pack, while also being qualified and confident.</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-you-should-never-do-during-a-job-interview?ref=fbf">10 Things You Should Never Do During a Job Interview</a> &mdash; Almost as important as knowing what to do, is knowing what <em>not </em>to do in a job interview. Some of these might seem obvious (don't be late, don't mumble), but they are all crucial missteps that can totally ruin an otherwise great interview. Avoid them at all costs.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/chrissa-hardy">Chrissa Hardy</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/flashback-friday-59-tips-to-help-you-nail-that-job-interview">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/flashback-friday-the-65-best-career-tips-weve-ever-shared">Flashback Friday: The 65 Best Career Tips We&#039;ve Ever Shared</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/flashback-friday-46-easy-ways-to-be-more-productive">Flashback Friday: 46 Easy Ways to Be More Productive</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-answer-23-of-the-most-common-interview-questions">How to Answer 23 of the Most Common Interview Questions</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-not-to-answer-10-of-the-most-common-interview-questions">How NOT TO Answer 10 of the Most Common Interview Questions</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/you-re-fired-20-signs-that-a-pink-slip-is-coming">You’re Fired! 20 Signs That a Pink Slip is Coming</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building career career tips common interview questions fbf flashback friday interview questions Job Interview Fri, 27 Jan 2017 10:30:32 +0000 Chrissa Hardy 1881874 at http://www.wisebread.com 7 Ways You're Sabotaging Your Job Hunt http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-youre-sabotaging-your-job-hunt <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/7-ways-youre-sabotaging-your-job-hunt" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_stressed_hand_89770179.jpg" alt="Woman learning ways she&#039;s sabotaging her job hunt" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>You're probably familiar with ways to sabotage an interview, such as dressing inappropriately, showing up late, and giving poor <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-answer-23-of-the-most-common-interview-questions">responses to an interviewer's question</a>. But sometimes, job seekers sabotage themselves before getting their foot in the door. If you're applying for jobs but not getting a call back, you could be unknowingly sabotaging your job hunt with these bad moves.</p> <h2>1. Looking Like an Idiot on Social Media</h2> <p>As employers review resumes and cover letters, some will Google the names of applicants to begin assessing the pool of candidates. If there are images attached to your name online &mdash; and there are &mdash; these could show up in a search. Thus, if you haven't Googled yourself, do so before applying for jobs to see what information is available about you.</p> <p>The employer's first impression of you begins with your online profiles; therefore, your Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and other accounts should have professional images. Even if an employer can't see your status updates because of privacy settings, they can see your profile images. If any of these <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-to-stop-doing-on-social-media-by-30">photos portray you as a drunken partygoer</a> (or worse), this could move your name to the bottom of the list.</p> <h2>2. Using a Cookie-Cutter Resume</h2> <p>When employers receive hundreds of responses to their job ads, they don't always have time to read every single resume or application. Sometimes, they use screening software to narrow down the best candidates for the job. This software is designed to look for resumes and applications that include specific accomplishments, levels of education, and keywords matching the job description. For that matter, your resume must include keywords found in the employer's job ad, or else your resume may never get through the filters and reach the right person.</p> <p>Also, make sure you tailor or customize resumes for each position. An employer can recognize a cookie-cutter resume, since pretty much everybody else applying for the job will have a similar vitae. This is a sign of laziness and employers may assume you're not serious about the position.</p> <h2>3. Being Overly Aggressive</h2> <p>After submitting an application or resume, it's okay to follow up after a couple of weeks &mdash; just don't be overly aggressive. This can annoy hiring managers. You can send a brief email or leave a message about the status of your application, but don't call every day, and don't stop by the office unannounced with hopes of getting a face-to-face meeting with hiring managers. If you come off as needy right off the bat your application will be sent to the circular file promptly.</p> <h2>4. Typos in Your Resume</h2> <p>With so many job applicants and so few opportunities, it's understandable why some people rush through their resumes and cover letters. The more you can complete in a short amount of time, the more you can send out. However, be cognizant of typos and grammatical errors.</p> <p>It only takes one major typo or grammatical error to leave a bad taste in an employer's mouth. And if you have several mistakes, the employer could think you don't pay attention to detail, that you simply don't care, or, the most likely scenario, you're just a dummy. If you didn't take time to proofread your resume, application, or cover letter, you may drop the ball in other areas, and employers aren't keen to hire that kind of employee.</p> <h2>5. Thinking a Resume Is Enough</h2> <p>Sometimes a resume is enough, but depending on the type of work you're seeking, it also helps to provide hiring managers with additional information like examples of your work or a link to an online portfolio. It's useful to highlight why you're the best person in your cover letter, but it's even better when employers can preview your work for themselves so they can see your talent and accomplishments firsthand.</p> <h2>6. Not Following Instructions</h2> <p>Job ads typically have detailed instructions for applying for positions, and it's important that you follow the employer's instructions carefully. If the employer says to submit your application using a specific online link, don't hunt down the hiring manager's personal email and send your resume to this address. And if the hiring manager says resumes should be no more than one page, don't send a longer document to give a stronger impression. If you can't follow simple instructions, the employer may assume you're unable to follow bigger ones, and that's not an attractive quality in a candidate.</p> <h2>7. Forgetting to Network</h2> <p>One of the worst things you can do when seeking a job is forgetting to work your network. This doesn't mean expecting family or friends to hook you up with a job, but in all likelihood, you know at least one person who knows about a company currently hiring. If you open your mouth and let others know that you're seeking work, they can possibly provide a lead or let you know when jobs become available. In doing so, you can find job openings you might have otherwise never known about.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/mikey-rox">Mikey Rox</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-youre-sabotaging-your-job-hunt">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/make-guerrilla-job-hunting-work-for-you">Make Guerrilla Job Hunting Work for You</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-best-times-of-year-to-start-a-job-search">The Best Times of Year to Start a Job Search</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-being-passive-kills-your-job-prospects">4 Ways Being Passive Kills Your Job Prospects</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/jumpstart-your-job-search-with-instagram">Jumpstart Your Job Search With Instagram</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-things-you-must-do-after-the-interview-to-land-the-job">6 Things You Must Do After the Interview to Land the Job</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Job Hunting interview etiquette job hunt Job Interview job search resume social media unemployed Fri, 30 Sep 2016 10:00:11 +0000 Mikey Rox 1802285 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Get the Job Without Saying a Word http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-the-job-without-saying-a-word <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-get-the-job-without-saying-a-word" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_shaking_hands_78500093.jpg" alt="Woman getting the job without saying a word" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>An interview is something most of us will do several times throughout our careers. Whether it's for a promotion within your current organization, or a <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-use-snapchat-in-your-job-search">new job in a different company</a>, you need to nail every appearance you make. And while what you say is important, how you say it, and the body language you use is crucial. Here are some basic rules everyone should follow.</p> <h2>1. Make a Confident Entrance</h2> <p>It has been said that the interviewer can tell within the first 30 seconds if you are going to be a good fit for the company. And most interviewers have already made up their minds between five and 15 minutes. So you need to walk into the room being very self-assured, without looking arrogant or cocky. Stand up straight, walk with purpose, and be both professional and welcoming. You are happy to be there, without being so enthusiastic that you're as giddy as a puppy meeting its new owner. Offer your hand if they don't immediately offer theirs, and you will be off to a great start. When it's time to leave, apply the same rules.</p> <h2>2. Give a Firm Handshake</h2> <p>The key word here is <em>firm</em>. This is not a competition to see if you can crush the fingers of the person opposite you. Some men see the handshake as a test of manliness and strength, which it is definitely not. Think of the way you would grip a golf club before a swing &mdash; good enough to hold onto it, without trying to crush the steel. It should not last too long, one to three pumps is all you need to get this done and get onto the proceedings. If your handshake is flimsy or limp-wristed, you may be considered weak or insecure, and that is not a good first impression to give.</p> <p>If your hands are clammy or sweaty, find a way to dry them off before you shake. This equates to nervousness or illness, and is not something you want the interviewer to be thinking of. And finally&hellip; it's possible the person interviewing you will not shake hands for their own hygiene reasons. If you extend your hand and don't get one in return, just quickly place your hand back by your side and move on.</p> <h2>3. Make Eye Contact</h2> <p>This is not the same as staring (which some interviewers have said is both unnerving and creepy), or refusing to look away from the interviewer during the entire interview. You simply want to maintain good periods of eye contact, around 10-15 seconds at a time, before breaking to look up into the air when pondering a question, or looking at items around the office while you keep the conversation going. It should feel like you're talking to a friend.</p> <p>If you have a hard time looking right into their eyes, look at their nose, or the space between their eyebrows. They won't know the difference. If you are being interviewed by more than one person, do your best to make eye contact equally with each person, not only the person asking the questions. And remember to smile.</p> <h2>4. Maintain Great Posture</h2> <p>Your usual sitting position in the office is probably far from textbook. Most of us tend to slouch a little in our chairs, even with the advanced in lumbar support. But in an interview, you need to be on your best behavior, and that means sitting up straight without being so stiff that you look like you're on parade. Your posture should look comfortable, but professional. Chest up, shoulders back, spine straight. Keep your hands on your knees or folded in your lap. If you sit back in your chair too much, you look sloppy, and the interviewer may think you're not taking this seriously.