security breach http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/117/all en-US Security Breach Puts 50,000 Credit Card Holders at Risk http://www.wisebread.com/security-breach-puts-50000-credit-card-holders-at-risk <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/security-breach-puts-50000-credit-card-holders-at-risk" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/safety-first-warning.jpg" alt="Security Breach Puts 50,000 Credit Card Holders at Risk" title="Security Breach Puts 50,000 Credit Card Holders at Risk" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="172" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>A security breach at Global Payments Inc., a third-party U.S. based processor, may have compromised <a href="http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052702303816504577313411294908868.html">50,000</a> Visa and MasterCard cardholder accounts. According to <a href="http://www.zdnet.com/blog/btl/warning-over-massive-mastercard-visa-security-breach/72829">ZDNet</a>, both Visa and MasterCard have sent out non-public alerts to banks notifying them of the breach.</p> <p><a href="http://krebsonsecurity.com/2012/03/mastercard-visa-warn-of-processor-breach/">Krebs on Security</a> reported that the breach was first detected by Global Payments in early March. The accounts were compromised between January 21st and February 25th 2012. The information obtained in the breach could be used to make counterfeit cards. It is unknown whether or not banks will issue new cards to cardholders as a result of the breach.</p> <p>Affected banks have begun analyzing transactions on the potentially affected cards in an attempt to find common points of purchases. So far, the transactions of the cards that have been analyzed seem to share the characteristic that they were used in parking garages in the New York City area.</p> <p>Visa has released information saying that the breach is being investigated by the Secret Service as well as an unidentified forensics company. The investigation is still in its early stages. Visa and MasterCard have both stated that their networks were not compromised as a result of the breach.</p> <p>If you use a Visa or MasterCard credit card, you may be affected by this breach. The good news is that most credit cards have fraud protection, so even if you are affected by this security breach, you most likely will not be affected by fraudulent charges if you catch them early enough.</p> <p>Make sure you spend some time this weekend checking your credit card statements either online or by phone to see if there has been any unusual activity going on. If there has been, get in touch with your credit card company ASAP!</p> <p>Additionally, if you have yet to get your free credit report this year, get your <a href="http://www.ftc.gov/bcp/edu/microsites/freereports/index.shtml">free annual credit report</a> to make sure there are no discrepancies on your report.</p> <p>Be sure to share this article with your family and friends via Facebook, Twitter, and email so they know about the security breach and can check their credit card statements to make sure they were not affected.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/ashley-jacobs">Ashley Jacobs</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/security-breach-puts-50000-credit-card-holders-at-risk">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/debit-or-credit-which-one-should-you-choose-at-the-checkout">Debit Or Credit? Which One Should You Choose At The Checkout?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/best-of-personal-finance-credit-where-credit-is-due-edition">Best of Personal Finance: Credit Where Credit Is Due Edition</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/are-debit-cards-as-safe-as-credit-cards">Debit Cards vs. Credit Cards: Fees and Fraud Protection</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/whats-the-difference-between-mastercard-and-visa-credit-cards">What&#039;s the Difference Between MasterCard and Visa Credit Cards?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/capital-one-360-review">Capital One 360: A Competitive Banking Option</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Credit Cards banking credit cards MasterCard security breach VISA Fri, 30 Mar 2012 22:10:52 +0000 Ashley Jacobs 915072 at http://www.wisebread.com Social Media and Identity Theft in 2010 http://www.wisebread.com/social-media-and-identity-theft-in-2010 <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/social-media-and-identity-theft-in-2010" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_000005434706XSmall.jpg" alt="dark alley" title="dark alley" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="166" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>In the next few days and weeks you will be bombarded with things to watch for in 2010 &mdash; you know, lists and such.</p> <p>They will detail ways to save, what the best vacation destinations are, who's hot and who's not &mdash; you know, the important stuff.</p> <p>Most of this important stuff, such as this blog post for example, you may wish to share via a social networking site: Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, MySpace &mdash; you know, the important sites.