Education &amp; Training http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/12010/all en-US Are You Pursuing an Overcrowded Career Field? http://www.wisebread.com/are-you-pursuing-an-overcrowded-career-field <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/are-you-pursuing-an-overcrowded-career-field" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/row_of_business_people_waiting_for_an_interview.jpg" alt="Row of business people waiting for an interview" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>When it comes to a career, knowing what you want to do is half the battle. The other half is actually finding a job in your chosen field. In some job markets, an influx of eager candidates has rendered certain fields completely overcrowded with qualified workers.</p> <p>If you're ready to earn a degree or certification and pursue a set career path, you may want to do some research first. Ensuring that you'll actually be able to find a job in your desired field can prevent you from feeling like you &quot;wasted&quot; the time and expense of your education or training.</p> <p>Here's how to discover if you might be pursuing an overcrowded career field.</p> <h2>Look into national and regional statistics</h2> <p>The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics compiles an <a href="https://www.bls.gov/ooh/education-training-and-library/home.htm" target="_blank">Occupational Outlook Handbook</a> that lists the projected outlook and employment changes for specific jobs over a 10-year period. If the projected growth of jobs in your desired field is low or nonexistent, you might want to pursue another career.</p> <p>Some job markets are more saturated in certain areas than others. If you're looking for more localized information, each state has a department of labor that collects state level stats about career prospects. The Idaho Department of Labor, for example, created a Jobscape Career Search Tool that allows citizens to check out the demand for specific jobs each year. The stats can be filtered by region using a ZIP code or city name. That can really help residents get a sense of job prospects. Here is a resource for finding each individual state's <a href="http://www.projectionscentral.com/Projections/ProjectionSites" target="_blank">labor statistics site</a>.</p> <p>When stats are projected over a longer period, it can be difficult to determine if the major growth has already happened. You may want to find stats that project shorter term growth (typically over a two-year period) for the occupation. <a href="http://www.projectionscentral.com/Projections/ShortTerm" target="_blank">Projections Central</a> is a solid place to start. It lists short-term projections of occupations by state. If the change in employment prospects is either negative or low, it might be a sign to move or pursue a different career.</p> <h2>Check job search sites</h2> <p>Another way to get a feel for a crowded career field is to browse common job listing sites and see what the current listings are. If there doesn't seem to be a lot of job openings for your chosen profession on a local, state, or national level, the career field might be overcrowded. If there are tons of jobs available, you might be safe.</p> <p>Continue to keep an eye on the job listings as you prepare to enroll in a college or certificate program. If anything changes or doesn't change, it could give you some valuable insight on the state of the job market. If job listings for the career never seem to crop up, that's a very bad sign. If the same job listings remain month after month, that can be a good sign that companies are struggling to find candidates.</p> <p>Note this method is far more useful for careers with shorter educational requirements. The state of the job market today won't necessarily tell you what it will be like a few years down the line for careers requiring advanced degrees.</p> <h2>Seek advice from a college career counselor</h2> <p>Students can seek career advice from on-campus resources. A college career adviser, depending on the school and the individual's experience, can be a valuable source of information.</p> <p>If the adviser isn't any help on career-specific questions, students can stop by the career services office. The professionals employed in career services may be slightly better equipped to help you determine if your first career choice is a lucrative one. If they don't have specific information about your intended job prospects, they can at least help point you in the right direction to find the information you need.</p> <h2>Ask professionals in your desired field</h2> <p>Networking can be helpful in determining if a specific degree is lucrative or not. Ask around to see if any family or friends might know someone who pursued the same degree or job field in the past. If you find someone, politely ask if they'd be willing to meet up and answer some of your questions. Consider asking how easy it was for them to find a job, what the competition was like, and if they've seen an influx of new graduates suddenly flood their market.</p> <p>If you need ideas for alternate career paths, many state government websites list the hottest jobs in their state for individuals to pursue. Indiana, for example, has a <a href="https://netsolutions.dwd.in.gov/hh50/jobList.aspx" target="_blank">Hot 50 Jobs list</a>.</p> <p>If your heart is still set on pursuing a career in a crowded field, take steps to ensure that you can outshine every other recent graduate during your job search. It may also be worthwhile to research which regions and states offer a more lucrative job market in that specific field.</p> <p>And as a final note, remember that different states have different certificate and education requirements to work in certain jobs. Make sure when you pursue an education that you will meet those requirements.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fare-you-pursuing-an-overcrowded-career-field&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FAre%2520You%2520Pursuing%2520an%2520Overcrowded%2520Career%2520Field-.jpg&amp;description=Are%20You%20Pursuing%20an%20Overcrowded%20Career%20Field%3F"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/Are%20You%20Pursuing%20an%20Overcrowded%20Career%20Field-.jpg" alt="Are You Pursuing an Overcrowded Career Field?" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/samantha-stauf">Samantha Stauf</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/are-you-pursuing-an-overcrowded-career-field">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-great-jobs-for-the-next-10-years">8 Great Jobs for the Next 10 Years</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-tips-for-my-career-clueless-college-self">5 Tips for My Career-Clueless College Self</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-you-dont-need-a-college-degree-to-succeed">Why You Don&#039;t Need a College Degree to Succeed</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-colleges-with-the-best-programs-to-get-you-jobs">8 Colleges With the Best Programs to Get You Jobs</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-money-moves-every-new-college-student-should-make">7 Money Moves Every New College Student Should Make</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Education & Training career counseling career fields college job markets oversaturated prospects shadowing statistics Mon, 09 Oct 2017 08:30:08 +0000 Samantha Stauf 2032526 at http://www.wisebread.com Yes, You Can Pay for Education With an IRA http://www.wisebread.com/yes-you-can-pay-for-education-with-an-ira <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/yes-you-can-pay-for-education-with-an-ira" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/education_fund_coins_652348714.jpg" alt="Education fund in jar" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>When most people think of saving for a college education, they usually think of 529 savings plans or Coverdell Education Savings Accounts (ESA). These accounts allow you to grow your money by investing in select mutual funds, much like a typical retirement account does. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-smart-places-to-stash-your-kids-college-savings?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Smart Places to Stash Your Kid's College Savings</a>)</p> <p>While both of these accounts are great investment tools to pay for a college education, there's another option you may not have considered. A Roth IRA can also be used for educational expenses. There are pros and cons for each way to save for college. Here's a brief rundown:</p> <table> <tbody> <tr> <td> <p><strong>Coverdell ESA</strong></p> </td> <td> <p><strong>529 savings plans</strong></p> </td> <td> <p><strong>Roth IRA</strong></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <p>No tax deduction from contributions.</p> </td> <td> <p>No tax deduction from contributions.</p> </td> <td> <p>No tax deduction from contributions.</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <p>Withdraw your contributions tax free.</p> </td> <td> <p>Withdraw your contributions tax free.</p> </td> <td> <p>Withdraw your contributions tax free. (If you withdraw interest, it will be taxed.)</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <p>Annual contribution limit: $2,000 per beneficiary.</p> </td> <td> <p>No annual contribution limit but most states limit total contributions to $300,000.</p> </td> <td> <p>Annual contribution limit: $5,500, or $6,500 if age 50 or over.</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <p>Anyone can contribute but the amount they can contribute is limited by their modified adjusted gross income. Ability to contribute phases out once modified AGI reaches $220,000.</p> </td> <td> <p>&nbsp; Anyone can&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; contribute.</p> </td> <td> <p>Must have income in order to contribute. People with high incomes ($181,000 for married couple) are prohibited from contributing.</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <p>Can be used for higher education and qualified K-12 expenses. Beneficiary must use account by age 30.</p> </td> <td> <p>Can only be used for higher education expenses.</p> </td> <td> <p>Can be used for higher education, first home purchase, qualified medical expenses, and retirement.</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <p>Account under guardian's name won't impact beneficiary's FAFSA.</p> </td> <td> <p>Account under guardian's name won't impact beneficiary's FAFSA.</p> </td> <td> <p>Withdrawals will increase your earned income and can affect beneficiary's FAFSA.</p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <h2>Roth IRAs</h2> <p>A Roth IRA differs from a traditional IRA in that the income you contribute is already taxed. The beauty of a Roth IRA is that the distribution you take from your contributions is <em>not </em>taxable (as long as the use is approved).</p> <p>Let's say your child is a college freshman. You withdraw $15,000 from your Roth IRA for their first year of school. None of this money will be taxed, as long as it is from your own contributions and not from the interest earned. Withdrawals are considered returns of contributions initially, for tax purposes. They are considered interest earnings second.