kids http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/1165/all en-US 6 Smart Financial Gifts to Give Your Kids This Year http://www.wisebread.com/6-smart-financial-gifts-to-give-your-kids-this-year <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-smart-financial-gifts-to-give-your-kids-this-year" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/mother_and_daughter_with_piggy_bank.jpg" alt="Mother and daughter with piggy bank" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>American poet Maya Angelou said it best: &quot;When you know better, you do better.&quot; The earlier that your kids develop good financial habits, the brighter their financial future will be.</p> <p>With the holidays right around the corner, now is the perfect time to set your sights on one or more of these financial gifts that will help your kids learn about, respect, and appreciate money.</p> <h2>1. Monopoly</h2> <p>Since 1935, this classic board game has entertained millions of people around the world. Turns out that playing rounds with &quot;Monopoly money&quot; can actually help build real life financial skills, such as negotiation, money management, and diversification. Plus, a round of Monopoly is a good way to practice arithmetic and social skills. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/holiday-gifts-6-fun-games-that-teach-money-and-finance?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Holiday Gifts: TK Fun Games That Teach Money and Finance</a>)</p> <h2>2. Custodial investment account</h2> <p>Most brokerage firms offer a custodial account that allows children to get a first taste of investing in the stock market under the supervision of a parent or guardian. With as little as $100, you could open a custodial account and let your kid make decisions about what stocks to hold or sell.</p> <p>In 2017, you can contribute up to $14,000 to a custodial account and still avoid gift taxes. In 2018, the annual federal gift exclusion moves up to $15,000. Your kid's custodial account is under your control until your kid legally becomes an adult, which happens somewhere between age 18 and 21, depending on your state's rules.</p> <p>A custodial investment account is a great way to get your child excited about investing and let them learn from firsthand experience how the stock market works. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-stocks-your-kids-would-love-to-own?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Stocks Your Kids Would Love to Own</a>).</p> <h2>3. Custodial Roth IRA</h2> <p>If your kid is already working a summer job or earning income from their own business, consider setting up a custodial Roth IRA for them. In 2017 and 2018, individuals may contribute up to $5,500 to a custodial Roth IRA. Here are a couple of reasons why this is a good idea:</p> <ul> <li> <p>Your child will have the same contribution limit as an adult, making it a real-life lesson in cultivating a good savings habit.</p> </li> <li> <p>Your child can get close to a decade of extra compounding interest for their nest egg.</p> </li> <li> <p>By taking the tax hit now, your child's retirement savings will grow tax-free forever.</p> </li> <li> <p>Your child will have another &quot;sandbox&quot; in which to make real-life decisions with investments.</p> </li> </ul> <p>Just imagine if <em>you </em>knew how life-changing investing in equities could be at such a young age.</p> <p>That alone may be the best financial gift for your kid this holiday season! (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-investing-lessons-you-must-teach-your-kids?ref=seealso" target="_blank">10 Investing Lessons You Must Teach Your Kids</a>)</p> <h2>4. 529 savings plan</h2> <p>The average class of 2016 graduate left school with $37,172 in student loan debt. If you could do something now to help prevent your kid from having to take out such costly student loans, that would certainly be a gift worth giving. The good news is you <em>can</em> do this by starting a 529 college savings plan. Eligible education expenses under a 529 plan go beyond tuition and academic fees and include expenses for room and board, transportation, equipment, and accommodations for individuals with special needs.</p> <p>Contributions to a 529 plan grow tax-free and the money is not taxed when it's withdrawn to pay for college expenses. In addition to federal tax savings, more than 30 states currently offer a full or partial tax deduction or credit for 529 plan contributions. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-9-best-state-529-college-savings-plans?ref=seealso" target="_blank">The 9 Best State 529 College Savings Plans</a>)</p> <h2>5. Cash</h2> <p>Yup, cash is still king. Regardless of their age, your kid will always love receiving a few bills as a gift. The main reason to gift cash during the holiday season is that it opens the door to have an ongoing conversation with your kids about budgeting. With a cash gift, you'll have plenty of chances to talk about what they're planning to buy, what they actually purchase, and how much money they have left. From there, you can start making it a habit to sit down with your son or daughter to talk about finances on a weekly or Bi-Weekly basis. It's a good time to catch up about other non-related finance topics as well. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-help-your-kid-build-their-first-budget?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Help Your Kid Build Their First Budget</a>)</p> <h2>6. Checking account with debit card and checkbook</h2> <p>Of course, this would be a great place for any cash gifts that your son or daughter receives from relatives and friends during the holidays (and throughout the year).</p> <p>While a checking account may not be as exciting as a new Xbox or bike, you can be sure that this gift is the one that your child will be using for the longest time. It's important that your kids start to build experience managing a checking account so they understand how to pay for everyday expenses, build a monthly budget, and safely use debit cards. By covering the ins and outs of how a checking account works when they're young, your kid will have one less thing to stress about as they get a little older or go off to college.</p> <p>No matter what your child's plans are, anyone can benefit from learning how to use a debit card, write checks, access an online account portal, and read a checking account statement.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F6-smart-financial-gifts-to-give-your-kids-this-year&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F6%2520Smart%2520Financial%2520Gifts%2520to%2520Give%2520Your%2520Kids%2520This%2520Year.jpg&amp;description=6%20Smart%20Financial%20Gifts%20to%20Give%20Your%20Kids%20This%20Year"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/6%20Smart%20Financial%20Gifts%20to%20Give%20Your%20Kids%20This%20Year.jpg" alt="6 Smart Financial Gifts to Give Your Kids This Year" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/damian-davila">Damian Davila</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-smart-financial-gifts-to-give-your-kids-this-year">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-13"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-use-the-holidays-to-teach-kids-about-money">How to Use the Holidays to Teach Kids About Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/teach-your-kids-about-money-with-their-holiday-gift-lists">Teach Your Kids About Money With Their Holiday Gift Lists</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/holiday-gifts-6-fun-games-that-teach-money-and-finance">Holiday Gifts: 6 Fun Games That Teach Money and Finance</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-money-conversations-parents-should-have-with-their-adult-kids">7 Money Conversations Parents Should Have With Their Adult Kids</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-prepare-your-kids-to-live-on-their-own">How to Prepare Your Kids to Live On Their Own</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance Family 529 plans budgeting cash checking accounts children Christmas custodial roth ira financial gifts games Holidays investing kids Fri, 01 Dec 2017 09:00:06 +0000 Damian Davila 2064624 at http://www.wisebread.com 21 Things You Should Make Your Kids Pay For http://www.wisebread.com/21-things-you-should-make-your-kids-pay-for <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/21-things-you-should-make-your-kids-pay-for" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/beautiful_little_girl_with_lollipop.jpg" alt="Beautiful little girl with lollipop" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Whether they receive it from relatives on birthdays, from you in the form of allowance, or from working once they're old enough to do so, most kids have some access to cash. And yet, many parents still find themselves paying for every little thing kids get, letting their money pile up in their piggy banks.</p> <p>As a mom of three, I have a few reasons for making my kids spend their own money on certain things. First, I like them to learn early on that every financial decision is a trade-off. Going to the movies on Saturday might mean not buying an after-lunch treat at school on Monday, for example. Second, I don't want to constantly get called upon to make yes/no purchasing decisions, or listen to whining. Third, kids who need money are a lot more likely to work, and working around the house helps me out, while working outside the house helps them develop valuable skills. (Whether you tie chores to allowance is a whole other ball of wax. At my house, allowance isn't direct pay for chores, but you can't receive your allowance if you're not a household member in good standing, which includes having chores done.) Finally, making kids use their own funds teaches them to plan ahead. &quot;Are you going to want ice cream at the beach? Bring your money. Carry it in a way that you won't lose it.&quot;</p> <p>Now, I'm not about to ask the kids to use their personal funds for groceries or rent, but there are plenty of items they should buy themselves. Here are some expenses kids can take over, divided by age group.</p> <h2>Little kids</h2> <p>My children started making their own purchases before they were in elementary school. However, I limited the things preschoolers had to buy for themselves to small luxuries. After all, a four-year-old is quite likely to lose her money on the way to the checkout counter, so you're not going to put her in charge of much cash.</p> <h3>1. Treats</h3> <p>&quot;Mom, the ice cream truck, the ice cream truck, <em>the ice cream truck</em>!&quot;</p> <p>My kids go into a Pavlovian frenzy at the sound of that music, and no econ lecture from me will ever convince them that they could get a lot more value for their money in the freezer section of the grocery store. From an early age, the ice cream truck was a pay-for-yourself proposition at our house. One unexpected benefit of this policy is that my kids spontaneously started buying for their siblings, if they had money and the others didn't.</p> <h3>2. Souvenirs</h3> <p>Whether it's a trip to the local children's museum or a flight around the world, travel is full of shopping opportunities. To prevent fun trips from turning into begging fests, I remind my kids to pack their own wallets as we head out the door. Having to be choosy about souvenirs will also prevent your house from filling up with clutter.</p> <h3>3. Toys</h3> <p>Saving up for a toy has been a rite of passage in our family, one not without its heartbreaks. I recently got rid of a big, fancy makeup case that had been around our house for about a decade, and my oldest and I reminisced about how excited she had been the day it was delivered to open it up and start applying makeup &mdash; and how disappointed she'd been that the play makeup it came with barely showed up on her skin at all. That kit had taken her months to save up for, and minutes to become disenchanted with. But that was just one of the many lessons kids learn by buying their own toys. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-use-new-toys-to-teach-kids-about-money?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Use New Toys to Teach Kids About Money</a>)</p> <h2>Preteen</h2> <p>At some point around second or third grade, it clicks for most kids that they have the power to get stuff without taking no for an answer &mdash; by buying it themselves. A minor money-obsessed phase may ensue, but don't worry; eventually they'll get used to being consumers and drop the Scrooge McDuck routine. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-fun-books-that-will-get-your-kids-excited-about-money?ref=seealso" target="_blank">10 Fun Books That Will Get Your Kids Excited About Money</a>)</p> <h3>4. Accessories</h3> <p>As a parent, it's your responsibility to make sure your child has something to wear to school and to keep them warm. But fancy barrettes? Earrings? Hair dye? That's on them.</p> <h3>5. Entertainment</h3> <p>Sometime during the middle-school grades, if my kid gets invited to go to the movies with friends, I start asking if they have enough money for the ticket. This is a decide-as-we go category, because some outings, like tickets to an amusement park, my kids just can't afford on their own. I will pay for those outings, if they really want to go. And if we go as a family, I pay.</p> <h3>6. Charity</h3> <p>The elementary years are a good age for the kids to start giving back. If you're out together and you see a collection bucket for the animal shelter, you can set a good example by putting some of your own money in the bucket &mdash; then ask them if they want to put in some of their own.</p> <h3>7. Anything they could get for free</h3> <p>If your kid wants a book, movie, or video game that could be checked out at the library for free instead, they should pay for it on their own. This is a good time to start learning the value/cost proposition of convenience. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-modern-reasons-to-visit-your-local-library-today?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Modern Reasons to Visit Your Local Library Today</a>)</p> <h3>8. Fundraiser items</h3> <p>So far this fall, my kids have already participated in two kinds of popcorn sales and one candy and nut sale. Then there is the monthly order form for book sales that kick back a small portion to the school. Some parents don't let their kids buy sugary treats with their own money, but I'm fine with letting them help their own and their siblings' sales totals.</p> <h3>9. Treats for their own pets</h3> <p>When my daughter begged for a pair of hermit crabs, I agreed to buy her a tank and the animals if she promised to keep her room tidy for 100 days. She came through, and the animals came home. But part of the deal was that after the initial setup costs, she was responsible for buying their food, their water dechlorinator, and any decorative plants and rocks she felt they needed.</p> <p>Other parents might pay for the necessary supplies, but let kids spend their own money on treats and accessories. I feed our family cats, for instance, but my daughters didn't even bother asking me to pay for Halloween costumes for the cats, because they knew I'd say no. Poor Myrtle and Katie were then outfitted as mermaids for the holiday.</p> <h3>10. Business supplies</h3> <p>My fifth-grader recently got into the <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/23-recipes-for-slime-your-kids-can-make-and-even-sell?ref=internal" target="_blank">slime business</a>. At first, I thought she was just making slime for fun, and as she didn't have any money, I agreed to purchase the contact solution, shaving cream, glue, and other supplies she wanted. But then she came home with a fistful of cash, announcing that she had made it all selling her slime at school. I told her that was great, but that all further supplies must be paid for out of her revenue. She bought more supplies, sold more slime, and ended up using the profits to purchase a computer game, which I hadn't even known she'd wanted.</p> <p>The same rule applies for lemonade stands; they get the lemons from our tree, but they have to pay for the cups and sugar.</p> <p>This is really important, because understanding that profit only kicks in after you cover your costs is a fundamental business lesson. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/13-businesses-your-tween-can-start?ref=seealso" target="_blank">13 Businesses Your Tween Can Start</a>)</p> <h3>11. Certain gifts</h3> <p>We don't give our kids money to shop for holiday and birthday gifts for family. If they don't have money, they can always make something.</p> <p>At this age, we still pay for the birthday gifts our kids bring to parties. However, there is an argument to be made for having kids pay or contribute to birthday party offerings. When they have to pay for birthday gifts for friends, they'll have to decide if the birthday kid is a real friend that they're happy to get a gift for, or just an acquaintance whose party they're going to for the free cake and bouncy house.</p> <h3>12. Things they broke or lost</h3> <p>The first backpack at the beginning of the school year is on me. If my child loses it and needs another one, they'll be paying for it. If they need some time to save up, they can dig out that embarrassing princess-themed backpack from under the bed and use that for awhile.</p> <p>Broke a neighbor's window playing baseball? I would pay up front, but you bet they are going to pay me back, week by week.</p> <h2>Teens</h2> <p>Once they turn 12 or 13, suddenly your kids have real earning power. My teen has earned $10 a day for walking and feeding pets for out-of-town neighbors, and $8 an hour for baby-sitting. With that ability comes the opportunity for her to get herself things I would not have provided; but it also comes with the opportunity for her to take over some expenses I previously footed.