car repairs http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/11899/all en-US 8 Simple Auto Repairs That Save Big Bucks in the Long Haul http://www.wisebread.com/8-simple-auto-repairs-that-save-big-bucks-in-the-long-haul <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/8-simple-auto-repairs-that-save-big-bucks-in-the-long-haul" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/5463666587_e9033a7580_z.jpg" alt="working on car" title="working on car" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="200" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>There you are, tooling down the Miracle Mile in the car of your dreams, letting the whole world drink in the spectacle that is the awesome you, when, BAM! A red warning light on the dash rains all over your parade. You wonder, as a typical human being, is this something I can ignore and perhaps it will go away? Is it really such big deal? (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-simple-tips-to-keep-your-car-running-longer">6 Simple Tips to Keep Your Car Running Longer</a>)</p> <p>Thankfully, the truth is that pretty often, that little red light isn't all that dire; the whole idea behind the computerized problem detection systems built into new cars is to warn you <em>before</em> the problems require big and expensive fixes. There are also other sensory warnings that should clue you into the fact that something's wrong, like wheel shimmy or squealing brakes.</p> <p>The little nuances can become bigger issues if you ignore them, though. So don't put a piece of duct tape over the red problem light; embrace it. Here are eight minor repairs that warrant your immediate attention, because the alternative is to pay big bucks in the near future to repair the damage that ignoring the little ones has caused. And while you're at it, be sure to search for <a href="http://dealnews.com/c238/Home-Garden/Automotive?eref=wisebread">automotive deals</a> (like this <a href="http://dealnews.com/Advance-Auto-Parts-coupons-20-off-no-minimum-10-off-30-more-/591823.html?eref=wisebread">series of Advance Auto Parts coupons</a>) that might make any DIY tasks easier to swallow budget-wise too.</p> <h2>1. Replace the Oxygen Sensor</h2> <p>The oxygen sensor in your car monitors your engine's, well, oxygen intake. It can determine if the engine is running too rich with too much gas in the engine or too lean with not enough gas in the mix. This sensor allows the engine's computer to adjust the fuel mixture for efficiency, and this sensor is the number one reason for your &quot;check engine&quot; light to come on. To repair or replace your oxygen sensor will set you back $246.39, according to CarMD.com. This is a small price to pay the world of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/when-diy-car-repair-costs-more">car repairs</a> today.</p> <p>If you ignore or delay the oxygen sensor in your engine your car could lose up to 40% of its gas mileage, and at $4 gas, that cost can add up quickly. Malfunction of this sensor can also cause power loss, make your vehicle slow to accelerate, and eventually foul your spark plugs and your catalytic converter. The price to replace a converter alone can reach $3,500 because precious metals are used in its construction: platinum, palladium, rhodium, even gold. You <em>really</em> don't want to replace your converter.</p> <h2>2. Fix Windshield Bruises</h2> <p>You catch a stone from a passing gravel truck and whoops &mdash; you have a very small, perhaps star-shaped ding in your windshield. It doesn't interfere with your vision, so what's the problem? The problem is that, once a small crack is made in the windshield, it threatens to grow and can race entirely across your windshield, obscuring your vision and ability to operate your vehicle safely.</p> <p>Luckily, there is a thriving window glass industry whose specialist can easily fix small cracks in a windshield using a transparent epoxy, usually for under $100. It can be done wherever your car is, too; there's no need to take it to the shop. And better news, many insurance companies will pay for the repair, rather than have you wait until you need an entire new windshield, which could cost upwards of $500 or more.</p> <h2>3. Replace Spark Plugs</h2> <p>Spark plugs ignite the fuel mixture in the combustion chamber of your engine. When they become fouled or wear out, they no longer fire at the proper time or at all. This malfunction can cause your engine to idle roughly, hesitate, or surge. It can also result in lost power and acceleration. A blown spark plug can even result in raw gas being fed to the catalytic converter, which could cause it to fail prematurely. Spark plugs that are faulty can also result in your vehicle failing state pollution testing, bringing along all the hassles that entails.</p> <p>A new set of spark plugs and spark plug wires will set you back a mere $314.67, according to <a href="http://corp.carmd.com/">CarMD.com</a>; that's not much in light of the cost of a new converter and the waste of fuel.</p> <h2>4. Balance Your Tires</h2> <p>If you've ever driven a car that made you feel like your were slithering down the road instead of coasting, you know what it feels like to have tires that are out of balance. This unpleasant sensation isn't the only downside to this condition, however. Unbalanced tires can cause uneven wear on your tires, and a new set of tires for your favorite ride can easily reach $400 or more.</p> <p>The shimmy can also put additional wear on your car's suspension system, eventually necessitating replacement of shocks and struts, which are way more costly than a simple tire balancing. Unbalanced tires also compromise your car's handling, which can result in having to repair dents in the bumpers or worse.