</p> <p>Now, you are likely thinking, &quot;But aren't IRA withdrawals subject to penalties if you withdraw them early?&quot; Generally, yes. Normally, you must be age 59 &frac12; or older, and have had the account for at least five years to withdraw without incurring a 10 percent tax penalty. Why? Well, all IRAs are retirement funds, primarily. They are designed to be withdrawn only as folks approach retirement.</p> <p>But no penalty applies if the withdrawal is for qualified educational purposes (or a first home purchase, or qualified medical bills). Even if your child or grandchild has a scholarship for full tuition, it's no problem. Roth IRAs can be used for any qualified educational expense, including room, board, books, and supplies.</p> <p>If your child or grandchild ends up not going to college, or not needing all the money, you can simply keep the money to continue funding your retirement. Note that to place money back into a Roth IRA, it will be subject to annual contribution limits ($5,500 if under age 50, and $6,500 if age 50 or older).</p> <h2>Traditional IRAs</h2> <p>You can also use traditional IRAs to pay for college. Essentially, traditional IRAs reverse the tax advantage of a Roth. You get a tax deduction upfront for all money contributed to a traditional IRA &mdash; but all withdrawals will be taxed at the federal and state level.</p> <p>As with a Roth IRA, if traditional IRA distributions before age 59 &frac12; are used for qualified educational expenses, they are not subject to the 10 percent penalty. However, they will be subject to tax. The IRS will get its money whenever you withdraw from a traditional IRA, regardless of what you withdraw it for.</p> <p>Because of the tax implications, while it is <em>possible </em>to use a traditional IRA for educational expenses, it may not be the most prudent move. If you want to tap into IRAs for college expenses, a Roth IRA is the better bet financially.</p> <h2>An important caveat</h2> <p>Realistically, tapping your IRA to pay for your child's education should rarely be your first choice. It can be a smart move if you have a considerable amount saved and a lot of time left before retirement to pay it back. Otherwise, you'll be draining the account of funds you very much need. It may be wiser to use an educational savings account to save for your child's education instead. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-saving-too-much-money-for-a-college-fund-is-a-bad-idea?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Why Saving Too Much Money for a College Fund Is a Bad Idea</a>)</p> <p>However, there are still benefits of using an IRA over an educational savings account if you know your retirement will still be secure. For example, by combining the funds into one account, you will have more flexibility in choosing whether to spend your savings on education &mdash; and how much &mdash; or to continue to hold it for your retirement.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fyes-you-can-pay-for-education-with-an-ira&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FHow%2520To%2520Pay%2520For%2520Your%2520College%2520Education.png&amp;description=Yes%2C%20You%20Can%20Pay%20for%20Education%20With%20an%20IRA"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/How%20To%20Pay%20For%20Your%20College%20Education.png" alt="Yes, You Can Pay for Education With an IRA" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/anum-yoon">Anum Yoon</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/yes-you-can-pay-for-education-with-an-ira">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-save-for-retirement-when-you-are-unemployed">How to Save for Retirement When You Are Unemployed</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-smart-places-to-stash-your-kids-college-savings">5 Smart Places to Stash Your Kid&#039;s College Savings</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/which-retirement-account-is-right-for-you">Which Retirement Account Is Right for You?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/this-one-thing-could-be-the-key-to-retiring-rich">This One Thing Could Be the Key to Retiring Rich</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-surprising-ways-to-get-more-college-financial-aid">12 Surprising Ways to Get More College Financial Aid</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Education & Training Retirement college contributions distributions higher education qualified expenses Roth IRA saving money traditional ira Wed, 04 Oct 2017 08:00:07 +0000 Anum Yoon 2029157 at http://www.wisebread.com Get Smart About Money With These 18 Free Online Courses http://www.wisebread.com/get-smart-about-money-with-these-18-free-online-courses <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/get-smart-about-money-with-these-18-free-online-courses" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/young_man_using_laptop.jpg" alt="Young man using laptop" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>A growing number of leading business schools and universities are offering free personal finance courses online. Why not take advantage of these sophisticated resources to grow your knowledge and take your finances to the next level? (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-places-to-get-free-personal-finance-classes?ref=seealso" target="_blank">10 Places to Get Free Personal Finance Classes</a>)</p> <p>These free online courses are sometimes known as Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs). Many are either based on university courses, or actually are the same university courses that have been offered to paying students on campus. Although you will not get credit toward a degree for taking a free class, you can certainly learn a thing or two that will help you manage your finances and become a better negotiator, entrepreneur, and investor. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-cheap-ways-to-continue-your-education-without-going-back-to-school?ref=seealso" target="_blank">8 Cheap Ways to Continue Your Education Without Going Back to School</a>)</p> <h2>1. Finance for Everyone: Smart Tools for Decision-Making</h2> <p>This <a href="https://www.edx.org/course/finance-everyone-smart-tools-decision-michiganx-fin101x-1#" target="_blank">introductory personal finance course</a> through the University of Michigan covers the basics of personal finance, teaching frameworks and methods that will better equip you to make sound everyday financial decisions.</p> <p>Time commitment: 6 weeks, 5&ndash;6 hours per week.</p> <h2>2. Behavioral Economics in Action</h2> <p>Offered through the University of Toronto, <a href="https://www.edx.org/course/behavioral-economics-action-university-torontox-be101x-0#" target="_blank">Behavioral Economics in Action</a> teaches students how economics drives consumer decisions and how to develop tools that lead to better financial decisions.</p> <p>Time commitment: 6 weeks, 4&ndash;5 hours per week.</p> <h2>3. Personal Finance</h2> <p>Purdue University offers <a href="https://www.edx.org/course/personal-finance-purduex-pn-17-2" target="_blank">Personal Finance</a>; Improve your money management by improving your understanding of key personal finance concepts such as investments, credit, and insurance.</p> <p>Time commitment: 5 weeks, 3&ndash;4 hours per week.</p> <h2>4. Analyzing Global Trends for Business and Society</h2> <p>The Wharton University of Pennsylvania offers an online course on <a href="https://www.edx.org/course/analyzing-global-trends-business-society-wharton-trends1x?source=aw&amp;awc=6798_1502742497_0d3411ef1fd94a7d7eb647004262589a&amp;utm_source=aw&amp;utm_medium=affiliate_partner&amp;utm_content=text-link&amp;utm_term=301045_https://www.class-central.com/" target="_blank">learning to understand global trends</a>, including how you can use that knowledge to make better financial decisions and investments.</p> <p>Time commitment: 7 weeks, 3&ndash;4 hours per week.</p> <h2>5. How to Start a Startup</h2> <p>With Stanford University's video course <a href="https://www.class-central.com/mooc/2572/how-to-start-a-startup" target="_blank">How to Start a Startup</a>, you'll learn the fundamentals of launching a new business; including how to develop product ideas, make sales, market products, and hire your first employees.</p> <p>Time commitment: 1,000 minutes of video.</p> <h2>6. Stocks and Bonds: Risks and Returns</h2> <p>Another Stanford video course, <a href="https://www.class-central.com/mooc/2453/stanford-openedx-stocks-and-bonds-risks-and-returns" target="_blank">Stocks and Bonds: Risks and Returns</a> covers the basics of stocks and bonds, including how value is established, what affects market prices, and what you actually get when you buy a stock or a bond.</p> <p>Time commitment: Self-paced.</p> <h2>7. Finance Theory I</h2> <p><a href="https://ocw.mit.edu/courses/sloan-school-of-management/15-401-finance-theory-i-fall-2008/" target="_blank">Finance Theory I</a>, offered by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, teaches you how the economy and capital markets work, including an introduction to complex investment instruments such as derivatives and options.</p> <p>Time commitment: Semester-length course.</p> <h2>8. Retail Fundamentals</h2> <p>Learning <a href="https://www.edx.org/course/retail-fundamentals-dartmouthx-rfundx-0" target="_blank">how retail works</a> can give you an advantage as a consumer. This course from Dartmouth covers the basics of how businesses select inventory and set prices to maximize profit.</p> <p>Time commitment: 4 weeks, 3&ndash;4 hours per week.</p> <h2>9. Economics of Money and Banking</h2> <p>This course from Columbia University teaches the <a href="https://www.coursera.org/learn/money-banking" target="_blank">basics of banking and monetary policy</a> and offers insight into the financial crisis of 2007&ndash;2009 from the perspective of financial institutions.</p> <p>Time commitment: 13 weeks, 5 hours per week.</p> <h2>10. Introduction to Negotiation: A Strategic Playbook for Becoming a Principled and Persuasive Negotiator</h2> <p>Negotiating effectively is one of the most effective ways to get ahead financially. This course from Yale promises to &quot;<a href="https://www.class-central.com/mooc/4336/coursera-introduction-to-negotiation-a-strategic-playbook-for-becoming-a-principled-and-persuasive-negotiator" target="_blank">help you be a better negotiator</a>&quot; by teaching tactics and tools to reach a better deal.</p> <p>Time commitment: 9-week course.</p> <h2>11. Personal &amp; Family Financial Planning</h2> <p><a href="https://www.coursera.org/learn/family-planning" target="_blank">Personal &amp; Family Financial Planning</a> from the University of Florida teaches the fundamentals of personal finance and money management including budgeting, credit, and taxes.</p> <p>Time commitment: 9-week course.</p> <h2>12. Investment Vehicles, Insurance, and Retirement</h2> <p>Khan University's <a href="https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/investment-vehicles-tutorial" target="_blank">Investment Vehicles, Insurance, and Retirement</a> course teaches the basic principles that will allow you to grow your money through investments and protect your money through insurance.