mending http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/11778/all en-US 15 Quick Clothing and Shoe Repair Fixes You Should Own http://www.wisebread.com/15-quick-clothing-and-shoe-repair-fixes-you-should-own <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/15-quick-clothing-and-shoe-repair-fixes-you-should-own" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_tights_heels_000043595558.jpg" alt="quick clothing and shoe repair fixes you should own" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Dress shoes losing heel caps, spills, a run in a pair of pantyhose&hellip; it's a jungle out there. My office desk drawers are a testament to 30+ years of dealing with &quot;work clothes&quot; emergencies. People come to me for repairs. I am the Office Mom of clothing emergencies.</p> <p>Over the years, I have learned how to make <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-fix-18-common-wardrobe-malfunctions">quick fixes</a> inexpensively. Here are some tried-and-true fixes.</p> <h2>1. Pantyhose/Nylons</h2> <p>My number one solution is to keep a spare pair in my desk. However, sometimes even that back-up pair fails &mdash; and always right before a meeting or a presentation. Naturally! A squirt of hairspray will stop that run. If you don't have hairspray, a little clear nail polish will also do the trick. Unfortunately, both are smelly, so try to fix quickly so they have time to dry.</p> <h2>2. Instant Seamstress</h2> <p>I wish I had a nickel for every time someone has borrowed my <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00CQR6C3O/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B00CQR6C3O&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=4VBRI7RDXWGXEE4F">sewing kit</a>. Aside from the needle and thread, the most often-requested item is the tape measure. This kit also contains some buttons, which are very handy, as well as small scissors.</p> <h2>3. Click, Clack, Busted Heel Cap</h2> <p>Every woman's nightmare: The doggone broken heel cap. They never break at home, do they? Always, every darn time, at work or on your way somewhere. Unless you like limping and clicking around all day (and explaining it a million times), you might want to make a very small investment in these <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B007V63Y8Q/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B007V63Y8Q&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=TAUJEKDLWWY3E2FL">heel caps</a>.</p> <h2>4. Sole to Sole</h2> <p>Guys, if your <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B008BIG4H6/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B008BIG4H6&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=XXVQ777SFGVH67N4">shoe soles</a> are worn out, you may save money by trying the repair yourself &mdash; and the rubber is made by Goodyear! They work on both dress shoes as well as boots.</p> <h2>5. Expensive Leather</h2> <p>It's upsetting to spend a lot of money on leather shoes only to scuff or scratch them. That is why you might try this <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000XJRYQ6/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B000XJRYQ6&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=IYMJ7NIS2CSBUYEV">leather repair product</a>. You can even mix your own color. It also works on the couch, other furniture, car seats, coats, etc.</p> <h2>6. Sweater Saver</h2> <p>Ever <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jWGtvznk11s">snag a favorite sweater</a>, and put a hole in it? Don't worry, you can fix it! What do you need? Just a simple sewing needle for a small hole, or a crochet needle for a larger one.</p> <h2>7. Stuck Zipper</h2> <p>This hint could not be cheaper. Where is that #2 pencil? First try rubbing the pencil on the zipper (the lead may lubricate it enough for it to work). If it is more complicated, check out this video for <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2GdKGMBIl-o">un-sticking a zipper</a>.</p> <h2>8. Eyeglass Repairs</h2> <p>We even take our eyeglass repair kit with us on vacations &mdash; it is <em>that</em> handy. It can be really miserable to lose a screw in your glasses and be nowhere near an optometrist. This little <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000H3Q2FC/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B000H3Q2FC&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=CYVDSZR5ZFQCAE7Y">eyeglass repair kit</a> is inexpensive and easy to pack.</p> <h2>9. Deodorant Smudges</h2> <p>I seem to pull this move most of the time when I am wearing black, which is just peachy because then it <em>really</em> stands out. Try dampening a washcloth or towel, wring it out really well, and gently brush off the smudge. Don't use a paper towel, which will just make matters worse.