</p> <p>On the other hand, if you lean forward too much, you can be considered aggressive. However, doing it from time to time, particularly when the interviewer says something of great interest, is fine. It shows that you are listening more closely, and that is a nice way to express enthusiasm.</p> <h2>5. Mirror Some of the Interviewer's Moves</h2> <p>A person doing a lot of interviews will usually be comfortable, and express positive body language movements. By mirroring (which is also a common way two people on a date will break down barriers and express interest), you are creating a subconscious bond between the two of you. However, it should be subtle, and used infrequently. If you get into a situation that becomes mimicry, you are going to offend or irritate the other person. They cross their hands, you cross your hands. They scratch their ear, you scratch yours. This is a surefire way to irk the interviewer, and you will not be called back.</p> <h2>6. Don't Overdo the Arm Movements</h2> <p>We are creatures that communicate with more than just words. In fact, <a href="http://www.nonverbalgroup.com/2011/08/how-much-of-communication-is-really-nonverbal">over 90% of communication is nonverbal,</a> and that means you are going to make gestures with your face, your body, and your hands. But don't get so excited that you're a windmill. It's okay to use your hands in a minimal way to help get a point across, but don't overdo it.</p> <h2>7. Respect the Interviewer's Personal Space</h2> <p>Most interviews are conducted over a table in an office or conference room, so you shouldn't have to worry too much about boundaries. However, there are times when you may have to get closer to the interviewer, especially if you are showing work from a portfolio, or you are sat facing each other without a table. When this happens, remember personal boundaries and barriers. No one wants a complete stranger getting too close, and it can also expose them to things like strong cologne, body odor, or bad breath &mdash; though hopefully, none of these are an issue.</p> <h2>8. Don't Get Too Relaxed</h2> <p>After a few minutes, you may start to become at ease with the interview process. The interviewer may have done a great job of calming your nerves, putting your fears at ease, and making you feel welcome. By all means, laugh at the interviewer's jokes, if they make them, and engage in more casual conversation if the interviewer is taking that lead. But do not sit back in your chair with your arms behind your head. Don't swing on the back legs of the chair either, or slump and stretch out your legs. These are signs of arrogance. And of course, never swear. No matter how casual the interviewer makes it, you do not want to curse like a sailor in any job interview.</p> <h2>9. Don't Fidget</h2> <p>Picking at your nails. Rubbing your head. Twirling your hair. Scratching your nose. Rapidly shaking one leg up and down. These are all annoying little movements that you may well be making unconsciously. A job interview can be nerve-wracking, and when you're nervous, you might do these things without realizing it. You must get them under control. They will only be perceived negatively. The interviewer will see that you are genuinely nervous. They may also think you're bored, hyperactive, or want to be anywhere but in that room with them. Practice with a friend or relative, and do everything you can to eliminate these fidgety moves.</p> <h2>10. Don't Cross Your Arms</h2> <p>Let's first address this myth that crossed arms mean you're closed off, bored, defensive, or trying to hide something. This is untrue. For some, crossed arms are simply comfortable, or a way of controlling fidgety hands. And science suggests that when you cross your arms, you are actually using both sides of your brain, and are <a href="http://www.today.com/health/are-crossed-arms-ok-body-language-myths-fixes-office-1D79842021">more likely to stay on task</a>.</p> <p>However, the myth has become more powerful than reality. Interviewers have been told to believe the pseudoscience, and when they see crossed arms, they think you're closed off or possibly uptight. In this case, crossing your arms is going to play into the folklore that 90% of interviewers believe to be true, so don't give them that signal.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-the-job-without-saying-a-word">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/make-guerrilla-job-hunting-work-for-you">Make Guerrilla Job Hunting Work for You</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/flashback-friday-the-65-best-career-tips-weve-ever-shared">Flashback Friday: The 65 Best Career Tips We&#039;ve Ever Shared</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/your-guide-to-getting-a-job-right-out-of-college">Your Guide to Getting a Job Right Out of College</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-youre-sabotaging-your-job-hunt">7 Ways You&#039;re Sabotaging Your Job Hunt</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/using-times-new-roman-on-your-r-sum-is-like-wearing-sweatpants-to-an-interview">Using Times New Roman on Your Résumé Is Like Wearing Sweatpants to an Interview</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Job Hunting body language confidence job hunting Job Interview job search resume Thu, 29 Sep 2016 09:30:26 +0000 Paul Michael 1801999 at http://www.wisebread.com 12 Questions to Ask Before You Take a Job Offer http://www.wisebread.com/12-questions-to-ask-before-you-take-a-job-offer <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/12-questions-to-ask-before-you-take-a-job-offer" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_80119927_LARGE.jpg" alt="asking questions before accepting a job" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>A job offer is exciting. It can mean new opportunities, more money, a move to a new city or state, and a big promotion. But wait just a second. Before you hurriedly take that offer and sign your name on the dotted line, you need to ask the following 12 questions. They can be the difference between a good job, a great career, and a position you don't actually want at all. Remember, with a <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-ace-your-next-coffee-interview">job offer</a>, the ball is in your court. They want you. You hold the power, and you should make sure you get exactly what you want.</p> <h2>1. How Many Vacation, Personal, and Sick Days Do I Get?</h2> <p>You cannot assume you will get the same vacation package you got with a previous employer. In fact, if you are moving to America from another country, you may be in for quite a nasty surprise. For instance, the UK mandates <a href="https://www.gov.uk/holiday-entitlement-rights/entitlement">28 days of paid vacation every year</a>, and this does not include public holidays. There are no such rules in the U.S., and most people are lucky to get 10 paid vacation days per year when starting a new job. So, ask, and see if it's negotiable.</p> <p>You also want to find out if these allowances increase over time. Some employers will add an additional five paid days after three and five years of continuous employment. Or, paid days off may increase with a promotion. You also want to ask about personal days, which have different conditions than vacation days (personal days may not be allowed to carry over). Is there a maximum amount of days that can be carried over before you stop accruing? These will all be outlined in the contract you sign, but you want clarification long before it is printed up.</p> <h2>2. What's Included in the Benefits Package?</h2> <p>Benefits cost employers a great deal of money, and so they are seen as a big incentive when hiring a new employee. The biggest cost is health insurance, and there will be options there, too. Some employers have a sliding scale of insurance options, including HMO, PPO, EPO, and HAS plans, and all will cost different amounts and have varying degrees of cover. Aside from health insurance, ask about other kinds of insurance, too. Are vision and dental included? Is life insurance included, or long and short-term disability? These options, if offered at no charge to you, can add up considerably to the basic pay package you are being offered. This is why a site like Salary.com will list base salary, and salary plus benefits. The latter can be a lot more. And if there is a bonus, ask about that. How much, what do you have to do to get it, and when is it paid?</p> <h2>3. What's the Parking Situation?</h2> <p>Parking can be a big deal in some cities, especially New York and L.A. If the company has a lot set aside for employee parking, you're usually in great shape. Is the parking offered close to the building, or is it quite a walk? Your personal safety may be an issue here. If you have to find your own parking, things can start getting tricky, and costly. Does the company cover employee parking costs, and if so, how much do they cover? For instance, you may be covered for street parking, but not a covered lot, and if you are worried about hail or other weather conditions, that can be a deal breaker. Does the company have a discount plan on public transportation? This can be a better option for some, as parking and gas money can be too expensive.</p> <h2>4. What Are the Actual Hours?</h2> <p>Depending on the industry in which you work, this can greatly <a href="http://www.calculators.org/savings/wage-conversion.php">impact your hourly wage</a>. If you are offered a starting salary of $60,000 per year, and work 40 hours per week, you're getting roughly $29/hour. If you work 60 hours per week with no overtime, that drops to less than $20/hour. So, ask for realistic working conditions. If you are going to be stuck in the office nights and weekends, you may want to negotiate your base pay, or ask for additional vacation and personal days. Your hiring manager may paint a very rosy picture of the conditions, so ask people whom you'll be working with. Be informed. You do not want to find out you just quit a $50,000 job working 40 hours per week for a $60,000 job working 60 hours per week.</p> <h2>5. When Am I Expected to Start?</h2> <p>It may seem like a no brainer, but some people get bitten badly by not asking this question before accepting the job. Then, they're in sticky mud when they realize the start date is too far away to make ends meet, or too soon to allow relocation, or finishing up a position at another firm. Although most employers will give you two weeks, it's possible you need more time than that to get your affairs in order. If you're moving across the country (or from another country), it can take months to find a new place and get situated. On the other hand, it may be that the position needs to be filled immediately, and your contract with your current employer demands two weeks' notice. Whatever the conditions, you need to know the start date. You can always negotiate coming in later, or earlier, or it may be that you cannot accept the job at all based on the start date offered. You do not want to find this out after you have resigned from your current position.</p> <h2>6. What Are the Promotion Opportunities?</h2> <p>In a fantastic episode of <em>The Office (UK)</em>, Tim says &quot;It's better to be at the bottom of a ladder you want to climb, than halfway up one you don't.&quot; This is very good advice, and something you must keep in mind when you are considering the new job. You may not be happy at your current job, but there may be more promotion opportunities than at the company you're thinking of moving to.</p> <p>Even worse, you may find out that it is impossible to get promoted out of the department you're applying for. Suddenly, you have gone from climbing a ladder, to hitting a glass ceiling. So, examine the organizational structure (ask for a company org chart if you can). See who is above you, and below you. Find out how quickly you can get promoted if you work hard. It may be that the starting salary is not ideal, but that the opportunities for promotion are excellent. And of course, the reverse may be true&hellip; you do not want a job that pays well now, but goes absolutely nowhere.