</p> <h2>5. Replace the PCV Valve and Hose</h2> <p>As your car burns gasoline, some of the fumes escape around the cylinder and reach the crankcase. The PCV valve routes this gas back into the combustion system, where it can be burned to minimize pollution and maximize mileage. A faulty PCV valve allows pressure to build up in the crankcase and drives oil out through the seals and gaskets.</p> <p>Replacement of the valve and hose costs an average of $102.47. The alternatives &mdash; in addition to dealing with oil leaks &mdash; is a motor that: idles roughly or even stalls; gets poorer gas mileage; accelerates sluggishly; and lacks proper power. Your PCV valve and hose can also affect the lifetime of your oil, causing it to become more viscous. This then comes a threat to the really expensive parts of your engine, such as the cylinder walls, properly lubricated.</p> <h2>6. Replace the Thermostat</h2> <p>The thermostat in your car senses the temperature of your engine, and when it gets hot, it signals the coolant to flow through your engine block. Your engine needs to run hot enough to efficiently burn fuel and keep oil flowing, but not so hot that it expands beyond expectations.</p> <p>If you ignore your thermostat you run the risk of boiling off your coolant, blowing a cylinder head gasket, or even cracking a head. These are all pricey problems you really don't want to face.</p> <h2>7. Replace EVAP Vacuum Hoses</h2> <p>The evaporative emissions system is part pollution control and part mileage maximizing. As gas naturally evaporates from your tank and fuel system, the EVAP prevents these vapors from escaping directly into the atmosphere. The hoses gather the vapors and routes them to a storage container and into the intake manifold while the engine is in engaged. There, these fumes are burned off.</p> <p>Ignore the EVAP red light and you'll find your engine may hesitate, stall, idle roughly or rapidly, and lose mileage. The average $95.83 charge for replacing the hoses will quickly pay off in increased performance.</p> <h2>8. Replace Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor (ECT)</h2> <p>Your power train control module (PCM) &mdash; the computer at the heart of your engine's operation &mdash; adjusts the composition of air and gas that enters the combustion chamber depending on the temperature at which the engine is operating. The engine coolant temperature sensor is the device that tells the power train control module what the internal temperature of the engine is. The PCM then determines the ratio of the fuel mixture, advance or delay the spark, increase the cooling fan speed, and other steps to fine-tune operations. Replacing the ECT will set you back about $150.62.</p> <p>If this sensor quits working properly, your PCM can assume that the engine is running cool and thusly richen the fuel mixture unnecessarily, wasting gas and putting more stress on the catalytic converter. This could suck many dollars out of your wallet.</p> <p>We'd all love to have a car that never needed any attention or maintenance beyond filling it with liquid gold. But the fact is that like any machine, your car will show signs of wear, and occasionally need some TLC to keep it running up to snuff. The trick is to tend to its needs early, while the problems are still small. And if you're lucky, you might just find an <a href="http://dealnews.com/c238/Home-Garden/Automotive?eref=wisebread">automotive deal</a> that makes it all the easier to address.</p> <p><em>This is a guest post by </em><a href="http://dealnews.com"><em>Dealnews</em></a><em>.</em></p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-blog-teaser"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Here are 8 minor repairs to do now before the damage costs you big bucks down the road. </div> </div> </div> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dealnews">Dealnews</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-simple-auto-repairs-that-save-big-bucks-in-the-long-haul">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/when-diy-car-repair-costs-more">When DIY Car Repair Costs More</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/remove-car-dents-quickly-and-cheaply">Remove Car Dents Quickly and Cheaply</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/repair-the-car-or-spend-the-cash">Repair the Car or Spend the Cash?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-slick-tools-to-save-money-on-car-repairs">6 Slick Tools to Save Money on Car Repairs</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/removing-car-scratches-the-revenge-of-the-frugal-body-shop">Removing Car Scratches: The Revenge of the Frugal Body Shop</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Cars and Transportation car repairs cost analysis Wed, 18 Jul 2012 10:24:14 +0000 Dealnews 942160 at http://www.wisebread.com When DIY Car Repair Costs More http://www.wisebread.com/when-diy-car-repair-costs-more <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/when-diy-car-repair-costs-more" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/2973786096_d679da09f8_z.jpg" alt="oil drain" title="oil drain" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="179" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>There are two reasons people take on do-it-yourself projects: 1) The person is crafty, handy, or otherwise skilled, and/or 2) The person is looking to save money.