</p> <p>Time commitment: Self-paced.</p> <h2>13. Securing Investment Returns in the Long Run</h2> <p>In the course <a href="https://www.coursera.org/learn/investment-returns-long-run" target="_blank">Securing Investment Returns in the Long Run</a> through the University of Geneva, you'll learn about active vs. passive investing and how to evaluate the performance of your investments to achieve good long-term returns.</p> <p>Time commitment: 4 weeks, 1&ndash;3 hours per week.</p> <h2>14. Fundamentals of Personal Financial Planning</h2> <p><a href="http://cat.ocw.uci.edu/oo/getPage.php?course=AR0102092&amp;lesson=001&amp;topic=1&amp;page=1" target="_blank">Fundamentals of Personal Financial Planning</a> from UC Irvine aims to teach you how to set and reach your financial goals by improving your knowledge of personal finance.</p> <p>Time commitment: 30 hours.</p> <h2>15. Free Online Personal Finance Course</h2> <p>This <a href="https://cals.arizona.edu/sfcs/personalfinance/introduction.html" target="_blank">personal finance primer</a> from the University of Arizona will teach you how to navigate the perils of today's consumer economy by mastering personal finance principles.</p> <p>Time commitment: 15 hours.</p> <h2>16. Econ 252: Financial Markets</h2> <p>Become a smarter investor with this <a href="http://oyc.yale.edu/economics/econ-252-08" target="_blank">economics course</a> from Yale, which aims to help you understand the inner workings of financial institutions such as banks, insurance companies, and securities markets.</p> <p>Time commitment: Semester-length course.</p> <h2>17. New Venture Finance: Startup Funding for Entrepreneurs</h2> <p>If you are thinking about starting a business, <a href="https://www.coursera.org/learn/startup-funding" target="_blank">New Venture Finance: Startup Funding for Entrepreneurs</a> from the University of Maryland will help you figure out how to fund your venture.</p> <p>Time commitment: 3&ndash;5 hours per week.</p> <h2>18. Marketing in a Digital World</h2> <p><a href="https://www.coursera.org/learn/marketing-digital" target="_blank">Marketing in a Digital World</a>, from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, will teach you how digital tools are revolutionizing the way products are bought and sold, and how this is providing unprecedented advantages for consumers.</p> <p>Time commitment: 4 weeks, 6&ndash;8 hours per week.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fget-smart-about-money-with-these-18-free-online-courses&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FGet%2520Smart%2520About%2520Money%2520With%2520These%252018%2520Free%2520Online%2520Courses.jpg&amp;description=Get%20Smart%20About%20Money%20With%20These%2018%20Free%20Online%20Courses"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/Get%20Smart%20About%20Money%20With%20These%2018%20Free%20Online%20Courses.jpg" alt="Get Smart About Money With These 18 Free Online Courses" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dr-penny-pincher">Dr Penny Pincher</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/get-smart-about-money-with-these-18-free-online-courses">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-online-forums-thatll-help-you-reach-your-financial-goals">9 Online Forums That&#039;ll Help You Reach Your Financial Goals</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-financial-moves-you-can-make-during-your-commute">10 Financial Moves You Can Make During Your Commute</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-online-tools-to-manage-your-money-in-under-10-minutes-a-week">5 Online Tools to Manage Your Money in Under 10 Minutes a Week</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-millennials-have-changed-money-so-far">6 Ways Millennials Have Changed Money (So Far)</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/financial-tricks-to-master-for-a-happier-life">Financial Tricks to Master for a Happier Life</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance Education & Training entrepreneurship freebies investing learning massive open online courses money management online courses resources Tue, 03 Oct 2017 08:30:11 +0000 Dr Penny Pincher 2028482 at http://www.wisebread.com 8 College Perks You Might Be Missing Out On http://www.wisebread.com/8-college-perks-you-might-be-missing-out-on <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/8-college-perks-you-might-be-missing-out-on" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/i_am_prepared_for_exam_very_well.jpg" alt="I am prepared for exam very well" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>College is expensive. Many students struggle to find the funds to attend college and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-easy-ways-to-avoid-student-loan-debt?ref=internal" target="_blank">avoid massive student debt</a>. And while student debt is an ongoing issue, there are many ways a student ID can provide big savings elsewhere. Savvy college students can utilize free or discounted activities and products to maximize their college experience and minimize their expenses. Here are eight college perks that you might be missing out on.</p> <h2>1. Reduced or free museum admission</h2> <p>Many museums and art galleries offer free or reduced admission to college students. New York University, for example, has a program called <a href="https://www.nyu.edu/life/arts-culture-and-entertainment/free-museum-access.html" target="_blank">Museum Gateway</a> that grants free admission to nearly a dozen museums and art galleries in New York City.</p> <p>Even if the college doesn't have a direct partnership with the museum to provide free admission to students, the museum might still have a student discount. The Museum of Fine Arts Boston, for example, offers free admission with a valid student ID. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/20-freebies-for-college-students?ref=seealso" target="_blank">20+ Freebies for College Students</a>)</p> <h2>2. Student discounts on computers</h2> <p>Computers are a vital tool. While students can access computers at local and college libraries, it can be a tad inconvenient. Computer manufacturers have created student discount programs to lower the monetary burden of students who need a computer.</p> <ul> <li> <p><a href="http://hp.force.com/external/hpacademy?AOID=51289" target="_blank">HP Academy</a> offers students 20 percent off HP products.</p> </li> <li> <p><a href="http://www.dell.com/en-us/learn/purchaseprogram/university" target="_blank">Dell University</a> offers students 20 percent off Dell products.</p> </li> <li> <p><a href="https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/store/b/sale" target="_blank">Microsoft</a> offers students up to 10 percent off Microsoft computers.</p> </li> <li> <p><a href="http://www3.lenovo.com/us/en/landingpage/students-and-teachers/" target="_blank">Lenovo</a> offers students 15 percent of Lenovo products.</p> </li> </ul> <p>If you get really lucky, the university might also offer additional savings or a free computer or tablet upon enrollment.</p> <h2>3. Discounted or free software</h2> <p>Software can be essential for a successful college career. Spreadsheets, word processing, presentation programs, and graphics editing programs are expensive. Thankfully, as a student, you are spared the high cost of the programs.</p> <ul> <li> <p>Office 365 is free to all students with a valid student ID. You can either download the programs from your college's website or from <a href="https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/education/products/office/default.aspx" target="_blank">Microsoft</a>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a href="http://www.adobe.com/creativecloud/buy/students.html" target="_blank">Adobe</a> offers students 60 percent off the price of their photography and design apps.</p> </li> </ul> <h2>4. Free access to gyms and rec centers</h2> <p>Most on-campus colleges tend to have a gym and rec center that are free for students to utilize. The perks offered in the gyms are highly dependent on the school. Perks range from workout equipment, one-on-one personal training, online, or on-site workout classes, lap pools, lazy rivers, hot tubs, rock climbing centers, and indoor recreation rooms for various intramural sports. Gym and rec center memberships are expensive, so it's definitely worth taking advantage of this perk.</p> <p>If you're an online student without access to your university's gym, private gyms often offer a student discount you can cash in on.</p> <h2>5. Free entertainment</h2> <p>Colleges often offer free admission to movie screenings, plays, guest speakers, sporting events, and concerts. These college-funded events can be great ways to fill your free time without dipping into your bank account.</p> <h2>6. Free mental health counseling and services</h2> <p>College life can be stressful. Students who are mentally and emotionally healthy have a slightly higher chance of succeeding at school. In order to help students maintain a good mental health, many colleges offer free individual, group, or couples therapy. The sessions are meant to help students deal with issues, manage their personal problems, and develop coping strategies. This is a free service that can, in many cases, save your educational career.</p> <h2>7. Discounted airfare and hotels</h2> <p>Whether it's for summer break, visiting the family, or returning to school, plane tickets and hotels can be horrendously expensive. The good news is that there are travel sites that offer discounted prices to students.</p> <ul> <li> <p><a href="https://www.studentuniverse.com/" target="_blank">Student Universe</a> lets students buy flights and hotels at a discounted rate. A student ID or class schedule will often be required to prove that you are a student.</p> </li> <li> <p><a href="https://www.cheapoair.com/deals/student-travel" target="_blank">CheapOAir</a> has a student travel page that offers discounted rates.</p> </li> <li> <p><a href="http://www.statravel.com/" target="_blank">STA Travel</a> offers an International Student Identity Card that provides discounts on flights and hotels.</p> </li> </ul> <h2>8. Clothing discounts</h2> <p>Students can receive special discounts at dozens of clothing retailers. This is especially true for students who need more formal clothing for internships or their first job after college.</p> <p>Once you have a little money to spend, go shopping for a few work-approved outfits before you graduate. Check out Banana Republic, J. Crew, Ann Taylor, Club Monaco, Sam's Club for student discounts. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-sites-where-the-right-email-address-can-save-you-money?ref=seealso" target="_blank">15 Sites Where the Right Email Address Can Save You Money</a>)</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F8-college-perks-you-might-be-missing-out-on&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F8%2520College%2520Perks%2520You%2520Might%2520Be%2520Missing%2520Out%2520On.jpg&amp;description=8%20College%20Perks%20You%20Might%20Be%20Missing%20Out%20On"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/8%20College%20Perks%20You%20Might%20Be%20Missing%20Out%20On.jpg" alt="8 College Perks You Might Be Missing Out On" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/samantha-stauf">Samantha Stauf</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-college-perks-you-might-be-missing-out-on">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-genius-ways-to-stock-up-on-school-supplies">6 Genius Ways to Stock Up on School Supplies</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-college-students-can-save-money-before-class-starts">8 Ways College Students Can Save Money Before Class Starts</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-smart-shoppers-will-save-at-amazons-whole-foods">How Smart Shoppers Will Save at Amazon&#039;s Whole Foods</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-effortless-ways-to-save-on-back-to-school-shopping">4 Effortless Ways to Save on Back-to-School Shopping</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-times-coupons-trick-you-into-spending-more-money">5 Times Coupons Trick You Into Spending More Money</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Education & Training Shopping college perks college student discounts saving money shopping tips student discounts Wed, 20 Sep 2017 08:30:17 +0000 Samantha Stauf 2023006 at http://www.wisebread.com 7 Money Moves Every New College Student Should Make http://www.wisebread.com/7-money-moves-every-new-college-student-should-make <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/7-money-moves-every-new-college-student-should-make" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/cute_college_student_walking_around_campus_on_sunny_day.jpg" alt="Cute college student walking around campus on sunny day" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>College is about more than just getting a degree. For many new college students, starting this phase of education is also a time to learn any number of important life skills, from proper laundry care to time management.</p> <p>However, many college students often overlook one important life skill: money management. As a college student, you might assume that money management isn't important, since you've got so little money to manage.</p> <p>Unfortunately, neglecting your money skills in college could have lasting negative repercussions throughout your adult life. Rather than assuming you'll sort out the money stuff &quot;later,&quot; get off on the right financial foot by following these money moves when you start your college career.</p> <h2>1. Open a student checking account</h2> <p>Your brand-new university ID makes you eligible for student checking accounts. This gives you a good home for your money while you're in school, and helps you develop good banking habits.</p> <p>Student checking accounts often have low or no minimum opening deposits, and they also generally do not require you to carry a minimum balance each month. In addition, some student accounts offer perks like a limited number of free out-of-network ATM transactions per month, free checks, and some overdraft forgiveness.</p> <h2>2. Start automating your bills</h2> <p>Once you have a checking account in place, you can take advantage of your bank's online bill paying services to set up automatic payments of your regular expenses. Automatic bill payment allows you to keep your focus on your studies, where it belongs.</p> <p>Of course, the caveat is that you need to periodically make sure your account has enough money to cover your automatically paid bills. One good way to do this is to set up a weekly reminder to check your finances. This will help you establish the habit of keeping an eye on your finances even as they are taken care of automatically.</p> <h2>3. Create a spending plan for your financial aid</h2> <p>Receiving a big chunk of money from your university's financial aid office can be pretty exciting &mdash; whether you're receiving loans you'll have to pay back, or grants that you won't. It's tempting to live it up when you receive your financial aid, but that's a good way to run out of money before the semester is over.</p> <p>Instead, take the time to create a spending plan for your financial aid disbursement before the money hits your bank account. Determine how much of your financial aid will need to go toward tuition, textbooks, lab fees, and living expenses. Having such a plan in place will help you keep your spending in check when you feel the urge to splurge some of your aid money.</p> <h2>5. Keep track of your student loans</h2> <p>Many college students &mdash; including yours truly! &mdash; make the mistake of paying no attention to their student loans until they have graduated. In general, the amount of money you are borrowing can seem unreal, so it's very easy to just ignore the problem until you reach your student loan exit interview just before graduation.</p> <p>However, knowing early how much you owe and how much it will cost you to pay it off is both good for your financial health and can help you remain motivated in your studies. It's much easier to get up for that 8 a.m. chemistry lab when you understand just how much you're paying for the privilege of going to it.</p> <p>If you have federal student loans, you can keep track of how much you have borrowed and what your repayment options will be through the <a href="https://www.nslds.ed.gov/nslds/nslds_SA/" target="_blank">National Student Loan Data System</a>. Just select &quot;Financial Aid Review,&quot; log in, and you can view all of your federal student loans in one place. If you have any private student loans, you will need to contact your lender for information regarding your loans.</p> <h2>6. Build up an emergency fund</h2> <p>When I was in college, a classmate's financial aid package was re-evaluated at the end of her first year. The school's financial aid office decided that she could count on an additional $1,500 from her family for her second year, even though she knew that it would be impossible to ask for that additional money. By working some serious overtime that summer and living off tuna fish and ramen, my classmate was able to scrape together the additional money. But this situation could have potentially meant the difference between her returning to school and her dropping out.</p> <p>An emergency fund can make this kind of unanticipated financial change much less stressful than it was for my classmate, especially when you are already living on a shoestring.</p> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/a-step-by-step-guide-to-creating-your-emergency-fund" target="_blank">Building an emergency fund</a> might feel impossible when you're in college, but don't forget that small amounts can add up to something really helpful. Start with an automatic transfer of $5 &mdash;$10 per week into a savings account. Add in whatever excess money you come across &mdash; including the cash you get for selling back textbooks or some of the birthday money Nana sends every year.</p> <p>Though your fund will grow slowly, working steadily on it will ensure that a financial aid (or other emergency) does not jeopardize your education.</p> <h2>7. Learn from your financial fumbles</h2> <p>Every time you make a financial decision as a college student, you have the opportunity to learn from your choices. The trick to learning from financial mistakes rather than repeating them, is to look back on the choices you made with curiosity and compassion for yourself. You're a college student, after all, and learning is the entire job description.</p> <p>Take each moment of money regret as an opportunity to figure out where your financial weaknesses are. You'll finish college with a much better understand of yourself and your money temptations, as well as potential solutions for avoiding those temptations.</p> <h2>Learn about finances before you enter the real world</h2> <p>It may feel like adding financial responsibility on top of your educational requirements will be too much to handle, but college is actually a great time to work on your money management skills. Taking good care of your finances as you are engaging in higher learning sets you up for financial success after graduation.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F7-money-moves-every-new-college-student-should-make&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F7%2520Money%2520Moves%2520Every%2520New%2520College%2520Student%2520Should%2520Make.jpg&amp;description=7%20Money%20Moves%20Every%20New%20College%20Student%20Should%20Make"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/7%20Money%20Moves%20Every%20New%20College%20Student%20Should%20Make.jpg" alt="7 Money Moves Every New College Student Should Make" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/emily-guy-birken">Emily Guy Birken</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-money-moves-every-new-college-student-should-make">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/css-is-one-source-of-college-financial-aid-you-cant-afford-to-overlook">CSS Is One Source of College Financial Aid You Can&#039;t Afford to Overlook</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-money-moves-to-make-the-moment-you-graduate">5 Money Moves to Make the Moment You Graduate</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/should-you-borrow-student-loan-money-from-amazon-prime">Should You Borrow Student Loan Money From Amazon Prime?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-things-financial-aid-might-not-cover">6 Things Financial Aid Might Not Cover</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-10-most-common-financial-aid-mistakes-and-how-to-avoid-them">The 10 Most Common Financial Aid Mistakes — And How To Avoid Them</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance Education & Training automatic payments bills checking accounts college emergency funds financial aid money moves savings student loans students Tue, 29 Aug 2017 09:00:05 +0000 Emily Guy Birken 2009181 at http://www.wisebread.com 5 Reasons Building Credit in College Helps You Win at Life http://www.wisebread.com/5-reasons-building-credit-in-college-helps-you-win-at-life <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-reasons-building-credit-in-college-helps-you-win-at-life" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_credit_card_514475258.jpg" alt="Woman building credit in college" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>As a college student, your credit score probably isn't a priority. You're too busy worrying about exams, homework, and scraping together enough money for a pizza on Friday night. But building good credit when you're in college is important. It can make it easier to rent an apartment, apply for a good credit card, and buy a car once you graduate. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-best-credit-cards-for-college-students?ref=seealso" target="_blank">The 5 Best Credit Cards for College Students</a>)</p> <p>Many college students graduate with no credit score at all. That's because they've never used a credit card or paid off an installment loan, such as for a car or mortgage. They haven't even started paying off their student loans yet.