Education &amp; Training http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/12010/all en-US 4 Things You Need to Know About Deferring Student Loans http://www.wisebread.com/4-things-you-need-to-know-about-deferring-student-loans <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/4-things-you-need-to-know-about-deferring-student-loans" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-528499384.jpg" alt="Man learning about deferring student loans" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="142" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Finding a way to pause your student loan payment can be a lifesaver when your financial life goes sideways. And trust me, this can happen to anyone at any time.</p> <p>For me, the financial roller coaster ride started in June 2010. I was expecting our first child when my husband accepted a job in another state. I'd had to quit my teaching job when we moved, and I knew I was not going to be bringing in a paycheck for at least a year.</p> <p>On top of this reduction in income, we bought a house in our new city, but it took nearly a year to sell our old house. We were stuck paying two mortgages for 11 months.</p> <p>Between the two of us, my husband and I also had about $35,000 in outstanding federal student loan debt. To help get a better handle on our monthly budget, we decided to explore the option of deferment until our financial situation became more stable.</p> <h2>What is deferment?</h2> <p>Deferment allows you to pause the monthly payments on your federal student loans for a set period of time. For subsidized loans (these include Federal Perkins loans, Direct Subsidized loans, and Subsidized Federal Stafford loans), interest will not accrue on your loans while they are deferred. Unsubsidized loans, on the other hand, do accrue interest during the deferment period. If you have an unsubsidized loan that you plan to defer, you are allowed to pay the interest to keep it from being capitalized and added to your principal, but it is not a requirement for your deferment.</p> <p>Deferment can make a huge difference in your bottom line, but it is not necessarily a cure-all to your financial problems. Here is what you need to know about deferring your student loans.</p> <h2>1. You might not be eligible for deferment</h2> <p>When we applied for a deferment of our student loan payments, our first big surprise was the discovery that we were not eligible. Borrowers are eligible for, and have the right to take, deferment in the following circumstances:</p> <ul> <li>During at least half-time enrollment in postsecondary school;<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>During full-time enrollment in an approved graduate program;<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>During enrollment in an approved rehabilitation training program if you are disabled;<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>During a period of unemployment (limited to three years);<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>During active duty with the military, or within 13 months of when your active duty occurred;<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>During periods of economic hardship, as defined by federal regulations (also limited to three years).</li> </ul> <p>My husband and I had assumed that going from two family members to three, from two paychecks to one, and from one mortgage to two, was sufficient enough to meet the economic hardship requirements. But federal regulations only allow for <a href="http://www.studentloanborrowerassistance.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/self-help-EconomicHardshipDeferment.pdf" target="_blank">economic hardship deferment</a> if you are either on public assistance, or the salary from your full-time employment is no more than 150 percent of the federal poverty guideline for your family size and state. His salary was too high to qualify.</p> <p>Instead of deferment, we had to apply for a discretionary forbearance, which is the option available to borrowers who aren't eligible for a deferment.</p> <h3>What's the difference between deferment and forbearance?</h3> <p>The biggest difference between the two processes is that interest will accrue on your loans if they go into forbearance, even if your loans are subsidized. This means that unless you pay the interest during the forbearance period, the accrued interest will be capitalized (added to your principal).</p> <p>In addition, deferments are granted in six-month increments, and you may keep applying for the next six-month increment of deferment as long as you qualify for it. Forbearance, on the other hand, is granted in 12-month increments, and you may only apply for it three times over the life of your loan.</p> <p>In some situations, forbearance is mandatory, which means your loan servicer must offer forbearance to you. You can receive mandatory forbearance in any of the following situations:</p> <ul> <li>During a medical or dental internship or residency program;<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>During economic hardship wherein your total monthly student loan payment is 20 percent or more of your total monthly gross income;<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>During service in a national service program, such as AmeriCorps;<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>You are a teacher who is eligible for teacher loan forgiveness;<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>You meet the eligibility requirements for the U.S. Department of Defense Student Loan Repayment Program;<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>You are a National Guard member who has been activated by a governor, but who is not eligible for a military deferment.</li> </ul> <p>For student loan borrowers who do not meet any of the eligibility requirements for a mandatory forbearance, the only other option is applying for a discretionary forbearance. As the name implies, these are granted to borrowers at their lender's discretion, and generally borrowers apply for them because of financial hardship or illness.</p> <p>In 2010, my husband and I were granted a discretionary financial hardship forbearance. My unemployment was nominally my choice &mdash; although I was actually unemployed because of my baby's insistence on a Virgo birthday that coincided with the beginning of the school year. If I had been unable to find full-time work, that would have potentially made us eligible for a deferment, rather than a discretionary forbearance.</p> <h2>2. Accrued interest can pack a mean punch</h2> <p>Unless you are lucky enough to be eligible to defer a subsidized loan, you are likely going to deal with accrued interest. The problem with accrued interest is that it's like the inverse of compound interest: The interest that you accrue on your student loan is capitalized, which generates even more interest.</p> <p>For instance, between the two of us, my husband and I paid about 4.5 percent interest on our outstanding $35,000 student loan debt. By putting our loans into forbearance and not paying the accrued interest, we added over $1,600 to the $35,000 principal over 12 months.</p> <p>Not only does capitalized interest increase the total amount you owe, but it can also potentially increase either your monthly payment or your repayment term.</p> <h2>3. Be prepared for paperwork</h2> <p>Neither deferment nor forbearance is an automatic process, even when they are &quot;mandatory.&quot; You will always have to apply for either deferment or forbearance.</p> <p>If you are applying for deferment, you will need to submit a request to your loan servicer. For deferments while you are enrolled in school at least half-time, you will need to contact your school's financial aid office as well as your loan servicer. This process is relatively simple, but you will need to go through it every six months to maintain your deferment.</p> <p>For forbearance requests, the paperwork can be a little more onerous. Like deferment, you will need to submit your request to your loan servicer. In some cases, you will need to submit documentation to support your request, especially if you are requesting a discretionary forbearance. For instance, my husband and I were required to prove we were paying two mortgages at once to be granted our forbearance.</p> <h2>4. You must continue paying until your request is granted</h2> <p>After you have made your request for deferment or forbearance, you are required to continue making your monthly payments until your lender informs you that the request has been granted. Generally, this process takes about 10 business days, but it can take as many as 30.</p> <p>Not making payments during this time can be serious. If you skip a month after submitting your request, and your request is denied, then your lender will consider you delinquent and you risk defaulting.</p> <p>Both the paperwork and the necessity of continuing payments means that deferment and forbearance are options you have to plan ahead for. If you have a sudden financial downturn with no emergency fund, then you might be scrambling to request a deferment or forbearance, which may not be immediately granted.</p> <h2>Postponing your student loan payments doesn't erase them</h2> <p>Anyone can fall into an untenable financial situation. Your student loan servicer wants to work with you to help you stay afloat, but deferment and forbearance are not instantaneous processes nor are they a given. Putting your student loan payments on hold can help you get back on your feet financially, but you need to be prepared to handle the costs and be ready to get back to paying off your loans as soon as you can.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/emily-guy-birken">Emily Guy Birken</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-things-you-need-to-know-about-deferring-student-loans">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-is-student-loan-forbearance-anyway">What Is Student Loan Forbearance, Anyway?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-to-pay-off-your-student-debt-faster">5 Ways to Pay Off Your Student Debt Faster</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-10-most-common-financial-aid-mistakes-and-how-to-avoid-them">The 10 Most Common Financial Aid Mistakes — And How To Avoid Them</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/css-is-one-source-of-college-financial-aid-you-cant-afford-to-overlook">CSS Is One Source of College Financial Aid You Can&#039;t Afford to Overlook</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-to-do-when-you-cant-afford-your-childs-college-education">What to Do When You Can&#039;t Afford Your Child&#039;s College Education</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance Education & Training capitalized deferment financial aid forbearance interest monthly payments student loans subsidized loans Mon, 24 Apr 2017 08:30:13 +0000 Emily Guy Birken 1932491 at http://www.wisebread.com 7 Ways Students Can Travel Abroad for Less http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-students-can-travel-abroad-for-less <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/7-ways-students-can-travel-abroad-for-less" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-497154266.jpg" alt="Students traveling abroad for less" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>The years you spend in college are arguably the only time you'll drink quite so much coffee, live with all of your best friends, and learn so much in such a short, intense period. They're also unique for most people in that you're given the flexibility to spend time traveling during long breaks from class or during a year spent studying abroad.</p> <p>Unfortunately, it's not a time when you're likely to be earning a lot of income that you can throw toward travel. But there are several ways students can save money and travel for less.</p> <h2>1. Enjoy cheaper flights</h2> <p>Websites such as <a href="https://www.studentuniverse.com/" target="_blank">Student Universe</a> and <a href="http://www.kqzyfj.com/click-2822544-11820477" target="_blank">STA Travel</a> offer special rates on flights for students and youth. Although booking through a third-party website always comes with caveats (changes and cancellations may be more difficult, for example, than if you book directly with the airline), it's worth checking these websites for deals.</p> <p>StudentUniverse specializes in discounted fares for students at degree-granting universities, though it does also offer some flights for anyone between the ages of 18 and 25. It has been around since 2000 and works with 75 airlines to negotiate cheaper rates, passing on the discounts to customers.</p> <p>STA offers discounted tickets for students, teachers, and anyone under 26, and has been in business since 1979. Student tickets are marked with a little blue circle with an &quot;S&quot; inside for &quot;student.&quot; Youth tickets are marked in green with a &quot;Y.&quot; (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-money-moves-students-should-make-during-a-gap-year?ref=seealso" target="_blank">8 Money Moves Students Should Make for a Gap Year</a>)</p> <h2>2. Always travel with your student ID</h2> <p>Be sure to bring along your student ID wherever you travel, since it can represent serious savings while you're away from home. You may already know that at some museums and historical sites, a student ID will get you reduced or even free admission. But some people are surprised to find that even movie theaters will sometimes also give a discounted price for showing a student ID.</p> <p>If you have some shopping to do before you leave, or you need to pick up some new items during your trip, Madewell offers a 15 percent discount on in-store purchases for students and teachers. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-best-credit-cards-for-college-students?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Best Credit Cards for Students</a>)</p> <h2>3. Take advantage of other student cards</h2> <p>Beyond a student ID, there are other student discount cards that can help you to save money while traveling. The <a href="https://www.isic.org/" target="_blank">ISIC</a> (International Student Identity Card) costs $25, but may be worth it, since it gives you access to more than 150,000 discounts on concerts, accommodations, museums, and restaurants.</p> <p>The ISIC card has the added benefit of being an internationally recognized means of proving your status as a student, which is valuable in places where a foreign student ID may not be accepted. Plan to order your card at least four weeks before your departure so that it will have time to arrive in the mail. You may even find yourself using it for discounts while you're at home, too.