</p> <p>If you fall exclusively into the &quot;saving money&quot; category, you probably realized long ago that DIY anything often takes a lot more time and effort than it is sometimes worth. But did you also know that DIY sometimes actually costs more money? (See also: <a title="Like DIY? Avoid These 10 Costly Mistakes" href="http://www.wisebread.com/like-diy-avoid-these-ten-costly-mistakes">Like DIY? Avoid These 10 Costly Mistakes</a>)</p> <p>For instance, consider basic car repair. Dealnews recently wrote <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/save-on-car-maintenance-with-these-5-diy-tips" title="Save on Car Maintenance">Save on Car Maintenance With These 5 DIY Tips</a>. Specifically, the article advises that you repair and replace your own windshield wiper blades, fuses, air filter, car battery, oil, and oil filter. But if the only reason you are doing these things yourself is to save money, you may be spending more money than you otherwise would.</p> <p>Recently, my cousin who is a mechanic, performed some maintenance on my car and I got the chance to help with a few of these &quot;DIY&quot; tasks. I can attest that these tasks may actually cost you more than if you had had the work performed by a professional. (My cousin also did a lot of much more skilled work, which, on the whole, saved us roughly $800.) Check out my three cost comparisons below.</p> <h2>Oil Change</h2> <p>Several of my local car repair shops either have daily specials (if you come in between certain hours) or they frequently mail coupons for $19.99 oil changes. If you want synthetic oil you'll pay about $20 more. So how much does it cost if you do it yourself? At our local Target store the cost is about $5.50 per quart of regular oil and about $7.50 per quart of synthetic oil. My Mitsubishi Galant (a standard 4-door sedan) takes 5 quarts of oil. Add an additional $5-8 for an oil filter and suddenly the cost is over $30 &mdash; nearly $10 more than I would have paid had I brought it to a shop.</p> <h2>Windshield Wipers</h2> <p>I paid $10.99/windshield wiper for a total of $20 (plus tax) for my Galant. Unfortunately, one of the wipers was faulty which will require an extra trip back to the store &mdash; where they will hopefully exchange my wiper. (I've already trashed the packaging.) If not, I'll have paid $30. Yet, last month on our other car (an Accord), we used a <a title="5 Awesome Alternatives to Groupon" href="http://www.tkqlhce.com/click-2822544-10817658">Groupon</a> for a tire rotation, oil change, new wiper blades, and system check for only $34. Had I purchased two of the Groupons, I would have spent $6 less than I did doing the car repair myself.</p> <h2>Car Battery</h2> <p>I didn't need a new battery this maintenance-go-round, but my cousin quoted me the price and it was only $15 cheaper than the price of the battery I had installed last winter. Call around and get price quotes as some of the companies can buy in bulk at a much better rate than you will ever get yourself. And if you do the battery replacement yourself, you risk temporarily losing access to your radio until you place a 30-minute call to the dealer to find out your radio code (I speak from experience about the radio code issue).</p> <p><strong>Big Caveat:</strong> There will always be DIY car repair that will save you money. For example, the handle to my glove compartment recently broke. The repair shop was going to have to order a $256 new part and also charge $40 in labor; but they advised me of a site called car-parts.com where I could likely find the part for cheaper. For $32, including shipping, I got an entire used glove box and installed it myself in less than 20 minutes.</p> <p>There are times when DIY saves you money, but, like all projects, ensure that you actually run the cost comparisons instead of assuming DIY always means cheaper services.</p> <p><em>Have you ever done car repair yourself? Did you actually save money?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/elizabeth-lang">Elizabeth Lang</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/when-diy-car-repair-costs-more">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/remove-car-dents-quickly-and-cheaply">Remove Car Dents Quickly and Cheaply</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-slick-tools-to-save-money-on-car-repairs">6 Slick Tools to Save Money on Car Repairs</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/removing-car-scratches-the-revenge-of-the-frugal-body-shop">Removing Car Scratches: The Revenge of the Frugal Body Shop</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-simple-auto-repairs-that-save-big-bucks-in-the-long-haul">8 Simple Auto Repairs That Save Big Bucks in the Long Haul</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/repair-the-car-or-spend-the-cash">Repair the Car or Spend the Cash?</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Cars and Transportation DIY car repairs cost analysis Wed, 21 Sep 2011 10:00:29 +0000 Elizabeth Lang 713545 at http://www.wisebread.com Repair the Car or Spend the Cash? http://www.wisebread.com/repair-the-car-or-spend-the-cash <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/repair-the-car-or-spend-the-cash" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/fender_bender.jpg" alt="Fender bender" title="Fender bender" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="172" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Over the past few months, I've been seeing cars in various states of disrepair. Big dents, dings, damaged windows and doors, bumpers scraping along the ground, you name it. And it got me scratching my head and wondering...are people choosing to take the insurance money and spend it on something other than the car repair? (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/remove-car-dents-quickly-and-cheaply">Remove Car Dents Quickly and Cheaply</a>)</p> <p>Now obviously, some of these cars were just old and in need of some major TLC. But in the company car park alone I've seen several cars that are from 2007 or after, and they have big bad dents and other major pieces of bodywork damage.