</p> <h2>7. Will There Be Considerable Travel Involved?</h2> <p>For some people, travel is a perk that they cannot wait to take advantage of. For others, travel means valuable time away from family and friends, and the hassle of living out of suitcases and hotels. Wherever you stand on this, you should know beforehand what the travel expectations are. Some jobs will actually list it in the ad (20% travel required). Others will play it by ear, but tell you that some travel each month will be happening.</p> <p>On the other hand, some will tempt you with travel opportunities, but they are empty promises and you will actually be chained to your desk, year in, year out. Get this knowledge up front. Can you talk to the person you are replacing? What was their specific experience of travel like? If you enjoy traveling on the company dime, and walk away from a job that gives you such a benefit, you want to make sure you are getting it from the new position.</p> <h2>8. Is There a High Turnover Rate Here?</h2> <p>A revolving door is not a good sign, and if people are constantly leaving, that is a sign of systemic issues plaguing the company. Usually, the biggest reason for high turnover is poor working conditions. This could mean very long hours, oppressive management, favoritism, low pay, or the lack or promotion opportunities. The company could also have a history of hiring and firing people on demand for projects. Whatever the reason, high turnover is a huge red flag. The hiring manager may well be reluctant to give you this information, so ask other employees. Or better yet, take a look at Glassdoor.com and see what former employees are saying. If there is a pattern there, especially for harassment or abuse, you know what to avoid.</p> <h2>9. What Is the Onboarding Process Like?</h2> <p>Onboarding is a buzzword term that means &quot;the mechanism through which new employees acquire the necessary knowledge, skills, and behaviors to become effective organizational members and insiders.&quot; In short, how long you will be given to get up to speed on the job, the daily duties, and the projects you are given. If they are going to give you extensive training and a grace period, that's worth knowing. If they expect you to hit the ground running, you need to know this beforehand. You do not want to take a job for which you are not yet qualified if they expect instant results. That will show quickly, and you could be laid off after a month or two.</p> <h2>10. What's the Company Culture Like?</h2> <p>Is it a fun place to work? Is there a strict dress code? Is there a great social life outside of the office? Are the hours somewhat flexible, or do you have to be there exactly at 9 a.m., and leave at 5 p.m.? Is lunch a strict one-hour affair, or is there wiggle room? Are there office parties, and gift exchanges? Is the office full of cliques that make it difficult to fit in and make friends? You want to know as much about the culture as you can. You spend more time at the office than you do at home, so it should be a place you enjoy working at.</p> <h2>11. Who Will Be My Supervisor?</h2> <p>A name is just a name if you're new to a company, but you can easily research that person with the availability of information on LinkedIn and social sites. Is it someone who is a go-getter, driven to get results, with high expectations of every team member? Is it someone with a lot of experience that you can learn from, and grow? Is it someone who hates competition, especially from subordinates? Find out who you will be reporting to, because a bad manager is one of the biggest reasons people quit their jobs.</p> <h2>12. Where Will I Be Working?</h2> <p>If you're taking a position as a mechanic, you're working in the garage. But if it's an office job, this could make a big difference for you. Right now, you may have an office, and the new job comes with a cubicle, or a desk in an open plan facility. This could be a deal breaker. Do you have a window? Again, for some people it's not important, but for others, natural light and a view is a must. If you can, ask to see the space and if it's not good enough, ask for something better. You want to get this nailed, possibly in writing, before you start.</p> <p><em>What other questions should you ask before taking a job offer? Share with us!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-questions-to-ask-before-you-take-a-job-offer">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-ways-to-job-hunt-without-getting-caught">9 Ways to Job Hunt Without Getting Caught</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-great-jobs-that-dont-pay-much">15 Great Jobs That Don&#039;t Pay Much</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-to-bounce-back-from-job-rejection">4 Ways to Bounce Back From Job Rejection</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/master-these-15-interview-questions">Master These 15 Interview Questions</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-calm-your-nerves-and-ace-your-interview">6 Ways to Calm Your Nerves and Ace Your Interview</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income Job Hunting important questions Job Interview job offer job search job seeker new job Wed, 29 Jun 2016 09:30:28 +0000 Paul Michael 1740968 at http://www.wisebread.com 4 Ways Being Passive Kills Your Job Prospects http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-being-passive-kills-your-job-prospects <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/4-ways-being-passive-kills-your-job-prospects" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_79220855_LARGE.jpg" alt="being passive killed her job prospects" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Nothing can sink a job interview faster than a visibly nervous or passive interviewee. The interview allows the applicant a chance to prove that they have the knowledge, the skill, and the experience laid out in their resume. A good interview can make a weak resume shine. A bad interview can make even the most experienced individual seem incompetent.</p> <p>No matter how many years of professional work experience you have, don't let the job interview process become your Achilles' heel. Here are four ways being passive can kill your job prospects. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-answer-23-of-the-most-common-interview-questions?ref=seealso">How to Answer 23 of the Most Common Interview Questions</a>)</p> <h2>Rambling</h2> <p>Job seekers are meant to paint a picture of professional competence, or at the very least, the potential for professional competence. Nothing can undermine that image faster than second guessing the answer you give.</p> <p><em>&quot;How fast can I write an article? I can write an article in two hours&hellip; well maybe three hours&hellip; I guess it really depends on the type of article...I mean&hellip;&quot;</em></p> <p>Give an answer and stick with it. Trust yourself. The interviewer doesn't need to know your entire thought process. They just want to know your norm. Rambling different answers to the same question could make the interviewer question the validity of your entire resume. If you can't answer a simple question, maybe the entire resume is a lie.</p> <h2>Thinking You Can't Do It</h2> <p>Before stepping foot into an interview, take a moment to reflect on how you view yourself. Personally, I tend to undervalue my own work. When asked during an interview if I can work under pressure, my gut instinct is to say no.</p> <p>The answer has nothing to do with reality and everything to do with self-doubt. I always underestimate my ability to work in new environments and on new types of projects. I need to remind myself in interviews that how I view myself has nothing to do with the reality of the situation. I can, and have, worked well under pressure before.</p> <p>Job seekers need to know whether they're in danger of letting their self-doubt destroy their ability to land a job they would flourish in. Be self-aware enough to realize when you need to go against what you're brain and gut are screaming at you.</p> <h2>Having Nothing to Ask</h2> <p>Interviews are meant to be a conversation where both the job seeker and the company determine whether they are a good fit. Many job seekers, who are desperate to find a job, might not realize that they're still expected to act as if they're personally evaluating whether the job is a good fit.</p> <p>Why? Even if saying no to the job isn't an option, trying to feel out the company can make you seem more invested in finding an organization where you contribute to that company's financial growth. And acting as if you're evaluating how you would fit in at the company can make you seem self-aware.</p> <p>In order to cultivate an image of evaluating the worth of the job, you should:</p> <ul> <li>research the company before the interview;</li> <li>check out their website;</li> <li>read their blog;</li> <li>read articles where the company is mentioned;</li> <li>check out any of the company's webinars;</li> <li>research their competitors;</li> <li>come prepared with questions to ask the interviewer.</li> </ul> <h2>Being Too Laid Back</h2> <p>Interviews are the time and place to carefully cultivate the right mannerisms. The interviewer needs to know that, even if the culture of the office is more relaxed, you can recognize when formality is needed and act accordingly. As an added bonus, the right body language and mannerisms can also make you appear more professional and confident.</p> <p>Due to a lack of emphasis on professional behavior these days, it can be hard to pinpoint what personal habits might be ruining the professional image you're attempting to create. Here are a few habits to add to your professional interview persona:</p> <ul> <li>wait for permission before taking a seat;</li> <li>give a firm handshake;</li> <li>don't fidget;</li> <li>maintain eye contact;</li> <li>have good posture (no slouching).</li> </ul> <p><em>What bad interview habits do you have that are hampering your ability to find a job? Share with us!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/samantha-stauf">Samantha Stauf</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-being-passive-kills-your-job-prospects">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-youre-sabotaging-your-job-hunt">7 Ways You&#039;re Sabotaging Your Job Hunt</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/make-guerrilla-job-hunting-work-for-you">Make Guerrilla Job Hunting Work for You</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-questions-to-ask-before-you-take-a-job-offer">12 Questions to Ask Before You Take a Job Offer</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/jumpstart-your-job-search-with-instagram">Jumpstart Your Job Search With Instagram</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-extreme-job-interview-tactics-that-worked">6 Extreme Job Interview Tactics That Worked</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income Job Hunting interview etiquette interview process Job Interview job search unemployed Wed, 29 Jun 2016 09:00:06 +0000 Samantha Stauf 1740970 at http://www.wisebread.com 4 Ways to Bounce Back From Job Rejection http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-to-bounce-back-from-job-rejection <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/4-ways-to-bounce-back-from-job-rejection" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_000061108306_Large.jpg" alt="bouncing back from job rejection" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>What's your go-to coping mechanism when faced with rejection? Openly sob in between giant bites of chocolate cake? Punch a pillow? Or maybe you bend the ear of every passerby about the sheer injustice of it all?</p> <p>We learn these methods when we're young, and while most of our toddler tactics dissipate with time, it's not unusual to hang onto these particular rejection responses for life.</p> <p>But there is a better way. Take it from the indefatigable Babe Ruth, who said, &quot;It's pretty hard to beat a person who never gives up.&quot; You can take rejection and bounce back stronger than ever. Here's how. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-ways-to-get-over-rejection?ref=seealso">11 Ways to Get Over Rejection</a>)</p> <h2>Don't Wallow</h2> <p>Get a handle on the emotional stages you pass through when faced with rejection. The most common model of emotional stages &mdash; known as the <a href="http://www.change-management-coach.com/kubler-ross.html">change curve</a> &mdash; categorizes them as shock, anger, bargaining, depression, and acceptance. Although the model was initially designed to describe the stages of grief, they have been found to hold true with much more minor changes such as rejection.</p> <p>Between the shock and anger stages, you're going to want to let off a little steam. Have a bellow. Take it out on the gym equipment. Pour yourself a large glass of wine. Whatever does it for you.</p> <p>But moving on through the natural stages of adjustment is the key to a quick recovery. It can be easy to grind to a halt at the stages of bargaining and depression, and to find yourself wallowing in the defeat. If you start to feel yourself <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/do-this-one-thing-every-day-to-defeat-negativity">getting overwhelmed by negativity</a>, take stock. Pull yourself up. But should the feeling persist, and you feel trapped, don't be afraid to seek help from family, friends, and medical professionals if necessary.</p> <h2>Don't Take It Personally</h2> <p>Remember that rejection happens to all of us. From being stood up on a date, to missing out on a great job, to being <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/mortgage-application-declined-here-s-how-to-respond">declined for a mortgage</a>, we've all been rejected at least once. If you want to take it all to heart, and find the personal slight in every rejection, you're going to live a life full of resentment and sadness. But the thing is, it's not about you.</p> <p>Try to create a little distance between yourself and your negative thoughts. If a rejection feels personal, take a step back and put it into perspective. If you didn't get that promotion, maybe there was simply another candidate who fit the position better. Maybe you're lined up for a different opportunity you simply don't know of yet. Maybe the interviewer was just plain bad. Either way, it's not about you, so don't beat yourself up.</p> <h2>Reflect and Review</h2> <p>So now that you have a sense of perspective, acknowledge if there is anything you can or should learn from the experience. Be wary of falling back into the hole of self-doubt or blame. But if there's anything you can learn from this, then the experience has been worthwhile in its own way.</p> <p>Hindsight, of course, is 20/20, and this isn't an exercise in wishful thinking. Ask yourself if, with the knowledge you had at the time, you could have taken a different course. If you were turned down for a bank loan, for example, could you have presented your case differently, or understood the assessment criteria better? Could you have improved your credit file or chosen a different bank to suit your circumstances? You cannot change the outcome, but you can turn regret into a life lesson instead.</p> <h2>Move Forward With a New Challenge</h2> <p>To reach the acceptance stage of the change curve takes time, and requires you to shift your focus from what has happened to what will happen. In other words, you need to get back on the horse.</p> <p>Whether you can pick up the same challenge and try a different angle, or find a new goal to pursue, will depend on the circumstances. If you've been rejected from a particular job, for example, then reapplying to the same role is probably futile. But reminding yourself of what you were looking for more broadly, before restarting your search elsewhere is the perfect antidote to rejection.</p> <p>If you've had a financial setback, then it might be time to rethink and set some entirely new money goals. What's crucial is having a meaningful target to shoot for, to stop yourself from slipping back in your adjustment process, and dwelling for too long on a rejection that has long passed. And this is where you have the possibility to not only recover from rejection, but to bounce back stronger than ever. Set a truly impactful goal, and use the pendulum effect as you swing from pent up frustration into full-on goal oriented action.</p> <p>Rejection should be redirection, not defeat.</p> <p><em>What's your top tip for overcoming rejection and bouncing back stronger than ever? Share with us in the comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/claire-millard">Claire Millard</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-to-bounce-back-from-job-rejection">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-questions-to-ask-before-you-take-a-job-offer">12 Questions to Ask Before You Take a Job Offer</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-things-that-really-annoy-hiring-managers">9 Things That Really Annoy Hiring Managers</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-being-passive-kills-your-job-prospects">4 Ways Being Passive Kills Your Job Prospects</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/flashback-friday-the-65-best-career-tips-weve-ever-shared">Flashback Friday: The 65 Best Career Tips We&#039;ve Ever Shared</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-a-job-learn-the-secret-from-a-bad-movie">How to get a job--learn the secret from a bad movie</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income Job Hunting career confidence drive first impression Job Interview job rejection job search rejection Mon, 16 May 2016 09:00:05 +0000 Claire Millard 1709581 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Ways to Calm Your Nerves and Ace Your Interview http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-calm-your-nerves-and-ace-your-interview <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-ways-to-calm-your-nerves-and-ace-your-interview" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_000061725250_Large.jpg" alt="staying calm to ace her job interview" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Next time you have a job interview, take a few deep breaths before walking in. Research shows that anxious candidates perform at a lower level in interviews than their relaxed peers. And not only are you stressed to the point of distraction about the interview, but the simple fact you're nervous &mdash; and probably showing it with sweaty palms and jittery energy &mdash; might mean that things won't work out for you, creating the worst sort of vicious circle.</p> <p>Don't let your interview nerves sabotage your chances. Use these tips to make sure you get the big break you deserve &mdash; and give interview anxiety the boot.</p> <h2>1. Recognize the Telltale Signs</h2> <p>The emotional twitchiness that comes with interview nerves quickly translates into physical symptoms, which can undermine your confidence and also indicate your level of anxiety to the interviewer. Whether it's feeling flushed, avoiding eye contact, or fiddling with your clothing, we all have our own personal range of mannerisms that come out when we are feeling the heat.</p> <p>Understanding how you tend to react when anxious is key. If you're not already aware, ask colleagues, family, or friends what they think. Chances are, they've noticed the small nervous ticks you turn to, even if you have not.</p> <p>Interestingly, research shows that speed of speech &mdash; speaking unnaturally slowly &mdash; is the only indicator that both interviewers and candidates agree is a <a href="https://www.springer.com/gp/about-springer/media/springer-select/interview-blues---anxious--slow-talkers-often-do-not-get-the-job-/55382?token=prtst0416p">telltale sign of nerves</a>. All other habits tend to be a personal cocktail of small things that vary among individuals. So if you're facing an interview and not sure where to start, then practicing pacing your speech in answers can help you overcome this most common of giveaways.</p> <h2>2. Harness the Jitters</h2> <p>Feeling nervous, to a certain extent, is actually a massive advantage to you. As long as your anxieties don't become so severe they're paralyzing, you can use the nervous energy to focus on preparation for your big day.</p> <h2>3. Do Your Research</h2> <p>If you already have an interview lined up, find out how many interviewers there will be, and whether there will be any pre-work or exercises to complete on the day. If you can find out the interviewer's name, then Google them. Knowledge is always power. Learn all you can about the company, including what others in the same field &mdash; industry insiders and the trade press &mdash; think of the business, for a balanced view. Simply following the right people on Twitter will glean you a whole lot of information that might come in handy.</p> <h2>4. Plan Your Answers</h2> <p>Learn how to answer some of the <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-answer-23-of-the-most-common-interview-questions">most common interview questions</a>, to make sure you're feeling confident. The STAR technique is useful for planning out answers to <a href="http://theinterviewguys.com/behavioral-interview-questions-and-answers-101/">behavioral questions</a>, as it forces you to think of the Situation, Task, Actions, and Results of any given example you might choose. Draft a list of the questions you might predict, and sketch out answers, including the relevant examples you might share. And plan how you might phrase any less-than-perfect experiences you've had along the way.</p> <h2>5. Practice!</h2> <p>You have your answers scoped out, now you just need to get them into your head. Try posting the key questions and your possible answers in places you will see them often. Think about the inside of your fridge door, or the bathroom mirror. Then start using your down time to run through your answers. Do them in your head if you have to, but out loud is far better. If you're in the shower, or in your car, talk an answer through.</p> <h2>6. Keep a Sense of Perspective</h2> <p>And finally, cut yourself a break. Everyone sits in an interview <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-scary-thoughts-everyone-has-during-a-job-interview">thinking scary thoughts</a>. Pretty much everyone has interview nerves, and learning to cope is a useful skill that pays dividends outside of the interview room, too. Ask yourself: <em>What is the worst that can happen?</em> And consider whether anything that comes to pass today will still feel important in 10 years time, to get your fears in perspective. Most importantly, take a deep breath, and keep smiling. You'll knock 'em dead!</p> <p><em>How do you get over your interview jitters? Share with us!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/claire-millard">Claire Millard</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-calm-your-nerves-and-ace-your-interview">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/master-these-15-interview-questions">Master These 15 Interview Questions</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-questions-to-ask-before-you-take-a-job-offer">12 Questions to Ask Before You Take a Job Offer</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-ways-to-job-hunt-without-getting-caught">9 Ways to Job Hunt Without Getting Caught</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-extreme-job-interview-tactics-that-worked">6 Extreme Job Interview Tactics That Worked</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-not-to-answer-10-of-the-most-common-interview-questions">How NOT TO Answer 10 of the Most Common Interview Questions</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Life Hacks Job Hunting calm your nerves interview jitters Job Interview job search nerves nervous new job Thu, 12 May 2016 09:30:24 +0000 Claire Millard 1708049 at http://www.wisebread.com Make Guerrilla Job Hunting Work for You http://www.wisebread.com/make-guerrilla-job-hunting-work-for-you <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/make-guerrilla-job-hunting-work-for-you" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_000020079119_Large.jpg" alt="using guerrilla tactics to land a job" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Guerrilla job hunting means: adopting unconventional tactics to land the job of your dreams. This method hits the headlines every now and again. And occasionally, we hear about a stroke of brilliance and a deserving candidate landing the job. But all too often, these stories are about job seekers who go to enormous lengths to catch the eye of a prospective employer, only to have it backfire horribly.