</p> <h2>4. Incorporate travel with your studies</h2> <p>Travel can be a unique learning experience, so why not get credit for your time abroad? Some universities offer amazing opportunities to incorporate travel into your course of studies. Check with your department about what kinds of internships or summer experiences it may accept for credit.</p> <p>Another option is to find classes that include travel. For instance, at my university, there were certain (highly coveted) classes that delved deeply into Italian art history. At the end of the term, the class took a two-week trip to see the artwork that they had been learning about all semester.</p> <p>Depending on your university and the specific department, these trips may even receive funding from the university to defray the cost of the trip for students.</p> <h2>5. Leverage study-abroad programs</h2> <p>Studying abroad is another way to seamlessly incorporate extra traveling into your student life. Not only will you get to experience life in whatever country you choose, you'll also have the opportunity to travel to areas nearby. Having a home base abroad for a semester can be an excellent way to get to know a different region of the world and learn about a new culture and language. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/budgeting-for-study-abroad-what-youll-need-and-how-to-access-your-money?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Budgeting for Study Abroad</a>)</p> <p>I studied abroad in the south of France, and during that time, I was able to travel extensively throughout Europe, visiting Prague, London, Budapest, and Istanbul, to name just a few destinations. While these trips would have been extremely expensive from the United States, since I was already in France, I could take advantage of cheap airfare on discount airlines like RyanAir and EasyJet. Plus, travel time was often only a few hours, so I could see these new cities over a long weekend.</p> <p>I reduced the cost of these trips further by staying with friends or acquaintances who were studying abroad in other European cities. That not only saved me the price of a hotel, it also gave me more of an insider's perspective on these destinations. When I didn't have a friend living in the place I was visiting, I'd use <a href="https://www.couchsurfing.com/" target="_blank">Couchsurfing</a> to find locals who would host me for free. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-to-make-money-during-a-semester-abroad?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Ways to Make Money During a Semester Abroad</a>)</p> <h2>6. Apply for grants</h2> <p>It's worthwhile to spend some time researching what grants are available through your school. Some top universities have travel funds for undergraduates to use for internships, research projects, or other programs abroad. You can apply for a grant to cover some or all of the costs of your travel and housing while you're away.</p> <p>Some grants are offered directly through schools, but others are open to students across the country. Spend time preparing your proposal, since these grants can be competitive.</p> <h2>7. Travel offseason for better rates</h2> <p>Prices can vary a lot depending on whether you travel in peak season or not. Take advantage of the flexibility of being a student to book cheap flights at less popular times of the year. Being flexible with your travel dates can pay off, too. Use websites such as <a href="https://www.skyscanner.com/" target="_blank">Skyscanner</a> that allow you to filter your search by the cheapest date to fly. If you haven't decided on a destination yet, you can also search flexible departure and arrival airports. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-secret-flight-search-site-savvy-travelers-use?ref=seealso" target="_blank">ITA Matrix Is the Best Kept Secret for Travelers</a>)</p> <p>When I was in college, I decided to take a semester off school to travel, and ended up being able to take advantage of an opportunity to travel to Chennai, India from Paris for just $200 &mdash; half the usual price. Once in India, I traveled for a month on only $200, so my cheap ticket was the equivalent of an extra month of travel.</p> <p>While you might think that traveling is outside of a meager student budget, hopefully this list will show you some of the unique advantages that students have for traveling cheaply.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F7-ways-students-can-travel-abroad-for-less&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F7%2520Ways%2520Students%2520Can%2520Travel%2520Abroad%2520for%2520Less.jpg&amp;description=7%20Ways%20Students%20Can%20Travel%20Abroad%20for%20Less"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/7%20Ways%20Students%20Can%20Travel%20Abroad%20for%20Less.jpg" alt="7 Ways Students Can Travel Abroad for Less" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/amanda-gokee">Amanda Gokee</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-students-can-travel-abroad-for-less">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-8"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-costly-flight-booking-mistakes-you-make-all-the-time">8 Costly Flight Booking Mistakes You Make All the Time</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-ways-to-get-free-or-almost-free-airline-tickets">10 Ways to Get Free (or Almost Free) Airline Tickets</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-freshman-shopping-tips-to-cut-college-costs">9 Freshman Shopping Tips to Cut College Costs</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-college-students-can-save-money-before-class-starts">8 Ways College Students Can Save Money Before Class Starts</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-to-make-money-during-a-semester-abroad">7 Ways to Make Money During a Semester Abroad</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Education & Training Travel Airfare discounts flights grants identity cards offseason students study abroad trips Thu, 13 Apr 2017 08:30:15 +0000 Amanda Gokee 1925373 at http://www.wisebread.com What to Do When You Can't Afford Your Child's College Education http://www.wisebread.com/what-to-do-when-you-cant-afford-your-childs-college-education <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/what-to-do-when-you-cant-afford-your-childs-college-education" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-168249072.jpg" alt="Learning what to do when you can&#039;t afford college education" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="141" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>First comes the joy: Your child receives the thick packet from a dream university, the sure sign of an acceptance.</p> <p>But then comes the reality: that sky-high price tag.</p> <p>The college your child has just been accepted to might be asking for $30,000, $40,000, $50,000 or more in tuition each year. And if your child doesn't receive much, or anything, in merit-based scholarships from that school, you and your child will be responsible for covering those costs &mdash; often in the form of student loans that can haunt your child's finances for decades after graduation. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-sobering-facts-about-student-loan-debt?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Sobering Facts About Student Loan Debt</a>)</p> <p>What if you haven't saved nearly enough to help cover these costs? What if you haven't managed to save anything at all? What can parents do when they can't afford their child's college education?</p> <p>The choice usually comes down to taking on tens of thousands of dollars in student loan debt or attending a less expensive alternative school. And if you can't afford the tuition at any school, there are still options in the form of scholarships, grants, and community college. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/college/college-resources?ref=internal" target="_blank">40+ College Resources for Parents and Students</a>)</p> <h2>Rising costs</h2> <p>Tuition rates continue to rise every year. Especially at private universities, this means that tuition that is already intimidating becomes a bit more of a financial burden with each passing year.</p> <p>In its 2016 report, the College Board said that the average annual sticker price &mdash; including tuition, fees, and room and board &mdash; stood at $20,090 for in-state students at public colleges, and $35,370 for out-of-state students. The average for private colleges was $45,370 in 2016.</p> <p>There is a glimmer of good news here: Many students don't pay this full price. That's because many students receive scholarships (many offered automatically by the schools that accept them) and grants. According to the College Board's 2016 report, the net price of college &mdash; the price showing what students <em>actually </em>pay after they receive financial assistance &mdash; was $14,210 a year for tuition, fees, and room and board for in-state students at public colleges, and $26,080 for students at private colleges.</p> <p>The fact still remains that after financial assistance, paying for college is no easy task, even at more affordable public universities.</p> <h2>Student loan burden</h2> <p>Student loan debt is a financial burden for many college graduates. According to Student Loan Hero, the average college graduate from the class of 2016 has $37,172 in student loan debt, a record high. But for many students, there is no other way to pay for college.</p> <p>If you can't afford to help pay for your child's college education, student loans are an alternative. The loans, though, are far from a perfect solution. First, students can only borrow from $5,500 to $12,500 in federal subsidized and unsubsidized loans. <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/college/federal-student-loans?ref=internal" target="_blank">Federal student loans</a> are the best option because they come with the lowest interest rates and most favorable repayment terms.</p> <p>Students who must borrow more each year will have to take out private loans. Their parents can also take out private student loans for their children. Those often come with higher interest rates and less favorable terms.</p> <p>Relying completely on student loans could also set you or your children up for a tough financial future after they graduate, especially if they struggle to land a decent paying job. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-surprising-ways-to-pay-off-your-student-loans?ref=seealso" target="_blank">8 Surprising Ways to Pay Off Your Student Loans</a>)</p> <h2>A more affordable school</h2> <p>Your child might dream of attending that elite private school, but an in-state public university might be a more affordable choice that can provide your child with an equally strong education.</p> <p>Explain to your children that an out-of-state private school might be a dream destination, but might also negatively affect their financial health for decades after graduation.</p> <p>Students might also attend an in-state public school for two years, taking the general education classes that they are required to complete. They can then apply again to their dream university for the final two years of their undergraduate career. This can make their entire college career more affordable.</p> <p>There's also community college. Community colleges are a far more affordable alternative to both private and public four-year colleges. Attending a community college for at least two years could leave graduates with far less student loan debt after graduation.</p> <h2>Sources of additional help</h2> <p>Many colleges automatically provide merit scholarships to incoming students, which students never have to repay. Colleges will automatically provide this financial assistance to the students they accept; students don't have to do anything to apply.</p> <p>Merit scholarships can make private universities far more affordable. Private schools generally pass out more of this aid to attract students who otherwise wouldn't be able to afford tuition at these schools.</p> <p>If your child is accepted at a school but doesn't receive any or enough merit aid directly from the university, you can always contact the institution's office of admissions or financial aid. Often, schools will allow you to fill out a hardship form as a way to request additional financial support. Colleges aren't required, of course, to provide more aid, but some might. A phone call could make a difference.</p> <p>Also search for scholarships. Your child might qualify for hundreds of scholarships, some offering significant financial help. Winning these scholarships isn't always easy, with many attracting thousands of applicants. But even earning one or two scholarships can help cut down the expense of a college education. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/college-without-loans-where-to-find-scholarships?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Where to Find Scholarships</a>)</p> <p>Your children can also work on a part-time basis to help afford tuition. Colleges usually offer their own work-study programs that can help defray expenses. Students who volunteer to serve as residential advisers at campus dorms might receive free or discounted room and board.</p> <p>You might even be able to significantly reduce your child's yearly college costs by convincing your child to attend a school close enough to home so that your student can continue living with you. Room and board generally costs about $10,000 a year; if your child lives at home, he or she can eliminate this cost.</p> <p>College education remains an expensive proposition. But you and your child do have options, if you look for them.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dan-rafter">Dan Rafter</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-to-do-when-you-cant-afford-your-childs-college-education">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-great-sources-of-financial-aid-for-switching-careers">7 Great Sources of Financial Aid for Switching Careers</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-things-you-need-to-know-about-deferring-student-loans">4 Things You Need to Know About Deferring Student Loans</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-things-financial-aid-might-not-cover">6 Things Financial Aid Might Not Cover</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-money-moves-students-should-make-during-a-gap-year">8 Money Moves Students Should Make During a Gap Year</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/college-without-loans-where-to-find-scholarships">College Without Loans: Where to Find Scholarships</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Education & Training college costs community colleges financial aid grants private schools public schools scholarships student loans Wed, 12 Apr 2017 09:00:10 +0000 Dan Rafter 1922478 at http://www.wisebread.com 9 College Expenses You Aren't Saving For http://www.wisebread.com/9-college-expenses-you-arent-saving-for <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/9-college-expenses-you-arent-saving-for" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-517076077.jpg" alt="Parent finding college expenses she didn&#039;t save for" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Worried that tuition and room and board will bleed you dry when your kid goes off to college? Pfft. Wait till you get a load of all the expenses you didn't account for! You'll want to sit down for this.