</p> <p>But hark, hark I say, these sites <em>are</em> actually important sites because millions use them. And millions such as yourself, will be vulnerable to scams, trickery and tomfoolery that will at best lead to some embarrassing hijacking of your page or computer and at worse, help a hacker dial down into what in the data protection world is called PII or personally identifiable information. We've covered a little bit of this in this <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/not-taking-jack-how-to-deal-with-identity-theft">blog</a> but never enough.</p> <p>Allow me to pose this question: Would you walk into a dark alley that says &quot;Check out this really cool video of you and your friends&quot;? Would you&amp; trust a Bobby D. like character who says &quot;I got some nice dresses for ya, right around the corner if you walk into that alley&quot;? Would you walk into that alley with your ID in hand, brandished for all to see?</p> <p>Of course not. You are, after all, kind of sane. I mean you're reading this aren't you?</p> <p>Yet so many people want to check out those cool videos and see which designer dresses that Bobby Digital has for them every time they log on. Sure they'd skipped the dark alley but only to do the same exact thing digitally on Facebook, et. al, every single day.</p> <p>This is why Antivirus software firms such as <a href="http://www.mcafee.com/us/local_content/white_papers/7985rpt_labs_threat_predict_1209_v2.pdf">McAfee</a> and <a href="http://www.symantec.com/content/en/us/about/media/pdfs/Symc_ISTrends09_ISSPredictions10.pdf">Symantec</a> both see 2010 as a breakthrough year for social media sites &mdash; wait for it &mdash; surprise, uhh yeah, a breakthrough in terms of them being attacked by hackers.</p> <p>What's alarming, if not brow-raising, is that most of the hacks on your favorite social portals for posting, partying, pandering, pithiness, and persiflage will take place because you or someone you know, walked into that dark digital alley in search of fun, just curious and also just plain careless.</p> <p>&ldquo;Mostly it's the users in an individual or small business environment through carelessness,&rdquo; said David Bloom, a Los Angeles-based consultant specializing in social media. &ldquo;Like Pogo said, &lsquo;We have met the enemy and it is us.</p> <p>Indeed most hacker intrusions count on curious users who they can snare by simply having the users click on web links or log in via fake web pages that look like the homepages of the most popular social media destinations.</p> <p><strong>Spoofing</strong>, for instance, involves hackers sending you phony alerts or messages supposedly from your friends, or in the case of Twitter, followers. But once you click on them there&rsquo;s the possibility of being re-routed potentially malicious sites or triggering automated viruses or remote code execution, which gives a hacker control of your browsing session.</p> <p><strong>Phishing</strong>, meanwhile, also counts on user participation but usually uses more familiar subject matter to users as bait. Users might get an &ldquo;emergency&rdquo; message, or a &ldquo;video of you&rdquo; from a friend. Another method is a fake error message from your social networking site requiring your action.</p> <p>With Phishing, users are most often lured into clicking on a spoofed link or page such as fake web pages that look like home pages of trusted web sites &mdash; i.e. Facebook &mdash; where users unwittingly type in login information or click on page links.</p> <p>By extension, links are becoming an important component of social networking security. Recently the heavy use of condensed URLs or web addresses (tinyurl and bit.ly) to post links on Twitter and Facebook has made easier to access or cut and paste into a web browser. On the flip side, the URL shorteners can also make it nearly impossible to identify the domain or origin. This increases chances of clicking on a spoofed or malicious link. Also, URL shorteners can also help spammers to evade spam filters installed on personal computers.</p> <p>&ldquo;Whether its tinyurl or bit.ly technology, users are getting into the habit of clicking links that they don&rsquo;t know or trust,&rdquo; says Corey Thomas, Vice President of Product and Operations for IT security firm Rapid7. &ldquo;This makes it much easier for a hacker to highjack the target&rsquo;s system. The most important thing in a situation like this is letting users know the potential risks of tiny URLs and that they should not be clicked on unless absolutely necessary.&rdquo;</p> <p>Someone can easily Tweet this blog and shorten the url from Wise Bread to something that looks like an algebra equation and bam you now have &quot;nice dresses.&quot;</p> <p>So remember this year as you give status updates on where you are and what size shoes you're wearing while sitting there, people, perhaps even the wrong people, will be watching and waiting.</p> <p>Cue ominous musical score and ring in 2010 with vigilance.