</p> <p>Did you hear about the one where the candidate back-flipped into the interview room? Or where she arrived armed with items purchased from the interviewer's Amazon wishlist? Those tales did not have happy endings. But even if your usual approach is a little more low key, you can still use some guerrilla skills without needing to hire a billboard to advertise yourself, or tattoo your resume on your forehead.</p> <p>Here's how to make this job seeking approach actually work for you, without making a total fool of yourself. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-extreme-job-interview-tactics-that-worked?ref=seealso">6 Extreme Interview Tactics That Worked</a>)</p> <h2>Make Yourself Stand Out</h2> <p>Recruiting managers might receive hundreds of applications for any single position advertised. Even with the most rigorous screening process in place, resume number 357 has to be pretty special to stand out. Some job seekers have gone to great lengths to make sure their applications memorable, including one famous tale of a job hunter sending a note asking for a coffee meeting, inside a coffee cup, using a FedEx tracking number. Monitoring the delivery notes online, she was able to see the exact moment it was received and signed for, and placed a call immediately to follow up. But don't panic. You don't need to do anything so extreme to make sure you get noticed.</p> <p>Make sure all the basics are covered first. Write a tailored resume and cover letter, making your enthusiasm for the role clear. Using a resume template is a great way to create a resume that stands out for the right reasons.</p> <p>Then try this:</p> <ul> <li>Make an effort to find out the name of the individual recruiting, and use it.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>If you can start adding value to the business at this early stage, you'll be remembered. Is there a business improvement idea, or some customer insight you can share as part of your application?<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Have an &quot;elevator pitch&quot; summing up your unique abilities, ready to use whenever you get the ear of a potential recruiter.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Gather intelligence. If you send an email application, follow up with a call. Ostensibly this is to check that the email was received, but take the chance while you're on the phone to get any insight into the business that you can.</li> </ul> <h2>Leverage Your Contacts</h2> <p>Once upon a time, &quot;it's not what you know, but who you know&quot; was the embodiment of a system that favored the elite. With the democratization of information resulting from Internet use, this is no longer the case. If don't have contacts who can help you in some way, then it's probably because you're not trying hard enough.</p> <p>First of all, think through your real-life connections. Do you have friends, family, or previous business contacts who might be able to help you? Can they put you in touch with managers at businesses you're interested in applying to, or who you can tap for information and ideas? Even if your direct connections don't work directly at the company in question, they may be partners, suppliers, or contractors, who can still offer valuable insight.</p> <p>Then try this:</p> <ul> <li>If you want to pump connections for ideas, ask to meet for a coffee. An informational interview sounds too formal and demanding.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Follow the right people: businesses, recruiters, industry insiders, and the trade press, on social media. The knowledge you gain can be game-changing. For example, if you learn about an organization's expansion plans, reach out directly even before they start to officially recruit, to get ahead of the game.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>A referral opens doors. If you have an inside contact, ask them to send your resume directly to the recruiter with a recommendation.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>If you have the nerve, call the CEO (or another senior manager) directly. Ask them where you should address your application. And when you do send in your resume you can legitimately say, &quot;the CEO recommended I apply to you directly.&quot; It's cheeky, but this implied recommendation has been known to work.</li> </ul> <h2>Follow Up</h2> <p>Recruiting managers are only human. There's research to show that if you've scored an interview, you're more likely to be selected if you are the first or last person seen, as memories are sharper, and the recruiter's mood is perhaps more forgiving. You can't necessarily dictate the order in which your interview falls, but you can increase your chances of being remembered with a polite follow-up note after an interview. Failing to follow up is a common <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-things-that-really-annoy-hiring-managers">complaint of recruiting managers</a>, so don't miss the chance to do so.</p> <p>Try this:</p> <ul> <li>Handwritten notes, in more traditional businesses, are preferred. In more modern or tech-focused organizations, an email is fine. Include a link to <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/30-minutes-to-a-linkedin-profile-that-gets-you-hired">your LinkedIn profile</a>, and you'll be able to see if the reader clicks through to check you out.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Thank the interviewer for their time, and reiterate your interest in the role in authentic terms. If something came up in the conversation that impressed you about the business, then say so.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Refer to a point of connection. If you mentioned an interesting article or book during your conversation, pass over the link in your message.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>If you felt you did not get across some skills, or answers as well as you could have, this is a chance to elaborate. The interviewers are likely to be flattered that you're still thinking of them after the meeting.</li> </ul> <p>Traditionally, a job search follows a regular pattern: find a relevant role advertised, apply, interview, and if all goes well, receive an offer. These days, finding a job is a more fluid process. Many roles are not even openly advertised, putting the ball firmly in the job seekers' court. Use your intuition, employ some of these tactics, and you will stand out for the right reasons. No backflips required.</p> <p><em>What tactics have you tried to get a job? Did they work for you? Share with us in the comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/claire-millard">Claire Millard</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/make-guerrilla-job-hunting-work-for-you">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-youre-sabotaging-your-job-hunt">7 Ways You&#039;re Sabotaging Your Job Hunt</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-being-passive-kills-your-job-prospects">4 Ways Being Passive Kills Your Job Prospects</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/flashback-friday-the-65-best-career-tips-weve-ever-shared">Flashback Friday: The 65 Best Career Tips We&#039;ve Ever Shared</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-the-job-without-saying-a-word">How to Get the Job Without Saying a Word</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-ace-your-next-coffee-interview">How to Ace Your Next Coffee Interview</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Job Hunting interview etiquette job application Job Interview job interview questions job search resume unemployed Thu, 05 May 2016 09:30:26 +0000 Claire Millard 1703709 at http://www.wisebread.com Flashback Friday: The 65 Best Career Tips We've Ever Shared http://www.wisebread.com/flashback-friday-the-65-best-career-tips-weve-ever-shared <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/flashback-friday-the-65-best-career-tips-weve-ever-shared" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_glasses_work_000075592811.jpg" alt="Woman learning best career tips ever shared" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Your first job will probably not be your dream job. In fact, you might not land your ideal professional role until your fourth, fifth, or sixth job. Crafting a fulfilling career takes time, and hopefully your peers and mentors are sharing their wisdom with you along the way.</p> <p>But just in case that wisdom is hard to come by, and you need some additional assistance in your path to success, we've got some brilliant job search tips right here.</p> <p>Here are the 65 best career tips we've ever shared.</p> <p><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5171/000050916338.jpg" width="605" height="340" alt="" /></p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-answer-23-of-the-most-common-interview-questions">How to Answer 23 of the Most Common Interview Questions</a> &mdash; Answering any question during a job interview can be stressful experience. There's so much pressure to nail every answer that's it's easy to flub a response. Well, not anymore. This will help you nail all interview questions, and hopefully, get the job.</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-extreme-job-interview-tactics-that-worked">6 Extreme Job Interview Tactics That Worked</a> &mdash; Sometimes the path to the stop requires standing out in a crowd. These unique interview tactics may seem extreme, but amazingly, they worked!</p> <p><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5171/iStock_000071991467_Large.jpg" width="605" height="340" alt="" /></p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-career-tips-you-wish-you-could-give-your-younger-self">7 Career Tips You Wish You Could Give Your Younger Self</a> &mdash; Hindsight is always 20/20, right? Well, what would you tell your younger self about how to be professionally fulfilled? There might be some handy advice in there for you now, too.</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-transition-to-a-new-career-after-30">6 Ways to Transition to a New Career After 30</a> &mdash; Starting over in a new field is not easy, especially once you're past your 20s &mdash; when life is generally more flexible and suited to career changes. These tips will help you transition at any age.</p> <p><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5171/guy_fired_000052937386.jpg" width="605" height="340" alt="" /></p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/fired-heres-how-to-keep-it-from-hurting-your-career">Fired? Here's How to Keep It From Hurting Your Career</a> &mdash; It happens to the best of us. Don't worry, losing your job doesn't mean your entire professional world has imploded. Pick yourself up, dust yourself off, and read this.</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-you-should-never-do-during-a-job-interview">10 Things You Should Never Do During a Job Interview</a> &mdash; There are certain topics that should not be discussed and certain things you should never ever do during an interview. Know the rules before you go.</p> <p><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5171/iStock_000068043419_Large.jpg" width="605" height="340" alt="" /></p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-signs-the-job-is-too-good-to-be-true">11 Signs the Job Is Too Good to Be True</a> &mdash; Don't fall for the job scam. There are plenty of jobs out there that are too good to be true, and here are all the telltale signs.</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-best-times-of-year-to-start-a-job-search">The Best Times of Year to Start a Job Search</a> &mdash; Certain seasons are just better for job hunting. If you've got a job now, but would like to make a change in the near future, try to search when the time is right.</p> <p><em>What other career tips have you learned along the way? Share your wisdom with us!