</p> <h2>1. College prep items</h2> <p>You'll want to send your kid off to college well prepared &mdash; with things. Things like study and work supplies, dorm room necessities, snack foods, toiletries, a new computer, maybe a new phone. It's amazing how easily items pile up when you're shopping for college.</p> <h2>2. Traveling home and back</h2> <p>No loving parent can go too long without seeing their kid &mdash; especially their freshman year in college. So, you'll need to account for travel costs to get your child back and forth to your home if they attend a school that requires more than a few hours' travel.</p> <p>&quot;Create a travel budget by researching typical costs for airfare, train, or bus, whichever mode of transportation is available to you, and estimate the number of times your child will head home throughout the year,&quot; suggests money-saving expert Andrea Woroch. &quot;If they have a car and are driving [a long] distance away from home, propose that they carpool to save on gas and tolls if applicable.&quot;</p> <p>They can also use a site like <a href="https://www.zimride.com/" target="_blank">Zimride</a>, which will connect them with other college students looking to share a ride.</p> <h2>3. Local transportation costs</h2> <p>If your child has a car on campus, you're looking at the cost of a parking pass plus insurance and gas. If they don't have a car, you'll need to consider a new bike and investigate the cost of public transportation passes. These costs can add up, as well. College students don't tend to be holed up in their tiny dorm rooms while not in class.</p> <h2>4. Food outside the meal plan</h2> <p>College meal plans are expensive enough by themselves, but don't count on those being your child's only source of food. Many campus dining halls close earlier than you probably think, and late night study sessions require energy. Plan on having to send them some extra dollars for groceries, snacks, and late-night diner runs.</p> <h2>5. Greek life</h2> <p>I was interested in joining a fraternity when I went to college. It signified the quintessential coming-of-age experience to me, and I liked the idea of having &quot;brothers,&quot; as I wasn't close with my own growing up.</p> <p>Nice sentiment, but it got expensive real quick.</p> <p>My dues were about $400 per semester, I wanted to buy new clothes every time we had a formal or theme party, and if something went wrong in the house &mdash; like the one time a drunk alumni brother smashed up our soda machine &mdash; we had to collectively cover the cost. By the end of four years, I had spent thousands of dollars to be part of this exclusive club &mdash; which, in hindsight, was worth every penny considering the memories I made. So, I guess what I'm saying here is &hellip; grab your checkbook.</p> <h2>6. Sports and extracurriculars</h2> <p>If you're the parent of a child whose athletic skills have earned them a college scholarship, congrats; consider yourself lucky. On the other hand, if your child is perfectly average but still wants to play sports or join extracurriculars, you'll need to cough up the cash.</p> <p>&quot;Sometimes participating in extracurricular activities on campus can cost extra money,&quot; says Johan Zhang, co-founder of CollegeVine. &quot;Whether it's paying for club dues, schoolwide participation fees, or even apparel, at many colleges there exists a hidden cost to joining and being an active member in extracurricular activities..&quot;</p> <p>Be sure to consider this and save up in advance.</p> <h2>7. Your trips to see your child</h2> <p>Bringing your kid home is going to cost you, and so is traveling to visit your child. You may also want to attend things like orientation weekend, parents' weekend, and other events hosted by the college. You'll need to factor in transportation, lodging, and food, so budget wisely.</p> <h2>8. Off-campus living</h2> <p>Eventually your kid will outgrow the dorm and want to live off-campus. This usually happens around junior year, but sometimes you can hold it off until senior year. With that comes the expense of monthly rent, renter's insurance, furniture, utility bills, and a security deposit that you're never going to see again. Make amends with that right now; it's already spent.</p> <h2>9. The extended plan</h2> <p>Listen, I'm rooting for you to get your kid in and out of college in four years, but, well... the odds aren't in your favor.</p> <p>&quot;At most public universities, over 80 percent of students will take more than four years to graduate due to overcrowded or unavailable classes,&quot; say Adrian Ridner, CEO and co-founder of Study.com. &quot;That means if you are planning on four years of college expenses, you could be under budgeting by 25 percent to 50 percent. Taking low cost college courses online can be a great way to stay on track and graduate on time. Another factor that can extend your child's time in school is lack of college readiness. This may mean completing remedial courses that do not count toward graduation.&quot;</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/mikey-rox">Mikey Rox</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-college-expenses-you-arent-saving-for">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-things-financial-aid-might-not-cover">6 Things Financial Aid Might Not Cover</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-freshman-shopping-tips-to-cut-college-costs">9 Freshman Shopping Tips to Cut College Costs</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-college-students-can-save-money-before-class-starts">8 Ways College Students Can Save Money Before Class Starts</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-smart-places-to-stash-your-kids-college-savings">5 Smart Places to Stash Your Kid&#039;s College Savings</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-money-saving-hacks-every-college-student-should-try">8 Money-Saving Hacks Every College Student Should Try</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Budgeting Education & Training college dining plans dorm rooms expenses food costs fraternities hidden costs kids sororities students transportation travel Tue, 11 Apr 2017 08:00:16 +0000 Mikey Rox 1923858 at http://www.wisebread.com Why Saving Too Much Money for a College Fund Is a Bad Idea http://www.wisebread.com/why-saving-too-much-money-for-a-college-fund-is-a-bad-idea <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/why-saving-too-much-money-for-a-college-fund-is-a-bad-idea" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-544603158.jpg" alt="Learning why saving too much college money is a bad idea" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>If you have children, you may have a <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-9-best-state-529-college-savings-plans?ref=internal" target="_blank">529 education savings plan</a> set up. While it's helpful to save for your kid's college education in advance, there are downsides to saving <em>too</em> much. Here are a few reasons you may want to adjust your contributions and/or revise your college fund strategy.</p> <h2>1. You may make more financial sacrifices than necessary</h2> <p>Unless you're loaded, you're probably making concessions elsewhere in your budget to keep up with contributions to your 529 &mdash; but at what cost? Are you neglecting other necessary payments, like credit card debt, resulting in additional fees? Are you compromising your health by reducing your visits to care providers? Do you have a sufficient emergency fund?</p> <p>Saving for your child's college education is important, but don't put it before any immediate needs. Paid-in-full college tuition is a luxury and privilege, and it shouldn't be your top priority if other aspects of your personal life and finances are affected.</p> <h2>2. Your retirement fund will suffer</h2> <p>If you're putting your child's paid-in-full education before your own later-in-life needs, consider this: You can take out a loan for education, but you can't take a loan for retirement. Millions of students have furthered their educations on their own dime and lived to tell the tale, because they're in perfect condition to work it off after they're spit out into the real world. You, however, may be nearing the time when you may not want or physically be able to work as your kid goes off to school, and that could wreak havoc on your financial future.</p> <p>&quot;If you devote the majority of your family savings to fund college education out of pocket, be prepared to push out your retirement goals,&quot; says registered investment adviser Ryan Miyamoto. &quot;By the time you are starting your family, you are usually thinking about getting serious with your retirement savings as well. These goals end up competing with each other, and with the rapid cost of college education, your retirement will suffer.&quot;</p> <h2>3. You're missing out on tax-exempt withdrawals of your 529 plan</h2> <p>Conservative investors miss out on the biggest benefit of 529 savings plans &mdash; tax-exempt withdrawals. Since tax-exempt withdrawals are only applicable to the gains, if you're using a 529 account to save for college and invest conservatively, your gains will be minimized compared to a growth investor. Having education as a top priority adds fuel to the fire of being conservative; you don't feel like this is your money, but rather your kids', so you irrationally think you want to minimize losses.</p> <p>Adds Miyamoto, &quot;Conversely, if these same individuals were to invest their savings into their own 401(k), the mentality changes; they're willing to take more risk since they view it as their own money.&quot;</p> <h2>4. You will have to pay sizable penalties if your 529 isn't used</h2> <p>You probably have an idea of how much you need to save for your child's education when you open your 529 plan, but whatever that number, it's still just a rough estimate. Your kid may need more than what you think college may cost at his or her time of birth, based on inflation 18 years later plus their choice of college. Let's hope the latter doesn't break the budget &mdash; but it probably will.</p> <p>On the other hand, if you funnel too much money to the account and it goes unused &mdash; for instance, if your scholar attends a relatively inexpensive school (which is normally good news, but not in this case) or decides not to attend college at all &mdash; you're going to kick yourself for not being a little more selfish with your money.</p> <p>&quot;If you overload a particular savings vehicle for college, you run the risk of actually being financially penalized,&quot; explains certified financial planner Greg Knight. &quot;For example, if you save too much in a 529 savings plan without having a drawdown strategy, you will incur income tax and a 10 percent penalty on the earnings portion of withdrawals not used for qualified education expenses. In general, distributions from 529 plans are not taxed provided they are used for qualified educational expenses. However, if you have paid all expenses and still have funds left, as the parent account owner you need to either name yourself as beneficiary and attend a qualified educational program to use the funds tax-free, or have another child or grandchild to name as a beneficiary.&quot;</p> <p>With 529 distributions, a portion is tax-free (as basis) and a portion is taxable (as earnings) unless the distribution is used to pay qualified educational expenses. Without knowing in advance who will use the 529 funds until they are depleted, you run the risk of paying tax and a 10 percent penalty.</p> <h2>5. You don't know if your kid will go to college</h2> <p>Another issue with putting too much cash in one basket is the variable of whether or not your kid will go to college at all. Once they're 18, you can't really make them do anything (unless you're holding financial support over their head), and, let's face it: College isn't for everyone. Having this fund might place undue pressure for them to do something they don't really want to do.</p> <h2>6. Your kid might not appreciate your sacrifice</h2> <p>I'm not suggesting that you shouldn't save for your kid's college education, but perhaps you shouldn't foot the entire bill. At the very least, refrain from telling them how much money is actually available. Plenty of parents want to pay their kids' way through college so they can enjoy the full experience, but that's really just providing them with an excuse to avoid taking on adult financial responsibilities. They may not truly appreciate the value of their education (nor your many years of saving) if they don't have to work for at least part of it themselves.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/mikey-rox">Mikey Rox</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-saving-too-much-money-for-a-college-fund-is-a-bad-idea">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-smart-places-to-stash-your-kids-college-savings">5 Smart Places to Stash Your Kid&#039;s College Savings</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-9-best-state-529-college-savings-plans">The 9 Best State 529 College Savings Plans</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-unique-ways-millennials-are-dealing-with-student-loan-debt">7 Unique Ways Millennials Are Dealing With Student Loan Debt</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-college-students-can-save-money-before-class-starts">8 Ways College Students Can Save Money Before Class Starts</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/when-should-you-start-saving-for-your-child-s-education">When Should You Start Saving for Your Child’s Education?