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/jabulani-leffall">Jabulani Leffall</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/social-media-and-identity-theft-in-2010">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-6"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-social-media-can-save-you-money">6 Ways Social Media Can Save You Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/social-media-an-easy-source-of-coupons">Social Media: An Easy Source of Coupons</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-earn-extra-income-with-twitter">How to Earn Extra Income With Twitter</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-social-media-stars-who-earn-way-more-than-you">5 Social Media Stars Who Earn Way More Than You</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-ways-to-make-facebook-productive">10 Ways to Make Facebook Productive</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Technology Facebook identity theft security breach social media twitter Tue, 05 Jan 2010 15:00:04 +0000 Jabulani Leffall 4452 at http://www.wisebread.com Lock bumping - your home isn't safe http://www.wisebread.com/lock-bumping-your-home-isnt-safe <p><img width="276" height="207" title="broken lock" alt="broken lock" src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/wisebread_imce/561966_security.jpg" /></p> <p>I heard about lock bumping last month from a friend. I figured it was all just a bunch of hokum. But I checked it out. It's not a myth, it's not an urban legend. Crooks can make a generic key to open any lock, including yours. And it's easy. As the video below will show, even a child can do it.</p> <p><strong>So, what is Lock Bumping?</strong><br /> It's a technique that's been around for many years (some say it dates back as early as the 1950s) and it's a simple way to 'pick' a pin tumbler lock using a bump key. And more scary is this...one bump key will work for ANY lock.</p> <p><strong>Ok, then what's a bump key?</strong><br /> I don't want to go into explicit detail here, for obvious reasons, but a bump key is basically a blank key that has been filed down to the lowest level in each groove. It will slide into any pin tumbler lock and enable the would-be thief to gain entry to your home in seconds.</p> <p><strong>How does it work?</strong><br /> Again, without delving too deep into specifics, the technique involves sliding the 'bump key' into the lock and giving it a thump. The tumblers inside will align, you give the key a turn, and quicker than you can say 'where's my DVD player?' the thieves are in to your home and ripping you off. The video below is quite scary, and shows you just how easy it really is.</p> <object width="425" height="350"> <param value="http://www.youtube.com/v/hr23tpWX8lM" name="movie" /> <param value="transparent" name="wmode" /><embed width="425" height="350" wmode="transparent" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" src="http://www.youtube.com/v/hr23tpWX8lM"></embed></object><p><strong>Scared? You should be. So, how do you protect yourself?</strong><br /> Fortunately, Lock Bumping does have counter measures. And believe it or not, more expensive locks are actually more vulnerable and open to attack. Because they are more precisely machined, expensive locks will turn more easily after a bump. The same goes for locks made of hardened steel, as they will sustain less damage during a bump. A cheaper lock may not withstand the force of the knock and refuse to turn.</p> <p><strong>Bump-Proof Locks</strong><br /> They do exist. They range in price from just under $100 to, well, several hundred dollars. But when you consider the financial costs of replacing your valuables or your identity, that's not so bad really.</p> <p>The most affordable bump-proof lock I discovered was at a site called wholesalelocks.com. Their Bump-roof BiLock looks like it's tough as nails. That's one serious looking lock. Other bump-proof locks that I've found, although not quite as affordable, include <a href="http://www.medeco.com/">Medeco</a> , <a href="http://www.videx.com/">Videx Cyberlocks</a> , <a href="http://www.mul-t-lockusa.com/newsdetails.asp?newsid=51">Mul-T-Lock</a> , and <a href="http://www.gokeyless.com/products.htm">GoKeyless</a> . I'm sure there are a few other secure locks on the market too. Just pop down to your local DIY store and ask if they have any Bump-Proof locks. If they don't (which is likely) they can certainly point you in the direction of someone who does sell them.</p> <p><strong>Is there a quick-fix solution?</strong><br /> There are a few. Your local locksmith is well aware of Lock Bumping, and can come out to your home and make your current locks more secure. If you don't fancy the call out charge, you could always fit an additional Mortise or Deadbolt lock to each exterior door. Unlike cylinder locks, these are far more difficult to bypass (although nothing is impossible), and two locks on a door is also a good deterrent.</p> <p><strong>Finally, if it's so prevalent, why aren't lock manufacturers doing anything?</strong><br /> Good question, right. The answer is an old one. Money. Right now, less than 5% of the population knows about Lock Bumping, and even fewer really give it the attention it deserves. The cost of making bump-proof locks is much higher, which means the cost to buy them is higher. And ultimately, that higher price point affects the bottom line.</p> <p>So, that's the scoop on Lock Bumping. Much more information is out there on the web if you really want to find it. More worrying, if you can find out how to make a bump key, so can any thief. Yikes. Now, I'm off to buy a Doberman with sharp teeth and an appetite for criminals.