</p> <p>Graduating with no credit makes life after college more challenging. Here are five big reasons why you should start building good credit when you're still in school.</p> <h2>1. Renting an apartment</h2> <p>In a recent survey by national credit bureau TransUnion, 48 percent of apartment landlords said that the results of a credit check rank among the top three factors they consider when deciding to lease an apartment to a potential renter.</p> <p>If your credit is bad, or if you don't have any credit at all, you'll struggle to rent an apartment on your own. You might have to rely on a co-signer, usually a parent, to sign the lease with you. If you can't find a co-signer, and you haven't built any credit while in college, finding your dream apartment, or even just a starter apartment, can get difficult.</p> <h2>2. Buying a car</h2> <p>Unless you buy a car with cash, you'll probably have to apply for an auto loan to finance the purchase of a new vehicle. Auto lenders study your credit, too. If they find that you don't have any history behind you, they'll be far less likely to approve you for the loan you need to buy that new car.</p> <p>Again, you might have to rely on finding a co-signer. This can be even more difficult for an auto loan. Not only are co-signers on an auto loan responsible for any payments you don't make, the loan will also be counted as their debt. This can make it more difficult for your co-signer to apply for new loans of their own.</p> <p>Overall, it's much easier to walk into an auto dealership knowing that you already have a credit history of your own.</p> <h2>3. Applying for student loans</h2> <p>You'll want a good credit history if you'll need to apply for private loans to help finance the cost of graduate or professional school. It's easier to get federal PLUS loans for graduate and professional schools with a lower credit score. However, you are limited in how much you can borrow through these federal sources.</p> <p>If you must borrow more, you might have to rely on private loans. And private lenders will take a close look at your credit. If you don't have a credit history, qualifying for one of these loans will be more challenging.</p> <h2>4. Being approved for credit cards</h2> <p>There are plenty of credit cards out there with <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-best-low-interest-rate-credit-cards?ref=internal" target="_blank">low interest rates</a> and valuable rewards programs. They can give you <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-best-cash-back-credit-cards?ref=internal" target="_blank">cash back on purchases</a> or let you <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/top-5-travel-reward-credit-cards?ref=internal" target="_blank">earn travel rewards</a> when you use your card.</p> <p>Without a credit history, and the credit score that comes with one, you'll struggle to qualify for one of these good cards. You might instead have to settle for a basic card with a higher interest rate.</p> <h2>5. Getting car insurance</h2> <p>Not having a credit history can even make qualifying for car insurance more of a challenge. If you do want to drive, and you can no longer stay on your parents' auto insurance policy, you'll have to apply for car insurance on your own. And many insurance companies today look at their own version of a credit score when determining who qualifies for insurance and at what rates.</p> <p>The lower your credit-based insurance score, the less likely you'll qualify for auto insurance &mdash; and the more likely you'll have to pay a higher premium if you do qualify.</p> <h2>Building a credit history</h2> <p>The best way to build a credit history while in college is to apply for a student credit card. These cards often come with lower limits. Some might even be <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-are-secured-credit-cards?ref=internal" target="_blank">secured cards</a>, meaning that you have to make a deposit into a bank account associated with the card. This deposit makes up your credit limit. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-use-credit-cards-to-improve-your-credit-score?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Use Credit Cards to Improve Your Credit Score</a>)</p> <p>Once you get a card, use it, but use it wisely. Only buy what you can afford to pay off in full each month. Then pay off your entire balance by every due date. As you generate a record of on-time credit card payments, you'll steadily build a credit history. At the same time, you'll start building a solid credit score, too.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F5-reasons-building-credit-in-college-helps-you-win-at-life&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F5%2520Reasons%2520Building%2520Credit%2520in%2520College%2520Helps%2520You%2520Win%2520at%2520Life.jpg&amp;description=5%20Reasons%20Building%20Credit%20in%20College%20Helps%20You%20Win%20at%20Life"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/5%20Reasons%20Building%20Credit%20in%20College%20Helps%20You%20Win%20at%20Life.jpg" alt="5 Reasons Building Credit in College Helps You Win at Life" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dan-rafter">Dan Rafter</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-reasons-building-credit-in-college-helps-you-win-at-life">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/debunking-8-common-credit-score-myths">Debunking 8 Common Credit Score Myths</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-every-parent-should-know-about-the-new-college-financial-aid-rules">What Every Parent Should Know About the New College Financial Aid Rules</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-money-moves-every-new-college-student-should-make">7 Money Moves Every New College Student Should Make</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-surprising-ways-bad-credit-can-hurt-you">15 Surprising Ways Bad Credit Can Hurt You</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/heres-why-credit-scores-and-reports-are-not-the-same">Here&#039;s Why Credit Scores and Reports Are Not the Same</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance Education & Training building credit co-signers college credit history credit score loans payment history renting students Mon, 28 Aug 2017 08:30:14 +0000 Dan Rafter 2010394 at http://www.wisebread.com 12 Surprising Ways to Get More College Financial Aid http://www.wisebread.com/12-surprising-ways-to-get-more-college-financial-aid <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/12-surprising-ways-to-get-more-college-financial-aid" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/beautiful_thoughtful_graduate_student_girl_young_woman_in_cap.jpg" alt="Beautiful thoughtful graduate student girl young woman in cap" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>The cost of college has risen so high that even middle and higher-income parents may qualify for some financial aid. Beyond how much money you earn, how a family structures college savings and general finances in the years leading up to and during college can have an impact on how much aid you're offered.</p> <p>It wasn't always like this. Once upon a time, students could pay their tuition at a public university with the money they earned working during summer. Now, students would have to work full-time all year to pay the average public school tuition, which has skyrocketed to $10,000 for in-state students and $25,000 for out-of-state students for the 2016-2017 school year, according to the College Board. Private colleges and universities are charging an average of more than $33,000 per year. And don't forget, you still need to set aside money for room, board, books, and Albert Einstein posters.</p> <p>All this means that most American families have a gap between what they can pay toward college and what college costs. Fortunately, a university's published &quot;sticker price&quot; is not what most families pay, especially for private colleges. According to the National Center for Education Statistics, even students with household incomes of $110,000 or more received an average of $15,240 in the 2013-14 school year to defray the cost of private nonprofit colleges, and $1,860 for public schools.</p> <p>And that's just the federal grants, loans, and work study jobs. Many schools also offer institutional aid consisting of grants, scholarships, and loans. Some well-endowed schools even promise to cover the entire difference between the family's resources and the price (usually incorporating a combination of loans and other aid types). These financial aid packages can be so large that some families pay less for the most expensive colleges than they would have paid for their local state school.</p> <p>How much aid a student is offered depends on a lot of things. Much of it has to do with how a family's finances are organized and how they fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) from the year before their kid starts college. Let's look at strategies for students to maximize available college funds.</p> <h2>1. Be strategic with college savings accounts</h2> <p>First of all, parents should make <em>retirement </em>their top savings priority, not education, because you can get loans for education, but there are no loans to fund retirement.</p> <p>&quot;It's just like being on an airplane: Help yourself first before assisting others,&quot; says Carol Stack, author of <a href="http://amzn.to/2vQaOq7" target="_blank">The Financial Aid Handbook: Getting the Education You Want for the Price You Can Afford</a><em>.</em></p> <p>Second, parents should keep any money they do save in their own names, not in a joint account or a Uniform Transfers to Minors Act (UTMA) account in the student's name. Your assets count against you even more than your parents' assets do. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-saving-too-much-money-for-a-college-fund-is-a-bad-idea?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Why Saving Too Much Money for a College Fund Is a Bad Idea</a>)</p> <p>For the same reason, grandparents or other well-wishers outside the immediate household should avoid directly giving students money for college. If your grandma wants to help with college, great! She should hold onto that money in her own account, not gift it to you. As long as it's in grandma's name, those assets don't get reported on the FAFSA.</p> <p>Some college-savvy financial planners even advise against taking out 529 accounts, those state plans that allow money to grow tax-free but can only be spent on qualified educational expenses, because 529s opened by parents will count on the FAFSA as parental assets and increase the expected family contribution (EFC). Gary Sipos, founder of College Cash Solutions, a for-profit company that offers advice on choosing a college and getting financial aid, always warns clients against them.</p> <p>&quot;In no case in the decade or so I've been doing this, have I ever seen a case where a 529 plan was a good idea,&quot; Sipos says.</p> <p>In Sipos' experience, even though these plans offer tax benefits, the harm to students' chances of getting financial aid can cost the family as much or more than they saved in taxes.</p> <p>However, most college savings experts stand by 529 plans.