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/chrissa-hardy">Chrissa Hardy</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/flashback-friday-the-65-best-career-tips-weve-ever-shared">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/flashback-friday-68-best-ways-to-make-money-that-are-actually-fun">Flashback Friday: 68 Best Ways to Make Money That Are Actually Fun</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/flashback-friday-59-tips-to-help-you-nail-that-job-interview">Flashback Friday: 59 Tips to Help You Nail That Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/make-guerrilla-job-hunting-work-for-you">Make Guerrilla Job Hunting Work for You</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-the-job-without-saying-a-word">How to Get the Job Without Saying a Word</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-answer-23-of-the-most-common-interview-questions">How to Answer 23 of the Most Common Interview Questions</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Job Hunting career fbf flashback friday Job Interview job search jobs resume Fri, 11 Mar 2016 11:00:15 +0000 Chrissa Hardy 1670661 at http://www.wisebread.com 9 Things That Really Annoy Hiring Managers http://www.wisebread.com/9-things-that-really-annoy-hiring-managers <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/9-things-that-really-annoy-hiring-managers" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_job_interview_000078187585.jpg" alt="Woman learning what really annoys hiring managers" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>You've made it to the interview, and all that's standing between you and your dream job is the hiring manager &mdash; but winning her over may be easier said than done. So what will it take to make her like you? Well, one thing you can do is avoid annoying her. We reached out to several hiring managers who shared their biggest pet peeves on the condition of anonymity.</p> <p>RELATED:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.popsugar.com/smart-living/What-Name-Your-Resume-Cover-Letter-26126164" target="_blank">What to Name Your Résumé and Cover Letter</a></p> <h2>1. When You Don't Understand the Company or Product</h2> <p>There's nothing a hiring manager hates more than wasting time, and you will definitely be seen as a waste of time if you don't understand the company or the product. It'll show that you're not even doing the basic research you need for the interview. Why should they even consider you if you're not putting forward the effort? It'll seem like you don't have any passion for or interest in the company, which is one of the biggest pet peeves of any hiring manager.</p> <h2>2. When You Don't Ask Questions</h2> <p>When you don't ask questions, it shows disinterest and lack of effort. One hiring manager told us, &quot;It makes me feel like they're just looking for any job. Anyone can make up good answers to an interview question, but I want to see how they think and what they care about.&quot; Need some help with this step? Check out some <a href="http://www.savvysugar.com/Good-Questions-Ask-During-Interview-33652741">great questions to ask</a> during the interview.</p> <p>RELATED:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.popsugar.com/smart-living/How-Make-My-Resume-Better-38831500" target="_blank">6 Ways to Revamp Your Résumé</a></p> <h2>3. When You Are Too Persistent</h2> <p>Persistence is an admirable trait, but be careful not to go overboard. &quot;A little persistence is good &mdash; I've often given a candidate a second look after a follow-up email,&quot; said one hiring manager. &quot;But emailing multiple times a week, stopping by the company's headquarters, and reaching out to every employee you can find on LinkedIn can seem desperate and annoying, and none of those things will get you hired.&quot;</p> <h2>4. When You Don't Follow Directions</h2> <p>The job listing says to email and not call or maybe that a cover letter is required. Follow those instructions to a T, because if you can't follow simple directions, it's likely that your application will be ignored.</p> <p>RELATED:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.popsugar.com/smart-living/How-Change-Your-Life-Year-26709448" target="_blank">36 Moves to Change Your Life For the Better</a></p> <h2>5. When You Get the Company's Name Wrong in Your Application Materials</h2> <p>You'll be surprised how often candidates mess this up in their applications. If you're sending your résumé to a lot of places, you may accidentally copy and paste the wrong company name. &quot;Nothing gets a cover letter tossed in my trash faster than seeing another publication's name in the 'to' field,&quot; said a hiring manager.</p> <h2>6. When You Don't Include Links For Easy Reference</h2> <p>Hiring managers will appreciate the little details that make the process easier for them. One hiring manager advised, &quot;If you mention your portfolio, a website, or your social media profiles, make it easy for me to view them! I want to read more about you and see what you can do, but I'm not going to spend time digging for it myself if you don't include.&quot;</p> <h2>7. When You Don't Follow Up After an Interview</h2> <p>This seems like an obvious step, but a lot of people don't follow up after an interview. At the very least, said one hiring manager, send a quick one-line thank you, although a thoughtful follow-up referencing something from your discussion is very much preferred. Here is a good&nbsp;<a href="http://www.savvysugar.com/Interview-Follow-Up-Email-Template-19179139">template for the follow-up email</a>.</p> <p>RELATED:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.popsugar.com/smart-living/Best-Jobs-America-2016-39873247" target="_blank">The 25 Best Jobs in America This Year</a></p> <h2>8. When You Make Up an Answer</h2> <p>You may be startled by an unexpected question, but don't resort to making up an answer. First of all, your interviewer can probably tell, and secondly, she will not be impressed. Take some time to think before crafting your answer, and read these steps on what to do when you're <a href="http://www.savvysugar.com/What-Do-You-Cant-Answer-Interview-Question-33925868">stumped by a question</a>.</p> <h2>9. When You're Too Casual</h2> <p>You may get along with the hiring manager, but remember that you should always still be professional even if the company culture seems casual. &quot;Keep emails professional and always include greetings and sign-offs, not just one-liners sent from your phone, and present yourself as poised and confident but not overly familiar in your interview,&quot; advised one hiring manager.</p> <p><em>Did we miss anything else that annoys hiring managers? Let us know in the comments!</em></p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-blog-teaser"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> When heading to a job interview, you want to impress the hiring managers. So make sure to avoid doing these nine things that really annoy them. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-guestpost-blurb"> <div class="field-label">Guest Post Blurb:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p style="text-align:center;"><a href="http://www.savvysugar.com" style="border:none;"><img alt="" src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u921/POPSUGARrgb.jpg" style="height:95px; width:300px" /></a></p> <p><em>This is a guest contribution from our friends at </em><a href="http://www.savvysugar.com/"><em>POPSUGAR Smart Living</em></a><em>. Check out more useful articles from this partner:</em></p> <ul> <li><a href="http://www.popsugar.com/smart-living/What-Name-Your-Resume-Cover-Letter-26126164">What to Name Your Résumé and Cover Letter</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.popsugar.com/smart-living/How-Make-My-Resume-Better-38831500">6 Ways to Revamp Your Résumé</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.popsugar.com/smart-living/How-Change-Your-Life-Year-26709448">36 Moves to Change Your Life For the Better</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.popsugar.com/smart-living/Best-Jobs-America-2016-39873247">The 25 Best Jobs in America This Year</a></li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;</p> </div> </div> </div> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/popsugar-smart-living">POPSUGAR Smart Living</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-things-that-really-annoy-hiring-managers">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-4"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-questions-to-ask-before-you-take-a-job-offer">12 Questions to Ask Before You Take a Job Offer</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-best-jobs-for-work-life-balance">4 Best Jobs for Work Life Balance</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-extreme-job-interview-tactics-that-worked">6 Extreme Job Interview Tactics That Worked</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-ways-to-job-hunt-without-getting-caught">9 Ways to Job Hunt Without Getting Caught</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-being-passive-kills-your-job-prospects">4 Ways Being Passive Kills Your Job Prospects</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income Job Hunting career tips hiring manager hr job hunting Job Interview job search Fri, 29 Jan 2016 15:00:04 +0000 POPSUGAR Smart Living 1643602 at http://www.wisebread.com 7 Career Tips You Wish You Could Give Your Younger Self http://www.wisebread.com/7-career-tips-you-wish-you-could-give-your-younger-self <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/7-career-tips-you-wish-you-could-give-your-younger-self" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_000071991467_Large.jpg" alt="thinking about career tips she wish she could give her younger self" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Imagine if you could go back in time and have a heart-to-heart with your 22-year-old self. What career advice would you give? What behaviors and habits would you thoroughly encourage? What fears would you try to put to rest?</p> <p>Granted, I don't know what the condition of your professional path has been, but if you're like most of us, there have been a few ups and downs along the way &mdash; as they're nearly impossible to avoid. With the lessons you've learned tucked securely in your back pocket, let's rewind the clock. Here are seven career tips your younger self needs to know.</p> <h2>1. Understand That Your Career Will Evolve</h2> <p>Very rarely is a person's career the product of a single epic choice. Building a career is a process of trying new things, responding to new markets and new technologies, making incremental moves, and listening to our changing interests. Don't stress out if you don't know at 22 what you want to do with the rest of your life.</p> <h2>2. &hellip;But Be Active in the Process</h2> <p>Not being sure what you want to do professionally is very different than not caring. The key is to begin <em>something</em>. Be conscious, be curious, and be active in the process of growing your skills. If a job isn't a good fit, figure out why before you move on. Use what you learn and then develop a strategy that keeps you constantly moving toward your goal &mdash; even if that means making a lateral move from time-to-time.</p> <h2>3. Start Saving Immediately</h2> <p>I'm writing this as I stare into the gaping maw of 50. And while life is great, I'm still trying to figure out how the last 25 years flew by so quickly. Start saving something &mdash; anything &mdash; with your very first paycheck and make structured saving a habit you never abandon. Compounding interest is a force worthy of your undying respect &mdash; learn about it; love it; live it. If you're not sure how to begin saving, some <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-microsaving-tools-to-help-you-start-saving-now">simple microsaving tools</a> can help you get started now.</p> <h2>4. Job-Hop Carefully</h2> <p>Make sure you're not job-hopping just for the sake of variety. There's real value in building experience, history, and a reputation within a company. If you're unhappy in a job, explore opportunities in another department or work toward a promotion. If moving on is the only answer, be clear about your goals, gather as much information as possible, and know exactly how the move will benefit you.