</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance Education & Training 529 plans college funds kids penalties retirement funds saving money saving too much taxes tuition Thu, 30 Mar 2017 08:30:15 +0000 Mikey Rox 1915279 at http://www.wisebread.com What Does "Free" College Tuition Really Pay For? http://www.wisebread.com/what-does-free-college-tuition-really-pay-for <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/what-does-free-college-tuition-really-pay-for" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-493478404.jpg" alt="College students learning if free tuition is free" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="143" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Free college tuition was a rallying cry for some candidates in the 2016 presidential election, and it's become a reality in several states (or soon will be). But is free tuition truly free?</p> <p>Here's our rundown of who pays, along with a look at some of the hidden, unintended costs &mdash; monetary, societal, and otherwise. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-save-on-college-tuition?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Ways to Save on College Tuition</a>)</p> <h2>1. Taxpayers Pick Up the Tab</h2> <p>Just three states &mdash; Minnesota, Oregon, and Kentucky &mdash; have free tuition programs in place, while the notion is being hotly debated by lawmakers in nearly a dozen other states. (The City of San Francisco recently announced free tuition at its community college.) All of these programs have small differences, but there's lots of commonality. First, all of the &quot;free&quot; tuition programs that have been proposed or are currently in place seek to shift the burden of payment from the student to the taxpayer. The idea is that the cost of an education is often prohibitive for individual students to bear, while state and federal taxpayers can collectively foot the bill without emptying their wallets.</p> <p>Rhode Island's free tuition program proposal, for example, has an estimated price tag of $30 million &mdash; or less than half of 1% of the <a href="http://www.providencejournal.com/news/20160616/ri-house-approves-89b-budget" target="_blank">Rhode Island state budget</a>. The program would annually benefit an estimated 8,000 resident students who enroll in a two-year program at any of the state's public colleges. Every Rhode Island resident would be eligible, regardless of income or academic ability.</p> <p>Cost estimates to institute free tuition programs such as the one being shopped around by Rhode Island lawmakers are relatively low, proponents say, because most of them are &quot;last dollar&quot; scholarships. This means that the program covers the gap a student has in his or her tuition and mandatory fees bill after subtracting federal funding and other financial aid grants. Such is the case for programs in place in Oregon and Minnesota, as well as those proposed in Rhode Island and New York.</p> <h2>2. Many Programs Are Limited to Community College or Trade School</h2> <p>Free tuition programs only apply to public schools, and many of them &mdash; including programs implemented or under consideration in Oregon, Maryland, Minnesota, and Massachusetts &mdash; further limit eligibility to students who plan to enroll in community colleges or trade schools.</p> <p>Minnesota's <a href="https://www.revisor.mn.gov/bills/text.php?number=SF0005&amp;session=ls89&amp;version=latest&amp;session_number=0&amp;session_year=2015" target="_blank">free tuition pilot program</a>, for example, covers tuition for students who plan to complete their schooling or training in a high-demand field within one or two years. The $5 million scholarship program applies to about 1,200 fields, ranging from cosmetology to poultry production, at the state's 30 community and technical colleges. It targets middle class students whose families earn $90,000 or less annually and who are not eligible for already existing federal and state grants that aim to help lower income students.</p> <p>For students whose sights are set on a four-year degree from a four-year school, very few of the free tuition programs offer much help. Rhode Island will cover tuition at any public school, including four-year institutions &mdash; but only for up to two years. New York's free tuition proposal, on the other hand, is fairly unique in that it would fund four-year programs at the 64 State University of New York (SUNY) and 23 City University of New York (CUNY) colleges.</p> <h2>3. Tuition Is Only a Fraction of the Cost of Going to College<strong> </strong></h2> <p>Free tuition is a wonderful benefit, but it certainly doesn't cancel out the cost of college attendance. In fact, it's only a fraction of the larger price tag attached to any college education.</p> <p>At Maryland's <a href="http://college-tuition.startclass.com/l/1706/Howard-Community-College" target="_blank">Howard Community College</a>, where a free tuition program for students at community colleges or trade schools is under consideration, the average cost of in-state tuition and fees is $5,626. That's less than a quarter of the total cost of attendance. In addition to tuition, students pay an average of $12,195 for room and board, $1,800 for books and supplies, and $2,532 for other expenses, such as transportation.</p> <p>In New York, students would similarly be responsible for covering their own room and board, books, and other living expenses. According to a TIME magazine analysis, even if the state of New York covers the $6,470 SUNY tuition, a student would still need to come up with about $14,500 a year for other college expenses.</p> <p>A rare exception is Washington State, where lawmakers are considering a program that would provide a tuition and mandatory fee waiver to resident students attending in-state community and technical colleges, plus one other perk: All students from families with an income less than 70% of the state median family income would also receive a stipend of up to $1,500 for books and other education-related expenses.</p> <h2>4. Free Tuition Programs Only Aid Resident Students</h2> <p>If your state doesn't have a free tuition program, you won't be able to mooch off one that does. All of the free tuition programs thus far apply only to in-state residents who choose to further their education within that state's borders.</p> <h2>5. Where Academic Eligibility Bars Are in Place, Minority, Low-Income Students Could Get Left Behind</h2> <p>Some free tuition programs, such as the one launched in Oregon in 2016, require students to achieve certain academic standards in order to be eligible for scholarship money. But there is evidence that reserving scholarship money for students of higher aptitudes can serve to &quot;<a href="http://www.nber.org/papers/w7756" target="_blank">widen the gap in college attendance</a> between blacks and whites and between those from low- and high-income families,&quot; according to the National Bureau of Economic Research.</p> <p>For example, a program launched in Georgia in 1993 with the aim of offering college scholarships to high school graduates who met certain academic requirements succeeded in increasing the state's college attendance rate by at least 7%. But researchers later found that most of that increase was represented by white, middle-class students. That's because when college becomes free or more affordable to students who meet and maintain certain academic markers, research shows that more <a href="https://www.civilrightsproject.ucla.edu/research/college-access/financing/state-merit-scholarship-programs-and-racial-inequality/heller-marin-state-merit-scholarship-2004.pdf" target="_blank">white, middle-class students benefit</a> because they are proportionately better able to meet those standards. It's an inconvenient truth: Sometimes scholarship money aimed at aiding low-income and minority students instead leaves them even farther behind.</p> <h2>6. Some Experts Wonder if Free Tuition Actually Leads to More College Degrees</h2> <p>Free tuition for high school graduates, regardless of income or aptitude, is the product of the Tennessee Promise, a program that covers community college or technical school tuition, but leaves more than one-third of students saddled with $5,000 to $10,000 in fees for <a href="https://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2015/10/free-tuition/410626/" target="_blank">books, rent, and living expenses</a>. For taxpayers, the net cost of the program for the 2015&ndash;2016 school year was $10.6 million.</p> <p>The Tennessee Promise has so far been successful in boosting college enrollment by 10%, but some experts wonder whether that boost will translate to higher college graduation rates. &quot;What you see is a lot of students enrolling who might not otherwise enroll. But you see really low success rates, and things like students going part-time because they can't afford the books,&quot; Debbie Cochrane, the research director at The Institute for College Access and Success (TICAS), told The Atlantic.</p> <p>If more students aren't attaining college degrees, will the Tennessee Promise be worth the strain on the state budget? That's the question academics and researchers are working to uncover.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/brittany-lyte">Brittany Lyte</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-does-free-college-tuition-really-pay-for">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-to-do-when-you-cant-afford-your-childs-college-education">What to Do When You Can&#039;t Afford Your Child&#039;s College Education</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-college-expenses-you-arent-saving-for">9 College Expenses You Aren&#039;t Saving For</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/20-freebies-for-college-students">20+ Freebies for College Students</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-9-best-state-529-college-savings-plans">The 9 Best State 529 College Savings Plans</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-tax-tricks-to-try-if-youre-stuck-with-student-loans">8 Tax Tricks to Try if You&#039;re Stuck With Student Loans</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Education & Training college cuny free tuition new york oregon public schools rhode island suny taxpayers Tennessee Mon, 06 Mar 2017 10:30:31 +0000 Brittany Lyte 1901332 at http://www.wisebread.com 5 Smart Places to Stash Your Kid's College Savings http://www.wisebread.com/5-smart-places-to-stash-your-kids-college-savings <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-smart-places-to-stash-your-kids-college-savings" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-604338428.jpg" alt="Finding places to stash a kid&#039;s college savings" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>If you're hoping to save the tens of thousands of dollars needed to send your children to college, you'll need to do more than stash money in a savings account. To accumulate enough cash to stave off future student loan debt, you'll probably need to invest, and do so over a long enough time horizon.</p> <p>The good news is that there are several investment vehicles out there that can help you save money while also offering some tax advantages. Some are designed specifically for college savings, while others have different purposes but can be used to help with education costs.</p> <p>When saving for college, consider stashing your money in one (or a combination) of these places.</p> <h2>1. A 529 Plan</h2> <p>Any conversation about college savings should begin with a 529 plan. These are investment plans offered by states that allow you to invest money tax-free, as long as the funds eventually go to college expenses. You can open a 529 plan as soon as a child is born and in many cases, begin contributing as little as $25 a month. In addition to seeing investments grow without fear of paying taxes later, you can also get matching contributions and additional tax benefits from some states. In most cases, there are no restrictions on which college a beneficiary can attend. A child enrolled Maryland's college savings plan, for example, can use funds to attend school in Ohio. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-9-best-state-529-college-savings-plans?ref=seealso" target="_blank">The 9 Best State 529 College Savings Plans</a>)</p> <p>Most 529 plans offer a menu of mutual funds to invest in, though you may find your options limited to target date funds with relatively high fees. And it's important to note that if you don't use the funds for college expenses, you'll pay taxes and a 10% penalty.</p> <h2>2. Coverdell ESA</h2> <p>A Coverdell Education Savings Account is similar to a 529, in that you can invest money and will not see taxes on the gains. The advantage of a Coverdell is that you can invest in just about anything, and the money can be used for any educational expenses, not just college (even tuition for private high schools or grade schools would qualify).</p> <p>There is a $2,000 annual limit on Coverdell accounts, however, so it's unlikely you'll be able to save for the full bulk of college costs. There are also income limits, as those individuals with a gross income of $110,000 (or $220,000 for parents filing jointly) can't open Coverdell accounts.</p> <h2>3. Taxable Brokerage Account</h2> <p>It's smart to look at other options before exploring a regular brokerage account to save for your kids' education. But it is one option that has some advantages over other accounts.</p> <p>The main downside is that there are no tax advantages when you try to save money in a taxable brokerage account. When you withdraw your money, you'll be stuck with capital gains taxes, and no one is offering to deduct contributions from your taxable income. But, regular brokerage accounts do offer the flexibility of investing in just about anything, so you can seek out investments that have better performance and lower fees. Moreover, there are also no restrictions on how you use the gains, so it's no big deal if your child gets a scholarship or does not attend college.</p> <h2>4. Roth IRA</h2> <p>A Roth Individual Retirement Account isn't designed for college savings, but it can be used for that purpose. Under a Roth IRA, any money can be withdrawn tax-free at age 59 &frac12;, so if you happen to have a college-aged child at that time, you can use that money for education with no penalty. Investors are also allowed to withdraw the contributions (but not the gains) without penalty at any time.</p> <p>A Roth IRA will generally offer more investment options than a 529 plan, though for people under 50, there is an annual contribution limit of $5,500. If you do use a Roth IRA for college expenses, it's important to remember that saving for retirement should remain a priority over saving for college. So it's advisable to use this account for education expenses only if you have additional plans for your retirement savings.</p> <h2>5. Municipal Bonds</h2> <p>If you're seeking some tax advantages as well as safety, municipal bonds can be a good option for college savings. You won't earn as much going this route, but you may still be able to accumulate enough for college if you start early and contribute regularly.