</p> <h2>10. Pilly Sweater</h2> <p>Sometimes I fail to notice that my sweaters have pills. You know what I mean &mdash; the little fuzzy balls under your arms or along side seams. It looks pretty crummy. I love this <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0034BV6KA/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B0034BV6KA&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=BQOXTHGDOVBPO7CV">sweater shaver</a>, which gently removes those furry things and has never caused any harm to my favorite sweaters.</p> <h2>11. Lunch Disaster</h2> <p>I shouldn't be allowed to ever eat mustard, which usually ends up on me, not in me. My husband, who is a laundry wizard, bought me these nifty little <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00EDW2JC8/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B00EDW2JC8&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=RQBO5IU4VFWSDD7G">stain wipes</a>. They fit easily into my purse and will tide me over (pun intended) until the clothing can be properly washed.</p> <h2>12. Hem on the Loose</h2> <p>Raid the office supply cabinet. Got packing tape? That will hold that hem until you can get it fixed properly. Don't be tempted to get out your stapler, which will damage the fabric.</p> <h2>13. Lint No More</h2> <p>My dogs have white fur. I like to wear black. See the problem? I buy lint brushes by the three-pack, but for the office, I love these <a href="http://www.amazon.com/Brushes-Travel-Compact-Purse-Pocket/dp/B005AJOB56/ref=sr_1_10?s=hpc&amp;ie=UTF8&amp;qid=1430191289&amp;sr=1-10&amp;keywords=lint+brushes">mini lint rollers</a> that fit in my desk or tote bag.</p> <h2>14. Sneaker Separation</h2> <p>This hint isn't that quick, since your shoes will need to dry at least overnight, but it's a good one. I wear my sneakers until the bitter end, so I was disappointed when a fairly new pair started &quot;flapping&quot; in the soles. They were otherwise in good shape and I didn't want to part with them just yet. <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002L9AL84/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B002L9AL84&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=3EDZ5PO4QAUIL2EE">Shoe Goo </a>to the rescue! My handy husband squeezed out a layer between the flapping soles and the shoes, let dry overnight, and the shoes were almost as good as new. It is also waterproof and really inexpensive. It also works on broken high heels.</p> <h2>15. The Last Resort</h2> <p>Buy <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00CCG97WW/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B00CCG97WW&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=6WOICH2Q2YK45DMD">assorted safety pins</a>. Thank me later.</p> <p><em>What are your favorite, reliable, cheap sartorial save-the-dayers?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/marla-walters">Marla Walters</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-quick-clothing-and-shoe-repair-fixes-you-should-own">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-easy-diy-car-repairs-to-save-big">8 Easy DIY Car Repairs to Save Big</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-diy-dog-toys-you-can-make-for-pennies">10 DIY Dog Toys You Can Make for Pennies</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-attractive-standing-desks-you-can-actually-afford">11 Attractive Standing Desks You Can Actually Afford</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-baking-soda-took-my-bathroom-from-yuck-to-yes">How Baking Soda Took My Bathroom from “Yuck” to Yes!</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-surprisingly-valuable-uses-for-a-penny">15 Surprisingly Valuable Uses for a Penny</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Life Hacks DIY clothes mending repairs shoes Tue, 12 May 2015 21:00:10 +0000 Marla Walters 1414198 at http://www.wisebread.com 7 Basic Sewing Tricks That Will Save You Money http://www.wisebread.com/7-basic-sewing-tricks-that-will-save-you-money <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/7-basic-sewing-tricks-that-will-save-you-money" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_000023158354.jpg" alt="hands sewing button" title="hands sewing button" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>You know those <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00CQR6C3O/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B00CQR6C3O&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=TX6XFCOGHQV62HNZ">little sewing kits</a> you can buy at the grocery store? They're definitely worth the money when you consider how they might save your wardrobe. Back in the day, when a button would fall off a shirt or a hem would tear, it didn't always mean buying a new shirt or pants. Instead, people repaired clothing by hand to wear for years to come. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/make-your-clothing-fit-perfectly-with-these-10-no-sew-fixes?ref=seealso">Make Your Clothes Fit Perfectly With These 10 No Sew Fixes</a>)</p> <p>Here are a few invaluable mending techniques &mdash; and specific clothing fixes &mdash; that don't require a sewing machine.</p> <h2>Running Stitch</h2> <p><iframe width="605" height="340" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/k6657ZhHWgI?rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <p>The <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k6657ZhHWgI&amp;spfreload=10">running stitch</a> (or straight stitch) is the easiest to learn, so it's worth adding to your repertoire. This stitch is basically under and over the fabric throughout the whole line of what you're stitching. You can use it to fasten most any two pieces of fabric together with good results. Under then over, under then over.</p> <h2>Whip Stitch</h2> <p><iframe width="605" height="340" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/v9kGyZDWZcA?rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <p>I first became familiar with a <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v9kGyZDWZcA&amp;spfreload=10">whip stitch</a> on <em>Grey's Anatomy</em>. Unfortunately, I won't be showing you how to use this skill in the human body, however useful that might be. After pinning together the fabric you plan to stitch, you drive through both and whip around the edge before come up again through the bottom at the same level where you first stitch rests. Continue until you've finished your piece, then tie off.</p> <h2>Tie Off</h2> <p><iframe width="605" height="340" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/AhEUqBSgwjI?rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <p>Along with stitching, it's key to know how to <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AhEUqBSgwjI&amp;spfreload=10">tie off&nbsp;sewing projects</a> so they'll stay strong and secure. The maneuver reminds me of <a href="http://www.offroad-ed.com/images/drawings/atv_turn_k_maneuver.jpg">making a K-turn</a>&nbsp;while driving. You'll stitch up through your fabric, then back down right next to where you started &mdash; leaving some loose thread. Then one more stitch through the back that you'll resolve back down through the loop you created to tie off into a knot before cutting free.</p> <h2>Sew a Button</h2> <p><iframe width="605" height="340" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/rQRq--7InTE?rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <p>Learning how to <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rQRq--7InTE&amp;spfreload=10">sew a button</a> back onto a shirt is easy. First, thread your needle so you have a double thread to work with. Use a couple straight pins to create space for a shank. Stitching from behind your fabric, work through that first button hole and then choose either a straight or cross pattern through the button a few times before winding thread around the base to create that shank. Then, stitch to the back of your fabric again and knot to fasten.</p> <h2>Sew a Hem</h2> <p><iframe width="605" height="340" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/tMqK-fNrCrM?rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <p>You'll find hems on most any piece of clothing you own, so it's good to know how to <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tMqK-fNrCrM&amp;spfreload=10">sew hems up</a> when they get loose. First, iron your hem flat back to its original allowance. Then &mdash; moving from left to right &mdash; use a catch stitch to work your way diagonally down the hem to fasten. This technique works well on most thick apparel fabrics, but you can also use a straight stitch if you're more comfortable. For a super easy fix, try <a href="http://www.amazon.com:80url=search-alias%3Daps&amp;amp;field-keywords=iron+on+hemming+tape/?_encoding=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;linkCode=ur2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=YI7KFVGET6SCUJGL">iron-on hemming tape</a>, which I've use on anything from clothing items to DIY curtains.</p> <h2>Sew a Hole</h2> <p><iframe width="605" height="340" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/0sal9F4RXeY?rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <p>I get tiny holes in my clothes all the time. To <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0sal9F4RXeY&amp;spfreload=10">sew holes shut</a>, start by matching thread to your garment. Then knot the end of your string or fix to your fabric using a few loop stitches. Working from the top of your project, sew the hole shut by moving from one side of the hole to the other. It's actually quite intuitive, you're just closing it back up again. Tie off to finish.