</p> <p>Clearly, these cars were involved in some kind of accident. Be it with another car, a lamp post, a wall, or an angry Transformer, something went wrong. Knowing that most good citizens have auto insurance coverage, I also know that these people would have received some kind of payment to have the car fixed whether it was their fault or not. I got sideswiped a few years ago, and the car took $4,500 worth of damage. I was given two options...choosing a recommended repair shop to deal directly with my auto insurance company, and I would pay the deductible. Or I could get a check based on the price the adjuster believed it would cost to have repaired, minus the deductible.</p> <p>At the time, I chose the first option. I needed the car fixed immediately. I wasn't ready to start calling around for competitive bids, and I also knew that the place chosen by my auto insurance company would be held accountable by them if the repair was not done well.</p> <p>But I got to thinking. I wonder...</p> <h3>How many say &quot;I can live with the dent; I'd much rather have the cash&quot;?</h3> <p>It makes all kinds of sense to me. Some people don't care about the resale value of the car or how it looks. It's a mode of transport that gets them from home to work, shopping, or the ball game. It's no big deal if it's not perfect, and a few thousand dollars is way more important than removing a dent from the door or fixing a crunched-up bumper.</p> <p>After that thought, I noticed damaged cars everywhere. I counted 23 in the parking lot at Target last week, and it was not a busy shopping day. True, some may have been very recently damaged and awaiting repair, but I saw a couple of major dents that had been very poorly spray-painted and a bumper that had been freshly covered with stickers. Clearly, these were not people who took the insurance money for the car repair. They probably kept the cash.</p> <h3>Is it legal to keep the cash, and are there consequences?</h3> <p>This gets us into some muddy waters. I did some digging on several auto repair sites, forums, insurance blogs, and so on. It seems that many people do, in fact, opt to cash the check and leave their vehicle in a state of disrepair. But this does have some ramifications.</p> <p>First, if you don't own the car outright (and that's a large majority of us), then the bank is the lienholder, and the money for the repair is to keep the car in good condition until the loan has been paid off. They want the car to be repaired, and they have every right to see that you make good on the repair. What's more, if the check is made out to both you and the lienholder, and you cash it, you could be liable for fraud charges and even jail time!</p> <p>If you own the car outright, it's much easier to decide to take the cash and spend it on bills, a new TV, or anything else. I have read several stories on <a href="http://www.autorepairserviceguidemarietta.com/blog/auto-a-c-repair/can-i-cash-and-keep-the-money-from-an-auto-insurance-co-made-out-to-me-and-the-lien-holder">Auto Repair Service Guide</a> of people who did just that:</p> <p>Thorax (a username, I believe) said, &quot;Yes you can do that.. I got about 800 for a scratch on my bumper, you couldn&rsquo;t really even see it unless you knew it was there or got up close&hellip; I decided to say screw it and keep the money&hellip;&quot;</p> <p>And Young Ian also chimed in, saying, &quot;Yep, you can cash it. My mom did the same thing some guy hit our salvage title prizm and she got like a thousand dollars for it. It was mainly cosmetic, she used it to pay bills. We still have a pretty ugly side, but she got a thousand bucks!&quot;</p> <h3>Now, over to you...</h3> <p>If you get in an accident and your car receives cosmetic damage, do you get it <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-to-find-a-reputable-mechanic">repaired</a>, or do you take the money and run? In these tough economic times, I can certainly see why many people would go for the latter option.</p> <p><em>References:</em></p> <ul> <li><a href="http://www.ehow.com/info_8254420_do-check-getting-car-fixed.html"><em>Do&nbsp;I&nbsp;Have to Spend My Insurance Check on&nbsp;Getting the Car Fixed?</em></a><em><br /> </em></li> <li><a href="http://www.autoinsurancetips.com/auto-insurance-claim-checks-repair-car-or-keep-cash"><em>Repair the Car or Keep the Cash?</em></a><em><br /> </em></li> <li><a href="http://www.carljohnsonautoservice.com/car-repair/do-i-have-to-repair-my-car-or-can-i-keep-the-insurance-cashcheck"><em>Do&nbsp;I Have to Repair the Car or Can I Keep the Insurance Cash/Check?</em></a></li> </ul> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/repair-the-car-or-spend-the-cash">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/when-to-drop-collision-coverage-on-your-car">When to drop collision coverage on your car</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/is-mechanical-breakdown-insurance-worth-it">Is Mechanical Breakdown Insurance Worth It?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-mistakes-to-avoid-when-shopping-for-car-insurance">6 Mistakes to Avoid When Shopping for Car Insurance</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-myths-about-car-insurance">5 Myths About Car Insurance</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-top-10-cheapest-cars-to-insure">The Top 10 Cheapest Cars to Insure</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Cars and Transportation Insurance car insurance car repairs spend insurance money Fri, 15 Jul 2011 10:36:22 +0000 Paul Michael 620800 at http://www.wisebread.com Back the Truck Up: How to Avoid Car Repair Rip-Offs http://www.wisebread.com/back-the-truck-up-how-to-avoid-car-repair-rip-offs <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/back-the-truck-up-how-to-avoid-car-repair-rip-offs" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_000003480641XSmall.jpg" alt="Auto mechanic" title="Auto mechanic" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="166" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>The colder temperatures and inclement weather may signal the need for a checkup at the mechanic shop. Auto repair shops are infamous for overcharging customers who don&rsquo;t know any better and only want their vehicles to operate reliably and safely. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/safety-tips-for-holiday-driving">Safety Tips for Holiday Driving</a>.)</p> <p>While not all shops deserve a bad reputation, there are quite a few with a history of taking people for more money than necessary. Just recently, my 2004 Kia acquired a hole in the exhaust system. The noise coming from the car resembled a loud motorcycle, and I was embarrassed every time I turned on the ignition. We finally had to break down and visit the repair shop for an estimate. We were told after a brief &quot;look-see-listen&quot; that the part alone would be close to $1,000 and with labor, we may face a bill of $1,300 or more. We made a scheduled appointment to bring the car back, and in the meantime consulted with a mechanic friend. He told us he thought he could repair the part rather than replace it, and eventually we only had to pay a total of $124 for the weld job. Thank goodness we had someone on our side.</p> <p>While not every mechanic is out to intentionally swindle a customer, there are still some precautionary measures one should take when dealing with <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-slick-tools-to-save-money-on-car-repairs">auto repair</a> companies in order to save money. Here are some tips to prevent being overcharged, underserviced, and scared into services you don&rsquo;t even need.</p> <h3>Find Reputable Shops</h3> <p>You want to select a mechanic shop that is licensed in the state and certified by the ASE or AAA. Get referrals from friends and family too.</p> <h3>Check It Out</h3> <p>When you get to the shop, check out the condition of the equipment in the garage, and how the garage looks in general. An outdated, unkempt garage may be a red flag for the competency and expectations of the shop. If you come across a shop owner who says he doesn't need the latest equipment to get the job done, you might want to consider finding someone else to do the work.</p> <h3>Refuse to Sign Blank Documents</h3> <p>For any type of work you plan on having done, make sure you only sign off on work orders that have specific job instructions and price estimates. Any work outside the scope of the original order should have to go through you first. Never sign any forms that are blank or that don&rsquo;t contain pertinent information.</p> <h3>Don&rsquo;t Fall for Dramatics</h3> <p>If you are told by the mechanic that essentially your car is on its last leg when you are pretty sure the problem is only minor, you should reconsider your choice in mechanics. If you are not mechanically savvy, find a friend who can accompany you to the appointment to make it less likely you&rsquo;ll get suckered into paying for services your vehicle doesn&rsquo;t need. Some unprofessional individuals will use scare tactics and &quot;family safety&quot; points to hook you for more services and money.</p> <h3>For Big Jobs, Consult with the Dealer</h3> <p>If you find that something major is wrong with your vehicle such as the emission system, it is a good idea to check back at the place you purchased the vehicle to find out about the <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/extended-car-warranties-three-things-to-know">warranty</a>. Some parts of vehicles' major systems are covered by long warranties, and in some cases, part replacement is required by law to be free.</p> <h3>Get a Second Opinion</h3> <p>After you have received a rough idea of how much it will cost to get your vehicle fully operational, it never hurts to get a second opinion. If you do seek another&rsquo;s advice, make sure to keep your lips zipped about your previous estimates and work order. You never want to influence your back-up opinion provider.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/tisha-tolar">Tisha Tolar</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/back-the-truck-up-how-to-avoid-car-repair-rip-offs">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-4"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/remove-car-dents-quickly-and-cheaply">Remove Car Dents Quickly and Cheaply</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/netspend-the-story-of-the-visa-debit-card-we-did-not-apply-for">netSpend: The Story of the Visa Debit Card We Did Not Apply For</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-vile-craigslist-scams-to-watch-out-for">8 Vile Craigslist Scams to Watch Out For</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/are-your-new-tires-really-6-year-old-ticking-time-bombs">Are your new tires really 6-year old ticking time-bombs?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-safe-is-craigslist">How Safe Is Craigslist?