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/lock-bumping-your-home-isnt-safe">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-powerful-ways-to-protect-your-money-from-cyber-theft">6 Powerful Ways to Protect Your Money From Cyber Theft</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-scams-and-cons-that-could-clean-you-out">The scams and cons that could clean you out.</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/turning-a-cold-war-spy-secret-into-a-cheap-anti-theft-device">Turning a cold war spy secret into a cheap anti-theft device</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-mugged">How To Get Mugged</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-to-sneak-more-exercise-into-your-busy-schedule">7 Ways to Sneak More Exercise Into Your Busy Schedule</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Life Hacks bump keys home security lock bumping master keys protect yourself. security breach theft Tue, 06 Mar 2007 21:28:40 +0000 Paul Michael 317 at http://www.wisebread.com UCLA security breach affects 800,000 people (not just students) http://www.wisebread.com/ucla-security-breach-affects-800-000-people-not-just-students <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/ucla-security-breach-affects-800-000-people-not-just-students" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_000018431019_Double.jpg" alt="UCLA campus" title="UCLA campus" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>LA Times reported this morning that &quot;hackers have gained access to a UCLA database containing personal information on about 800,000 of the university's current and former students, faculty and staff members, among others.&quot;&nbsp;The personal information stolen include names, birth dates, social security numbers, home addresses, and other contact information.</p> <p>There are two things you have to know that are not widely reported by the media:</p> <h2>Breach Also Affects Applicants and Parents</h2> <p>According to UCLA's information website, the breach also affects &quot;student applicants and some parents of students or applicants who applied for financial aid.&quot;</p> <p>The database also includes current or former staff and faculty of the University of California, Merced, and current or former employees of the University of California Office of the President, for which UCLA does administrative processing.</p> <p>This could potentially affect a lot of people. If you applied to UCLA or had a standardized test score sent to UCLA, you may be affected by this breach.</p> <h2>Don't Wait for UCLA to Contact You</h2> <p>While UCLA claims that it will attempt to contact all those who are affected, don't hold your breath.</p> <p>I know many people who are personally affected by this security breach who did NOT receive a notice from UCLA. They had to call the UCLA hotline (877 533-8082) to verify that they were indeed a victim.</p> <p>When the victims asked why they did not receive the notice, UCLA hotline operators said that they only sent out information to the most recent contact info listed on URSA, UCLA's online records system. Not surprisingly, most alumni, parents, and applicants do NOT constantly update UCLA with their latest mailing or e-mail addresses.</p> <p>Call the hotline (877 533-8082) right now and check whether you have been affected.</p> <h2>If You Are a Victim, What Should You Do?</h2> <p>According to UCLA:</p> <p>&quot;As a precaution, UCLA recommends that you contact one of the three national credit bureaus to place a fraud alert on your consumer credit file and obtain a copy of your personal credit report. Once a credit bureau places a fraud alert on your credit file, the two other credit bureaus will automatically do the same. Each bureau will then send you a copy of your credit report. The fraud alert and credit reports are free. Here is the contact information for the fraud divisions of the national credit bureaus:</p> <ul> <li><a href="http://www.equifax.com/">Equifax</a>: (888) 766-0008&nbsp;</li> <li><a href="http://www.experian.com/fraud">Experian</a>: (888) 397-3742&nbsp;</li> <li><a href="http://www.transunion.com">TransUnion</a>: (800) 680-7289&nbsp;</li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/will-chen">Will Chen</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/ucla-security-breach-affects-800-000-people-not-just-students">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dont-panic-do-this-if-your-identity-gets-stolen">Don&#039;t Panic: Do This If Your Identity Gets Stolen</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-to-never-keep-in-your-wallet">5 Things to Never Keep in Your Wallet</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-signs-your-college-is-a-scam">6 Signs Your College Is a Scam</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-simple-ways-to-protect-yourself-from-medical-records-theft">7 Simple Ways to Protect Yourself From Medical Records Theft</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/your-ssn-can-now-be-accurately-guessed-using-date-and-place-of-birth">Your SSN Can Now Be Accurately Guessed Using Date and Place of Birth</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Consumer Affairs fraud fraud alert identity theft la times security breach ucla Wed, 13 Dec 2006 04:06:33 +0000 Will Chen 79 at http://www.wisebread.com