</p> <p>Municipal bonds are nice because they are tax-free, and don't come with the volatility of stocks. Muni bonds with strong ratings can earn you a tax equivalent return of between 5% and 6%, which is quite solid. If you invest $5,000 annually into these kinds of bonds, you'll have well over $100,000 by the time the kids head off to school.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/tim-lemke">Tim Lemke</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-smart-places-to-stash-your-kids-college-savings">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-4"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-saving-too-much-money-for-a-college-fund-is-a-bad-idea">Why Saving Too Much Money for a College Fund Is a Bad Idea</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-9-best-state-529-college-savings-plans">The 9 Best State 529 College Savings Plans</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/when-should-you-start-saving-for-your-child-s-education">When Should You Start Saving for Your Child’s Education?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/does-your-kid-need-an-ira">Does Your Kid Need an IRA?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-stocks-your-kids-would-love-to-own">5 Stocks Your Kids Would Love to Own</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Education & Training Investment 529 plans brokerage accounts college Coverdell ESA kids municipal bonds Roth IRA saving money Wed, 15 Feb 2017 11:00:11 +0000 Tim Lemke 1887743 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Things Financial Aid Might Not Cover http://www.wisebread.com/6-things-financial-aid-might-not-cover <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-things-financial-aid-might-not-cover" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/kid_books_piggybank_626639020.jpg" alt="Guy learning things financial aid might not cover" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Most students and parents realize that it's crucial to apply for financial aid, regardless of what your financial status may be. However, many families don't realize how expensive college can be, even if you receive a great financial aid package. It's important to recognize what items financial aid may not cover so that you can be better prepared for the school year ahead.</p> <h2>What Is Covered</h2> <p>Every student's financial aid package is different, so there are no exact expectations on how much you will receive and what will be covered. The package is based on the full cost of college, which includes tuition and fees, room and board, and sometimes, things like books and school supplies. Financial aid may also cover a summer session, but again, it all depends on how much is included in your particular package.</p> <p>If you live at home or off-campus, your package may include an allowance for things like transportation, housing, and food. If you live on campus, the dorm room and required meal plans may be covered.</p> <h2>What Isn't Covered</h2> <p>Students should be prepared for unexpected charges, which can quickly become overwhelming. Some of the most common college costs not covered by financial aid include:</p> <h3>1. Transportation</h3> <p>Some schools offer aid for transportation, but it's rare and something you should budget for. You'll need to find money for gas or public transportation. There may also be parking fees, campus shuttle fees, and transportation costs to travel back home during the summer and winter breaks.</p> <h3>2. School Supplies</h3> <p>Books may or may not be covered by a financial aid package, but you will still need to find money for pens, pencils, notebooks, and any other school supplies you may need for the semester. You may also be charged extra for art supply fees or other course necessities. You may also need to purchase things like a new laptop or printer for your dorm room.</p> <h3>3. Dorm Supplies</h3> <p>If you'll be living on campus, you'll need to buy items for your dorm. This can include everything from a mini fridge and television to new sheets and beanbag chairs.</p> <h3>4. Lab Fees</h3> <p>There are frequently lab fees, equipment charges, and other fees associated with certain courses.</p> <h3>5. Activity Fees</h3> <p>If you're planning on participating in sports, clubs, sororities or fraternities, or other on-campus activities, there will be additional fees.</p> <h3>6. The College Experience</h3> <p>Part of the fun of college is going out and meeting new friends, which will result in costs for eating out, going shopping, going to concerts or sporting events, and paying for other forms of entertainment.</p> <h2>How to Fill in the Gap</h2> <p>According to Damian Rothermel, a CFP who specializes in college funding, it's possible to <a href="http://www.forbes.com/sites/learnvest/2014/03/24/9-things-you-probably-didnt-know-about-financial-aid-for-college/2/#7c72a39223a1" target="_blank">negotiate your financial aid package</a>. He says that once you receive your financial aid package, you can contact the school to appeal for more money.</p> <p>For instance, if the Expected Family Contribution is too high, you can appeal the offer. You can also provide documentation to support your request for increased funding.</p> <p>If a student needs more funding for the school year, then there are a number of options available.</p> <ul> <li>Grants and scholarships. There is no limit on how many scholarships you can apply for, so it's best to get into the routine of searching for and applying for scholarships whenever possible.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Work-study jobs. Students can earn money through work-study jobs either on or off campus.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Part-time jobs. There are endless part-time jobs available to students, which can help them earn the extra money needed for items that aren't covered by financial aid.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Payment plans. The school may have payment plans available, allowing you to spread the remaining costs you owe throughout a semester.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Student loans. Student loans should be your last resort, as the last thing a student wants after graduation is to be saddled with debt. Your best bet is to first apply for a federal loan, which offers flexible payments if you don't find employment after college. There are also private or alternative loans available to students. Many banks also offer special student loan rates that you may not have to begin paying off until graduation.</li> </ul> <p>If you still have questions about how to fill in the gap, the school's financial aid office is available to help however they can. You may want to call and speak with them about how you can receive more funding. They may be able to help you find scholarships, part-time work, and good private student loans.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/andrea-cannon">Andrea Cannon</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-things-financial-aid-might-not-cover">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-5"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-sobering-facts-about-student-loan-debt">5 Sobering Facts About Student Loan Debt</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/a-better-way-to-rank-americas-colleges">A Better Way to Rank America&#039;s Colleges</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/css-is-one-source-of-college-financial-aid-you-cant-afford-to-overlook">CSS Is One Source of College Financial Aid You Can&#039;t Afford to Overlook</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-college-expenses-you-arent-saving-for">9 College Expenses You Aren&#039;t Saving For</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-tax-tricks-to-try-if-youre-stuck-with-student-loans">8 Tax Tricks to Try if You&#039;re Stuck With Student Loans</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Education & Training college financial aid higher education not covered room and board student loans students transportation tuition Tue, 24 Jan 2017 10:30:36 +0000 Andrea Cannon 1876850 at http://www.wisebread.com 7 Ways to Make Money During a Semester Abroad http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-to-make-money-during-a-semester-abroad <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/7-ways-to-make-money-during-a-semester-abroad" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/student_study_abroad_547198588.jpg" alt="Students making money while studying abroad" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Studying abroad offers college students the chance to explore the world, learn more about different cultures, and meet people from a variety of backgrounds. But studying abroad can be expensive. The average <a href="http://www.foxbusiness.com/features/2013/06/14/thinking-studying-abroad-it-not-all-about-cost.html">cost for a semester abroad</a> was $17,785 during the 2012&ndash;2013 school year, and costs have no doubt increased since then.</p> <p>So how can a college student on a budget afford to study abroad and enjoy all of the food, travel, and experiences available to them?</p> <p>Thankfully, there are plenty of working opportunities available to American students studying abroad.</p> <h2>1. Teaching English</h2> <p>American students studying in a country where English is not the official language have a built-in job opportunity. There is demand for native speaking English teachers all over the world, and the average college student is in a great position to take a part-time job teaching English as a foreign language. You can pursue this informally by chatting with your local classmates or professors at the university to find one-on-one students, or you can pursue more traditional teaching positions through your study abroad program or your university.</p> <p>This option is especially beneficial to any students who hope to have a career in education. My experience volunteering at a French primary school when I studied abroad was a big factor in my favor when I went to graduate school for a Master's degree in education.</p> <h2>2. Translation Work</h2> <p>If you are relatively fluent in your host country's official language, working as a translator can be a great way to make money and practice your foreign language skills. Typically, translators will translate into their native tongue, which means you can offer successful translation services even if you are not completely fluent in your adopted language.</p> <p>For many students, simply posting some fliers around campus offering your translation services can net you plenty of clients.</p> <h2>3. On-Campus Jobs</h2> <p>Just like American universities, many international schools offer work-study jobs for students, including those who are visiting from other countries. Stop by the work-study office at your university, or ask some of your local classmates if they know of opportunities for on-campus jobs.</p> <h2>4. Guiding Tours</h2> <p>No matter where you are studying, it's likely that it is a destination for English-speaking tourists. Contact local tourism boards to find out if there is a need for English-speaking tour guides. This will give you an excellent way to learn the intricacies of your adopted home while earning a little cash.</p> <p>You can also rely on your other expertise to land a tour guide job. For instance, an art history major might find a job as a docent in a museum, while a future architect might be able to get a job leading groups on tours of architecturally significant buildings.</p> <h2>5. Bartending or Working in a Coffee Shop</h2> <p>For students who wish to completely immerse themselves in their new home, working as a bartender or a barista in a cafe can be an excellent way to earn money while also meeting a variety of people and practicing your language or cultural skills.</p> <p>To land a serving job, stroll through the popular areas of town and chat with managers of bars, restaurants, and coffee shops. Bring your resume and evidence that your visa allows you to work legally.</p> <h2>6. Work at a Tourist Hostel</h2> <p>Hostels are an inexpensive place for tourists to stay, and they can be an excellent workplace for a visiting student. Like hotels, hostels are open round-the-clock, and so they need workers for every shift. If you are fluent in a common language (including English!), the hostel's management might need you to work at the front desk. Hostels have guests from all over the world, and a front desk attendant who can speak multiple languages is a boon.</p> <p>In addition to front desk work, you might also take a job in housekeeping or the kitchen. While the work may not be glamorous, it will offer you an opportunity to earn money and learn more about your adopted country.</p> <h2>7. Write for Travel Sites</h2> <p>You're probably already keeping a journal or diary of your time abroad &mdash; why not get paid for it? There are a number of travel sites and other publications that are always looking for well-written pieces on travel destinations. And don't assume that your writing will only find a home in a travel-specific website. There are often <a href="https://thewritelife.com/31-travel-magazines-and-websites-that-pay-freelance-writers/">regional publications or other sites</a> that would welcome your work.</p> <p>In addition, you could also start your own blog. No one is claiming that blogging is a quick way to make big bucks, but a student living abroad has plenty of stories to write about, and it's easy to place ads on your blog. Blogspot, WordPress, and Tumblr are all places you can easily start a blog that you can monetize. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-easy-ways-to-make-extra-money-blogging?ref=seealso">5 Easy Ways to Make Extra Money Blogging</a>)</p> <h2>Considerations for Student Workers Studying Abroad</h2> <p>It's not enough to just land your job while you're studying. You also need to be aware of the financial and logistical concerns of your work.</p> <p>In particular, make sure you have a visa that will allow you to work, even if you are working for cash. Also, remember that the currency exchange rate can affect just how far your money will go, especially if you are earning American money (as a blogger or freelancer might). Make sure you know how the conversion rate will affect your spending power, and know the costs of exchanging money when you withdraw money locally from your American bank.</p> <p>Finally, there is some good news for any student working for a foreign employer: You will owe no U.S. taxes on anything you earn <a href="https://www.irs.gov/publications/p54/ch04.html">under $101,300</a> as of 2016. You still have to pay local taxes on your wages, but Uncle Sam will let you keep all that is left.