</p> <h3>13. Salon services</h3> <p>Bright hair colors are all the rage in both smaller kids and teens these days, but having this done in the salon is not cheap. I pay for my teen's basic haircuts (because if I didn't, she'd never get one), but if she wants an ombre or a manicure, that's on her. I can always point her toward the local beauty school for discounted services.</p> <h3>14. Clothing</h3> <p>I recently told my teen she is responsible for paying for all of her clothes. I don't think this is a choice that all parents will agree with, but I want to see how it goes. She's already well acquainted with the benefits of thrift store shopping, so it won't be as expensive for her as you might think.</p> <h3>15. Entertainment with friends and dates</h3> <p>While I pay for more expensive outings for my elementary kids, as a teen, my daughter can pay for her own ticket to a theme park or play if she goes with friends. I'd still treat for a family outing, though. As the kids get older, we're grateful that they want to spend the day with us at all, and we're not going to risk them saying they don't want to come along because it's too expensive.</p> <p>My teen hasn't dated yet, but when she starts, there is no way I'm giving her money to go out on a dinner date.</p> <h3>16. Gifts</h3> <p>At some point during the high school years, teens can take over the cost of bringing a gift to a birthday party they're invited to. This can push them to learn how to put together gifts within their budget. My teen recently bought her friend who loves to bake a gift of frostings and sprinkles in a cute hand-decorated gift bag. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/25-thoughtful-and-frugal-personalized-gift-ideas?ref=seealso" target="_blank">25 Thoughtful and Frugal Personalized Gift Ideas</a>)</p> <h3>17. Data plan</h3> <p>I bought each of my older kids their first phone (or gave them a hand-me-down) and paid for call-and-text-only service. I didn't want to give my kids the option of <em>not</em> paying for the service, because I wanted it active for safety and so I could keep track of them.</p> <p>But when the teen wanted a data plan in order to start posting on Instagram, that was on her. So far, she has paid it without complaint, even though she's not getting much value for her money, since she usually forgets her phone at home or forgets to charge it.</p> <h3>18. School extras</h3> <p>I pay for supplies required by school, P.E. shoes, and field trip fees. But if my kid wants a yearbook, she has to pay for it. Same goes for tickets to a school dance or any other nonessential fun thing. When she gets to high school and wants to attend homecoming and prom, she can pay for the clothing, tickets, and dinners that go with those events.</p> <h3>19. A car and driving expenses</h3> <p>Most schools don't teach driver's ed anymore, so learning to drive is likely to require the cost of private driving school in addition to DMV fees.</p> <p>Once they have a license, should you purchase a car for your teen? What about insurance, oil changes, and maintenance? The answers to these questions are going to vary according to family circumstances. While I am all for teens footing the bill for their own expenses when possible, I can imagine that in some families, having the teen drive may be as much about convenience for the parents as it is for the kid.</p> <p>When I started driving, my parents happily handed over the responsibility of getting my little brother to all his activities. Because of that, it seemed fair that they gave me use of their old car and paid for the extra insurance cost of having a teen driver on their policy.</p> <p>However, most families will agree that certain driving expenses, such as gas and traffic tickets, should be footed by the teen driver. Outside of parent-mandated errands, kids need to learn that the number of miles they can drive depends on how much gas money they have. It's also not a bad idea for them to learn to ask friends they transport to pitch in at the pump. And if your child gets a moving violation or even a parking ticket, what better way to remember to behave better next time than to have to work extra hours to pay for the ticket? Oh, and if your child has an accident that causes the insurance payment to go up, or loses their good-grade discount, they should pay the difference. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-mistakes-parents-of-teen-drivers-make?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Mistakes Parents of Teen Drivers Make</a>)</p> <h3>20. Travel without family</h3> <p>Once a year, our middle school runs an international trip led by teachers and a tour company. It costs thousands of dollars. My daughter knows that if she chooses to participate, she will have to raise those thousands of dollars herself.</p> <p>Family travel, on the other hand, comes out of my pocket. I want her there with me, and I'm willing to pay the fare to make that happen!</p> <h3>21. Extracurricular activities</h3> <p>This is a tough one, because like most parents, I want my kids to participate in sports and other activities that help them develop their bodies and minds. My teen is into figure skating, and I currently pay for classes, new skates, costumes, and competition fees. But this may change as she gets older, especially if she is able to start a regular part-time job.</p> <p>It's certainly fair to ask teens to split the bill for an extracurricular, or to set a limit on the number of extracurriculars the parent will pay for. If nothing else, kids who want a new pair of cleats instead of accepting hand-me-downs should pay for that.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F21-things-you-should-make-your-kids-pay-for&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F21%2520Things%2520You%2520Should%2520Make%2520Your%2520Kids%2520Pay%2520For.jpg&amp;description=21%20Things%20You%20Should%20Make%20Your%20Kids%20Pay%20For"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/21%20Things%20You%20Should%20Make%20Your%20Kids%20Pay%20For.jpg" alt="21 Things You Should Make Your Kids Pay For" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/carrie-kirby">Carrie Kirby</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/21-things-you-should-make-your-kids-pay-for">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-use-new-toys-to-teach-kids-about-money">How to Use New Toys to Teach Kids About Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/3-good-money-examples-every-parent-should-set">3 Good Money Examples Every Parent Should Set</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-essential-money-moves-for-new-parents">7 Essential Money Moves for New Parents</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/teach-your-kids-about-money-with-their-holiday-gift-lists">Teach Your Kids About Money With Their Holiday Gift Lists</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-fun-games-that-teach-your-kids-about-money">6 Fun Games That Teach Your Kids About Money</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Budgeting Family budgeting tips kids kids allowance kids shopping money lessons money lessons for kids toys Tue, 28 Nov 2017 09:30:10 +0000 Carrie Kirby 2062566 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Prepare Your Kids to Live On Their Own http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-prepare-your-kids-to-live-on-their-own <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-prepare-your-kids-to-live-on-their-own" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/happy_young_girl_with_her_mother_making_dough.jpg" alt="Happy young girl with her mother making dough" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Raise your hand if you have a young adult in your life who isn't ready for the &quot;real&quot; world.</p> <p>It's incredibly common for 20-somethings (and even 30-somethings) to be a little more than clueless when it comes to living on their own. Being able to sustain your independence with both your money and lifestyle is a skill that everyone needs to learn, and every parent needs to start teaching while their kids are still young.</p> <p>The good news is, this is very doable. If you're currently trying to mold impressionable youngsters into self-sufficient adults, here's how you can protect them from a very rude awakening when they go it alone.</p> <h2>1. Teach them basic life skills</h2> <p>I'm fortunate to have grown up in a family of blue-collar Americans who relied on their own wits and two bare hands to get by, and they were eager to pass their skills down to their children and grandchildren. Some of those skills took (I make a mean Bundt cake and clean the house with maid-like results), while others are still a work in progress (I call AAA when I have a flat tire; might as well get my money's worth, right?).</p> <p>These basic life skills should be required teaching at home because your kids won't learn them any place else. I'm a huge advocate for integrating this sort of education into the public school curriculum &mdash; because honestly, what teenager needs to know calculus over income tax prep? &mdash; but as it stands, that responsibility falls to you. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-life-skills-your-kids-wont-learn-in-school?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Life Skills Your Kids Won't Learn in School</a>)</p> <p>As such, it's on you to school your offspring on all of life's dirty little jobs, including but not limited to:</p> <ul> <li> <p>Laundry and other household chores.</p> </li> <li> <p>Grocery shopping, meal prep, and cooking for themselves.</p> </li> <li> <p>Integrating coupons and discounts into their everyday purchases.</p> </li> <li> <p>How credit and debit cards work.</p> </li> <li> <p>How interest rates affect loans.</p> </li> <li> <p>The difference between paying in cash versus relying on credit.</p> </li> <li> <p>How to prepare a resume.</p> </li> <li> <p>How to interview for a job (and not look like a slob).</p> </li> <li> <p>How to comprehend basic contracts.</p> </li> <li> <p>How to drive or use public transportation.</p> </li> <li> <p>How to make and stick to a budget.</p> </li> </ul> <h2>2. Manage their money for their first year of employment</h2> <p>Adults spend their money on frivolous things a lot of the time &mdash; so what do you expect kids to do? As soon as they get a job and start bringing home the bacon, they're rushing straight to their favorite stores for new clothes, taking their boyfriend or girlfriend out on a nice date, and loading up on drive-thru junk food.</p> <p>We all did it.</p> <p>You can curb that behavior by sitting your kid down and letting them know that the Bank of Mom and/or Dad will be in charge of their income for the first year of their first job. Offering them this kind of hands-on guidance and advice is a good way to teach teens how to save and spend wisely.</p> <p>Open two accounts in their name &mdash; checking and savings &mdash; and put 40 percent of their paycheck into each of those accounts. Give them the leftover 20 percent to do whatever they'd like. When expenses arise for which you don't feel responsible, like if they receive a speeding ticket or want to go away for the weekend with friends, explain how the money will come from <em>their</em> checking account to pay for it. You may get some resistance at first, especially if they're used to you forking cash over, but they'll thank their lucky stars they know how to manage money when they strike out on their own.</p> <h2>3. Charge them rent to live in your home once they turn 18</h2> <p>Your kids are adults the day they turn 18 &mdash; a fact that your teenager has probably reminded you of a million times since they started high school &mdash; and it's high time you started treating them accordingly. If they want to be grown-ups with no rules and no curfew but still live under your roof, you have every right to ask for help with the bills.</p> <p>You don't have to charge them fair market value, but a couple hundred bucks a month, or even putting them in charge of a particular bill, is reasonable. I'm also a proponent of teens paying their own cellphone bill starting at age 18. They'll certainly learn to be more responsible with their phones when repairs or replacements are coming out of their own pockets.</p> <h2>4. Help them establish good credit and explain the importance of it</h2> <p>I didn't know anything about how credit worked before I got my first credit card. Given that naiveté, I went on a shopping spree as soon as the card was in my hands, and I didn't/couldn't pay the bill until seven years later. That's what can happen when a clueless 18-year-old gets their hands on a shiny piece of plastic. And in my case, it royally screwed up my credit for a long time.</p> <p>Help your kids avoid my mistake by talking to them about how credit works and the importance of being conscious about building and maintaining a good credit score. Educate them on how good credit affects major purchases like cars and houses and even renting apartments. Their livelihood depends on it &mdash; unless, of course, you want them to live with you forever. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-questions-to-answer-before-giving-your-kid-a-credit-card?ref=seealso" target="_blank">4 Questions to Answer Before Giving Your Kid a Credit Card</a>)</p> <h2>5. Provide less for them once they start driving</h2> <p>As your child's parent or guardian, it's your legal responsibility to provide for them until they're able to provide for themselves. But you can start to cut back on the handouts as soon as they're responsible enough to drive.</p> <p>Certainly you still need to feed, clothe, and provide housing for your child, but they can start doing more for themselves, too. They can run to the store for their own hair product when they run out, open their own wallets for the video games they covet, and even make their own dentist and doctor appointments. Think of it as an education in independence with training wheels. You're still around to guide them through the processes, but they should start accepting tasks as their own.</p> <h2>6. Teach them time management skills</h2> <p>My friends make fun of me for how much I micromanage my own time. Anything I have to do goes straight into my calendar, and I keep a daily to-do list at work while creating side lists on an as-needed basis. As a result, my life runs much smoother.</p> <p>Considering your kids &mdash; especially high-schoolers &mdash; have busy schedules (for which they likely rely on you to keep on track), it will eventually benefit them for you to teach good time-management skills. Teach them how to add to-dos to their smartphone calendars as soon as they receive them, set up alerts for reminders, and help them form a habit of checking their schedule on a daily basis to keep their lives running smoothly.</p> <h2>7. Step back when they have a problem until your help is absolutely required</h2> <p>A large part of maturing to adulthood is learning how to solve problems on your own, and that means you need to let your children make mistakes from time to time &mdash; even when they come to you looking for the easy way out.</p> <p>&quot;There is a tendency for parents to step in too quickly when their children face a problem,&quot; says Jim Seibold, a marriage and family therapist in Arlington, Texas. &quot;Instead of telling them what to do and how they need to fix it, push them to think through options. Ask them what they think they should do. We can then teach by asking them to think about the consequences of their ideas. For instance: 'That sounds interesting, what do you think would happen if you tried that?'&quot;</p> <p>Just as importantly, this approach expresses confidence in your kids. It lets them know that you believe in their ability to think and consider choices, which will be helpful when it's time for them to move out of the house. That alone can be worth its weight in gold for worrisome moms and dads. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-parenting-mistakes-to-avoid-when-teaching-kids-about-money?ref=seealso" target="_blank">4 Parenting Mistakes to Avoid When Teaching Kids About Money</a>)</p> <h2>8. Stop giving them everything they want or think they need</h2> <p>I wasn't deprived of anything growing up, but I wasn't handed everything I wanted, either. Around age 14, my parents encouraged me to start working part time for the money I needed to go out with my friends or buy the things that teenagers want to buy. I wasn't over the moon about it at the time, but I also didn't hate it &mdash; I made new friends, had a sense of freedom, and did what I pleased with my money. In hindsight, it helped lay the foundation of my entrepreneurial spirit, which has gotten me everywhere I've wanted to be in life thus far.</p> <p>Seibold instituted a similar practice in his family, asking his kids to purchase their own electronics, cellphones, and any other luxury they wanted.</p> <p>&quot;They learned to save money they received for birthdays, Christmas, etc., so they could afford these purchases,&quot; he explains. &quot;As parents, we still pay for a lot, but it is important for kids to understand what it means to put off immediate gratification in order to save for something they really want. It may have been 'easy' money since it was gifted, but they still had to learn to save.&quot;</p> <h2>9. Establish good nutritional habits from the get-go</h2> <p>Most of us enjoy junk food every now and then (sometimes a little more often than that &mdash; guilty!), but nutrition and cooking skills all begin with you as a parent. It's your job to raise your children on healthy meals and teach them how to make smart food choices so they're eating a balanced diet. Does that mean you should never order pizza or pull into a drive-thru? No, of course not. But you should be conscious of limiting those instances to help your child establish a healthy relationship with food so they're best prepared to feed themselves responsibly (and cook instead of relying on takeout).