</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Cars and Transportation Consumer Affairs car repairs mechanics rip offs scams Tue, 07 Dec 2010 14:00:15 +0000 Tisha Tolar 359997 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Slick Tools to Save Money on Car Repairs http://www.wisebread.com/6-slick-tools-to-save-money-on-car-repairs <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-slick-tools-to-save-money-on-car-repairs" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/car repairs.jpg" alt="" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="188" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-link field-field-dealista-file"> <div class="field-label">Dealista MP3:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="http://media.blubrry.com/dealista/traffic.libsyn.com/dealista/dealista028_car_repairs.mp3" target="_blank">Dealista #28: How to Save Money on Car Repairs</a> </div> </div> </div> <p><em>This article shares tips from the newest episode of </em><a href="http://dealista.quickanddirtytips.com/"><em>Dealista</em></a><em>, our podcast that'll help you get more for less.</em></p> <p>It&rsquo;s happened to all of us &mdash; a car repair we didn&rsquo;t budget for, and that nearly left us cash-strapped or without transportation. It really doesn&rsquo;t have to be this way! These 6 tools are reliable and affordable, designed to help get car maintenance and repair costs under control and well under budget.</p> <h3>1. CarMD Diagnostic Tool</h3> <p><a href="http://www.carmd.com/">CarMD</a> is not the exact replica of the code readers used in fancier repair shops, but it can diagnose most any common car problem. Simply connect the $100 device to your car&rsquo;s connectors (instructions are included) and get data to help you know what&rsquo;s really going on with your car. You don&rsquo;t have to wait for an issue to arise before getting your money&rsquo;s worth out of this tool, however. It&rsquo;s also great for pre-trip inspections and making sure that your car is smog compliant! (You might also find it useful to get a read out on a car you haven&rsquo;t bought yet &mdash; before you drive it off the lot.)</p> <h3>2. Local Auto Supply Store</h3> <p>Thought they were only good for purchasing extra wiper blades and quarts of oil? Think again! There are many complimentary services available at most major car part suppliers (O&rsquo;Reilly&rsquo;s, Autozone, Advanced Auto, Pep Boys, etc.) that can help you out for little to nothing. Common offerings include starter checks, alternator checks, code reading, battery testing/charging, and tire checks. While it won&rsquo;t prevent you from having to go to the shop for a major repair, I&rsquo;ve used my local shop to help me decide whether I can go a few more miles on an already distressed battery, and they even loan out tools &mdash; the really expensive ones &mdash; for a refundable fee charged to your credit card. You can save big money at these places!</p> <h3>3. RepairPal</h3> <p>I absolutely love <a href="http://www.repairpal.com/">RepairPal</a>! When I&rsquo;m not using the web-based interface from home to get an accurate quote on what it will cost me to have a timing chain replaced, for example, I can use the accompanying smart phone app to get detailed info about what a repair should cost &mdash; before I head into the shop. It includes info on how much your repair will be parts vs. labor, and even gives you details of the common cost to perform maintenance by zip. If you&rsquo;re stuck on the road with a broken down vehicle, you can use the RepairPal app to contact a local repair shop directly, and armed with all the information about your car and specific repair, you can be sure you won&rsquo;t be taken at the mechanic&rsquo;s shop.</p> <h3>4. DriverSide</h3> <p><a href="http://www.driverside.com/">DriverSide</a> is another fantastic web resource, a community of drivers who care about their cars (but not in a weird way). You simply register your make and model to get automatic updates on recalls, service bulletins, and other news about your vehicle. You can ask questions of mechanics and even see how much parts will cost for your precious ride. It&rsquo;s the perfect all-in-one solution to car maintenance, and it&rsquo;s entirely free.</p> <h3>5. AllDataDIY</h3> <p>Do you feel ambitious? Like working on your own vehicle? If you&rsquo;re up to the challenge of performing your own car repairs, then <a href="http://www.alldatadiy.com/">AllDataDIY</a> may be the perfect solution for you. With just a minimal annual subscription fee, you can have access to all the data that a mechanic would need to perform all kinds of repairs and maintenance tasks for your particular vehicle. Loaded with diagrams, charts, parts detail, and recall info, you could do just about any job on your own &mdash; provided you have the patience, skills, and right tools. We&rsquo;ve used our subscription numerous times to do everything from simple rotor replacement to a major engine overhaul. (Homes with more than one vehicle may get a discount for buying additional subscriptions after the first.)</p> <h3>6. Craigslist</h3> <p>Perhaps the most useful of all the tools, <a href="http://www.craigslist.com/">Craigslist</a> has helped us to connect to all the things we just couldn&rsquo;t fit into our budget, otherwise. Whether we&rsquo;ve found quality used tires, a part-time moonlighting mechanic, or a tailgate for our pickup, we&rsquo;ve been able to hunt down and purchase for far less from Craigslist. With so many qualified professionals and parts dealers struggling in this economy, we&rsquo;ve found our odds of getting a competitive price for parts and labor to be much higher via the site, and it&rsquo;s always nice to meet new people with similar interests in DIY car care. If you haven&rsquo;t considered Craigslist for your parts or labor needs, add it to your resource list!</p> <p><em><a href="http://dealista.quickanddirtytips.com">Dealista</a> is a collaboration between Wise Bread and <a href="http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/">Quick and Dirty Tips</a>, the producer of popular podcasts such as <a href="http://grammar.quickanddirtytips.com/">Grammar Girl</a>, <a href="http://moneygirl.quickanddirtytips.com/">Money Girl</a>, <a href="http://winninginvestor.quickanddirtytips.com/">Winning Investor</a>, and <a href="http://mightymommy.quickanddirtytips.com/">Mighty Mommy</a>.