</p> <h2>Working and Studying Abroad</h2> <p>In general, the most valuable experiences you will have during your time abroad will happen outside of the classroom. Finding a way to earn money while you study is not only a savvy financial move, but it will also add depth and richness to your time in another country.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/emily-guy-birken">Emily Guy Birken</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-to-make-money-during-a-semester-abroad">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-6"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-college-expenses-you-arent-saving-for">9 College Expenses You Aren&#039;t Saving For</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-students-can-travel-abroad-for-less">7 Ways Students Can Travel Abroad for Less</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-freshman-shopping-tips-to-cut-college-costs">9 Freshman Shopping Tips to Cut College Costs</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-get-paid-to-learn">6 Ways to Get Paid to Learn</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-things-financial-aid-might-not-cover">6 Things Financial Aid Might Not Cover</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Education & Training Extra Income college English international travel jobs language skills side jobs students study abroad teaching tourism writing Wed, 28 Dec 2016 10:30:23 +0000 Emily Guy Birken 1863677 at http://www.wisebread.com 7 Unique Ways Millennials Are Dealing With Student Loan Debt http://www.wisebread.com/7-unique-ways-millennials-are-dealing-with-student-loan-debt <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/7-unique-ways-millennials-are-dealing-with-student-loan-debt" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/man_graduate_debt-450067439.jpg" alt="Millennials dealing with student loan debt" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Many Millennials are wracked with student loan debt and don't see a way out anytime soon. Fortunately, there are some unique opportunities available to you &mdash; both while you are in school and after you graduate &mdash; that can help you deal with this obligation. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-you-shouldnt-panic-about-your-federal-student-loans?ref=seealso">Why You Shouldn't Panic About Your Federal Student Loans</a>)</p> <p>According to Debt.org, student loans account for <a href="https://www.debt.org/students/" target="_blank">over $1 trillion in debt</a> in America, and among those who borrow, the average debt load is about $30,000. However, with the right plan of action, you can tackle this debt in less time and with a smaller overall effect on your life and financial well-being.</p> <p>See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/which-student-loan-repayment-plan-saves-you-the-most?ref=seealso2">Which Student Loan Repayment Plan Saves You the Most?</a></p> <h2>1. Take Advantage of Income Share Agreements</h2> <p>Purdue University was the first to offer such a program (theirs is called &quot;<a href="http://purdue.edu/backaboiler/" target="_blank">Back a Boiler</a>&quot;), which provides funding to students who are willing to repay the foundation a portion of their salaries for up to10 years following graduation. These are often referred to as Income Share Agreements or ISAs.</p> <p>With an Income Share Agreement, there is less risk for the student because payments are based on a percentage of your income. (If you earn less, you pay less; when your income increases, you pay more, up to a defined maximum.) Conversely, with a traditional loan, there is a set loan repayment amount that you must find a way to pay every month, even if you don't have a job (although you may be eligible for a variety of deferments or other payment plans; check with your lender).</p> <p>See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-definitive-guide-to-pay-as-you-earn-a-great-student-loan-repayment-plan?ref=seealso2">The Definitive Guide to Pay As You Earn</a></p> <h2>2. Find an Investor</h2> <p>Some schools offer programs where an &quot;investor&quot; buys &quot;shares&quot; in a student's future. This is similar to an ISA, but can also be agreed upon privately. If the student does well financially after graduation, then the investor profits, but the student may end up paying even more than they would have on a private loan. On the other hand, if the student doesn't make much money during the repayment period, then the investor loses. As an added bonus, by selling stock in themselves, students may have even more motivation to do well after graduation. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-surprising-ways-to-pay-off-your-student-loans?ref=seealso">Surprising Ways to Pay Off Your Student Loans</a>)</p> <h2>3. Plug Your Venmo Account</h2> <p>Once you've opened a Venmo account, you can begin accepting payments from friends, family members, and concerned strangers who want to help you pay off your student loan. Ask for money to be deposited into your Venmo account for your birthday, graduation present, and during the holidays. Loved ones may be willing to contribute even more if they know the money is going toward your student loan.</p> <p>You can share your Venmo account via email or social media. Better yet, you can even make signs with your Venmo account on them, which you can hold in front of the camera at large events or in the background of your favorite news shows. There have been two successful instances where someone <a href="http://www.abc-7.com/story/33099003/what-the-tech-money-app-and-student-make-money-after-stunt" target="_blank">holding a sign</a> with their Venmo account received more than $20,000 in payments from amused viewers. While these feats pulled in 2013 and 2016 weren't for noble purposes, it just goes to show that this quick stunt can really pay off.</p> <h2>4. Volunteer More</h2> <p>With organizations like <a href="http://www.sponsorchange.org/" target="_blank">SponsorChange</a> and <a href="http://www.zerobound.com/" target="_blank">Zerobound</a>, you can volunteer your time and skills to meaningful organizations and your student loans will also reap the benefits. While you accumulate good karma from volunteering your time, the organizations will contribute toward your student loan debt as repayment. Organizations like <a href="http://www.nationalservice.gov/programs/americorps" target="_blank">AmeriCorps</a> and <a href="https://www.peacecorps.gov/" target="_blank">Peace Corps</a> also offer partial loan cancellation incentives to volunteers.&nbsp;</p> <h2>5. Find the Right Employer</h2> <p>More companies are now offering student loan payoff programs as a perk to new employees. This is becoming especially common with new startups. When you are meeting with a potential employer, you may want to ask if their benefits program offers student loan repayment options.</p> <h2>6. Consider Student Loan Forgiveness Programs</h2> <p>There are various <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-to-get-student-loan-debt-forgiveness?ref=internal" target="_blank">student loan forgiveness programs</a> available, but only to select people. While most borrowers won't qualify for these programs, it is worth looking into.</p> <p>For instance, with the <a href="https://studentaid.ed.gov/sa/repay-loans/forgiveness-cancellation/public-service" target="_blank">Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program</a>, people working in public service can have their loans forgiven after 10 years of payment. There are also income-driven repayment plans, which can forgive your loans after 20&mdash;25 years of repayment. You may also qualify for special federal student loan forgiveness programs if you work in low-income schools or in public service jobs, such as for a nonprofit or the government.</p> <h2>7. Explore Traditional Methods</h2> <p>Traditional means of student loan repayment are always a great option. <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-times-student-loan-refinancing-can-save-you-big?ref=internal">Debt refinancing</a> or debt consolidation can help lower the interest you pay in the long-run. You can also take advantage of automatic debt payments, make payments twice per month, or trim your budget so there's more left over for repayment. These methods will all help you to pay off your student loan faster and can save you a great deal of money in the long-run. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-ways-to-pay-back-student-loans-faster?ref=seealso">15 Ways to Pay Back Student Loans Faster</a>)</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/andrea-cannon">Andrea Cannon</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-unique-ways-millennials-are-dealing-with-student-loan-debt">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-7"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-to-get-student-loan-debt-forgiveness">8 Ways to Get Student Loan Debt Forgiveness</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-sobering-facts-about-student-loan-debt">5 Sobering Facts About Student Loan Debt</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-tax-tricks-to-try-if-youre-stuck-with-student-loans">8 Tax Tricks to Try if You&#039;re Stuck With Student Loans</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-surprising-ways-to-pay-off-your-student-loans">8 Surprising Ways to Pay Off Your Student Loans</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-things-financial-aid-might-not-cover">6 Things Financial Aid Might Not Cover</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance Debt Management Education & Training college income share agreements investors loan forgiveness millennials repayment student debt student loans tuition volunteering Thu, 15 Dec 2016 10:30:31 +0000 Andrea Cannon 1853983 at http://www.wisebread.com How Trump's Presidency Might Change Student Loans http://www.wisebread.com/how-trumps-presidency-might-change-student-loans <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-trumps-presidency-might-change-student-loans" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/saving_college_fund_544603158.jpg" alt="Learning how Trump&#039;s presidency might change student loans" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Whether you were a Trump supporter or not, the $1.3 billion student debt issue is one that needs to be tackled. Trump called student debt an 'albatross' around the necks of borrowers. While he didn&rsquo;t spend a lot of his election talking about student loans, he did offer several plans to solve the debt problem.</p> <p>All of the President-Elect&rsquo;s student loan plans are still just that &mdash; plans. However, here is how Trump&rsquo;s presidency might affect your current or future student loan (or your children&rsquo;s loans).</p> <h2>Cap on Maximum Repayment Amount</h2> <p>Trump addressed the ever-growing student loan debt dilemma in his rally in Columbus, Ohio, on October 13. One of his proposed solutions was to cap how much a borrower would have to repay. He said, &quot;We would cap repayment for an affordable portion of the borrower&rsquo;s income, 12.5%, we&rsquo;d cap it. That gives you a lot to play with and a lot to do.&quot;</p> <p>Currently, the Revised Pay As You Earn, or REPAYE, plan allows borrower&rsquo;s to cap their monthly payments at 10% of their discretionary income. However, this is only applicable for federal loans, and the plan requires borrowers to extend the length of their loan, meaning they will pay for their debt longer.</p> <p>Trump&rsquo;s plan to cap loan repayment at 12.5% might look higher initially, but depending on how he enforces the plan, it could save a lot of money for borrowers. If Trump allows the monthly cap to be applied to private loans, then this plan will benefit many borrowers.</p> <h2>Student Loan Forgiveness After 15 Years</h2> <p>Trump added to his speech in Columbus, Ohio, &quot;And if borrowers work hard and make their full payments for 15 years, we&rsquo;ll let them get on with their lives. They just go ahead and they get on with their lives.&quot;</p> <p>Currently loan forgiveness is available through special forgiveness programs, such as the public service loan forgiveness plan and the teacher loan forgiveness plan. The income-driven repayment plan will also forgive student loan debt after 20 or 25 years of payments, depending on which plan you qualify for.</p> <p>Trump&rsquo;s 15-year forgiveness plan would drastically cut the length of loan repayment and finally offer solutions for individuals weighed down with private loan debt. Trump did not give exact numbers to how much this plan would cost or save Americans, but it was said that it would be paid for through reduced federal spending overall. Also, it is believed that this plan would save the government money through fewer defaulted loans. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-stop-student-loans-from-ruining-your-life?ref=seealso">How to Stop Student Loans From Ruining Your Life</a>)</p> <h2>Cut College Costs</h2> <p>Trump also addresses the root of the student loan dilemma &mdash; costs set by colleges. On his site, Trump wrote that he plans to, &quot;work with Congress on reforms to ensure universities are making a good-faith effort to reduce the cost of college and student debt in exchange for the federal tax breaks and tax dollars.&quot;</p> <p>Colleges have no incentives to lower costs, so why should they? If Trump were to offer significant tax breaks, then students might see lower tuition bills, too.</p> <h2>Aid for Non-Traditional Schools</h2> <p>Right now, federal aid is for students attending schools that are accredited through the Department of Education. This means that if a vocational school or nontraditional school program is not accredited, students cannot receive federal aid to help them attend. Trump said on his campaign website that he would help make it possible for any student to attend and complete whatever school or program they wanted.</p> <p>According to his website, he wants to &quot;ensure that the opportunity to attend a two- or four-year college, or to pursue a trade or a skill set through vocational and technical education, will be easier to access, pay for, and finish.&quot; (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-is-student-loan-forbearance-anyway?ref=seealso">What Is Student Loan Forbearance, Anyway?</a>)</p> <h2>So What Does Trump&rsquo;s Plans Mean for You?</h2> <p>If you are already paying student loan debt, then there is a possibility that the plans will not fully be developed and implemented for another year or two. Taking on something as big as student debt and bloated college costs is not an overnight job.