</p> <p>&quot;The 529 is probably going to be one of your best options,&quot; says Joseph Orsolini, a certified financial planner with Illinois' College Aid Planners.</p> <p>If a grandparent wants to save for college in a 529 plan, they should open their own account, not contribute to one set up by the parents. This way, it's not counted as a parental or child asset. Even then, Orsolini warns, caution is needed to avoid having the account hurt the student's aid chances. If your grandma owns the plan and pays the first year tuition out of it, that payment is counted as your income, and could decrease the amount of aid you qualify for the next year.</p> <p>&quot;You want to withdraw starting the second half of sophomore year,&quot; Orsolini advised. Because the FAFSA looks backward to past years' tax returns, at this point, you'll be in the clear and the student income from Grandma's 529 plan won't affect financial aid.</p> <p>If you're a student who already has money in your own name, you might consider spending that on things you'll need for college &mdash; like test prep classes, or a new computer &mdash; before the period reported on the FAFSA. Once you start paying tuition, spend your own money before your parents spend any of theirs. If your parents want to pay your tuition, they can instead make up for it with a gift later or by helping you pay off any loans you take out.</p> <h2>2. Fill out the FAFSA, even if you think your family makes too much money</h2> <p>The FAFSA is the first step in getting need-based aid, and it's a pain in the butt to fill out. Among other things, it asks for tax returns, your household income, and assets. High income, say over $200,000 a year, lowers your odds of receiving grants and loans, so if your household falls in that category, you may think there's no point in going through the agony. <em>Fill it out anyway.</em></p> <p>There are so many factors affecting whether you will get aid &mdash; like how many people are in your family and whether any of them will be in college at the same time as you &mdash; that you might qualify for at least subsidized loans, despite high income. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-10-most-common-financial-aid-mistakes-and-how-to-avoid-them?ref=seealso" target="_blank">The 10 Most Common Financial Aid Mistakes &mdash; And How To Avoid Them</a>)</p> <h2>3. File early, and accurately</h2> <p>The opening date for turning in the FAFSA has been moved up, and it's important to get that thing in within about a month of opening day. If you plan to start college in the fall of 2018, that means turning in the FAFSA starting Oct. 1, 2017.</p> <p>Financial aid is first come, first served, Sipos explains. If you wait until spring, financial aid officers may be running low on funds to distribute. &quot;They might give you half the award they would have given you if you had applied a few months earlier,&quot; he says.</p> <p>In addition, if your FAFSA has errors, it can get kicked back to you for corrections and then you have to go to the back of the line.</p> <h2>4. Spend more time with your poorer parent</h2> <p>If your parents are divorced and live separately, you only have to put the income and assets from <em>one </em>of those households on your FAFSA. So do you put down your mother's income or your father's income? The rules simply say that you submit the information about the <a href="https://studentaid.ed.gov/sa/fafsa/filling-out/parent-info#who-is-parent" target="_blank">household you spent the most time in</a> during the preceding year &mdash; even if it was only one day more.</p> <p>For example, say your parents are divorced and you split your time evenly between their houses. Your mother and her new husband make $300,000 a year and have a million bucks in the bank. Your father is on disability, and has no assets beyond his house and car. If you are presented as his child, your chances of getting financial aid are greater. While you're in high school, make sure you spend more than half the year living with your dad.</p> <h2>5. If you work, watch your earnings</h2> <p>If you, the high school or college student, earn more than $6,400 in a year, colleges will consider that as money you could be paying in tuition, and reduce need-based awards accordingly. Of course, most student jobs don't pay much, but even at minimum wage, working 20 hours a week all year would put you over the threshold. There are many reasons you may want to work, including wanting to be self-sufficient or gaining valuable job experience. Just remember that once you pass the $6,400 per year threshold, increased tuition costs may eat up 50 cents of every dollar you earn.</p> <p>Instead of working more than 15 hours a week for pay during the last year of high school, when your income must be reported on the FAFSA for your first year of college, consider spending your time doing something that will boost your college application, from studying for the SAT or ACT to doing volunteer work.</p> <p>This is also a warning to parents: Paying your kids a good salary to work for you might help you taxwise, but the penalty in the financial aid application could eclipse any tax savings.</p> <h2>6. Don't dismiss more expensive colleges</h2> <p>School aid offers can vary, based both on how much the school wants you and also how much the institution is. Once you have the financial aid promises in hand, you may be surprised at how much you're expected to pay differs from the sticker price.</p> <p>&quot;[D]epending on a family's income and a college's available aid funds, the cost paid by the family for attending even the most expensive Ivy League schools may be less than the cost of attending an in-state public university,&quot; reads <a href="http://amzn.to/2vLp9Wj" target="_blank">Paying for College Without Going Broke</a> by Kalman Chany, a popular primer on navigating the financial aid process.</p> <p>Don't make a final decision until you have all the aid letters in hand, because the sticker price is not an apples-to-apples comparison.</p> <h2>7. Don't automatically choose the best college you got into</h2> <p>Many schools reserve their best merit aid offers for the top 25 percent of applicants, based on test scores, Sipos explains. That means if you barely squeak into a great school, but would be one of the top students at a good school, you'll probably get a better aid offer from the good school. Sipos counsels families on this strategy when applying for colleges, using information schools publish about their students' median college entrance test scores.</p> <h2>8. Look into whether you have to report your family's small business income</h2> <p>Sipos used to be a general financial planner, but he was inspired to specialize in college financial planning when he met a couple who was drowning in debt despite having run a successful business for years. They'd sent three daughters to Ivy League schools, and because they earned a good income, and their business was worth a lot, they'd never bothered to fill out a FAFSA.</p> <p>What the family didn't know was their business met the legal description of a <a href="http://www.finaid.org/fafsa/smallbusiness.phtml" target="_blank">small business that does not count</a> against students for financial aid purposes. Family farms fall into this category, as well. The family would have qualified for financial aid if they'd applied, Sipos says, leaving them ready to retire after their kids graduated, instead of running double time to dig out of debt.</p> <p>&quot;They could have saved $30,000 a year if they had exempted their business. The financial aid officer didn't mention anything,&quot; he says.</p> <h2>9. Put money into non-reportable assets</h2> <p>If your parents have car loans, credit card debt, or a mortgage, it makes good sense to pay them off as much as possible, not only to reduce their debt but also to increase the amount of aid you might be eligible for. You have to report how much money and other liquid investments your family has on the FAFSA. That means your parents' bank accounts are considered money they could be putting toward your education. But the <a href="https://www.cappex.com/hq/articles-and-advice/financial-aid/fafsa/How-to-Shelter-Assets-on-the-FAFSA" target="_blank">value of your family's primary home</a> and personal possessions such as cars don't count against you in assessing your need. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-smart-places-to-stash-your-kids-college-savings?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Smart Places to Stash Your Kid's College Savings</a>)</p> <h2>10. Make sure the school knows about all special circumstances</h2> <p>Besides the volumes of information the FAFSA asks for, you can also include a letter explaining the family's circumstances &mdash; and in many cases, you should. For instance, if you have a disabled sibling who needs expensive care, or another challenging circumstance, let the school know so it can take that into account when calculating your family's ability to pay.</p> <h2>11. Negotiate with the financial aid office</h2> <p>When you get your aid letter, it's not necessarily a &quot;take it or leave it&quot; proposition. You can let the school know if other schools offered you a better deal, and urge them to take another look.</p> <p>If you haven't already written a letter about special circumstances, now is the time to do that. Finally, if the year reported on the FAFSA was an unusually good year financially for your family &mdash; your mother got a huge bonus, for example, or your parents sold an investment property &mdash; you can provide previous and subsequent tax returns to support your case, Sipos advises.</p> <h2>12. Join the military or a public service program</h2> <p>Two members of my family became the first in their respective lines to go to college, thanks to the GI Bill, a program that helps service members and veterans cover education costs. That's just one of the college benefits available to veterans and service members. It's worth looking into.</p> <p>Outside of the military, AmeriCorps, Teach for America, the Peace Corps, and the Public Service Loan Forgiveness program are all avenues for paying off student loans or financing college.</p> <p>Some people might look at the above tactics as gaming the system. It's certainly possible to pass beyond optimizing into the shady territory of trying to hide income and assets.</p> <p>&quot;I lose my patience with people who are affluent &mdash; and they want to hide that affluence? Come on,&quot; Stack says.</p> <p>While it's up to the individual to decide which legal financial aid optimization tactics are appropriate, reputable college financial planners see no problem in making a financial plan that maximizes the chance of getting aid.</p> <p>&quot;You're just following the rules,&quot; Orsolini says<strong> &quot;</strong>It's no different from putting money in a 401(k) to minimize your tax burden.