</p> <h2>10. Praise your children, but don't go overboard</h2> <p>Encourage your children to express themselves, to try their best at whatever they attempt, and to accept failures gracefully. The truth is, somebody has to be the loser; that's just how life goes. The quicker they learn that they can't always come out on top, the easier life will be. They need both the confidence to reach for their aspirations and the grit to learn and move forward if things don't go their way.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fhow-to-prepare-your-kids-to-live-on-their-own&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FHow%2520to%2520Prepare%2520Your%2520Kids%2520to%2520Live%2520On%2520Their%2520Own.jpg&amp;description=How%20to%20Prepare%20Your%20Kids%20to%20Live%20On%20Their%20Own"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/How%20to%20Prepare%20Your%20Kids%20to%20Live%20On%20Their%20Own.jpg" alt="How to Prepare Your Kids to Live On Their Own" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/mikey-rox">Mikey Rox</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-prepare-your-kids-to-live-on-their-own">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-life-skills-your-kids-wont-learn-in-school">7 Life Skills Your Kids Won&#039;t Learn in School</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-smart-financial-gifts-to-give-your-kids-this-year">6 Smart Financial Gifts to Give Your Kids This Year</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-fun-games-that-teach-your-kids-about-money">6 Fun Games That Teach Your Kids About Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-use-the-holidays-to-teach-kids-about-money">How to Use the Holidays to Teach Kids About Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-frugal-living-skills-you-should-be-teaching-your-children">7 Frugal Living Skills You Should Be Teaching Your Children</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Family Lifestyle basics budgeting children discipline first jobs kids life lessons life skills parenting Mon, 27 Nov 2017 09:00:07 +0000 Mikey Rox 2057738 at http://www.wisebread.com 7 Money Conversations Parents Should Have With Their Adult Kids http://www.wisebread.com/7-money-conversations-parents-should-have-with-their-adult-kids <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/7-money-conversations-parents-should-have-with-their-adult-kids" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/smiling_mother_with_young_daughter.jpg" alt="Smiling mother with young daughter" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>It's hard for many of us to talk about money. Money conversations can be stressful and awkward, and you may be tempted to just stay mum on the subject. However, it's vital that you pass financial wisdom on to your kids, even when they're adults. It's important to teach them about money growing up, but there are some things better discussed when they are older. Here are the money conversations you should be having with your adult children.</p> <h2>1. Financial boundaries</h2> <p>If you are supporting your adult children and you'd like to stop, or if you want to avoid it altogether, it's important to set up some financial boundaries. If you don't want to support them financially at all, tell them that up front and stick to it. That way, you won't end up paying for things and resenting it.</p> <p>If your adult kids are relying on you for part or all of their financial support, sit down together and form a plan. Cutting them off entirely probably won't work for either of you, but you can start slow; back off on payments over the course of six months to a year, and set up concrete steps along the way. For instance, you may decide to stop giving them &quot;fun&quot; money right away, but be willing to cover their cellphone plan for six more months.</p> <p>Make sure you go about having this conversation compassionately. Tell your child that you love them and that you want this for them as well as for you. Offer to help them along the way, to be available to answer questions or aid in budgeting, and let them know that you will always be there for them in other ways. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/are-you-ruining-your-retirement-by-spoiling-your-kids?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Are You Ruining Your Retirement by Spoiling Your Kids?</a>)</p> <h2>2. Financial values</h2> <p>Have a conversation with your adult child about what they want in life and how much those things will realistically cost. This is the time to talk about the financials behind car ownership, homeownership, traveling the world, and more. Make sure they have an understanding of how much money they'll need to have in order to afford the lifestyle they want, and how much they need to make in a week, a month, and a year to achieve that.</p> <p>Talk to them, also, about what is really important in life. Tell them that fancy cars, big houses, and lavish vacations aren't the keys to happiness. Ask them to think about what they would pursue if they were dying or what they would miss most if they suffered a serious injury. This can help them figure out what is important to them and what they may not be willing to trade their time and money for.</p> <h2>3. What it means to live within your means</h2> <p>Your adult kids need to understand the importance of spending less than they earn. Show them how to calculate this so they can determine for themselves when to spend their money and when it would be better to save or invest it. Your kids need to figure out how to sacrifice spending on superfluous things in order to live a financially secure life.</p> <h2>4. How to make a budget</h2> <p>Along the same lines, your adult children need to know how to make a budget. You can actually begin teaching this in childhood by giving your kid a weekly allowance and helping them break down how they want to spend their money. Even if you wait until they're older, though, you need to sit down with them and make sure your kids understand what they <em>need</em> to spend money on, what they <em>want</em> to spend money on, and how to allocate those dollars accordingly. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/build-your-first-budget-in-5-easy-steps?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Build a First Budget in 5 Easy Steps</a>)</p> <h2>5. The benefits and dangers of loans and credit cards</h2> <p>In a culture where credit is readily available, your kids need to know how to evaluate different credit opportunities based on benefits and drawbacks, as well as how to wisely use credit. As soon as they are old enough to obtain financing of their own, you need to talk with your kids about credit cards, educational loans, personal loans, and home loans.</p> <p>It will help to tell stories from your own life. Whether you've made financial mistakes or have been wise with your money, walking your kids through how you made your financial decisions and how they ultimately affected you will make the principles real, rather than keep them so abstract. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-financial-basics-every-new-grad-should-know?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Financial Basics Every New Grad Should Know</a>)</p> <h2>6. Saving for retirement</h2> <p>It can be hard for people in their late teens and 20s to think about saving for retirement, because it all feels so far away. But it's critical you talk with your adult children about how much they may need for retirement, and walk through some compound interest calculations with them so they see the benefit of saving early. Make sure they understand the basics of an IRA and 401(k), as well as what it means to be fully vested and take advantage of an employer match. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/this-is-the-basic-intro-to-having-a-retirement-fund-that-everyone-needs-to-read?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Basic Intro to Retirement Funds</a>)</p> <h2>7. Your financial plan</h2> <p>As your kids get older, they also need to know about <em>your</em> financial plan, before they find themselves trying to figure it out without you. This can be an especially difficult conversation to have, because on top of talking about money, you're also talking about serious injury, illness, or death.</p> <p>Still, it's important for your kids to know what types of insurance you have, because knowing whether you have long-term care coverage, for instance, may help them make better decisions later on. Talk to them, too, about how you plan to divide up your estate. This can keep conflicts to a minimum after you are gone, so they can grieve instead of fight. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-fair-way-to-split-up-your-familys-estate?ref=seealso" target="_blank">The Fair Way to Split Up Your Family's Estate</a>)</p> <p>If one of your adult children is the executor of your will, make sure they understand that responsibility and that they have all the relevant information. They should have access to the location of your accounts, the account numbers, and any identification information, as well as contact information for your lawyer. You can write all of this out for them so they can simply file it away until they need it.</p> <p>Talking about money can be hard, but it's also important. Speaking with your adult children about these topics will ensure they have a better chance at a financially healthy life.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F7-money-conversations-parents-should-have-with-their-adult-kids&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F7%2520Money%2520Conversations%2520Parents%2520Should%2520Have%2520With%2520Their%2520Adult%2520Kids.jpg&amp;description=7%20Money%20Conversations%20Parents%20Should%20Have%20With%20Their%20Adult%20Kids"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/7%20Money%20Conversations%20Parents%20Should%20Have%20With%20Their%20Adult%20Kids.jpg" alt="7 Money Conversations Parents Should Have With Their Adult Kids" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/sarah-winfrey">Sarah Winfrey</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-money-conversations-parents-should-have-with-their-adult-kids">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dont-start-a-family-before-reaching-these-5-money-goals">Don&#039;t Start a Family Before Reaching These 5 Money Goals</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-smart-financial-gifts-to-give-your-kids-this-year">6 Smart Financial Gifts to Give Your Kids This Year</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/reach-your-money-goals-faster-with-a-simple-naming-trick">Reach Your Money Goals Faster With a Simple Naming Trick</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-financial-resolutions-you-can-conquer-before-new-years">10 Financial Resolutions You Can Conquer Before New Year&#039;s</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-use-the-holidays-to-teach-kids-about-money">How to Use the Holidays to Teach Kids About Money</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance Family adult children boundaries budgeting credit kids loans money conversations money matters retirement saving money Wed, 22 Nov 2017 10:00:07 +0000 Sarah Winfrey 2056811 at http://www.wisebread.com Teach Your Kids About Money With Their Holiday Gift Lists http://www.wisebread.com/teach-your-kids-about-money-with-their-holiday-gift-lists <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/teach-your-kids-about-money-with-their-holiday-gift-lists" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/mother_and_daughter_exchanging_gifts.jpg" alt="Mother and daughter exchanging gifts" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Giving my children Hannukah presents is one of my favorite parts of the holidays. Seeing their faces light up when they open a gift is one of the best feelings in the world.</p> <p>However, it can be very easy for kids to overlook the message of generosity that we are trying to teach for Christmas and Hannukah. They are bombarded by advertisements on all sides and constant reminders that the holidays are on their way &mdash; which means kids can often fall prey to the <em>gimme gimmes.</em> Many parents see this play out when they ask their kids to create a holiday wish list, and receive an eight-page, single-spaced list of expensive items.</p> <p>But just because children can learn the wrong things from holiday gifts doesn't mean they have to. In fact, parents can use the practice of writing a gift list to teach their kids about budgeting, frugality, generosity, and managing expectations. This year, try one of the following holiday gift lists to help your children learn about money and the true spirit of giving. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-use-the-holidays-to-teach-kids-about-money?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Use the Holidays to Teach Kids About Money</a>)</p> <h2>1. The four gift list</h2> <p>Families following the four gift list rule will give each child:</p> <ul> <li> <p>Something they want.</p> </li> <li> <p>Something they need.</p> </li> <li> <p>Something to wear.</p> </li> <li> <p>Something to read.</p> </li> </ul> <p>When your kids are penning their holiday wish lists, tell them to place each item in one of these four categories. You can make it clear that they can put more than one item in each category, but they will only receive one present from each category. This will help them to better understand the things they truly need and recognize how much they value their various wanted items. If everything on their list is a want, this exercise will help them manage their expectations. It can also potentially spur them to find needs, clothes, and books that they are excited to receive.</p> <p>This rule is also very helpful for parents who often go overboard with gift shopping. When you see something adorable that you'd love to give your child, you'll have to decide if it's worthy of being one of only four &quot;somethings&quot; on the list.</p> <h2>2. Include gifts to others</h2> <p>Last winter, my sons were delighted to watch the animated adaptation of <em>The Snowy Day</em> by Ezra Jack Keats on Amazon. We had long been fans of the classic book, and the sweet story of Peter's adventure in the snow was expanded to tell an animated Christmas story in this short film.</p> <p>One of my favorite parts of the adaptation was the story of Peter's Jewish friend Layla, who delivers a gift to a charity on the sixth night of Hannukah. She explains that it's her family's tradition to give instead of receive on that night of Hannukah, and she and her mother have picked out something special to give away.</p> <p>This tradition is very well-suited to Hannukah, which lasts for eight nights. Parents can easily set aside one night to be about giving to those less fortunate rather than receiving &mdash; but any family can encourage their children to think of others when making their holiday gift lists.</p> <p>In addition to writing down the things that they want, your kids can also include a list of gifts they can give to others. These could be traditional gifts for families in need, or they can be more creative, like writing letters to deployed soldiers or volunteering. By including a place for giving back on their holiday wish list, your kids will learn to associate generosity with your holiday traditions.</p> <h2>3. Create a gift-giving theme</h2> <p>For older children, a fun way to celebrate the holidays and teach frugality is to set a theme for gift giving. For instance, Stacia Mcclure's family would give everyone a hard spending limit, and specify where everyone could shop: &quot;One year, we decided all gifts had to come from a truck stop &mdash; and gift cards were excluded. My dad still talks about that year because he got an entire box of Necco wafers. The hospital gift shop Christmas was also quite entertaining.&quot;</p> <p>Other types of holiday themes might include only buying &quot;As Seen on TV&quot; items, books, games, or food items.</p> <p>Picking a &quot;theme&quot; helps teenagers learn to be creative within a spending framework, which is excellent practice for learning how to be frugal. A teen who can have fun and give a meaningful (or at least hilarious) low-cost gift from a truck stop will learn to think outside the box when it comes to tougher money decisions. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-steps-to-stress-free-holiday-gift-giving?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Steps to Stress-Free Holiday Gift Giving</a>)</p> <h2>4. Ask them to pick a stock</h2> <p>Several years ago, Stephanie McCullough's daughter asked for a new iPod for the holidays. &quot;Instead, I bought her two shares of Apple,&quot; McCullough says, &quot;which cost about the same as a new device at the time. There was no way to know this at the time, but the stock has skyrocketed since then.&quot;</p> <p>If you let your children know that you plan to buy them a share of a company they like, you will not only be giving them a gift that will keep on giving, but you can also help to spark an interest in finance.</p> <p>They can either pick a publicly-traded company they like, or they can do a little research into how well their favorite companies have fared in the market. The latter will help them start to get a sense of figuring out what makes a good investment. Even if they don't research their stock before including it on their gift list, you can invite them to track the stock's price over time to see how their gift is doing.</p> <h2>5. Include a time gift</h2> <p>As much as your children love ripping the wrapping paper off a new toy, what they really want most is to spend time with their parents. You can give them the gift of your time by asking them to include a request on their gift list for something you can do together. For instance, your child might list &quot;baking cookies together&quot; or &quot;going fishing together&quot; on their wish list.</p> <p>While you could always create a &quot;coupon&quot; for the requested time gift, you can also find a small tangible item you could give your child to use for their time gift. For instance, you might give them a new cookbook that you can peruse together to find the perfect cookie recipe, or a fishing hat for them to wear next time you go to the lake.