</p> <h2>Patch Jeans</h2> <p><iframe width="605" height="340" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ohDDHxZ-a3w?rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <p>You can iron a patch onto jeans to fix tears and holes, but this <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ohDDHxZ-a3w&amp;spfreload=10">sewn patch alternative</a> allows you to be more creative with fabric choices. Start by measuring your hole and cut your patch so it more than covers the area. Iron the edges of the patch so they're clean, then fix it to the jeans with straight pins. Using color thread that matches the patch, start sewing from a corner with a running stitch technique until you work your way around the entire patch. Knot to finish.</p> <p><em>What are your go-to mending techniques? Please share in comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/ashley-marcin">Ashley Marcin</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-basic-sewing-tricks-that-will-save-you-money">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-12"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/13-diy-clothing-projects-for-men">13 DIY Clothing Projects for Men</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/make-your-clothing-fit-perfectly-with-these-10-no-sew-fixes">Make Your Clothing Fit Perfectly With These 10 No-Sew Fixes</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-ways-to-recycle-and-reuse-old-t-shirts">15 Ways to Recycle and Reuse Old T-shirts</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/19-ways-to-reuse-old-towels">19 Ways to Reuse Old Towels</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-smart-uses-for-safety-pins">12 Smart Uses for Safety Pins</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> DIY Style mending needle and thread patching sewing Mon, 09 Mar 2015 17:00:10 +0000 Ashley Marcin 1324572 at http://www.wisebread.com To Buy or Not to Buy? Criteria for Thrift-Store Clothes Shopping http://www.wisebread.com/to-buy-or-not-to-buy-criteria-for-thrift-store-clothes-shopping <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/to-buy-or-not-to-buy-criteria-for-thrift-store-clothes-shopping" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/2723030157_977fe0c9e4_z.jpg" alt="thrift store" title="thrift store" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="167" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>It's a lot of fun to shop at a thrift store. There are a lot of clothes that are <em>almost</em> great. Here are my tips for separating the &quot;buy it&quot; from the &quot;leave it&quot; items. It doesn&rsquo;t matter if it is the bargain of the century, if it&rsquo;s just going to sit in your closet because it needs some type of mending that you'll never get to. Here are some of the frequent problems I&rsquo;ve encountered, along with my suggestions. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-to-look-for-every-time-you-visit-a-thrift-store">10 Things to Look for Every Time You Visit a Thrift Store</a>)</p> <h3>Zippers</h3> <p>If a zipper doesn&rsquo;t work, I&rsquo;d leave the item behind. I find zippers to be tricky to replace, and a new zipper runs about $7.</p> <h3>Buttons</h3> <p>Missing a button? Check the inside seams of the garment. Usually, you will find a spare. If not, see if you can rob a button from the bottom of the shirt, or from a cuff, and use that in the missing button&rsquo;s place. Do you have a button jar at home where you might find a match? Unless the buttons are extremely unusual, you can probably find a close replacement at a fabric store. I&rsquo;d take a chance on buying it. If you don&rsquo;t know how to sew on a button, here is a helpful link: <a href="http://www.wikihow.com/Sew-a-Button">How to Sew a Button</a></p> <h3>Collars</h3> <p>It is frustrating when the rest of the garment is in great shape, but the collar is frayed. I think these are a lot more trouble than they are worth. Leave it behind.</p> <h3>Stains</h3> <p>Unfortunately, most of them are not going to come out. In all probability, the previous owner tried hard, already. I had a friend who would always say, &ldquo;I&rsquo;ll just put an appliqué&rsquo; over it.&rdquo; I think that works for jeans, but nothing else. In most cases, it&rsquo;s pretty obvious. I&rsquo;d leave it behind.</p> <h3>Rips</h3> <p>As a rule, if the threads of the fabric have been ripped, that&rsquo;s a tough repair. However, if the rip is in a seam, you can probably make this repair easily if you have a sewing machine. I&rsquo;d take a chance.</p> <h3>Holes</h3> <p>If the fabric has a pattern (for instance, a plaid) you can probably make this repair. For a solid fabric, it will be too obvious. Below are photos of a wool kilt, unfortunately discovered by moths. To make a similar repair, cut a piece of the fabric from the hem or a seam. Pin the &ldquo;patch&rdquo; piece to the inside of the garment and hand-stitch (of course using appropriate thread color).