&quot;</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F12-surprising-ways-to-get-more-college-financial-aid&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F12%2520Surprising%2520Ways%2520to%2520Get%2520More%2520College%2520Financial%2520Aid.jpg&amp;description=12%20Surprising%20Ways%20to%20Get%20More%20College%20Financial%20Aid"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/12%20Surprising%20Ways%20to%20Get%20More%20College%20Financial%20Aid.jpg" alt="12 Surprising Ways to Get More College Financial Aid" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/carrie-kirby">Carrie Kirby</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-surprising-ways-to-get-more-college-financial-aid">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/yes-you-can-pay-for-education-with-an-ira">Yes, You Can Pay for Education With an IRA</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-college-expenses-you-arent-saving-for">9 College Expenses You Aren&#039;t Saving For</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-9-best-state-529-college-savings-plans">The 9 Best State 529 College Savings Plans</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-money-saving-hacks-every-college-student-should-try">8 Money-Saving Hacks Every College Student Should Try</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-smart-places-to-stash-your-kids-college-savings">5 Smart Places to Stash Your Kid&#039;s College Savings</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Budgeting Education & Training affording college college college expenses college savings continuing education saving money saving money for college Tue, 22 Aug 2017 08:30:10 +0000 Carrie Kirby 2007138 at http://www.wisebread.com Here's What You Need to Know Before Buying a College Meal Plan http://www.wisebread.com/heres-what-you-need-to-know-before-buying-a-college-meal-plan <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/heres-what-you-need-to-know-before-buying-a-college-meal-plan" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/smiling_student_on_lunch_break_in_cafeteria_looking_at_camera.jpg" alt="Smiling student on lunch break in cafeteria looking at camera" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Before heading off to college, you need to budget for its many expenses. On top of tuition, course materials, and room and board, many people also forget about one important line item: food! (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-college-expenses-you-arent-saving-for?ref=seealso" target="_blank">9 College Expenses You Aren't Saving For</a>)</p> <p>The unfortunate news is you often don't have a lot of options for combating the high cost of college campus meals. But at least you can go into the situation informed, so you can make appropriate budget allowances. Here are six things every student should know about college meal plans:</p> <h2>1. Residential students are often required to buy one</h2> <p>First of all, you may think that you have the option of whether or not to buy a meal plan. Turns out that if you're a student living in university quarters, your school will likely require you to buy one. Make sure to read the fine print, because freshmen can be required to pay up for a &quot;platinum&quot; plan. For example, for the 2017-2018 school year, the Stevens Institute of Technology in New Jersey required its freshmen living on campus to purchase an unlimited $3,200 per semester meal plan.</p> <p>Even students living in dormitories with kitchens can be required a minimum buy-in for food costs, according to The New York Times.</p> <h2>2. &quot;Lighter&quot; meal plans are often only available to upperclassmen</h2> <p>If you find that a top-tier meal plan is excessive and you want to downgrade, you may have to wait a few semesters (or years). It's not uncommon that lighter versions, such as a 10-meal per week plan, are only available to students with a certain number of semesters under their belts. Freshmen may be required to buy plans with 15 to 19 meals per week.</p> <h2>3. Rollovers may not be allowed</h2> <p>Some schools allow you to apply unused meals from one week to the next, and others don't. To help you make the most out of your meal plan, check the applicable rules regarding rollovers. Tight rules may make skipping meals at participating cafeterias and vendors a big financial waste. You don't want to skip a meal you've paid for, only to have to pay for off-plan food later when you're hungry.</p> <h2>4. Cost per &quot;swipe&quot; can be higher</h2> <p>Some college dining plans provide cards with a preloaded number of swipes that students can use at participating on-campus eateries. Sound good? Well, the problem is, that convenience comes at a cost: Cardholders often end up paying more &quot;per swipe&quot; than somebody paying for the same meal with cash.</p> <p>If you're looking for variety, going the DIY route is more budget-friendly. Instead of swiping for overpriced coffee at the on-campus coffee shop, invest in a small coffee pot for your dorm room. By buying your own ground coffee and milk, you should be able to crank out two Americanos with milk per day for a total cost of about 60 cents. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-money-saving-hacks-every-college-student-should-try?ref=seealso" target="_blank">8 Money-Saving Hacks Every College Student Should Try</a>)</p> <h2>5. Meal plan expenses aren't eligible for tax credits</h2> <p>Many college students are eligible for two great tax credits:</p> <ul> <li> <p>Lifetime Learning Credit: This credit allows you to deduct up to 20 percent of your first $10,000 in qualified education expenses, up to $2,000 per taxpayer.</p> </li> <li> <p>American Opportunity Credit: This credit enables you to cover up to $2,500 of undergraduate college costs.</p> </li> </ul> <p>Unlike expenses for course-related supplies or tuition, meal plan fees aren't eligible toward either one of these tax credits. Even when required as a condition for enrollment or attendance, meal plan fees aren't considered qualified education expenses. This is especially frustrating, because up to 40 percent of the American Opportunity Credit is refundable, even if you don't owe any federal taxes. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dont-skip-these-8-tax-breaks-for-students?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Don't Skip These 8 Tax Breaks for Students</a>)</p> <h2>6. Higher costs contribute to higher student loans</h2> <p>According to Student Loan Hero, the average 2016 graduate took home $37,172 in student loan debt, up 6 percent from 2015. With their average student loan burden going up, students have to look for ways to drive down costs. And increasingly expensive college meal plans aren't helping.</p> <p>According to U.S. Department of Education data, the average college charged about $4,300 for a 19-meal per week contract for the 2015 academic year, or $7.50 per meal. In the same year, the Bureau of Labor Statistics found the average American spent just $4,000 eating at home for a 12-month period (that's just $4 a meal!). That means the average college student with a meal plan pays 87.5 percent more per meal.</p> <p>It turns out that cutting back on that pricey college meal plan doesn't just help you ward off the extra pounds, but it also helps keep the student debt monster in check.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fheres-what-you-need-to-know-before-buying-a-college-meal-plan&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FHeres%2520What%2520You%2520Need%2520to%2520Know%2520Before%2520Buying%2520a%2520College%2520Meal%2520Plan.jpg&amp;description=Heres%20What%20You%20Need%20to%20Know%20Before%20Buying%20a%20College%20Meal%20Plan"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/Heres%20What%20You%20Need%20to%20Know%20Before%20Buying%20a%20College%20Meal%20Plan.jpg" alt="Here's What You Need to Know Before Buying a College Meal Plan" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/damian-davila">Damian Davila</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/heres-what-you-need-to-know-before-buying-a-college-meal-plan">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-college-students-can-save-money-before-class-starts">8 Ways College Students Can Save Money Before Class Starts</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-money-moves-every-new-college-student-should-make">7 Money Moves Every New College Student Should Make</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-reasons-building-credit-in-college-helps-you-win-at-life">5 Reasons Building Credit in College Helps You Win at Life</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-college-expenses-you-arent-saving-for">9 College Expenses You Aren&#039;t Saving For</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/css-is-one-source-of-college-financial-aid-you-cant-afford-to-overlook">CSS Is One Source of College Financial Aid You Can&#039;t Afford to Overlook</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance Education & Training college food costs meal plans requirements students tax credits Tue, 15 Aug 2017 08:30:10 +0000 Damian Davila 2001478 at http://www.wisebread.com Ask the Readers: What Advice Would You Give a College Freshman? http://www.wisebread.com/ask-the-readers-what-advice-would-you-give-a-college-freshman-0 <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/ask-the-readers-what-advice-would-you-give-a-college-freshman-0" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_college_student_585509908.jpg" alt="Giving advice to a college freshman" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p><em>Editor's Note: Congratulations to An G, Betty, and Amy for winning this week's contest!</em></p> <p>Students across the nation are going back to school. This is an exciting time for many of them, especially for new college students who may be living on their own for the first time and experience more freedom &mdash; and responsibility &mdash; as adults.</p> <p><strong>What advice would you give a college freshman?</strong> What was the most important lesson you learned during your early adult years?</p> <p>Tell us what advice you would give a college freshman and we'll enter you in a drawing to win a $20 Amazon Gift Card!</p> <h2>Win 1 of 3 $20 Amazon Gift Cards</h2> <p>We're doing three giveaways &mdash; here's how you can win:</p> <ul> <li>Follow us on Twitter</li> <li>Tweet about our giveaway for an entry.</li> <li>Visit our Facebook page for an entry.</li> </ul> <p>Use our Rafflecopter widget for your chance to win one of three Amazon Gift Cards:</p> <p><a class="rcptr" href="http://www.rafflecopter.com/rafl/display/79857dfa313/" rel="nofollow" data-raflid="79857dfa313" data-theme="classic" data-template="" id="rcwidget_5qsytaby">a Rafflecopter giveaway</a> </p> <script src="https://widget-prime.rafflecopter.com/launch.js"></script></p> <h4>Giveaway Rules:</h4> <ul> <li>Contest ends Monday, August 21st at 11:59 p.m. Pacific. Winners will be announced after August 21st on the original post. Winners will also be contacted via email.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>This promotion is in no way sponsored, endorsed or administered, or associated with Facebook or Twitter.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>You must be 18 and U.S. resident to enter. Void where prohibited.</li> </ul> <p><strong>Good Luck!