</p> <p>By having your child include a time gift request on their holiday wish list, you are teaching them that the best gifts come from being together, rather than spending lots of money.</p> <h2>The benefit of limits</h2> <p>The magic of the holiday season does not come from tearing into an enormous pile of presents, even though much of our culture tries to convince kids otherwise. Teaching your children to use frameworks for thinking about their holiday gift wishes can help them to better appreciate the real lessons of the season, as well as learn some important money skills that will last them well into adulthood.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fteach-your-kids-about-money-with-their-holiday-gift-lists&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FTeach%2520Your%2520Kids%2520About%2520Money%2520With%2520Their%2520Holiday%2520Gift%2520Lists.jpg&amp;description=Teach%20Your%20Kids%20About%20Money%20With%20Their%20Holiday%20Gift%20Lists"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/Teach%20Your%20Kids%20About%20Money%20With%20Their%20Holiday%20Gift%20Lists.jpg" alt="Teach Your Kids About Money With Their Holiday Gift Lists" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/emily-guy-birken">Emily Guy Birken</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/teach-your-kids-about-money-with-their-holiday-gift-lists">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-use-the-holidays-to-teach-kids-about-money">How to Use the Holidays to Teach Kids About Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-smart-financial-gifts-to-give-your-kids-this-year">6 Smart Financial Gifts to Give Your Kids This Year</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-stocks-your-kids-would-love-to-own">5 Stocks Your Kids Would Love to Own</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-top-money-lessons-to-learn-from-ruth-soukups-unstuffed">4 Top Money Lessons to Learn From Ruth Soukup&#039;s &quot;Unstuffed&quot;</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-financial-gifts-mom-will-love-for-mothers-day">6 Financial Gifts Mom Will Love for Mother&#039;s Day</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance Family children Christmas gifts hannukah Holidays kids money lessons presents stocks wish lists Thu, 09 Nov 2017 08:00:09 +0000 Emily Guy Birken 2046508 at http://www.wisebread.com 9 Family Money Matters Your Kids Don't Need to Know http://www.wisebread.com/9-family-money-matters-your-kids-dont-need-to-know <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/9-family-money-matters-your-kids-dont-need-to-know" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/working_at_home_1.jpg" alt="Working at home" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>When you have kids, there will come a time when you want to teach them about money. Some basic personal finance lessons can go a long way toward helping your children understand things like spending, saving, and even investing.</p> <p>But there are many things about your family's finances that your children don't need to know right away, even if they are curious. Information about your family's income, debt, and spending can be confusing and even troubling to younger kids. And kids are prone to share this information when it's best to keep it private.</p> <p>Older teenagers may benefit from learning more about your financial situation as they approach an age when they will be earning money and making purchases on their own. But for younger children, especially, it may be best to keep the following financial information close to your vest. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-parenting-mistakes-to-avoid-when-teaching-kids-about-money?Ref=seealso" target="_blank">4 Parenting Mistakes to Avoid When Teaching Kids About Money</a>)</p> <h2>1. Your income</h2> <p>Your kids don't need to know how much money you make. All they need to know is that you love them and will care for them. Younger kids, in particular, have no real sense of the value of money anyway. You could tell them you earn $100 a year and they would think you are rich.</p> <p>Children also have a habit of blabbing, and you never want to find your children bragging to other kids &mdash; or even worse, their parents &mdash; about how much money you earn. Your kids will be better off learning that happiness and financial security have less to do with your income and more to do with what you do with money when you have it. This means teaching them about saving, about being charitable to others, and about being appreciative of what you have.</p> <h2>2. Which parent earns more</h2> <p>It's common for one parent to earn more than the other. This is especially true if one parent chooses to stop working or works part-time to raise a family. Children should generally be left oblivious to which spouse is higher earning because salaries don't represent a person's full contribution to the family.</p> <p>If one parent stops working, it may mean they are taking on a greater share of household responsibilities. And it's also important to note that many of our more important professions are not particularly high paying. A schoolteacher may bring in less money than their banker spouse, but is likely to work just as hard. Rather than share details with your child about which spouse earns more, simply explain to them the value of all work, and give them an appreciation of the broad, non-monetary contributions needed to keep a household going.</p> <h2>3. Your retirement balance</h2> <p>Let's say you've been saving aggressively for retirement and have several hundred thousands of dollars saved. Now, let's say you just told your daughter she can't have ice cream because it costs too much. A child, if she was aware of your retirement savings, might find this baffling. It's hard for young people to grasp that you may have a large amount in savings but are still pinching pennies.</p> <p>Your retirement savings and overall net worth is not something that should be shared too widely. A child who finds out his dad has hundreds of thousands of dollars in the bank may be motivated to brag, and that's not good. So it's best to keep information about your retirement plan to yourself.</p> <h2>4. Your debts</h2> <p>Debt can be a major source of family stress, but it's a stress that only parents should carry. Your worries about how you'll pay off that credit card bill or how you'll make those car payments are your worries, not your kids'. There may be instances when you need to be honest with your children if there is money trouble, and older children may benefit from lessons in money management, credit, and the cost of borrowing. But as long as you are able to provide and care for your kids, they are best left unaware of your financial debt burden.</p> <h2>5. The price of your home</h2> <p>The cost of your house is public information, but that doesn't mean you need to broadcast it to your kids. The only thing that kids need to know about housing is that they have a roof over their head. What you paid for your house should, to the best of your ability, be kept between the buyer, seller, and real estate agent.</p> <p>Additionally, it's best not to share too much detail about mortgage debt. If they ever get a hint that you are struggling to make mortgage payments, that will only lead to anxiety.</p> <h2>6. What you inherit</h2> <p>If a relative passes away and leaves some assets to you, the specifics of that inheritance should be kept as private as possible. This is especially true if the inheritance is quite large. If a child learns of a sizable windfall and shares that information with others, that can lead to jealous family members or friends, and could even make you a target for thieves and scammers.</p> <p>Sometimes, certain family members receive less than others, or are cut out of the will altogether. This can result in family strife that children should not be concerned about.</p> <p>For older children, it is OK to explain to them how inheritances work, as they may take comfort in believing you'll leave them something when you pass. And there will be a time when you need to tell older children about their own inheritance so they have an idea of what they may have to manage.</p> <h2>7. The cost of gifts</h2> <p>Kids have a way of believing that the most expensive item is always the best. They'll reject something if they believe you got it at a deep discount or (gasp!) second-hand. So parents may be best served by not indicating how much they spent on that video game system or that baseball bat. By hiding the cost of items you buy for your kids, they may be more inclined to evaluate the gift on its merits.</p> <h2>8. Child support payments and alimony</h2> <p>If you and your spouse have divorced, you may be on the hook for child support payments, alimony, or both. These costs are usually determined by courts and can be a major source of tension between parents. The children are best left unaware of these details and any drama or conflict surrounding them. It may be comforting to a child if they are aware that support payments are being made, but sharing specific dollar figures can be problematic.</p> <h2>9. In some cases, the cost of college</h2> <p>This is a tricky one. If your child will end up paying for their own college education, he or she will obviously need to know what they'll be on the hook for. And if you are paying for all or part of college, they will be well served to know how much of a financial commitment you are making toward their education. (It will comfort them to know you are saving as much as possible.) But this information should not come to them immediately. A child's first priority should be to stay in school and get good grades. A young high schooler does not need to be burdened with the stress of whether they need to get scholarships or whether they'll be on the hook for student loans later.</p> <p>It's also important to understand that final college costs can vary from family to family, depending on scholarships and financial aid. A wealthy family might pay the full price to send their child to an Ivy League school, while a low-income family may pay next to nothing. This family financial information is really nobody's business, so it's important to be judicious in what you share with your child.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F9-family-money-matters-your-kids-dont-need-to-know&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F9%2520Family%2520Money%2520Matters%2520Your%2520Kids%2520Don%2527t%2520Need%2520to%2520Know.jpg&amp;description=9%20Family%20Money%20Matters%20Your%20Kids%20Don't%20Need%20to%20Know"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/9%20Family%20Money%20Matters%20Your%20Kids%20Don%27t%20Need%20to%20Know.jpg" alt="9 Family Money Matters Your Kids Don't Need to Know" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/tim-lemke">Tim Lemke</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-family-money-matters-your-kids-dont-need-to-know">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-smart-financial-gifts-to-give-your-kids-this-year">6 Smart Financial Gifts to Give Your Kids This Year</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-money-conversations-parents-should-have-with-their-adult-kids">7 Money Conversations Parents Should Have With Their Adult Kids</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/teach-your-kids-about-money-with-their-holiday-gift-lists">Teach Your Kids About Money With Their Holiday Gift Lists</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-use-the-holidays-to-teach-kids-about-money">How to Use the Holidays to Teach Kids About Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dont-start-a-family-before-reaching-these-5-money-goals">Don&#039;t Start a Family Before Reaching These 5 Money Goals</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance Family alimony borrowing child support children debt divorce high earners income kids retirement spending Wed, 25 Oct 2017 08:00:07 +0000 Tim Lemke 2038887 at http://www.wisebread.com 4 Questions to Answer Before Giving Your Kid a Credit Card http://www.wisebread.com/4-questions-to-answer-before-giving-your-kid-a-credit-card <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/4-questions-to-answer-before-giving-your-kid-a-credit-card" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/lets_learn_about_responsible_spending.jpg" alt="Let’s learn about responsible spending" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Would you give your 10-year-old a credit card? Many parents would; in fact, a recent study by T. Rowe Price found that nearly one out of every five parents with children between the ages of eight and 14 have given their child a credit card.</p> <p>Are you considering joining this group of parents? If so, you need to make sure that you ask your young children these questions first. And make sure you get the answers you need to hear to inspire confidence that your youngster is ready for that piece of plastic. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/13-things-to-teach-your-kids-about-credit-cards?ref=seealso" target="_blank">13 Things to Teach Your Kids About Credit Cards</a>)</p> <h2>What is the credit card for?</h2> <p>If you're giving a kid as young as 13 or 14 a credit card, it's safe to assume that this card is to be used only for a specific purpose. Maybe you want your child to use the card to buy a train pass each month to get back and forth from school. If that's all the card is to be used for, spell it out clearly so your child understands and isn't tempted to use it to buy a new shirt or video game. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-reasons-to-add-your-teen-as-an-authorized-user-on-your-credit-card?ref=seealso" target="_blank">4 Reasons to Add Your Teen as an Authorized User on Your Credit Card</a>)</p> <h2>What is the spending limit per week or per month?</h2> <p>You'll need to set clear spending limits before handing over a credit card to your kids. Maybe your kids can only charge up to $150 a month. Or maybe their spending limit is $300. Whatever it is, make sure your kids know this limit and understand what it means. Ask them about it early and often. You want your kids to understand that the spending limit is a rule and not a suggestion.</p> <p>Make it clear, too, that if their monthly limit is $200 and they charge $150 in the first week, they can now only spend $50 for the rest of the month. Don't let them break that spending limit. If you do, that limit become meaningless. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/should-you-cosign-your-teenagers-credit-card-application" target="_blank">Should You Cosign on Your Child's Credit Card Application?</a>)</p> <h2>Who pays, and how much?</h2> <p>Before giving your children a credit card, you'll need to establish the payment rules with them. Explain how credit cards work, and that if the bill isn't paid on time, the account will be hit with late fees. Make sure that they understand the consequences of not paying their balances off in full each month and that high interest rates can make credit card debt grow quickly.</p> <p>Once you've asked your kids these credit card basics, establish ground rules for how the card is to be paid. Maybe you've agreed to pay the card in full each month, as long as your children don't spend past a certain limit. Maybe you and your children have agreed to split the monthly bill, with your children covering their half with allowance money or withdrawals from their savings accounts.</p> <p>Whatever arrangement you agree to, don't change the rules at the end of a month. Your children might complain that they have to pay half the credit card bill. Don't let their complaints convince you to cover the whole bill. This won't teach your children about financial responsibility.</p> <h2>Do they understand the consequences of misusing their cards?</h2> <p>Have consequences in place if your child overspends with a credit card or purchases items they're not supposed to be buying.</p> <p>Maybe you agree that your child can charge $150 a month maximum. If your child spends $200 in a month, they should know that there will be consequences. Perhaps they will be responsible for repaying what they overspent, whether that repayment comes in the form of extra chores, a withdrawal from their savings account, or a reduction in next month's spending limit.</p> <p>If your children use their cards to purchase something they aren't allowed to buy &mdash; say an in-app purchase or a fast food meal &mdash; there should be consequences, too. Maybe your child will lose their card for a month or on a permanent basis if they don't follow your buying rules. Spell these rules out before you give them their own credit card. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-important-lessons-frugal-parents-teach-their-children?