</p> <p>However, if you are currently in college or are a parent with a child attending college in the next three years, then there is a possibility that Trump&rsquo;s plan will benefit you. For the rest of America, it is hard to determine just how much Trump&rsquo;s plans will cost.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/ashley-eneriz">Ashley Eneriz</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-trumps-presidency-might-change-student-loans">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-8"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-unique-ways-millennials-are-dealing-with-student-loan-debt">7 Unique Ways Millennials Are Dealing With Student Loan Debt</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-stop-student-loans-from-ruining-your-life">How to Stop Student Loans From Ruining Your Life</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-every-parent-should-know-about-the-new-college-financial-aid-rules">What Every Parent Should Know About the New College Financial Aid Rules</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-to-get-student-loan-debt-forgiveness">8 Ways to Get Student Loan Debt Forgiveness</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dont-get-trapped-by-these-higher-education-scams">Don&#039;t Get Trapped by These Higher Education Scams</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Education & Training college debt donald trump federal aid loan forgiveness president trump REPAYE school student loans vocational school Fri, 02 Dec 2016 12:30:07 +0000 Ashley Eneriz 1844379 at http://www.wisebread.com 15 Unique Holiday Gifts for Teachers That They'll Actually Like http://www.wisebread.com/15-unique-holiday-gifts-for-teachers-that-theyll-actually-like <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/15-unique-holiday-gifts-for-teachers-that-theyll-actually-like" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-483199046.jpg" alt="teachers will love these gifts" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>The holiday season is upon us, and I've been starting my gift shopping in the hopes of finishing early so I can relax. On the list this year are my daughter's preschool teachers (three of them!) who have been tremendously helpful, nurturing, and caring.</p> <p>Out of respect for allergies in the classroom (as well as New Year's diet resolutions), I'm planning to give nonfood gifts this year. As a former teacher myself, I accumulated a good amount of impractical tchotchkes, so I assembled this list of practical gifts that teachers will actually like and use.</p> <h2>1. Personalized Tote Bag</h2> <p>As a former teacher, I spent many days lugging assignments back and forth in reusable shopping bags. Why not help a teacher out by giving him/her a sturdy, personalized tote bag? You can make it yourself by printing an iron-on transfer and decorating a plain canvas tote bag from the craft store, monogram a bag with fabric paint, or you can purchase one ready-made on Etsy. Either way, it's sure to send a message that an educator's hard work is appreciated.</p> <h2>2. Water Bottle</h2> <p>Coffee mugs are so 2003. Hydration is where it's at these days! Help your teacher stay healthy by providing them with a <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-best-aluminum-and-stainless-steel-water-bottles">sturdy reusable water bottle</a> that can be sipped from all day. Bottles from Camelbak and Contigo are always well-received, but less expensive options can be found at big box stores if you're on a budget.</p> <h2>3. Lunchbox Accessories</h2> <p>Like your kids, teachers usually pack a lunch to eat at school. Make your teacher feel a little more pampered at lunch time by giving them a fancy insulated lunch bag, a Thermos, and/or a few ice packs and reusable containers (at the rate I lose them, you can never have too many). A cookbook full of lunch ideas is also a great idea.</p> <h2>4. Gift Cards</h2> <p>While not the most personal gift, gift cards are certainly practical and are more likely to be used than any other gift. Starbucks, iTunes, and Amazon <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/save-on-christmas-shopping-with-this-clever-gift-card-strategy">gift cards are always useful</a> and appreciated. Gift cards to local restaurants are also a great way to help a teacher relax. Many teachers spend their own money on school supplies for students, so a gift card to Target, Walmart, Staples, or a craft store can help them keep costs down. Pair it with a thoughtful note and your teacher will be a happy camper.</p> <h2>5. Organization Tools</h2> <p>When it comes to gifts, teachers may have tchotchkes a-plenty, but nary a place to store them. Give the gift of organization with a set of sturdy baskets, boxes, and drawer organizers. Alternatively, a gift card to The Container Store might do the trick.</p> <h2>6. Personalized Office Supplies and Stationery</h2> <p>Put a smile on a teacher's face every time they open their desk drawer by providing a set of personalized office supplies. A monogrammed notepad, a personalized stamp, fancy scissors and staplers, and cute paper clips can brighten a teacher's day while remaining super practical.</p> <h2>7. Travel Accessories</h2> <p>Gift-giving occasions for teachers often happen before the winter or summer holidays, and your teacher might be taking a much-needed vacation. Why not make traveling a little easier by gifting some travel accessories? An attractive travel pouch with small toiletry bottles, mesh suitcase organizers, or a tote with a beach towel and sunscreen, can all be used by a jet-setting teacher.</p> <h2>8. Quality Bath Products</h2> <p>I always feel a little ambiguous about giving bath products, because as a teacher, I received my fair share of cheap, dollar-store bubble baths and lotions. However, I was always happy to receive quality bath products from brands like Bath and Body Works, The Body Shop, or Philosophy. De-stressing in a hot bath with some aromatherapy bath salts really did wonders to lift my mood after a hard day.</p> <h2>9. Low-Maintenance Plants</h2> <p>The great thing about giving plants is that the teacher can leave them in the classroom to brighten up their work day, or take them home if they desire. And if they die, they can be thrown away and won't clutter up a junk drawer for years. Easy care plants such as succulents and air plants are good choices, or a pretty flower like an orchid or bromeliad that blooms for a long time.</p> <h2>10. Movie Night In</h2> <p>Give a teacher a relaxing night in by packing a basket with a cozy throw blanket, a gift card for an online movie rental (such as iTunes, Amazon, or Google Play), and a box of microwave popcorn. (Okay. Technically, this is a food gift, but popcorn makes every movie better!)</p> <h2>11. Classroom Supplies</h2> <p>If you're a teacher, you'll know that students are constantly asking to borrow pens, and somehow those pens rarely find themselves back onto your desk. Keep your child's teacher's costs down by giving him/her a jar full of pens that can be kept on their desk. Other useful items that teachers often buy themselves include highlighters, bandages, stickers, sticky notes, and sanitizing wipes.</p> <h2>12. Books for the Classroom</h2> <p>Most teachers get plenty of trinkets from students every year, but classroom supplies remain neglected. Age-appropriate books are great for kindergarten and lower-grade classrooms which may reuse the same small selection of books all year. You may want to ask the teacher what books are needed, or simply give them a gift card to a bookstore so they can make the best choice.</p> <h2>13. Activity Books</h2> <p>Adult coloring books are all the rage these days, and for good reason. They are incredibly relaxing. A coloring book with a set of nice colored pencils could be a thoughtful gift for a teacher, especially for someone who likes crafting. A sudoku or crossword puzzle book could be similarly fun to do when the teacher gets a little spare time.</p> <h2>14. Hobby Supplies</h2> <p>Have your child ask the teacher what hobbies they enjoy, and give them hobby supplies. Some ideas include: scrapbooking supplies, gardening supplies, baking tools and mixes, or a gift certificate to a hobby store.</p> <h2>15. Handmade Gifts</h2> <p>Nothing is as memorable or personal as a gift that was lovingly handmade by your child. Whether that's a personalized T-shirt or baseball cap, a classroom scrapbook, a planter, ornament, or picture frame, it's sure to send the message that you and your child appreciate the teacher's hard work and dedication to their job.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/camilla-cheung">Camilla Cheung</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-unique-holiday-gifts-for-teachers-that-theyll-actually-like">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-9"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-frugal-gifts-for-the-person-who-needs-a-nap">9 Frugal Gifts for the Person Who Needs a Nap</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/wise-bread-gift-guide-gifts-that-save-money">25 Gifts That Save Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-art-of-the-group-gift">The Art of the Group Gift</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-smart-reasons-to-last-minute-holiday-shop">9 Smart Reasons to Last-Minute Holiday Shop</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/50-unique-gift-ideas-for-men">50+ Unique Gift Ideas for Men</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Education & Training Shopping budgeting gift guide gift ideas gifts for teachers holiday shopping Holidays nonfood gifts teachers Thu, 01 Dec 2016 12:00:13 +0000 Camilla Cheung 1844263 at http://www.wisebread.com How Your Child Can Earn College Credits in High School (For Cheap) http://www.wisebread.com/how-your-child-can-earn-college-credits-in-high-school-for-cheap <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-your-child-can-earn-college-credits-in-high-school-for-cheap" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/student_happy_books_82665501.jpg" alt="Student earning college credits in high school for cheap" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>College credits are expensive. Even a class at a community college can add a few hundred dollars to your overall tuition bill. For most undergrad degrees, the first two years are devoted to general education basics that don't necessarily impact an individual's future career. For example, to get my degree in English, I still needed to take Biology and Calculus classes.</p> <p>There are a few methods that will allow high school students to earn college credits before they actually enter the college scene. Doing so can help them shave off a semester or even a whole year, which translates into a lot of money saved, depending on your college's cost per unit. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-freshman-shopping-tips-to-cut-college-costs?ref=seealso">9 Freshman Shopping Tips to Cut College Costs</a>)</p> <h2>Take CLEP Exams</h2> <p>The College Level Examination Program allows students to earn three credits or more on passed CLEP tests. There are 33 tests that can be taken and there are currently 2,900 colleges and universities that will accept credit for passing CLEP.</p> <p>According to CollegeBoard, &quot;More than 60% of CLEP test takers said that they relied on their <a href="https://bigfuture.collegeboard.org/get-in/testing/learn-about-the-clep-program">high school course work</a> to learn the material needed for their CLEP exam(s).&quot;</p> <p>The average college course costs $900, and the cost of CLEP is $80. If your child is able to pass five CLEPs, then it will cost you $400, but potentially save you $4,100 in tuition.</p> <p>Every university has their own set of rules, so make sure you know how many credits from CLEP tests they will accept beforehand. It is also wise to know how many CLEPs are applicable toward your major. For example, the college might accept 10 CLEPs, but a specific major might only need eight of those. You don't want to waste time or money taking CLEPs that cannot be applied to your degree.</p> <h2>Take AP Tests</h2> <p>Many schools offer AP courses, which are more demanding that typical high school courses. Not only do AP courses look impressive on college applications, but they can count as college credit if students pass the exam.</p> <p>AP courses and fee exams differ for each school. The standard fee for each exam is $93. A reduced fee is available for low-income families. Some schools might charge additional fees for proctoring and administering the course and exam.</p> <p>Even if your child's school does not offer a certain AP course, your child can still take the exam. You will need to find an authorized testing center, and know that the test might be harder for individuals that did not take the specialized course for the entire year.</p> <h2>Enroll in International Baccalaureate Courses</h2> <p>Depending on the high school, students can take singular IB courses or choose to pursue an IB diploma. An IB diploma is challenging, but it can shave a whole year off a student's college experience. Unfortunately, IB is a smaller program than AP, and is not as widely offered. However, if your child's school does offer IB courses, it is possible that they can transfer for more units than an AP course, depending on the college and course.</p> <p>Check with your child's school to see the exact cost of the IB program. As an example, Davis School District in Bountiful, Utah charges $864 for an IB diploma, which comes with six exams, on top of a $168 registration fee. However, they say their average IB students complete high school with 44 college credits, which comes out to the affordable price of $23.45 per unit. That is a huge difference from the usual $200&ndash;500 per unit cost that community and state colleges charge.</p> <h2>Take College Classes While in High School</h2> <p>Depending on your child's high school and community college regulations, your child can enroll in limited college courses while still in high school. Some college courses require prerequisites and you might need to gain signed authorization from your child's high school principal before they can dual enroll.</p> <p>This option can cost more than AP classes or IB courses, but it can also be more flexible. Community college courses can be demanding, but for a student that is dedicated, it is more than likely they will pass the class. It can be disheartening to take a rigorous AP course only to have your credit riding on passing one exam.</p> <p>Also with community colleges, your child will have access to online class options, help from professors, and summer class options.