</em></p> <p><em>If you enjoyed these tips you can find more in <a href="http://dealista.quickanddirtytips.com">our show's archive</a>.</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/linsey-knerl">Linsey Knerl</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-slick-tools-to-save-money-on-car-repairs">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-5"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/remove-car-dents-quickly-and-cheaply">Remove Car Dents Quickly and Cheaply</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/when-diy-car-repair-costs-more">When DIY Car Repair Costs More</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/removing-car-scratches-the-revenge-of-the-frugal-body-shop">Removing Car Scratches: The Revenge of the Frugal Body Shop</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/repair-the-car-or-spend-the-cash">Repair the Car or Spend the Cash?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-easy-diy-car-repairs-to-save-big">8 Easy DIY Car Repairs to Save Big</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Cars and Transportation DIY car repairs dealista Wed, 10 Mar 2010 14:00:01 +0000 Linsey Knerl 5706 at http://www.wisebread.com Removing Car Scratches: The Revenge of the Frugal Body Shop http://www.wisebread.com/removing-car-scratches-the-revenge-of-the-frugal-body-shop <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/removing-car-scratches-the-revenge-of-the-frugal-body-shop" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/3515869215_4d3cd4293d_z.jpg" alt="purple mustang" title="purple mustang" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="178" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>After the unexpected popularity of my <a title="Remove Car Dents Quickly and Cheaply" href="http://www.wisebread.com/remove-car-dents-quickly-and-cheaply">previous post on dents</a>, I thought it would be good to follow up with perhaps an even more annoying and prevalent form of car damage &mdash; scratches. We all get them, they really look awful and I have been on the hunt finding new and old techniques for removal.</p> <p>Once again, I can't vouch for the success of all of these as I have only tried a couple. And as always, the type of scratch and model/make of car will also vary the result you get. But they're always worth a try. Here we go...</p> <h3>1. Super glue, aluminum foil, grease wax and paint scrapings</h3> <p>OK, I admit it. I'm way too scared to try this one as I have a 6-month-old Civic and don't want to make my scratch look any worse. Plus, I don't think this one works with clear coat. But if you have an older model car and want to try it out, be my guest. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-slick-tools-to-save-money-on-car-repairs">6 Slick Tools to Save Money on&nbsp;Car Repairs</a>)</p> <h3>2. Rubbing compound and wax</h3> <p>Sorry, no video for this one but I got this from a mechanic and it's solid advice for minor scratches. I trust it 100%.</p> <ul> <li>Apply a polishing compound with the MILDEST abrasive to a damp sponge.</li> <li>Use a circular motion and buff the area until the scratches have gone. NOTE: Practice first on an unseen part of the car, maybe in the trunk.</li> <li>Wash the area completely with your usual wash-and-wax cleaner.</li> <li>Apply wax (liquid wax works best) to a sponge and buff the area, again in a circular motion.</li> <li>Using a soft towel, buff the wax away. The minor scratches should be history.</li> </ul> <h3>3. Car touch-up paint and rubbing compound</h3> <p>A similar version to No. 2, but for slightly deeper scratches. The full account with photographs can be found <a href="http://www.homeofsbc.com/Scratches/scratches.html">here</a> but the basic principle is this:</p> <ul> <li>Apply a layer of touch-up paint over the scratch.</li> <li>Remove excess with a sharp piece of plastic, after it has dried.</li> <li>Using an abrasive polish and a soft cloth (or buffing machine) begin buffing</li> <li>When all of the paint is removed, wash, wax and buff as usual. Not perfect, but a lot better than before.</li> </ul> <h3>4. Toothpaste?</h3> <p>Nope. Sorry, doesn't work. It didn't work on my CDs either. Another busted technique is Colored Car Wax, which will only mask the scratch for a while but it soon wears off. Of course, you can always splurge a little and buy a scratch/swirl remover. I found some good ones <a title="swirl removers, compounds and polishes" href="http://www.autogeek.net/swreandpo.html">at Autogeek</a>. Or better yet, just buy a complete rubber bra for the whole car! (By the way, that last one's not really my advice...I mean, c'mon...that's going a little overboard, yes?)</p> <p><img height="304" width="406" src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/wisebread_imce/fullbra.jpg" alt="full bra" title="full bra" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/removing-car-scratches-the-revenge-of-the-frugal-body-shop">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-6"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/remove-car-dents-quickly-and-cheaply">Remove Car Dents Quickly and Cheaply</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/when-diy-car-repair-costs-more">When DIY Car Repair Costs More</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-slick-tools-to-save-money-on-car-repairs">6 Slick Tools to Save Money on Car Repairs</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/repair-the-car-or-spend-the-cash">Repair the Car or Spend the Cash?