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Important Lessons Frugal Parents Teach Their Children</a>)</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F4-questions-to-answer-before-giving-your-kid-a-credit-card&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F4%2520Questions%2520to%2520Answer%2520Before%2520Giving%2520Your%2520Kid%2520a%2520Credit%2520Card.jpg&amp;description=4%20Questions%20to%20Answer%20Before%20Giving%20Your%20Kid%20a%20Credit%20Card"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/4%20Questions%20to%20Answer%20Before%20Giving%20Your%20Kid%20a%20Credit%20Card.jpg" alt="4 Questions to Answer Before Giving Your Kid a Credit Card" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dan-rafter">Dan Rafter</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-questions-to-answer-before-giving-your-kid-a-credit-card">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-your-bad-credit-can-impact-your-kids">How Your Bad Credit Can Impact Your Kids</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-smart-financial-gifts-to-give-your-kids-this-year">6 Smart Financial Gifts to Give Your Kids This Year</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/teach-your-kids-about-money-with-their-holiday-gift-lists">Teach Your Kids About Money With Their Holiday Gift Lists</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-use-the-holidays-to-teach-kids-about-money">How to Use the Holidays to Teach Kids About Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-family-money-matters-your-kids-dont-need-to-know">9 Family Money Matters Your Kids Don&#039;t Need to Know</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance Family allowances authorized users children co-signing credit limits kids responsibility Mon, 23 Oct 2017 08:30:10 +0000 Dan Rafter 2039974 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Protect Your Child From Identity Theft http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-protect-your-child-from-identity-theft <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-protect-your-child-from-identity-theft" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/computer_hacker_stealing_information_with_laptop.jpg" alt="Computer hacker stealing information with laptop" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Your ex-spouse calls you, but the name on the caller ID is your child's. You receive a hospital bill for a C-section supposedly performed on your eight-year-old son. Or, you bring your child to the bank to open her first savings account, and are denied because they say she has a record of bad checks.</p> <p>All these are warning signs for a surprisingly prevalent crime: child identity theft. Most adults are aware that their own names and Social Security numbers can be hijacked by scammers who open fraudulent accounts in their names; not everyone realizes that the same thing can and does happen to kids.</p> <p>Identity theft can interfere with college, job prospects, buying a car, or getting that first mortgage. So it's important for you to understand how to protect your kids from this fraud. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-comprehensive-guide-to-identity-theft-everything-you-need-to-know?ref=seealso" target="_blank">The Comprehensive Guide to Identity Theft: Everything You Need to Know</a>)</p> <h2>Fraudsters love kids</h2> <p>You might think a kid's identity wouldn't appeal to scammers. After all, kids have no credit history and they're not even old enough to get their own credit cards. But the victim being under 18 is generally not a problem for opening new accounts. The credit bureaus don't know the applicant's age, says Eva Velasquez, CEO and President of the Identity Theft Resource Center.</p> <p>And, a blank credit history can be attractive to a criminal who might have many blemishes on his or her own report, says Robert Chappell, a state police captain who wrote <em>Child Identity Theft: What Every Parent Needs to Know</em>.</p> <p>Even better, from a crook's perspective, is the fact that the crime can go undetected for years since no one usually thinks to check a kid's credit report.</p> <p>&quot;In many instances, the first time a young adult might discover they're a victim of identity theft is when they try to apply for a loan for college and are denied because someone else either already destroyed their credit or already took out a student loan using their Social Security number,&quot; Velasquez says.</p> <h2>How does your child's info get out there?</h2> <p>Anyone with access to a child's Social Security number and date of birth can apply for accounts and services in their name. There are a number of ways scammers can get their hands on those vital digits:</p> <h3>Paperwork</h3> <p>When this information is written on school or sports team forms, it's seen by staff. If forms aren't shredded properly before disposal, it can also be found in recycling bins by thieves. To defend against these risks, be judicious about what you write on forms.</p> <p>&quot;Leave the Social Security number blank. A Social Security number is like gold to a thief,&quot; Chappell says.</p> <h3>Hacking</h3> <p>When hackers broke into health insurance company Anthem's database in 2015, tens of millions of children's records were among those compromised. There's not much you can do to prevent a breach like that, but if you get a letter notifying you that your child's account was involved in a hack, take advantage of any credit monitoring service offered.</p> <h3>Friends and family</h3> <p>Disturbingly, often the person who steals a child's identity is a relative or close friend.</p> <p>Even parents are sometimes tempted to put their children's names and Social Security numbers on account applications if their own credit is bad. To prevent a relative from exploiting your child's identity, Chappell advises keeping kids' sensitive documents under lock and key, just as you should your own.</p> <p>&quot;Don't carry your child's Social Security card around in your wallet or allow your child to carry their Social Security card,&quot; Chappell advises. &quot;It's just not needed on a daily basis.&quot;</p> <h2>What should you do if your child's identity is stolen?</h2> <p>Follow these tips from the Federal Trade Commission and other experts:</p> <ul> <li> <p>File a police report and report the crime to the FTC at <a href="https://www.identitytheft.gov/" target="_blank">IdentityTheft.gov</a>.</p> </li> <li> <p>Contact the three major credit bureaus to request your credit reports (you can access all three credit reports via <a href="http://www.annualcreditreport.com" target="_blank">AnnualCreditReport.com</a>). Ask each bureau to remove any fraudulent accounts. Then freeze your credit so no new accounts can be opened.</p> </li> <li> <p>Contact the appropriate creditor to explain that the fraudulent account was opened in a minor's name.</p> </li> <li> <p>Consider paying for a credit monitoring service.</p> </li> <li> <p>Visit the <a href="https://www.identitytheft.gov/" target="_blank">FTC's Identity Theft Resource site</a> for more help.</p> </li> </ul> <p><span style="background-color: transparent; font-size: 13px; color: rgb(0, 0, 0);"></p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</h2> <h2 style="text-align: center;"><span style="background-color: transparent; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-size: 13px;">Like this article? Pin it!</span></h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fhow-to-protect-your-child-from-identity-theft&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FHow%2520to%2520Protect%2520Your%2520Child%2520From%2520Identity%2520Theft.jpg&amp;description=How%20to%20Protect%20Your%20Child%20From%20Identity%20Theft"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="background-color: transparent; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-size: 13px;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/How%20to%20Protect%20Your%20Child%20From%20Identity%20Theft.jpg" alt="How to Protect Your Child From Identity Theft" width="250" height="374" /></span></p> <p></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/carrie-kirby">Carrie Kirby</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-protect-your-child-from-identity-theft">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-protect-your-retirement-account-from-a-hack">How to Protect Your Retirement Account From a Hack</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-protect-your-credit-after-the-equifax-breach">How to Protect Your Credit After the Equifax Breach</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-spot-a-credit-repair-scam">How to Spot a Credit Repair Scam</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-smart-financial-gifts-to-give-your-kids-this-year">6 Smart Financial Gifts to Give Your Kids This Year</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/teach-your-kids-about-money-with-their-holiday-gift-lists">Teach Your Kids About Money With Their Holiday Gift Lists</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance children credit freezes federal trade commission fraud identity theft kids protections security breach social security Tue, 17 Oct 2017 08:30:11 +0000 Carrie Kirby 2035898 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Use the Holidays to Teach Kids About Money http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-use-the-holidays-to-teach-kids-about-money <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-use-the-holidays-to-teach-kids-about-money" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/halloween_is_here.jpg" alt="Halloween is here" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>My kids love the holidays. They plan their Halloween costumes as early as March; they ask to help make pumpkin pie the moment there's even a hint of chill in the air; and they have Hanukkah wish lists going nearly year-round.</p> <p>My husband and I get a kick out of their enthusiasm. It helps us remember the holiday magic we felt as children. But in addition to being fun and meaningful traditions, holidays also offer parents the opportunity to teach their kids about money.</p> <p>Before this year's holiday season kicks into high gear, consider using the occasions to teach your kids the following lessons about managing money:</p> <h2>Halloween</h2> <p>Your kids' favorite candy-based holiday provides you with several ways to teach important money management skills.</p> <h3>Costume budgeting</h3> <p>Whether you are footing the bill for your child's costume or you are asking them to use their own money, start by setting a dollar limit on the amount they can spend and offer to help them shop around. These limits will help your child understand the trade-offs they will have to make to stay within a budget.</p> <p>For instance, your daughter might find that the Wonder Woman costume at the local party store would blow her budget &mdash; but she could save money by stenciling Diana Prince's WW logo on a red T-shirt she already owns and adding white star stickers to a pair of blue shorts or a blue skirt. Recognizing that she could spend either money or time is an important part of learning to budget. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/20-simple-and-cheap-halloween-costumes-for-kids?ref=seealso" target="_blank">20 Simple and Cheap Halloween Costumes for Kids</a>)</p> <h3>Candy negotiations</h3> <p>Not every candy in your child's trick-or-treat bag can be a Reese's Peanut Butter Cup or a Snickers. There's bound to be some candy corn, Good &amp; Plenty, or even just Dum Dums that your kids aren't particularly interested in. You can help them to learn the value of negotiation by fostering candy exchanges.</p> <p>After they've finished with trick-or-treating, encourage your kids to trade with each other. These candy swaps can help your kids figure out just how much they value coveted candy. Is another Mars Bar worth three Twizzlers? Just how many Tootsie Rolls are equivalent to a Blow Pop? This kind of negotiation can help your kids learn how to compromise and determine what they value.</p> <h2>Thanksgiving</h2> <p>Thanksgiving is a time for family, but it can also provide your kids with an excellent opportunity to learn about the importance of tracking your expenses.</p> <h3>Track spending</h3> <p>The average household spent $342 over Thanksgiving weekend in 2016, according to Statistic Brain. You can involve your kids in your Thanksgiving expenditures by asking them to keep a running tally of your spending for the holiday.</p> <p>Save your receipts from any Thanksgiving-related expenditures &mdash; everything from your purchase of pumpkin pie fixings, to the gas station fill-up on the way to Grandma's house, to the 75 percent off fitness tracker you bought for Aunt Sue on Black Friday. Hand over the receipts to your child so they can keep careful track of just how much Thanksgiving will cost you this year.</p> <p>Not only will this exercise in tracking your household spending help your kids to practice their math skills, but it will also help them see just how quickly expenses can add up.</p> <h2>Christmas and Hanukkah</h2> <p>Kids get understandably excited about the gift aspect of Christmas and Hanukkah, but these holidays are also a perfect opportunity to teach them how to manage their money.</p> <h3>Gift budgeting</h3> <p>It's so easy to go overboard when buying gifts for loved ones, and it's important for children to learn that you can give presents without breaking the bank. Even very young children can help you to create a list of everyone you want to give a present to. From there, decide on the amount of money you can afford to spend per person. Older children who will be buying their own presents for family can make this decision themselves, with your help. Younger kids can help by writing down the dollar amount you can spend.</p> <p>You can then start brainstorming gift possibilities. Have your kids comparison shop for prices or figure out alternatives if certain gifts aren't in the budget. This exercise can help your kids understand that generosity and spending too much aren't synonymous.</p> <h3>Wants and needs</h3> <p>Holidays can often be a time of excess, which means it can be tough for kids to recognize the difference between their wants and their needs. One way parents can help their kids learn those differences is to institute the Four Gift Rule. With this rule, each child receives:</p> <ol style="margin-left: 40px;"> <li> <p>Something they want.</p> </li> <li> <p>Something they need.</p> </li> <li> <p>Something to wear.</p> </li> <li> <p>Something to read.</p> </li> </ol> <p>Limiting your children's wish lists to four distinct categories helps your kids focus on the things that they truly need and the wants that they value most. You can make it clear to your kids that they can put more than one item in each category, but that they will only receive one present from each category.</p> <p>Not only will this system help save you money and time, but it will help your kids keep their gift expectations reasonable.</p> <h2>Holidays, with a side of money management</h2> <p>Enjoying the holiday season with your children is a perfect time to teach them some of the finer points of budgeting, negotiation, money management, and managing expectations.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fhow-to-use-the-holidays-to-teach-kids-about-money&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FHow%2520to%2520Use%2520the%2520Holidays%2520to%2520Teach%2520Kids%2520About%2520Money.jpg&amp;description=How%20to%20Use%20the%20Holidays%20to%20Teach%20Kids%20About%20Money"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/How%20to%20Use%20the%20Holidays%20to%20Teach%20Kids%20About%20Money.jpg" alt="How to Use the Holidays to Teach Kids About Money" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/emily-guy-birken">Emily Guy Birken</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-use-the-holidays-to-teach-kids-about-money">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-smart-financial-gifts-to-give-your-kids-this-year">6 Smart Financial Gifts to Give Your Kids This Year</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/teach-your-kids-about-money-with-their-holiday-gift-lists">Teach Your Kids About Money With Their Holiday Gift Lists</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-money-conversations-parents-should-have-with-their-adult-kids">7 Money Conversations Parents Should Have With Their Adult Kids</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-prepare-your-kids-to-live-on-their-own">How to Prepare Your Kids to Live On Their Own</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-ways-to-tidy-up-your-finances-before-the-holidays">10 Ways to Tidy Up Your Finances Before the Holidays</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance Family budgeting children Christmas gift giving Halloween hanukkah Holidays kids money lessons negotiating Thanksgiving tracking Mon, 09 Oct 2017 08:30:08 +0000 Emily Guy Birken 2031775 at http://www.wisebread.com Beyond Disney: 8 Affordable Family Destinations in the US http://www.wisebread.com/beyond-disney-8-affordable-family-destinations-in-the-us <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/beyond-disney-8-affordable-family-destinations-in-the-us" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/it_is_a_piggyback_horserace.jpg" alt="It&#039;s a piggyback horserace" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>While some kids have a unique bucket list of travel dreams and goals, nearly every child dreams of going to Disney World one day. For many kids &mdash; and many families &mdash; Disney is a box that must be checked off no matter the cost or the inconvenience involved.</p> <p>But, with Disney World tickets approaching $100 per person, per day, many families can't justify the cost. This is especially true if you need to fly to the park, since even domestic airfare can add an extra $300&ndash;$500 per person to the cost of your trip.</p> <p>Fortunately, there is an array of other family-friendly destinations just waiting to be discovered all over the United States. If you're planning a fun trip with your kids but want to spend less than you would at Disney World, consider these affordable vacation spots all over the country.</p> <h2>1. Orlando, Florida</h2> <p>Sure, Orlando is home to Disney World, but that's not all. This southern city is actually bursting with affordable things to do and see that have little to do with Mickey Mouse or Donald Duck.</p> <p>For starters, you'll find plenty of non-Disney parks, including Fun Spot America Theme Park and Aquatica Orlando Water Park, both of which are less than $50 per person, per day to visit. Also keep in mind that the Disney Springs district (formerly Downtown Disney), which features plenty of Disney stores and attractions, is free to visit even if you're not going to one of the parks. You'll also find numerous non-park attractions in Orlando, including a wax museum, the Orlando Science Center, and Ripley's Believe It Or Not.