</p> <h2>5. Don't Waste Time in a Job You Hate</h2> <p>There are countless benefits of youth, and having time to recover from our mistakes is a big one. If you have the luxury of choice, don't stay in a job that isn't (and won't ever be) a good fit. Dragging yourself to a <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-that-job-you-hate-keeps-you-poor">job you hate keeps you poor</a>, trains you to be unmotivated, and wastes your time and talent. Though no job is a carnival ride every day, search for what inspires you. Find work that speaks to part of your soul.</p> <h2>6. Don't Burn Bridges</h2> <p>Who hasn't dreamt of killing the copier, finally telling off the boss, and speeding away in a cloud of righteous exhaust fumes? Dramatic endings might make great cinema, but burning bridges is a terrible career strategy. However much you think your employer may deserve it, avoid leaving things on a bad note. Give two weeks' notice, express gratitude, and move on. You may need that bridge again someday. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-ways-to-repair-a-burned-bridge?ref=seealso">10 Ways to Repair a Burned Bridge</a>)</p> <h2>7. Explore the Unconventional</h2> <p>I worked for large corporations until the recession of 2008 gave me space and time enough to reflect on a few career assumptions I'd made. The financial crisis proved to be just the motivator I needed to reinvent how I made a living &mdash; I only wish I'd made the leap sooner. My point is, don't be afraid to explore unconventional career paths while you're young. Find your professional niche and, if possible, gradually build your living around it. There are few things sweeter than thriving in a career you built from scratch.</p> <p><em>What career advice would you give a new nine-to-fiver? What lessons were the hardest for you to learn? Share with us in the comments below.</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/kentin-waits">Kentin Waits</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-career-tips-you-wish-you-could-give-your-younger-self">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-things-that-really-annoy-hiring-managers">9 Things That Really Annoy Hiring Managers</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-questions-you-should-always-ask-in-an-exit-interview">8 Questions You Should Always Ask in an Exit Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-questions-to-ask-before-you-take-a-job-offer">12 Questions to Ask Before You Take a Job Offer</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-pearls-of-career-wisdom-from-brian-tracy">6 Pearls of Career Wisdom From Brian Tracy</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-career-tips-your-younger-self-would-give-you">9 Career Tips Your Younger Self Would Give You</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income career tips employment Job Interview job search younger self Wed, 27 Jan 2016 18:00:06 +0000 Kentin Waits 1645871 at http://www.wisebread.com 9 Ways to Job Hunt Without Getting Caught http://www.wisebread.com/9-ways-to-job-hunt-without-getting-caught <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/9-ways-to-job-hunt-without-getting-caught" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_hiding_desk_000052944964.jpg" alt="Woman learning ways to job hunt without getting caught" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Applying for a new job is often a Catch-22: You've got to put yourself out there as a candidate, but you don't want to get caught by your current employer for fear of being prematurely fired. Yes, it's a fine line to walk for career advancement, but you can totally perfect this skill with these nine ways to conduct a stealthy job search.</p> <h2>1. Keep Your Social Media Profiles Current at All Times</h2> <p>If you're active on social media in general, your various profiles are probably up-to-date on the regular. If they're not, and you update them out of the blue, it could raise suspicions, particularly on LinkedIn and if you're connected to coworkers &mdash; which you probably are.</p> <p><a href="http://alexandermannsolutions.com/about-alexander-mann-solutions/our-talent/key-person/ian-cluroe">Ian Cluroe</a>, director of global brand and marketing for Alexander Mann Solutions, warns against this sudden attention to your social media profiles.</p> <p>&quot;Keeping your social profiles up-to-date ensures that you don't raise flags when you're the one actively searching, and enables you to be found by sources who may have an opportunity that you're the perfect person for but you would have otherwise known nothing about because your outdated profile made you impossible to find,&quot; he says.</p> <h2>2. Don't Send Resumes to Blind Ads Online</h2> <p>If you don't know who the recipient of your resume is, do not send it. I repeat, DO NOT SEND IT. You don't know who is on the other end, and serendipity has a way of biting you in the butt for not being careful.</p> <p>&quot;A woman once told me that her coworker responded to a blind ad and then was confronted a short while later by someone in the company from Human Resources,&quot; reveals certified career coach <a href="http://www.calltocareer.com/about/">Cheryl E. Palmer</a>. &quot;The HR professional asked her if she was looking for another job. The woman lied and said no. The HR professional responded, &quot;I got your resume.&quot; It turned out that the job that this woman had unwittingly applied for was at her own company.&quot;</p> <h2>3. Be Cautious When You're Networking</h2> <p>Of course you have to network when you're searching for a new position &mdash; just be smart about it. Be very careful to whom you're telling your <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-low-key-jobs-for-people-who-hate-stress">plans to switch jobs</a>, because you never know who you're talking to. As a rule, don't go to networking events at a bar where you're going to have a couple drinks and become less inhibited. That's a recipe for certain disaster.</p> <h2>4. Don't Let Your Attire Give It Away</h2> <p>Here's a prime example of amateur tactics that absolutely raise red flags: When your everyday work attire is chinos and a button-down and you all of a sudden show up to work in a suit and tie. The jig will be up immediately, and you're better than that, bro.</p> <p>&quot;Dressing up more than normal can be a real giveaway that you are interviewing for another position,&quot; says Palmer. &quot;To avoid suspicion, put your interview clothes in your car and change in a discreet location before the interview. It's also a good idea to schedule interview appointments during times when your absence won't raise questions. Taking too much time off from work can signal that you are interviewing at other companies.&quot;</p> <h2>5. Don't Tell Your Coworkers That You're Looking</h2> <p>I'm sure there are coworkers you trust to keep the secret that you're looking for a new job, but my life motto has fared me well so far &mdash; trust no one, and fear everyone. Besides, you don't know what plans they have in mind for their own career advancement. They may view your undercover search as an opportunity to swoop in and take your job right out from under you. And if that happens, you'll kick yourself for being so loose-lipped. Ruthless comes in all shapes, sizes, and smiles.</p> <h2>6. Consider Having an Executive Recruiter on Your Side</h2> <p>If you're afraid of getting caught searching for a job (and you should be), there are ways to ease your anxiety. Hiring an executive recruiter is one such solution, and it won't even cost you. Recruiters are paid by employers, and their fees are usually based on your starting salary. Depending on the type of job you're seeking &mdash; like CEO or VP of Somethingorother &mdash; working with a recruiter is often the only way to go.</p> <p>Zach Brown, a senior sourcing recruiter for David Brown International, details a few of the benefits of using a recruiter.</p> <p>&quot;A skilled recruiter can leverage their network and industry connections to get your resume and portfolio in front of employers in your field that are looking for top talent,&quot; he explains. &quot;Going this route will get you exposure with the right companies without having to post your resume everywhere for all to see. Look for an established recruiter that specializes in your career field and has worked with the types of organizations that you are interested in working for.&quot;</p> <h2>7. Keep Your Search Quiet, Especially on Social Media</h2> <p>As a professional, you should be mindful of what you're posting to social media, in general &mdash; no more drama! &ndash; but you should particularly be conscious to keep your job search updates off Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and other sites. Even if you're not connected to your boss or coworkers online, what you post has a mysterious way of popping up in places you don't want it to be seen &mdash; security settings, be damned.</p> <h2>8. Don't Use Anyone at Your Current Job as a Reference</h2> <p>If you don't want to raise a red flag that you're looking for a new job, WHY would you use one of your coworkers as a reference? Surely you have three other people with whom you're not currently working who can vouch for you, no?</p> <h2>9. Search for Your New Job on Your Own Time and Equipment</h2> <p>And, finally, don't be sketchy and use company time to search for a position with another company. That's not only dumb, but also disloyal and rude. Use your own computer and other resources on your own time. Get caught and you're likely to get fired on the spot. The only silver lining is that it will seriously speed up your job search. You don't want it to go down like that.</p> <p>Palmer says, &quot;You should never put your work email or work phone number on your resume. Also, you should use a personal email address that sounds professional &mdash; i.e., ralph.smith@[emailservice].com, not wonderboy@[emailservice].com &mdash; and list your cell phone number so that communication with potential employers will remain private. In addition, you should use your computer at home to send emails to hiring managers. Using the computer at work is risky since many companies monitor their employees' computer use.&quot;</p> <p><em>Do you have tips on how employees can search for a new job without raising a red flag? Let me know in the comments below.</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/mikey-rox">Mikey Rox</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-ways-to-job-hunt-without-getting-caught">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-questions-to-ask-before-you-take-a-job-offer">12 Questions to Ask Before You Take a Job Offer</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-great-jobs-that-dont-pay-much">15 Great Jobs That Don&#039;t Pay Much</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-best-times-of-year-to-start-a-job-search">The Best Times of Year to Start a Job Search</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-youre-sabotaging-your-job-hunt">7 Ways You&#039;re Sabotaging Your Job Hunt</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-to-bounce-back-from-job-rejection">4 Ways to Bounce Back From Job Rejection</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income Job Hunting boss Job Interview job search new job resume Thu, 12 Nov 2015 11:15:12 +0000 Mikey Rox 1606587 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Extreme Job Interview Tactics That Worked http://www.wisebread.com/6-extreme-job-interview-tactics-that-worked <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-extreme-job-interview-tactics-that-worked" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/man_crossed_arms_000046266010.jpg" alt="Man trying extreme job interview tactics that worked" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Getting a job is hard. These days, it may even be very hard. But so is getting an interview, and when you are given the chance to sit down and chat with someone who holds your future in their hands, you usually play it very safe. But sometimes safe isn't the best answer. Sometimes, like with these examples that came from an extensive <a href="https://www.quora.com/What-is-the-craziest-thing-you-have-ever-said-or-done-at-an-interview-and-still-got-the-job">Quora Q&amp;A,</a> you have to employ extreme <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-things-you-must-do-after-the-interview-to-land-the-job">interview tactics to get the position</a>.