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-easy-diy-car-repairs-to-save-big">8 Easy DIY Car Repairs to Save Big</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Cars and Transportation DIY car repairs remove scratches Mon, 23 Apr 2007 22:36:33 +0000 Paul Michael 549 at http://www.wisebread.com Remove Car Dents Quickly and Cheaply http://www.wisebread.com/remove-car-dents-quickly-and-cheaply <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/remove-car-dents-quickly-and-cheaply" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/000056468586.jpg" alt="" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Dents suck. And so does the cost to repair them. My wife's car has a ding in the door that's really been bugging me, and as a frugal shopper I wondered if smarter folks than myself have ever figured out a cheap way to repair dents. Good news...they have. (See also: <a title="car repairs" href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-slick-tools-to-save-money-on-car-repairs">6 Slick Tools to Save Money on Car Repairs</a>)</p> <p>After doing a lot of web browsing I found many ways. But I don't have the cash for my own electromagnet, or the skills to do paintless dent repair (look either of these up, they take time and money...and a lot of skill). No, I wanted a quick, cheap &quot;10 minutes or less&quot; solution. And I found two. Ladies and gentlemen...welcome to the two minute body-shop. The tips below are for dents. I have another post if you want to <a title="Removing Car Scratches" href="http://wisebread.com/removing-car-scratches-the-revenge-of-the-frugal-body-shop">repair scratches</a>.</p> <h2>1. Remove a dent with dry ice</h2> <p>You can find dry ice in many places these days, even your local grocery store. It's cheap too, around $2 or less for a pound (you can buy it in bulk online for even cheaper). All you do is <a title="How to Cure Car Dent with Dry Ice" href="http://www.metacafe.com/watch/yt-ab5PdrAIKeo/how_to_cure_car_dent_with_dry_ice/">touch the dry ice to the dent</a> for a few seconds and repeat the process until the dent is gone. Wear dry ice gloves though.</p> <p><embed height="345" width="400" name="Metacafe_yt-ab5PdrAIKeo" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" pluginspage="http://www.macromedia.com/go/getflashplayer" wmode="transparent" src="http://www.metacafe.com/fplayer/yt-ab5PdrAIKeo/how_to_cure_car_dent_with_dry_ice.swf"></embed></p> <h2>2. Remove a dent with a hairdryer and an air duster</h2> <p>I like this one even more, namely because an air duster and a hairdryer is readily accessible in most homes these days. A <a title="Remove Car Dent With Airduster" href="http://www.metacafe.com/watch/501379/remove_car_dent_with_airduster/">slightly different process</a>, but still very quick, cheap and easy.</p> <p><object height="390" width="480"> <param value="http://www.youtube.com/v/0oQpks0ZsUM?fs=1&amp;hl=en_US" name="movie" /> <param value="true" name="allowFullScreen" /> <param value="always" name="allowscriptaccess" /><embed height="390" width="480" allowfullscreen="true" allowscriptaccess="always" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" src="http://www.youtube.com/v/0oQpks0ZsUM?fs=1&amp;hl=en_US"></embed></object></p> <h2>3. Remove a dent with a lighter, aluminum foil and an air duster</h2> <p>Thanks to several WB readers for pointing <a title="Remove Car Dent With Lighter" href="http://www.metacafe.com/watch/963248/remove_car_dent_with_a_lighter/">this new addition</a> out. It's very similar to method #2, and please take note of the use of aluminum foil. I wouldn't want any of you to burn your paintwork. As you can see, and hear, this one works a treat.</p> <p><embed height="345" width="567" allowfullscreen="true" wmode="transparent" flashvars="id1=377458" allowscriptaccess="always" src="http://www.ebaumsworld.com/player.swf"></embed></p> <p>Use any one of these and you'll have an almost invisible fix in no time. Plus, you won't have to be without your car while it's in the shop and best of all, you won't have to spend a ton of cash on a repair. A frugal fix indeed.</p> <p><strong>UPDATE:</strong></p> <p>We like to give a complete picture here at Wise Bread. Well, since this article was posted several videos have come out that claim to debunk the methods, or give new ways to use them. You decide.</p> <p><embed height="345" width="400" src="http://www.metacafe.com/fplayer/yt-3fqNRIXUJlM/removing_dents_with_ice.swf" wmode="transparent" pluginspage="http://www.macromedia.com/go/getflashplayer" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" allowscriptaccess="always" name="Metacafe_yt-3fqNRIXUJlM"></embed></p> <p><iframe width="420" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/dnmJBzfboOI" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/remove-car-dents-quickly-and-cheaply">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-7"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/when-diy-car-repair-costs-more">When DIY Car Repair Costs More</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-slick-tools-to-save-money-on-car-repairs">6 Slick Tools to Save Money on Car Repairs</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/removing-car-scratches-the-revenge-of-the-frugal-body-shop">Removing Car Scratches: The Revenge of the Frugal Body Shop</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/repair-the-car-or-spend-the-cash">Repair the Car or Spend the Cash?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-easy-diy-car-repairs-to-save-big">8 Easy DIY Car Repairs to Save Big</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Cars and Transportation DIY car repairs Sat, 21 Apr 2007 03:22:59 +0000 Paul Michael 539 at http://www.wisebread.com