</p> <p>The best part about Orlando is that there is a nearly endless supply of affordable hotel and condo options. Not only can you book a three-bedroom Orlando condo for less than $99 per night, but three-star hotel properties around the city start at just $50 per night. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-affordable-amusement-parks-that-are-just-as-fun-as-disney" target="_blank">8 Affordable Amusement Parks That Are Just as Fun as Disney</a>)</p> <h2>2. Santa Claus, Indiana</h2> <p>While Santa Claus, Indiana probably sounds obscure (and it kind of is!), this tiny town is actually home to Holiday World &amp; Splashin' Safari &mdash; a theme park/water park that was recently named number four in the nation and number 13 in the world. The big difference is, instead of Disney's $100 per person ticket price, a day at Holiday World starts at just $27.99 per person. You also get free sunscreen, soft drinks, parking, and Wi-Fi, making it easy to save even more.</p> <p>But, there's other stuff to do in Santa Claus, including Santa's Candy Castle (a sweets shop), Santa's Stables (horseback riding), golf courses, and a berry farm. You can also pitch a tent affordably at Lake Rudolph Campground &amp; RV Resort, or book a local two-star or three-star hotel for as little as $56 per night in October. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-easiest-ways-to-save-on-your-next-rv-camping-trip" target="_blank">Easiest Ways to Save on Your Next RV Camping Trip</a>)</p> <h2>3. San Diego, California</h2> <p>San Diego is well-known for its year-round perfect weather, its beautiful beaches, and its endless bounty of things to do. You can visit the famous San Diego Zoo, check out the USS Midway Museum, explore Balboa Park, or enjoy a beach day in nearby (and famous) La Jolla.</p> <p>While California is an expensive state to visit overall, San Diego can be surprisingly affordable. For example, you can book an overnight at a downtown hotel this October for as little as $70 per night. Heck, even the Wyndham Garden San Diego near Sea World can be booked for as little as $83 per night this fall. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-affordable-water-parks-you-can-drive-to" target="_blank">5 Most Affordable Cruise Lines for Families</a>)</p> <h2>4. Branson, Missouri</h2> <p>Branson is known for its honky-tonk music and over-the-top shows, but that's not all. The city is also home to a range of family-friendly activities to please kids (and parents) of all ages. You can check out an inexpensive country or Broadway-style show, visit the famed Titanic Museum, or ride rides at Silver Dollar City theme park or take on the Runaway roller coaster at Branson Mountain Adventure Park.</p> <p>Branson hosts a wide range of lodging options, many of which have amazing pools and on-site entertainment of their own. You can book a nightly stay at Castle Rock Resort &amp; Waterpark this fall for as little as $69 per night. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/family-friendly-hotel-and-resort-chains-where-kids-stay-free" target="_blank">Family-Friendly Hotel and Resort Chains Where Kids Stay Free</a>)</p> <h2>5. Grand Canyon</h2> <p>The Grand Canyon is a natural wonderland with jaw-dropping scenery and ample opportunities for outdoor recreation. Depending on where you stay near the Grand Canyon, you can find hiking, white-water rafting, and waterfalls to explore.</p> <p>The Grand Canyon Skywalk allows your family to walk over the expansive canyon without fear, while the historic Grand Canyon Railway offers a fun way to see the area without too much work.</p> <p>Amazingly, you can book a four-star hotel in Flagstaff for as little as $120 per night this fall, or a simple room at Country Inn &amp; Suites for as little as $99.</p> <h2>6. South Dakota</h2> <p>South Dakota is constantly overlooked as a top travel destination, which is a shame. Taking your kids to South Dakota is both a walk through time and a celebration of our country's natural beauty. Not only is the state home to historic Mt. Rushmore, but it offers the scenic Badlands National Park, Black Hills National Forest, and quirky spots like the Corn Palace and Wall Drug Store.</p> <p>South Dakota is perfect for a family RV or camping trip, or as part of an extensive road trip across the northern states. Hotels in Wall start at about $70 per night, while lodging in cities like Keystone starts at just $50 per night.</p> <p>Even some of the pricier hotels in the state are rather affordable. A night's stay at the three-star Black Forest Inn Bed &amp; Breakfast, for example, will set you back just $160 per night this fall.</p> <h2>7. Myrtle Beach, South Carolina</h2> <p>Myrtle Beach, South Carolina is beautiful indeed, but it doesn't get enough credit as an affordable beach destination. Believe it or not, you can book an oceanfront condo for as little as $700 per week this fall. Oceanfront hotels like Bar Harbor start at just $44 per night. If you want something fancier, even the Embassy Suites on the Myrtle Beach oceanfront can be booked for as little as $219 per night.</p> <p>While the beach will keep everyone in your group busy, there is plenty of other stuff to do when you tire of the sand and surf. For example, Myrtle Beach is home to several small amusement parks and water parks, plus a state park and a Ripley's Aquarium. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-affordable-water-parks-you-can-drive-to" target="_blank">10 Affordable Water Parks You Can Drive To</a>)</p> <h2>8. Gatlinburg, Tennessee</h2> <p>Gatlinburg, Tennessee sits in a beautiful setting among the gorgeous Great Smoky Mountains. The area is known for its mountain scenery, outdoor recreation like hiking and climbing, and a family-friendly atmosphere with plenty to do and see.</p> <p>For example, you'll find the Ripley's Aquarium of the Smokies, which features over 10,000 exotic sea creatures from all over the world. You can also enjoy the Great Smoky Mountains National Park in all its glory, dozens of breweries and mom n' pop diners, and shopping. Dollywood, an Appalachian-themed family park, is also just 20 minutes away in nearby Pigeon Forge.</p> <p>Both Gatlinburg and Pigeon Forge are affordable spots for families as well, with three-star hotels starting at just $109 per night this fall during peak leaf-changing season.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fbeyond-disney-8-affordable-family-destinations-in-the-us&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F8%2520Affordable%2520Family%2520Destinations%2520in%2520the%2520US.jpg&amp;description=8%20Affordable%20Family%20Destinations%20in%20the%20US"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/8%20Affordable%20Family%20Destinations%20in%20the%20US.jpg" alt="8 Affordable Family Destinations in the US" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/holly-johnson">Holly Johnson</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/beyond-disney-8-affordable-family-destinations-in-the-us">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-affordable-water-parks-you-can-drive-to">10 Affordable Water Parks You Can Drive To</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-money-lessons-i-learned-from-three-weeks-in-europe">8 Money Lessons I Learned From Three Weeks in Europe</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-countries-where-you-can-travel-on-30-a-day-or-less">7 Countries Where You Can Travel on $30 a Day or Less</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-little-known-secrets-to-saving-money-on-your-next-cruise">10 Little-Known Secrets to Saving Money on Your Next Cruise</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-cities-where-airbnb-is-way-cheaper-than-a-hotel">5 Cities Where Airbnb Is Way Cheaper Than a Hotel</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Travel affordable children family grand canyon kid friendly kids orlando san diego theme parks united states vacation Mon, 25 Sep 2017 08:30:10 +0000 Holly Johnson 2025391 at http://www.wisebread.com How Your Bad Credit Can Impact Your Kids http://www.wisebread.com/how-your-bad-credit-can-impact-your-kids <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-your-bad-credit-can-impact-your-kids" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/working_at_home.jpg" alt="Working at home" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>This is not about laying the guilt on you as a parent (there's already plenty of that to go around). However, you need to know that bad credit not only impacts your financial situation, but can also have long-term effects on your kids. Here's what you need to know.</p> <h2>It could keep them from getting a student loan</h2> <p>Co-signing a student loan should not be the default decision in helping your child afford college. Co-signing can cause serious financial problems for you down the line if your child cannot afford to make the loan payments. However, if you do decide you want to help your child apply for a student loan by co-signing, a poor credit score could prevent you from doing so. Your negative credit history will come up in the loan application and can cause it to be denied.</p> <p>Being unable to get a student loan means that your child may have to choose from limited educational options. Is that the end of the world? No, of course not. But certain career tracks depend on specific educational programs, and limited college options can make that difficult.</p> <p>Federal student loans, however, are still an option for your child even if you have poor credit. The Perkins loan and the Stafford loan, for example, have fixed interest rates and don't depend on credit history to determine eligibility.</p> <h2>It could make it more difficult for them to establish a credit history</h2> <p>College is often the time when young adults start establishing their own, independent credit history. That seems like no problem, until you realize that &quot;independent credit history&quot; isn't so independent at first.</p> <p>In fact, many credit card companies require a co-signer on a card if the primary applicant is under 21 years of age. That means that if you want to co-sign on a card to help your child start building credit, your own bad credit can cause your child's application to be denied. Keeping your kid out of credit card debt is great, but well-managed use of a credit card is often a great way to start establishing credit history. It's tough to get credit for a bigger purchase when there's no credit history to check.</p> <p>A <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-best-secured-cards-with-no-annual-fee?ref=internal" target="_blank">secured credit card</a> may be a good alternative, but keep a careful eye on hidden fees and increasing interest rates. The key to using a secured credit card successfully is to pay it off in full each month; otherwise, the high interest rates will cost you and your child much more than it's worth to build that credit history.</p> <h2>It could teach them poor financial habits</h2> <p>If your bad credit is a result of poor financial habits, you may have passed those &mdash; and a bad attitude toward money in general &mdash; on to your kids. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-bad-money-habits-youre-teaching-your-kids?ref=seealso" target="_blank">4 Bad Money Habits You're Teaching Your Kids</a>)</p> <p>If they haven't learned from you how to budget, how to save, and how to plan for the future, they probably don't know how to do it. And if you're not showing them how to handle financial stress in a healthy way, or communicate with each other about financial issues, chances are they won't learn how.</p> <p>The great news is that you can all learn together, starting now. A poor financial past does not have to mean a poor financial future. You can change your habits and your attitudes, and there's help available to do so. Start with financial counseling to figure out how you (and your kids) can build better financial habits for today and for the future.</p> <h2>It could prevent them from accessing opportunities</h2> <p>There are often special extracurricular activities, such as field trips, tutoring, music lessons, and more, which come with a hefty price tag. Many parents can't afford these expenses outright, but can use a credit card or other loan option to pay for the expense and then pay that debt off within a few months.</p> <p>Poor credit can keep you from being able to access this payment option for these extra expenses, which means your child may have to pass on them. If your child is focused on a future that involves art, music, or sports, those missed opportunities may really matter.</p> <p>However, it's worth noting that, in general, there are inexpensive options to build a stellar academic resume. Look into free extracurricular activities such as volunteering in local communities, trading lessons for service or help, or applying for scholarships for workshops and camps. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/save-on-school-expenses-without-ruining-your-kids-childhood?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Save on School Expenses Without Ruining Your Kid's Childhood</a>)</p> <h2>It can negatively impact their home life</h2> <p>Poor credit can have a major impact on your ability to access housing, transportation, and work. It isn't fair to be judged solely by your credit score; unfortunately, it happens.</p> <p>Poor credit might prevent you from getting a lease, which can make your living conditions unstable and bring a lot of stress into your life. You might encounter the same issues being unable to get a car loan, which means you have to rely on public transportation, rides from friends, or an old, unreliable car for getting around.</p> <p>Of course, living and transportation issues can make getting to work difficult. If your job is unstable, your income is unstable. This instability leads to more financial issues and stress, all of which can directly impact your child's life at home. It's a vicious cycle.</p> <h2>What can you do?</h2> <p>Despite the negative consequences of bad credit, there are steps you can take right now to start improving things. It's not just for you; it's also for your kids. Here's a short list to get you started.</p> <h3>Get financial counseling</h3> <p>There are resources available, such as confidential, low-fee credit counseling from nonprofit organizations. A good place to find help is through the <a href="https://www.nfcc.org/" target="_blank">National Foundation for Credit Counseling</a> and the <a href="http://fcaa.org/" target="_blank">Financial Counseling Association of America</a>. You can also ask at your local credit union and religious or nonprofit organizations. Many of these places offer free or low-cost access to financial advisers, credit counseling, and debt management. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-organizations-that-really-can-help-you-with-your-debt?ref=seealso" target="_blank">8 Organizations That REALLY Can Help You With Your Debt</a>)</p> <h3>Start taking steps now to deal with your bad credit</h3> <p>Don't put this off another moment longer. <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-counseling-when-you-need-it-and-when-you-dont" target="_blank">Credit counseling</a>, <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-tricks-to-consolidating-your-debt-and-saving-money" target="_blank">debt consolidation</a>, <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-unnecessary-household-expenses-you-can-cut-today" target="_blank">lowering expenses</a>, and even <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-steps-to-take-when-bankruptcy-is-your-only-option" target="_blank">declaring bankruptcy</a> may be good options.</p> <p>Dealing with poor credit is not easy. However, you're not alone. Many people have <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/your-bad-credit-isnt-the-end-of-the-world" target="_blank">dealt with bad credit</a> and come through it stronger than ever, and you can, too. No matter how tough your financial past has been, you can build positivity for your kids by communicating, being proactive, and looking for ways forward, together.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fhow-your-bad-credit-can-impact-your-kids&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FHow%2520Your%2520Bad%2520Credit%2520Can%2520Impact%2520Your%2520Kids.jpg&amp;description=How%20Your%20Bad%20Credit%20Can%20Impact%20Your%20Kids"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/How%20Your%20Bad%20Credit%20Can%20Impact%20Your%20Kids.jpg" alt="How Your Bad Credit Can Impact Your Kids" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/annie-mueller">Annie Mueller</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-your-bad-credit-can-impact-your-kids">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-questions-to-answer-before-giving-your-kid-a-credit-card">4 Questions to Answer Before Giving Your Kid a Credit Card</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-smart-financial-gifts-to-give-your-kids-this-year">6 Smart Financial Gifts to Give Your Kids This Year</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/teach-your-kids-about-money-with-their-holiday-gift-lists">Teach Your Kids About Money With Their Holiday Gift Lists</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-use-the-holidays-to-teach-kids-about-money">How to Use the Holidays to Teach Kids About Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-family-money-matters-your-kids-dont-need-to-know">9 Family Money Matters Your Kids Don&#039;t Need to Know</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance Family bad credit children co-signing credit history financial habits impact kids negative stress student loans Thu, 21 Sep 2017 08:00:06 +0000 Annie Mueller 2022638 at http://www.wisebread.com What to Do If You're Retiring With Debt http://www.wisebread.com/what-to-do-if-youre-retiring-with-debt <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/what-to-do-if-youre-retiring-with-debt" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/old_couple_having_problems_with_their_home_finances.jpg" alt="Old couple having problems with their home finances" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>For a growing number of older Americans, the golden years have been tarnished by debt. If you're retired or will be soon, and too much debt is weighing you down, here are three common sources of senior debt, along with some suggestions for breaking free.