</p> <p><img alt="" src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u11/KiltFront.jpg" /></p> <p><img alt="" src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u11/KiltBack.jpg" /></p> <h3>Hems</h3> <p>Too long? Easy fix. Just turn up the edge and stitch. Too short? Check the existing hem. Can you let it out a little? Take a look at the line, though, that is revealed when you let down a hem. The old hemline may be too obvious. Sometimes, you can use the steam setting on your iron to get the old hemline out.</p> <h3>Odor</h3> <p>Go ahead, give it the sniff test. If there is odor, it is possible to get it out. It might take a lot of effort and multiple washings, though, so you will need to decide whether you think it will be worth your time, effort, and investment in additional laundering supplies. Because I discovered dormant body odor when I steam-ironed a cotton blouse I found, I turned my husband (a.k.a., Der Stain-meister, in our house) loose on it. He did plenty of Internet research, and tried most of the remedies sworn by online:</p> <ul> <li>paste of 20 Mule Team Borax</li> <li>soak in hydrogen peroxide</li> <li><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/254-uses-for-vinegar-and-counting">vinegar</a> soak and after-wash rinse</li> <li>baking soda paste</li> <li>ammonia in the wash water</li> </ul> <p>Many of these things seemed to help, incrementally (the 20 Mule Team Borax paste and the hydrogen peroxide soak, most notable among them). But what finally removed the last traces of body odor, even under the steam iron, was when he sprayed the armpits of the garment with a 50/50 dilution of rubbing alcohol and water, then let the blouse <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/line-drying-your-laundry-frugal-or-foolish">line-dry</a>. He says it helps to understand that body odor is caused by bacteria, so killing bacteria without damaging the garment is the trick. Since that episode, he has seen recommendations he would like to try on the next problem garment: Cascade in the wash water, a can of Coca-Cola in the wash water (not Diet Coke), and a spray of Antibacterial Febreeze. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-things-in-your-kitchen-that-get-rid-of-bad-smells-naturally">6 Things in Your Kitchen That Get Rid of Bad Smells Naturally</a>)</p> <h3>Linings</h3> <p>If a coat is in otherwise good shape, you can re-line it, although it is not easy. Home sewers know the challenges (slippery fabric, tricky fit). For a price, you may find a seamstress or tailor who will take on the challenge. Be aware, though, that you may pay as much or more for a lining as you did for the entire coat.</p> <h3>Fit</h3> <p>For pants, either they fit, or they don&rsquo;t. Leave them behind if they don&rsquo;t. It takes an extremely skilled tailor to make a pair of pants fit properly. A dress has more possibilities. You may be able to take it in if it&rsquo;s too big. Yesterday I found a sleeveless dress that is a size too big, but I could tell that taking in a half-inch on each armhole would be perfect. If something is too tight, do not play the &ldquo;if I just lose five pounds&rdquo; game. The odds are that the clothing will just languish your closet, taking up valuable space.</p> <p>My last tip: check the washing instructions. Be realistic. I personally no longer purchase clothing that has to be dry-cleaned. I never liked items that had to be hand-washed, or &ldquo;blocked,&rdquo; like sweaters. If you know you will put off cleaning, and therefore wearing this item, it&rsquo;s a waste of your money.</p> <p>Happy hunting.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/marla-walters">Marla Walters</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/to-buy-or-not-to-buy-criteria-for-thrift-store-clothes-shopping">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-best-deals-in-every-thrift-store">The 5 Best Deals in Every Thrift Store</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-ultimate-thrift-store-how-far-will-you-go-for-a-bargain">The Ultimate Thrift Store: How Far Will You Go for a Bargain?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-sneaky-store-perks-that-make-you-overspend">4 Sneaky Store Perks That Make You Overspend</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-reasons-you-should-splurge-on-experiences-not-things">4 Reasons You Should Splurge on Experiences, Not Things</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-to-spot-and-avoid-a-fake-sale">4 Ways to Spot and Avoid a Fake Sale</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Shopping mending thrift store used clothing Thu, 28 Jan 2010 17:00:02 +0000 Marla Walters 4929 at http://www.wisebread.com