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/ashley-eneriz">Ashley Eneriz</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-your-child-can-earn-college-credits-in-high-school-for-cheap">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-10"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-9-best-state-529-college-savings-plans">The 9 Best State 529 College Savings Plans</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-college-students-can-save-money-before-class-starts">8 Ways College Students Can Save Money Before Class Starts</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-money-saving-hacks-every-college-student-should-try">8 Money-Saving Hacks Every College Student Should Try</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-saving-too-much-money-for-a-college-fund-is-a-bad-idea">Why Saving Too Much Money for a College Fund Is a Bad Idea</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/20-freebies-for-college-students">20+ Freebies for College Students</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Education & Training ap classes clep college credits ib courses saving money school semesters tuition Tue, 15 Nov 2016 10:00:14 +0000 Ashley Eneriz 1827229 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Ways to Get College Kids Home for the Holidays for Cheap http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-get-college-kids-home-for-the-holidays-for-cheap <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-ways-to-get-college-kids-home-for-the-holidays-for-cheap" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/friends_traveling_together_58534620.jpg" alt="Finding ways to get college kids home on the cheap" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Kid off to college this year? You're already feeling the pinch on your budget as he or she starts their (fingers crossed) four-year career, but there are perhaps a few expenses you may have overlooked during all the hustle and bustle &mdash; like how your little smarty pants will get home during breaks and holidays. To keep these travel costs manageable, consider these inexpensive ways.</p> <h2>1. Cash in Miles for Free Flights</h2> <p>In all the years you've been saving those airlines miles for the vacation of a lifetime, I bet you never thought you'd have to compromise them by bringing your kid back and forth from college for holiday breaks. Yeah, it sucks, but when they graduate and land that high-paying job, they'll totally pay you back&hellip; right?</p> <p>While you hold your breath on that prospect, consider consulting <a href="http://www.rewardexpert.com/">RewardExpert</a>, which helps travelers create easy-to-follow strategies by developing customized points earning plans and maximizing frequent flyer rewards. The service makes it easy to earn free tickets in just a few months, or help you make the most of what you already have.</p> <h2>2. Carpool With Someone Headed the Same Direction</h2> <p>I often carpooled with friends to and from college who lived at least somewhat close to my home. I'd offer gas money for the ride, and my parents would pick me up from their homes so they didn't have to go out of their way to drop me off at mine. Your kids can do the same thing the old-fashioned way by asking their friends for a ride, or &mdash; if they don't have any friends who live within driving distance of where you're from &mdash; suggest that they post an ad on Craigslist or a community or school message board looking for a driver.</p> <p>Alas, if that's too 20th century for them, there's <a href="http://thecollegecarpool.com/">College Carpool</a>, one of a handful of services that allow students to connect with others driving the same direction through private pages for each college. Through forums, students can find available rides, or proactively request one.</p> <h2>3. Enroll in a Car Share</h2> <p>Does your kid prefer to take the wheel, but they don't have a car of their own on campus? Nowadays they can sign up for car-sharing services, which help eliminate the issue of not being able to rent a car from traditional services (like Alamo) that usually require drivers to be at least 25 years old. Car-sharing services like <a href="http://www.zipcar.com/universities">Zipcar</a> and <a href="https://www.enterprisecarshare.com/us/en/home.html">Enterprise CarShare</a> are available to university students, and monthly fees are low. Once registered, students can reserve a car whenever they need one. This is a helpful convenience especially around the holidays when the rest of the family is busy with their own day-to-day concerns.</p> <h2>4. Hop on the Bus</h2> <p>I never took the bus home from college &mdash; that eight-hour ride didn't much appeal to me, plus I had awesome friends who didn't mind giving me a lift &mdash; but when I moved to Manhattan without a car in my mid-20s, I often hopped on a Greyhound to get back to my hometown of Baltimore. It was convenient, fast, and, most importantly, cheap.</p> <p>Thus, if you live a reasonable distance from child's university and they don't mind tight quarters, this may be a good option for you and your family. It's actually a rather relaxing ride once you get situated; most modern bus services, including BoltBus and Megabus, feature free WI-FI, power outlets, and even reclining seats. Smaller-scale regional buses, like <a href="http://www.coachusa.com/info/shortline/ss.studentdiscounts.asp">Short Line</a>, also offer student discounts.</p> <h2>5. Travel by Train</h2> <p>If booking your kid a bus ticket isn't an option, perhaps riding the friendly rails is a more accommodating compromise. <a href="https://www.amtrak.com/student">Amtrak</a> provides service from 500 destinations in 46 states, and it offers a 15% student discount along with the opportunity to earn points toward free travel. Amtrak is the only nationwide rail-service, which means you don't have any other options for train travel, unless you can work your regional lines to your advantage if they exist.</p> <h2>6. Get Creative</h2> <p>You don't always have to choose one option over another. Sometimes you can use a few different methods &mdash; like a bus to a train or a train to a plane, for instance. Look for the best deals among the types of transportation available to you and plan your student's trip home accordingly. It may take some time to plan and settle on the most efficient and cost-effective method, but it's worth it &mdash; especially when you consider how often you may have to do this over and over again in the next four (or five or six) years.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="//www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F6-ways-to-get-college-kids-home-for-the-holidays-for-cheap&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F6%20Ways%20to%20Get%20College%20Kids%20Home%20for%20the%20Holidays%20for%20Cheap.jpg&amp;description=6%20Ways%20to%20Get%20College%20Kids%20Home%20for%20the%20Holidays%20for%20Cheap" data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-config="above" data-pin-color="red" data-pin-height="28"><img src="//assets.pinterest.com/images/pidgets/pinit_fg_en_rect_red_28.png" alt="" /></a> </p> <!-- Please call pinit.js only once per page --><!-- Please call pinit.js only once per page --><script type="text/javascript" async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/6%20Ways%20to%20Get%20College%20Kids%20Home%20for%20the%20Holidays%20for%20Cheap.jpg" alt="6 Ways to Get College Kids Home for the Holidays for Cheap" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/mikey-rox">Mikey Rox</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-get-college-kids-home-for-the-holidays-for-cheap">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-11"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-college-expenses-you-arent-saving-for">9 College Expenses You Aren&#039;t Saving For</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-students-can-travel-abroad-for-less">7 Ways Students Can Travel Abroad for Less</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-reasons-to-add-your-teen-as-an-authorized-user-on-your-credit-card">4 Reasons to Add Your Teen as an Authorized User on Your Credit Card</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-smart-money-moves-for-empty-nesters">7 Smart Money Moves for Empty Nesters</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-lessons-that-teach-your-kid-to-be-their-own-boss">5 Lessons That Teach Your Kid to Be Their Own Boss</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Education & Training Family Travel carpooling college flights holiday breaks kids moving home public transportation rewards miles teens trains young adults Wed, 09 Nov 2016 10:00:13 +0000 Mikey Rox 1806658 at http://www.wisebread.com Does Divorce Affect Your Student Loans? http://www.wisebread.com/does-divorce-affect-your-student-loans <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/does-divorce-affect-your-student-loans" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/broken_heart_cash_25865628.jpg" alt="Learning if divorce affects your student loans" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Going through a divorce can get messy, especially when there are a lot of assets to divide and financial matters to take care of. Even worse, couples often forget that debts &mdash; and not just assets &mdash; must often be split. And student loan debt can be especially hairy. Understanding the ramifications of divorce on student debt is essential to negotiating a mutually beneficial split. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/heres-what-happens-to-a-mortgage-in-a-divorce?ref=seealso">Here's What Happens to a Mortgage in a Divorce</a>)</p> <h2>When Did You Take on the Debt?</h2> <p>If you took on your student loan before marriage, then the debt is considered separate property, and you are solely responsible for it. Similarly, you won't be held responsible for any debt taken out by your spouse before marriage.</p> <p>However, if you or your spouse took on student <a href="https://www.nolo.com/legal-encyclopedia/debt-marriage-owe-spouse-debts-29572.html">loan debt while married</a>, then the debt is considered your shared property. As a matter of fact, any debt taken on in a marriage is considered shared property, including the following:</p> <ul> <li>Mortgages</li> <li>Car loans</li> <li>Personal loans</li> <li>Sometimes business loans</li> <li>Credit card debt</li> </ul> <h2>It All Depends on Your State's Laws</h2> <p>Many states are <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Community_property">community property states</a>, which means everything is split down the middle. If you live in a community property state, the student loan debt (along with all other debt) will be split 50-50. Even if one party will suffer financial hardships from the split debt, the court will still hold them liable for half of it.</p> <p>Of course, it is the court's discretion how they split marital property, and each state has unique rules in place. In <a href="https://www.legalzoom.com/knowledge/divorce/topic/equitable-distribution-community-property">equitable distribution states</a>, such as New York, each divorce is weighed differently. According to The Wall Street Journal, &quot;If it seems like one spouse will have high income after a divorce and another will struggle to make debt payments, the higher earner may end up having to fork over some <a href="http://www.wsj.com/articles/SB10001424052702304626804579363253873904162">temporary spousal support</a> to cover the ex's debt payments.&quot;</p> <h2>Consolidated Student Loans</h2> <p>Before 2006, married couples were able to consolidate their loans. Many couples did this to get a lower interest rate and save money &mdash; but for couples that did this, they had to permanently attach themselves to the loan.</p> <p>Unfortunately, if one party does not pay their assigned portion of their loan, the other party will still be held fully responsible. Married couples can no longer consolidate their student loans, so if you were married after 2006, then this does not apply to you.</p> <h2>How to Avoid Problems Before Marriage</h2> <p>No couple wants to think about divorce before they get married, but if student loan debt is worrisome to you, there are a few things you can do before tying the knot. First, it is important that both you and your potential spouse know how much debt you each have. Everything should be laid out on the table. Secondly, to protect yourself, sign a prenuptial agreement that states how debt is supposed to be split in the case of a divorce. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/could-a-divorce-improve-your-finances?ref=seealso">Could a Divorce Improve Your Finances?</a>)</p> <h2>So How Much Student Loan Debt Will I Be Responsible for After Divorce?</h2> <p>When it comes to figuring out how much student loan debt you will be responsible for after a divorce, it all depends on your case and the state you live in. It is important for you and your spouse to know <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/life-after-bankruptcy-whats-next">the financial weight of your divorce</a> before committing to one fully. Talk with a divorce attorney to find out more information that relates to your specific case.</p> <p>If the court does hold you responsible for your spouse's student loan debt after divorce, then it is important to pay it. If you don't, you will be held liable, your wages could be garnished, and your credit score can suffer.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/ashley-eneriz">Ashley Eneriz</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/does-divorce-affect-your-student-loans">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-12"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-manage-your-money-during-a-spousal-separation">How to Manage Your Money During a Spousal Separation</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-secrets-you-need-to-tell-your-financial-adviser">11 Secrets You Need to Tell Your Financial Adviser</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/could-a-divorce-improve-your-finances">Could a Divorce Improve Your Finances?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-every-parent-should-know-about-the-new-college-financial-aid-rules">What Every Parent Should Know About the New College Financial Aid Rules</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-to-make-the-most-of-your-student-loan-grace-period">4 Ways to Make the Most of Your Student Loan Grace Period</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance Education & Training consolidation court divorce loans marriage state laws student debts Tue, 08 Nov 2016 10:00:15 +0000 Ashley Eneriz 1827231 at http://www.wisebread.com