</p> <h2>1. Mortgage debt</h2> <p>One of the tenets of wise money management is to be mortgage-free by the time you retire, ridding yourself of what is likely your biggest expense as you enter what may be a lower- and fixed-income season of life. However, for a growing number of older people, that is not the case.</p> <p>According to the Federal Reserve, about 42 percent of households where the head of household is 65 to 74 years old had mortgage debt (a mortgage or home equity loan) in 2013 &mdash; up from 32 percent in 2004 and just 19 percent in 1992. Many such borrowers refinanced their mortgages in order to take advantage of low interest rates, but in doing so, reset the 15- or 30-year mortgage clock.</p> <p>What to do? If your overall housing costs, including taxes and insurance, take up more than 25 percent of your monthly gross income, consider downsizing. Reducing or eliminating your mortgage and lowering what you pay for property taxes, homeowners insurance, utilities, and maintenance could do wonders for your financial peace of mind. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-you-can-cut-costs-right-before-you-retire-0?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Ways You Can Cut Costs Right Before You Retire</a>)</p> <h2>2. Student loan debt</h2> <p>Much has been made of how indebted today's college graduates are. What's less well known is that the fastest-growing segment of the population with education debt is the 60-plus crowd. Most such borrowers took out loans for their kids or grandkids via Parent PLUS loans, or they co-signed on a student loan and now find themselves responsible for the payments.</p> <p>According to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, the number of people age 60 or older with student loans quadrupled between 2005 and 2015 to 2.8 million.</p> <p>What to do? Look into loan consolidation or rehabilitation (if you're behind on the payments). Both are preferable to default, in which case the government could reduce your Social Security benefits in order to collect.</p> <h2>3. Credit card debt</h2> <p>The overuse of plastic isn't just something that plagues the young. According to the National Council on Aging, in 2012, nearly one-third of households headed by someone age 60 or older carried a credit card balance. Are these older households simply living beyond their means? Some probably are, but an AARP survey found that over half the older households with credit card debt put their medical care on plastic.</p> <p>What to do? If your credit card debt is unmanageable, consider contacting a local affiliate of the <a href="https://www.nfcc.org/" target="_blank">National Foundation for Credit Counseling</a>. They may be able to negotiate lower interest rates. In addition, if you haven't done so already, don't put medical bills on your credit card. Instead, see if you can work out a payment plan directly with the medical provider, which may offer more favorable terms. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-fastest-method-to-eliminate-credit-card-debt?ref=seealso" target="_blank">The Fastest Method to Eliminate Credit Card Debt</a>)</p> <h2>Other ways to ditch your debt</h2> <p>No matter how old you are, an important key to getting out of debt is margin &mdash; creating a gap between your income and expenses so you've got the money to make extra payments on your debts. There are only two sides to the margin equation: income and expenses.</p> <h3>Increase income by picking up a part-time job</h3> <p>By definition, retirement means not working anymore, so the idea of going back to work may not fill your heart with joy. However, even a temporary part-time job can make a big difference in how quickly you get out of debt. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-great-retirement-jobs?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Great Retirement Jobs</a>)</p> <p>Start thinking of where you could work. How about consulting with your former employer, hanging out a shingle as a sole proprietor, or simply picking up some hours at a local retailer?</p> <p>Keep in mind that if you started claiming Social Security benefits before your normal retirement age, earning too much from a part-time job may reduce those benefits. Learn more on the <a href="https://www.ssa.gov/oact/cola/rtea.html" target="_blank">Social Security Administration's website</a>.</p> <h3>Decrease expenses by taking your kids off the payroll</h3> <p>It's common for parents to help their adult children with everything from health insurance premiums to cellphone bills. According to a Merrill Lynch study, nearly 70 percent of people age 55 or older with adult children are doing so.</p> <p>Wouldn't it be easier for you to cut them off if you realized that doing so would not only benefit you, but it would benefit them as well? That's one of the key messages in the classic book, <em>The Millionaire Next Door</em>. Authors Thomas Stanley and William Danko found that adults who receive &quot;financial outpatient care&quot; from their parents tend to become dependent on such help and end up saving and investing less than those who do not receive money from their parents. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/are-you-ruining-your-retirement-by-spoiling-your-kids?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Are You Ruining Your Retirement by Spoiling Your Kids?</a>)</p> <h2>There's plenty of time to retire debt</h2> <p>It may be discouraging to find yourself buried in bills at a time of life when you had hoped to slow down and enjoy the fruit of all your years of labor. However, increases in longevity mean you probably still have plenty of time to reap those rewards. What'll make all the difference is how quickly you implement the ideas mentioned above.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fwhat-to-do-if-youre-retiring-with-debt&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FWhat%2520to%2520Do%2520If%2520You%2527re%2520Retiring%2520With%2520Debt.jpg&amp;description=What%20to%20Do%20If%20You're%20Retiring%20With%20Debt"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/What%20to%20Do%20If%20You%27re%20Retiring%20With%20Debt.jpg" alt="What To Do If You're Retiring With Debt" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/matt-bell">Matt Bell</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-to-do-if-youre-retiring-with-debt">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-of-the-fastest-ways-to-go-broke-in-retirement">4 of the Fastest Ways to Go Broke in Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-retiring-with-debt-isnt-the-end-of-the-world">Why Retiring With Debt Isn&#039;t the End of the World</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-red-flags-that-your-retirement-plan-may-be-off-track">4 Red Flags That Your Retirement Plan May Be Off Track</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/these-5-expenses-will-probably-cost-you-a-lot-less-in-retirement">These 5 Expenses Will Probably Cost You a Lot Less in Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-one-couple-paid-off-147k-of-debt-even-while-unemployed">How One Couple Paid Off $147k of Debt (Even While Unemployed)</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Debt Management Retirement adult children co-signed credit card debt expenses giving money increasing income kids mortgages student loans Tue, 19 Sep 2017 08:00:07 +0000 Matt Bell 2021474 at http://www.wisebread.com 5 Business Lessons From These Child Entrepreneurs http://www.wisebread.com/5-business-lessons-from-these-child-entrepreneurs <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-business-lessons-from-these-child-entrepreneurs" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/two_boys_dressed_as_nerds_smiling_with_mind_reading_helmets.jpg" alt="Two Boys Dressed as Nerds Smiling with Mind Reading Helmets" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Kids inspire us to look at the world differently. Their insights and optimism help us find the best in ourselves and in others. This unbridled belief in their ability to make an impact also makes them inspiring entrepreneurs. If you've ever had a business idea and doubted yourself, let this short list of kid entrepreneurs erase your fear and teach you the lessons you need to build the business of your dreams.</p> <h2>1. Mikaila Ulmer, founder of Me &amp; the Bees Lemonade</h2> <p>Imagine taking a painful experience and rather than growing bitter, you get better. That's exactly what happened to Mikaila Ulmer. When she was four years old, she was stung twice by a bee. That would make many people afraid of bees, or at least dislike them. Instead, Mikaila was fascinated by them. Those bee stings gave Mikaila a mission: to learn about bees and their role in our ecosystem. In the course of that research, she learned that bees were dying at an alarming rate.</p> <p>Simultaneously, Mikaila also received an old cookbook from her grandmother that contained a recipe for flaxseed lemonade. She took that recipe, added local honey to it, started selling it at events, and donated a portion of her profits to help save the bees.</p> <p>Today, <a href="https://meandthebees.com/" target="_blank">Me &amp; the Bees Lemonade</a> is going strong, flying off the shelves at Whole Foods and at many other restaurants and stores nationwide. And Mikaila? You can often find her speaking and educating people about bees and our ecosystem at events and on panels, and running workshops to save the bees. Her motto is &quot;Buy a bottle. Save a bee.&quot;</p> <p>Her lesson to us: Find the silver lining. Spin an unpleasant experience on its head, look at the situation from a compassionate, curious perspective, and use what you learn to build a successful business.</p> <h2>2. Neha Gupta, founder of Empower Orphans</h2> <p>Imagine that you have the tradition of giving gifts to others to celebrate your birthday. That's the tradition in Neha Gupta's family. Every year, to celebrate their birthdays, her family members travel back to their hometown in India to give presents to orphans.</p> <p>Neha wanted to do more than just provide gifts to orphans. She wanted them to have the resources they need to create a better life for themselves as they get older. To fund this effort, she made and sold wine charms door-to-door and at community events. The wine charms became so popular that she attracted the attention of corporate sponsors who also supported her effort.</p> <p>With the success of the wine charms, Neha started a nonprofit organization called <a href="http://www.empowerorphans.org/" target="_blank">Empower Orphans</a>. The organization has raised over $1,000,000, and Neha has won numerous awards for her work, including the International Children's Peace Prize.</p> <p>Her lesson to us: A rising tide lifts all boats. Passion for a cause can drive success not only for you, but for others as well.</p> <h2>3. Bella Weems, founder of Origami Owl</h2> <p>A few years ago, my mom gave me a locket to celebrate the opening of a play I wrote and directed in New York City. It's a metal locket with a glass center that has a charm inside. My charm depicts the tragedy and comedy faces associated with theater. It's a beautiful locket and I was so intrigued by how unique it is that I looked into the company that made it, <a href="https://www.origamiowl.com/" target="_blank">Origami Owl</a>.</p> <p>I learned that it was created by teenager Bella Weems. She wanted a car of her own, and rather than help her get one, her parents told her to find a way to earn the money to buy a car for herself. Bella always loved making jewelry and was particularly passionate about locket necklaces and bracelets. Origami Owl was born!</p> <p>In just two years, Bella had turned her passion for jewelry making and her desire to have a car of her own into a multi million-dollar direct sales business. Since then, she's empowered others to be designers and supported other kid entrepreneurs by being what she calls a Force for Good.</p> <p>Her lesson to us: Sometimes, entrepreneurs are born out of something as simple as wanting a new car. You never know what life event will spur you to create something successful. Then, when you find that success, pay it forward.</p> <h2>4. Moziah Bridges, founder of Mo's Bows</h2> <p>Are bow ties fashionable? In the hands of Moziah Bridges, they certainly are! Hailing from Memphis, Tennessee, Mo founded <a href="https://mosbowsmemphis.com/" target="_blank">Mo's Bows</a>. Mo learned how to sew from his grandmother and mother, and his very first ties were crafted from vintage fabric he found in his grandmother's closet. His bow tie designs have been so successful that he recently inked a licensing deal with the NBA. His next goal? He wants to finish school in Memphis so he can attend Parsons School of Design in New York City, and develop his own full clothing line by the time he's 20.</p> <p>His lesson to us: Follow your creativity and perfect your craft. Produce a quality product you are proud of, and success will ultimately follow.</p> <h2>5. Lily Born, founder of Imagiroo</h2> <p>The best products are born from pain points: That's a main tenant in product development. Find something that ails you or someone else, create a solution, and build a business around that solution.</p> <p>Lily Born saw her grandfather struggling with Parkinson's disease. One of the primary difficulties for people with Parkinson's is the tremor that makes their hands shake. Lily's grandfather was having a hard time holding and drinking from a cup because of his tremors. She designed a cup that wouldn't tip over and would prevent her grandfather from spilling his drink.</p> <p>She found this design was also helpful for her father, who was prone to spilling his coffee on his computer when he was working. The seed of her future company, <a href="http://www.imagiroo.com/" target="_blank">Imagiroo</a>, was in that original cup design. Her cups are now available in a durable plastic material with comfortable grips and in a wide variety of fun colors.</p> <p>To encourage all of us to imagine a better world through better products, Lily also created the <a href="http://www.imagiroo.com/invention-workbook/" target="_blank">Invention Workbook</a>. It walks readers through the invention process, and is available for free on her website in PDF format.</p> <p>Her lesson to us: Don't overthink it. Sometimes, the answer is right in front of you. Solving a common problem with a simple solution is often all it takes for a business to flourish.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F5-business-lessons-from-these-child-entrepreneurs&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F5%2520Business%2520Lessons%2520From%2520These%2520Child%2520Entrepreneurs.jpg&amp;description=5%20Business%20Lessons%20From%20These%20Child%20Entrepreneurs"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/5%20Business%20Lessons%20From%20These%20Child%20Entrepreneurs.jpg" alt="5 Business Lessons From These Child Entrepreneurs" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/christa-avampato">Christa Avampato</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-business-lessons-from-these-child-entrepreneurs">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-top-7-blogs-for-entrepreneurs">The Top 7 Blogs for Entrepreneurs</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-8-best-books-for-entrepreneurs">The 8 Best Books for Entrepreneurs</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/over-7-million-money-making-ideas-google-patents">Over 7 million money-making ideas - Google Patents</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-smart-financial-gifts-to-give-your-kids-this-year">6 Smart Financial Gifts to Give Your Kids This Year</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-prepare-your-kids-to-live-on-their-own">How to Prepare Your Kids to Live On Their Own</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Entrepreneurship businessowners children design inspiration inventions kids small businesses Mon, 18 Sep 2017 08:00:07 +0000 Christa Avampato 2021153 at http://www.wisebread.com Don't Start a Family Before Reaching These 5 Money Goals http://www.wisebread.com/dont-start-a-family-before-reaching-these-5-money-goals <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/dont-start-a-family-before-reaching-these-5-money-goals" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/parents_carrying_son_on_shoulders_as_they_walk_in_park.jpg" alt="Parents Carrying Son On Shoulders As They Walk In Park" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Raising kids is expensive. The numbers bear this out: The U.S. Department of Agriculture reported that in 2015 a middle-income family spent an average $12,980 each year on each child. To raise a child from birth through age 17, it would cost married parents an average $233,610. And these figures don't include the cost of a college education.</p> <p>Because raising children &mdash; not to mention buying cars and homes to accommodate them &mdash; is an expensive task, it makes sense to set certain financial goals for yourself before you start a family. Being financially prepared for children can make raising them, and paying for this process, a far easier task.</p> <p>Here are a few money goals to set before you start having children.</p> <h2>1. An emergency fund with six months of daily living expenses</h2> <p>Children come with unexpected expenses; everything from $200 for an emergency room visit to a surprise $500 bill from the dentist. You can prepare for these expenses by creating an emergency fund.