</p> <h2>1. The Walkout</h2> <p>Let's start this series off with the story that inspired it &mdash; namely, mine. Advertising is a competitive and cutthroat industry, and getting your foot in the door, even for an interview, can be hard work. Even back in the early 2000s, before the Internet bubble burst, getting a decent job in the industry was tough.</p> <p>So, when getting an interview at a place known for doing outstanding work, the usual routine for candidates was to go in, sit down, be polite, let the interviewer tear your work apart, and hope for a callback. If you were lucky, he or she would actually like a few pieces in your portfolio.</p> <p>In my case, the hiring manager, who was a director of marketing, looked like a bulldog chewing a wasp as he went through my work. &quot;Seen it before. Crap. Not impressed. That's obvious.&quot; And so on.</p> <p>As he got halfway through the folio, I'd had enough. I needed a job, but not one that would be filled with this kind of derision. I stood up, closed it, and politely said, &quot;thanks for your time, but clearly my work is not suited for you or this company.&quot;</p> <p>As I walked out, he got out of his chair and patted me on the back. &quot;Wait, wait,&quot; he said. &quot;Maybe I was being a bit harsh. I think there are actually some strong pieces in there.&quot;</p> <p>I sat down with him, and it turns out this was his &quot;test.&quot; To see how candidates react to a real ego bashing. Would they cry? Would they get angry? Would they say nothing? Apparently, my reaction was the one he had been looking for.</p> <p><strong><em>Moral of this story:</em></strong><em> Trust your gut. If you really feel like you need to react in a certain way, and it does not seem inappropriate (like punching someone in the face for instance), go with it. Showing people who you really are can make a big difference. </em></p> <h2>2. The Pocket Surprise</h2> <p>This story comes from <a href="https://www.quora.com/What-is-the-craziest-thing-you-have-ever-said-or-done-at-an-interview-and-still-got-the-job/answer/Richard-Waddington?srid=isCn&amp;share=1">Richard Waddington</a>, who had been the same company for over 10 years, and was looking for a change. (Incidentally, a <a href="https://www.jobvite.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/jobvite_jobseeker_nation_2015.pdf">recent study</a> shows 50% of people see their current job as just a placeholder, and are actively looking around.)</p> <p>Richard had never been out on an interview in all that time, and so when he decided to move on and got an interview at another company, he was obviously nervous. The stress of finding the right clothes and shoes, the preparation, the background work &mdash; they can all get to a person.</p> <p>Richard was also a family man, and as he left for the interview, his four-year-old daughter handed him a little plastic cow from her farm yard play set and said, &quot;Daddy, take this for good luck.&quot;</p> <p>Richard went through hours of interviews, with different people (which is all too common these days) before sitting in front of the VP of HR. She sternly asked him, &quot;How do I know you'll fit in?&quot;</p> <p>Without thinking, he exclaimed, &quot;I have a cow in my pocket!&quot; He set the cow on the table, over an awkward silence. But, she burst out laughing, and he got the job.</p> <p><strong><em>Moral of this story:</em></strong><em> A real moment can go a long way toward showing people who you are when your guard is down. A genuine laugh, a reaction, something that lets the interviewer see a person and not just a candidate, may feel extreme or risky&hellip; but it can reap rewards.</em></p> <h2>3. The Refusal</h2> <p>Perhaps the most extreme thing you can ever do is refuse an offer of a job &mdash; if you actually want to get that job. Or, refuse to do something that the interviewer asks you to do. It's a risk, but for some people, it has definitely worked.</p> <p>This has a lot to do with catching the interviewer off guard. They know they are in a position of power. They have the job, you want the job, and therefore, they have the upper hand. But what if you take control?</p> <p><a href="https://www.quora.com/What-is-the-craziest-thing-you-have-ever-said-or-done-at-an-interview-and-still-got-the-job/answer/Stephan-Vladimir-Bugaj?srid=isCn&amp;share=1">Stephan Bugaj</a> did just that. His career was in a very technical field, and to start off the proceedings he dressed more like a biker than an office worker. When the interviewer asked him to solve a technical puzzle, he said no. Flatly, no. Then, he offered the reason; one that was given to him by a physics teacher some years back and said, &quot;How does putting a person in a situation where they're faced with a difficult and unfamiliar problem and then denying them access to equipment, reference materials, and discussions with colleagues in any way represent a realistic professional environment?&quot;</p> <p>He got the job. And so did Gil Yehuda, another interview candidate who actually refused the job offer. Gil's story is long; you can read it on Quora. But the short version is, Gil had surmised that the job in question was ill-defined, and was probably not one he should take. So he said no. But when he was then asked for a salary range, he asked the interviewer to make an offer impossible to refuse. She did.</p> <p><strong><em>Moral of this story:</em></strong><em> You can take control of the interview by doing the unexpected. Not in a way that would get you kicked out of the building for breaking public decency laws, but by questioning things, and refusing the requests or offers on the table. It will definitely make you stand out. </em></p> <h2>4. The Honest Approach</h2> <p>Of course, there's honesty, and then there's boorishness. You certainly don't want to be so brutally honest that you upset everyone in the room. But interviewers are so used to hearing rehearsed, bland answers that a touch of real honesty can be refreshing &mdash; and memorable.</p> <p>A case in point &mdash;&nbsp;<a href="https://www.quora.com/What-is-the-craziest-thing-you-have-ever-said-or-done-at-an-interview-and-still-got-the-job/answer/Michael-Shiloh">Michael Shiloh</a>. As an infectious disease specialist, he was used to working in high-pressure environments, and was prepared for rigorous interview questions and techniques. He was sat in front of 25 members of the faculty admissions committee, and they all had questions for him.</p> <p>The answers came easy to him, as the questions were nothing out of the ordinary. But towards the end of the long process, one interviewer threw a huge curveball by asking, &quot;If you were to design an RGD peptide to potently inhibit the integrin IIb/IIIa receptor, what would it look like?&quot;</p> <p>Michael was stumped. He had nothing. So, trusting his gut he said, &quot;I have no idea. But if I did know, I wouldn't be here interviewing for your program, but rather there, working on it. And, they'd be paying me big bucks to do it.&quot;</p> <p>Hearty, deep laughter followed, along with the offer of a position.</p> <p><strong><em>Moral of this story:</em></strong><em> Don't be tempted to give the interviewer a lot of platitudes and vanilla responses. A lot of the time, an interviewer will be much more impressed by the truth; even if the truth is difficult to say, and sets you in a less favorable light. (Just think how we would react if politicians were honest.)</em></p> <h2>5. The Bluff</h2> <p>This is a case of, when all else fails&hellip; bluff.</p> <p>The interviewee, John Doe (who wants to remain anonymous for obvious reasons), was applying for a job as a consultant. And, the interview was not going well.</p> <p>The interviewer then asked John to solve a puzzle, and as he described it, John could not help the spread of a massive grin on his face. He had recently heard, and solved, this very puzzle, and interrupted the interviewer, saying, &quot;Sir, I'll be honest with you. I've heard this one before,&quot; and gave an outline of the solution.</p> <p>The interviewer appreciated his candor, and went on to another question. This one was a mind bender. A very hard, almost impossible, puzzle for John to solve. He had no idea. So, he did the only thing he could think of. Smiling broadly he said, &quot;Sir, I hate to admit it, but I've heard this one before as well!&quot;</p> <p>The interviewer did not ask for proof, but simply believed him and said, &quot;Wow&hellip; no puzzles today it seems.&quot; The bluff worked, and John got the job.</p> <p><strong><em>Moral of this story:</em></strong><em> Sometimes, you can bluff and win. But you really have to be prepared to have your bluff called. However, if that happens, simply use the honest approach &ndash; &quot;hey, I was bluffing, I just have no idea how to answer.&quot; It might just work, too. </em></p> <h2>6. The Backup Plan</h2> <p>Finally, we come full circle and finish on another story from my advertising past. Before the days of cheap Macbooks and readily available design software, ad portfolios still had to look the part. And spec work (work done for a client that has not asked for it, merely to showcase your talents) still had to look the business. Creative teams would often employ designers and photographers to help them comp up ads that would not look out of place in magazines or on billboards.</p> <p>The portfolio of my art director and myself was full of both produced and spec work. The produced work, as it was early in our careers, was not great. The clients weren't blue chip, and the spec work was put together in our spare time with stock photos and rub down transfers. It looked&hellip; acceptable.</p> <p>As we went into the interview, we were nervous. This was a big shop, and they demanded quality. The creative directors looked bored as they flicked through the portfolio, and we could tell they were getting ready give us the polite brush-off. As one stood, and started to say, &quot;well, thanks for coming in, but&hellip;&quot; I stopped him and said, &quot;honestly, the work is crap compared to the ideas we have sketched in the back pocket of the portfolio.&quot;</p> <p>They both looked a bit taken aback, but they reached in, and brought out the sketches my partner and I had been working on for much bigger ideas. Ones that were beyond our skill to produce with any great polish. We didn't plan on showing them to anyone, but figured, what the hell. They flicked through them, smiling, pointing, whispering, for 10 minutes. Then they said, &quot;when would you be able to start?&quot;</p> <p><strong><em>Moral of this story:</em></strong><em> Never be afraid to impress people with ideas you do not think are quite ready. Whether it's a new product, a sales plan, an app, or anything else relevant to your career, if it gives you goose bumps, it may well do the same to your future employer.</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-extreme-job-interview-tactics-that-worked">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-questions-to-ask-before-you-take-a-job-offer">12 Questions to Ask Before You Take a Job Offer</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-ways-to-job-hunt-without-getting-caught">9 Ways to Job Hunt Without Getting Caught</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/master-these-15-interview-questions">Master These 15 Interview Questions</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-to-bounce-back-from-job-rejection">4 Ways to Bounce Back From Job Rejection</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-calm-your-nerves-and-ace-your-interview">6 Ways to Calm Your Nerves and Ace Your Interview</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income Job Hunting hacks interview Job Interview job interview tips job search Thu, 22 Oct 2015 17:23:13 +0000 Paul Michael 1593842 at http://www.wisebread.com