</p> <p>As its name suggests, an emergency fund is an account that you only tap to cover unanticipated necessities. With an emergency fund, you won't have to resort to paying for unexpected expenses with a high-interest credit card.</p> <p>Most financial experts recommend that you have at least six months' worth of daily living expenses saved in your emergency fund. That might seem like a daunting goal, but you can get there by steadily putting away even just $100 every month.</p> <h2>2. A credit score of 740 or higher</h2> <p>Your credit score is an important number. Lenders use it to determine if you qualify for mortgage, auto, personal, and student loans. They also rely on it to set your interest rate, with a high score usually equaling lower interest rates.</p> <p>Most lenders today consider a credit score of 740 or higher to be very good. Getting your score to this level, then, should be one of your goals before you start having children. Having a strong credit score means you'll pay less for a mortgage or car loan. That can reduce your living expenses significantly, something that can help ease the financial stresses that come with raising children. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-to-improve-your-credit-score-fast?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Ways to Improve Your Credit Score Fast</a>)</p> <h2>3. A work history</h2> <p>You'll need a steady income to pay for the expenses involved in raising children. The best way to get this income is to build a stable career in your field. Make sure you have several years logged in your field before you begin having children. While there are no guarantees that you'll never lose your job, the odds will be lower if you've already established yourself in your field. And if you do lose your job, you'll have an easier time finding new work.</p> <h2>4. Saving for retirement</h2> <p>Retirement might seem far off, especially when you're thinking of starting a family. But it's never too early to start saving for retirement. The earlier you start, the more dollars you have once you leave the workforce.</p> <p>Before you have children, start socking away money each month for retirement. The easiest way to do this is to sign up for the 401(k) plan that your employer offers. This way, your retirement funds will be deposited automatically with each paycheck.</p> <p>If you don't have access to a 401(k) fund, open a traditional or Roth IRA. Deposit as much as you can each year to get into the habit of saving for retirement. If you do this, it'll be easier to continue saving for retirement after your children are born. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/are-you-ruining-your-retirement-by-spoiling-your-kids?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Are You Ruining Your Retirement by Spoiling Your Kids?</a>)</p> <h2>5. A plan for your children's college education</h2> <p>College might seem far away, too. After all, your children aren't even born yet. You're focused more on paying for preschool than on picking a college.</p> <p>But you should start planning for your children's college education before you even begin building your family. The average class of 2016 graduate took home $37,172 in student loan debt, a number 6 percent higher than the year before. That amount continues to rise each year. You don't want your children to be burdened with student loan debt as they become young adults.</p> <p>Consider opening a 529 college savings plan to help you start stowing away money for your soon-to-be-born children's secondary education. You might be surprised at how quickly college costs sneak up on you. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-smart-places-to-stash-your-kids-college-savings?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Smart Places to Stash Your Kid's College Savings</a>)</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fdont-start-a-family-before-reaching-these-5-money-goals&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FDont%2520Start%2520a%2520Family%2520Before%2520Reaching%2520These%25205%2520Money%2520Goals.jpg&amp;description=Dont%20Start%20a%20Family%20Before%20Reaching%20These%205%20Money%20Goals"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/Dont%20Start%20a%20Family%20Before%20Reaching%20These%205%20Money%20Goals.jpg" alt="Don't Start a Family Before Reaching These 5 Money Goals" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dan-rafter">Dan Rafter</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dont-start-a-family-before-reaching-these-5-money-goals">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-money-conversations-parents-should-have-with-their-adult-kids">7 Money Conversations Parents Should Have With Their Adult Kids</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-financial-decisions-youll-never-regret">8 Financial Decisions You&#039;ll Never Regret</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/money-a-mess-try-this-personal-finance-starter-kit">Money a Mess? Try This Personal Finance Starter Kit</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-signs-youre-making-all-the-right-money-moves">6 Signs You&#039;re Making All the Right Money Moves</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-simple-money-milestones-anyone-can-hit">6 Simple Money Milestones Anyone Can Hit</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance Family career college credit score emergency funds expenses goals kids money moves raising children retirement saving money Tue, 29 Aug 2017 08:00:06 +0000 Dan Rafter 2009180 at http://www.wisebread.com 17 Creative, No-Mess Activities for Kids Stuck at Home http://www.wisebread.com/17-creative-no-mess-activities-for-kids-stuck-at-home <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/17-creative-no-mess-activities-for-kids-stuck-at-home" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/girl_paint_mess_498734754.jpg" alt="Girl doing creative, no-mess activities at home" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Maybe you have a kid stuck at home because they're not old enough for school yet, or maybe they're home with a cold, or it's a snow day. It doesn't matter. This list is jam-packed with ideas to keep them occupied and fully entertained all day long, without a huge, sticky mess to clean after it's over. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/50-fun-things-to-do-when-youre-stuck-inside-during-winter?ref=seealso" target="_blank">50 Fun Things to Do When You're Stuck Inside During Winter</a>)</p> <h2>1. Get pointillistic with dot markers</h2> <p><a href="http://amzn.to/2w5408c" target="_blank">Dot markers</a> have been around for a long time, used primarily for playing Bingo. I've found the best deals at the local dollar store.</p> <p>Use them to create connect-the-dots or to draw on plain paper. You could also have the kids try a <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R9DX5MhkfYQ" target="_blank">crash course on pointillism</a>, a cool art technique that involves a lot of dots. They can use the dot markers to create their own pointillistic masterpieces.</p> <h2>2. Draw a comic strip</h2> <p>Your kiddo can be a cartoonist. First, print out blank comic strips or draw your own comic strips by marking out the lines on plain paper. Use a ruler to get them straight.</p> <p>Then they can use colored pencils, washable markers, or pens to draw and color in their own comic strips. Encourage them to make up new characters going on amazing adventures, or suggest that they simply draw out stories based on their own daily lives.</p> <h2>3. Make (and play) a ringtoss game</h2> <p>You can make a ringtoss game out of almost anything (just make sure it isn't sharp, or hard, or breakable). You'll need things that are ring-shaped or that you can bend into a ring shape, like pipe cleaners. Then you need a target: something thin and tall enough for the rings to slide over.</p> <p>To play, have your kids set the target up and take two or three big steps back from it. They toss as many rings over the target as they can. You can make it more interesting by adding in extra challenges, such as a time limit, smaller rings, or having them stand further away from the target.</p> <h2>4. Create your own board game</h2> <p>Your kids get to design the whole game: characters, the goal, the board, and the rules.</p> <p>Have them start by deciding what the goal is: how can someone win the game? Do they need to get a certain number of points? Or go all the way around the board? Then have them set some rules: do they roll dice or use a spinner? (They can use parts from other board games you own &mdash; such as dice or an hourglass &mdash; for their new game.)</p> <p>Suggest that they use whatever they can find as raw materials. For example, draw the game board on a piece of cardboard, cut paper into cards, create characters or game pieces out of modeling clay, or use tiny toys they already have.</p> <h2>5. Try an origami challenge</h2> <p>Start with some simple shapes for origami. There are a lot of YouTube tutorials, for example, a <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KG62H5QaD2o" target="_blank">ninja star</a> or <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z_ubB8Ff2Vs&amp;list=PLnoO3k54vcBQ_tNFyn7ukM1-LaQBAG2Ld" target="_blank">a baby chicken</a> or a <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gSrVSbEdPEE&amp;index=10&amp;list=PL2vt_TPKQbZob-85AoY8Cxtj8LjigvTNk" target="_blank">water bomb</a>. (Obviously you should start with the water bomb.) When they've mastered a couple of the easier tutorials, have them try some harder shapes.</p> <h2>6. Build a tiny town</h2> <p>Hit up the recycling bin for empty plastic bottles and cardboard boxes. The thin cardboard is best, because it's easier to cut.</p> <p>They can build the structures of their town by cutting, stacking, and combining boxes and bottles. Cut out or draw on doors and windows. Washi tape or masking tape can be used to attach the structures together. Colored tape can also be used to designate roads through their very own tiny towns.</p> <h2>7. Make a marble run</h2> <p>Start with a hard surface (like the floor) and use toys and books to create a racecourse. Your kids can put in little obstacles; they should be small and light so the marble won't be stopped completely. To start the marble on its run, cut cardboard tubes (from toilet paper or paper towels) in half. Tape them together to make them longer. Stack one end on books or a table and make sure it slopes down into the beginning of the racecourse.</p> <h2>8. Make a toy car track</h2> <p>If they have some toy cars, they can make a custom track, with jumps and challenges, out of almost anything. My kids use stools or a stack of books and then pieces of cardboard, small boxes, or big, flat books to build ramps and jumps.</p> <p>They can even come up with tunnels and create obstacle courses. If they have blocks or Legos around, they can build some structures or tunnels for the cars to go through. Or demolish. That part is entirely up to them.</p> <h2>9. Create an ad</h2> <p>The idea of this game is for your kids to come up with their very own advertisement for a made-up product. So, to start with, have them come up with a product that they want to &quot;sell.&quot; It can be as stupid or silly or serious as they want it to be.</p> <p>Next, they need to come up with some ideas about how to advertise it. Maybe a story, or act out a scene, or perform a song. They can use costumes, props, a whole scene. My kids like to video their ads and then review and improve them. Or just laugh at them.</p> <h2>10. Make a music video or do karaoke</h2> <p>They should select their songs, decide on a script or choreographed dance if they're making a video, or just sing and dance their hearts out. Costumes and props make this extremely fun and allow them to be more immersed in the music.</p> <h2>11. Go on a scavenger hunt</h2> <p>A scavenger hunt can work inside or outside. You can come up with your own list and have them hunt around the house for them, or they can come up with their own list of ideas. They can decide to hunt as a team or go separately as a competition. Set a timer to make it more challenging and exciting.</p> <h2>12. Create a memory challenge</h2> <p>The kids will need a timer for this. They should start by finding five to 10 small objects: a marble, a toy car, a spoon, etc. Spread them out on a tray and look at them for 30 seconds. Then move the tray somewhere they can't see it and have them try to remember all the objects on the tray. They can write a list or draw a picture of each one. How many did they remember? If they got them all, add more objects, or start with a completely new set. Make it more challenging by giving them less time to look at the objects on the tray (try 20 seconds, and then 15).</p> <h2>13. Take a Lego building challenge</h2> <p>Kids can use any sort of building toy for this. Blocks or K'Nex or Magnetos will work just as well as Legos. First, make a list of 10 to 15 things they want to build. Or check out <a href="http://afewshortcuts.com/free-printable-lego-challenge-cards/" target="_blank">these printable Lego challenge cards</a> for inspiration.</p> <p>To do the challenge, choose something from the list to build. Then start building. They can use a timer to see how quickly they can build it. Or they can take their time and do the best possible job.</p> <h2>14. Tell some fortunes</h2> <p>This is fun to do with friends or siblings. Make some paper fortunetellers by following <a href="http://innerchildfun.com/2016/10/make-paper-fortune-tellers.html" target="_blank">these instructions</a>.</p> <p>Or, for a simpler version, you can play a game from my childhood (I know, right? So old.) called MASH. All you need is a piece of paper and something to write with. Here are <a href="http://mashplus.com/how-to-play-mash/" target="_blank">the full instructions</a>.</p> <h2>15. Do some pasta-marshmallow architecture</h2> <p>Get their inner architect to work with dry pasta. Seriously! They'll need dry spaghetti noodles and mini marshmallows. Gumdrops work too, if you're low on marshmallows.</p> <p>To build, stick the spaghetti noodles into the marshmallows and gumdrops to connect them and create structures. You can also use toothpicks, or break the spaghetti into pieces for shorter sections. You can start with simple squares and cubes, and then connect them for more complex structures. Here's <a href="https://modernparentsmessykids.com/stem-activity-gum-drop-engineering/" target="_blank">some inspiration</a> to get you started.</p> <h2>16. Make a felt board and pieces</h2> <p>You'll need felt, some cardboard, and scissors. To start, have the kids cover a cardboard with felt, then staple or carefully glue it on. They could use a few different colors of felt to create a background or setting. Maybe a green strip for grass on the bottom, and a gray triangle for a mountain.</p> <p>Next, they can cut out shapes with the rest of the felt. The felt shapes will stick to the felt board, so they can use them to create characters, settings, buildings, and all sorts of other stuff on the felt board.</p> <h2>17. Come up with 10</h2> <p>Need some more ideas? I got this method from a writer named <a href="http://www.jamesaltucher.com/2014/05/the-ultimate-guide-for-becoming-an-idea-machine/" target="_blank">James Altucher</a>, and it works well. You can do this or have your kids do this if they're bored.</p> <p>First, think of a problem or a question, like &quot;What are some cool things I can do by myself?&quot; or &quot;What could I do when I'm bored that won't get me in trouble?&quot; Then make a list of 10 ideas that answer your question. Don't stop at five or six. Your brain will want to. Don't let it be lazy. Insist on 10. Your brain saves all the really good ideas for eight and nine and 10.</p> <p>If you make one list, you can make another one. What's another question? How about, &quot;What can I do with my friends?&quot; or &quot;What are some things I want to learn about?&quot; or &quot;How can I not be bored?&quot; Make another list for each question. Make 10 lists! Now you have 100 ideas. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/25-ways-to-entertain-your-child-for-free-or-cheap?ref-seealso" target="_blank">25 Ways to Entertain Your Child for Free or Cheap</a>)</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F17-creative-no-mess-activities-for-kids-stuck-at-home&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F17%2520Creative%252C%2520No-Mess%2520Activities%2520for%2520Kids%2520Stuck%2520at%2520Home_0.jpg&amp;description=17%20Creative%2C%20No-Mess%20Activities%20for%20Kids%20Stuck%20at%20Home"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/17%20Creative%2C%20No-Mess%20Activities%20for%20Kids%20Stuck%20at%20Home_0.jpg" alt="17 Creative, No-Mess Activities for Kids Stuck at Home" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/annie-mueller">Annie Mueller</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/17-creative-no-mess-activities-for-kids-stuck-at-home">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-4"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-reasons-frugal-families-love-boardgame-night">8 Reasons Frugal Families Love Boardgame Night</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-smart-financial-gifts-to-give-your-kids-this-year">6 Smart Financial Gifts to Give Your Kids This Year</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/holiday-gifts-6-fun-games-that-teach-money-and-finance">Holiday Gifts: 6 Fun Games That Teach Money and Finance</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-fun-books-that-will-get-your-kids-excited-about-money">10 Fun Books That Will Get Your Kids Excited About Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-best-sites-to-help-your-kids-learn-about-money">8 Best Sites to Help Your Kids Learn About Money</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Entertainment Family arts and crafts fun things to do games keep kids busy kid activities kids no mess activities things to do with your kids Fri, 25 Aug 2017 08:30:11 +0000 Annie Mueller 2008742 at http://www.wisebread.com