</strong></p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-blog-teaser"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> Tell us what advice you would give a college freshman and we&#039;ll enter you in a drawing to win a $20 Amazon Gift Card! </div> </div> </div> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/ashley-jacobs">Ashley Jacobs</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/ask-the-readers-what-advice-would-you-give-a-college-freshman-0">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/ask-the-readers-to-clip-or-not-to-clip-a-chance-to-win-10">Ask The Readers: To Clip or Not to Clip? (A Chance to Win $10!)</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/ask-the-readers-200-giveaway-what-does-corporate-social-responsibility-mean-to-you">Ask the Readers $200 Giveaway: What Does Corporate Social Responsibility Mean to You?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/ask-the-readers-what-winter-savings-tip-do-you-swear-by">Ask the Readers: What Winter Savings Tip Do You Swear By?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/ask-the-readers-how-did-you-spend-your-first-paycheck">Ask the Readers: How Did You Spend Your First Paycheck?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/ask-the-readers-what-is-your-new-years-resolution">Ask the Readers: What Is Your New Year&#039;s Resolution?</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Education & Training Giveaways Ask the Readers college advice Tue, 15 Aug 2017 08:30:05 +0000 Ashley Jacobs 2000991 at http://www.wisebread.com 14 Dorm Essentials That Make Student Life Easier http://www.wisebread.com/14-dorm-essentials-that-make-student-life-easier <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/14-dorm-essentials-that-make-student-life-easier" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-501795383.jpg" alt="College student bringing dorm essentials that make life easier" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="141" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Dorms are designed to be no-frills living spaces that house students who are more focused on learning than luxury. But dorm life doesn't mean you have to sacrifice every creature comfort. Here are 14 dorm room essentials that will make life easier, safer, and healthier. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-freshman-shopping-tips-to-cut-college-costs?ref=seealso" target="_blank">9 Freshman Shopping Tips to Cut College Costs</a>)</p> <h2>1. Oscillating fan</h2> <p>Dormitories aren't known for their elaborate climate control options. A compact but powerful <a href="http://amzn.to/2vAoBn6" target="_blank">oscillating fan</a> will not only help keep you cool; it'll generate a bit of valuable white noise to mask any late night revelry.</p> <h2>2. Earplugs</h2> <p>And while we're on the topic of noise, stock up on disposable <a href="http://amzn.to/2viPwkx" target="_blank">foam earplugs</a>. If you're a light sleeper or used to the uninterrupted silence of a private bedroom, the adjustment to dorm life can be rough. Though earplugs won't block out noise completely, they'll dampen it enough that you can get some sleep. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-fall-asleep-when-you-cant?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Fall Asleep When You Can't</a>)</p> <h2>3. Blackout curtains</h2> <p><a href="http://amzn.to/2vBfvpS" target="_blank">Blackout curtains</a> promote sleep by keeping out early morning sunlight. They're especially useful in rooms with east-facing windows or in urban settings where blinking traffic signals and bright security lights are hard to escape.</p> <h2>4. Microwave and mini-fridge</h2> <p>This kitchen duo will make food preparation and storage a snap &mdash; helping you avoid spendy trips to off-campus restaurants. But before you buy, check with the university housing staff or student handbook to determine which in-room appliances are allowed. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-best-small-appliances-for-students?ref=seealso" target="_blank">The 5 Best Small Appliances for Students</a>)</p> <h2>5. Stainless steel flatware</h2> <p>Rather than throw away money on disposable utensils, invest in a <a href="http://amzn.to/2vg5dul" target="_blank">set of flatware</a> for dorm room dining. No need to buy new; you can easily assemble a mismatched collection from yard sales or thrift stores.</p> <h2>6. Shower caddy</h2> <p>Since most dorms feature communal bathrooms, you'll need a handy way to transport your personal care items. Grab-and-go <a href="http://amzn.to/2fqH9zI" target="_blank">shower caddies</a> have a place for all the hygiene goods that keep you looking great.</p> <h2>7. Antimicrobial flip-flops</h2> <p>No matter how clean they may be, those communal showers have a distinct &quot;ick factor.&quot; Protect your feet and stop the spread of germs by investing in a pair of slip-resistant <a href="http://amzn.to/2vBQdIo" target="_blank">antimicrobial shower sandals</a>.</p> <h2>8. First aid kit</h2> <p>Headaches and colds are a fact of life (especially during finals week). Keep a small supply of pain relievers, cough drops, and cold medicine on-hand to make dorm life easier during trying times. And when emergencies happen, make sure your first aid kit includes rubbing alcohol, antibiotic ointment, bandages, and aloe vera gel for burns. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-best-first-aid-kits?ref=seealso" target="_blank">The 5 Best First Aid Kits</a>)</p> <h2>9. Clip-on light</h2> <p>All-night study sessions are a time-honored tradition among college students. Use a <a href="http://amzn.to/2wESqPU" target="_blank">clip-on light</a> to illuminate your textbook and not your snoozing roomie. With a flexible &quot;gooseneck&quot; design and durable clip, they're perfect for bunk bed rails and headboards.</p> <h2>10. Desktop organizer</h2> <p>No matter how virtual our workspaces become, everyone needs a <a href="http://amzn.to/2vBwubU" target="_blank">desktop organizer</a> to hold highlighters, pens, sticky notes, and assorted chargers and cables. And when your course load gets heavier, at least your desk won't be a total mess.</p> <h2>11. Bed risers</h2> <p><a href="http://amzn.to/2vg3vct" target="_blank">Bed risers</a> are an inexpensive way to reclaim precious square footage for seasonal clothes, luggage, and sports equipment. Some risers even come with built-in electrical outlets and USB ports for easy bedside charging.</p> <h2>12. Over-the-door shoe organizer</h2> <p>To maximize limited space in your dorm room, think vertically. <a href="http://amzn.to/2fqd7Mx" target="_blank">Over-the-door shoe organizers</a> aren't just for footwear. Use the pockets to hold scarves and gloves, cosmetics, cleaning supplies, utensils, and packaged snacks.</p> <h2>13. Flexible furniture</h2> <p>In tight spaces, every item needs to pull double duty. Keep an eye out for small-scale multiuse furniture (an ottoman with a built-in storage compartment or a shelf that can also serve as a room divider). Also, consider items like folding chairs and <a href="http://amzn.to/2vBJRc5" target="_blank">TV trays</a> that can be easily stored when not in use.</p> <h2>14. Cleaning kit</h2> <p>Spills, stains and other minor mishaps need quick attention. Assemble a small cleaning kit with stain removers, laundry detergent, all-purpose cleaner, and a microfiber cloth. It'll definitely come in handy when those inevitable &quot;oops!&quot; moments happen.</p> <p>Let me wrap things up with one final, but crucial, tip: Before investing in any item that can be shared, check with your soon-to-be roommate. Together, you can coordinate shopping lists to avoid duplication or split the cost of big-ticket purchases.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F14-dorm-essentials-that-make-student-life-easier&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F14%2520Dorm%2520Essentials%2520That%2520Make%2520Student%2520Life%2520Easier.jpg&amp;description=14%20Dorm%20Essentials%20That%20Make%20Student%20Life%20Easier"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/14%20Dorm%20Essentials%20That%20Make%20Student%20Life%20Easier.jpg" alt="14 Dorm Essentials That Make Student Life Easier" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/kentin-waits">Kentin Waits</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/14-dorm-essentials-that-make-student-life-easier">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-8-best-ways-to-save-on-back-to-school-supplies-right-now">The 8 Best Ways to Save on Back-to-School Supplies Right NOW</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-back-to-school-items-you-can-sell-for-extra-cash">6 Back-to-School Items You Can Sell For Extra Cash</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-genius-ways-to-stock-up-on-school-supplies">6 Genius Ways to Stock Up on School Supplies</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-freshman-shopping-tips-to-cut-college-costs">9 Freshman Shopping Tips to Cut College Costs</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/flashback-friday-47-best-back-to-school-shopping-hacks-ever">Flashback Friday: 47 Best Back-to-School Shopping Hacks Ever</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Education & Training Shopping back-to-school back-to-school shopping college college freshman dorm essentials dorm room school supplies shopping for college Thu, 10 Aug 2017 09:00:06 +0000 Kentin Waits 1999315 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Genius Ways to Stock Up on School Supplies http://www.wisebread.com/6-genius-ways-to-stock-up-on-school-supplies <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-genius-ways-to-stock-up-on-school-supplies" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-153500715.jpg" alt="Saving on school supplies" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="142" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>The new school year is just around the corner, which means it's also time to start shopping for school supplies. When you're on a budget, coming up with the money to pay for binders, notebooks, and backpacks can be difficult. And growing supply requirements can put a real strain on families. According to the National Retail Federation, the average family with children in grades K-12&nbsp;<a href="https://nrf.com/media/press-releases/back-school-and-college-spending-reach-758-billion" target="_blank">plans to spend $673.57 on school supplies</a>, clothing, and shoes for the new school year.</p> <p>The good news is there are ways you can reduce your spending, while also getting everything you need. Here are six ways you can save on school supplies. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-best-credit-cards-for-back-to-school-shopping?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Best Credit Cards to Use for Back to School Savings</a>)</p> <h2>1. Shop your home</h2> <p>You likely have supplies stashed around your home you've forgotten about. Shopping your own home first can prevent you from buying unnecessary supplies.</p> <p>Set up a large bin or designate a corner for school supplies. Work with the rest of your family to check drawers, closets, and under beds for pens, rulers, or backpacks. Pile everything into the designated section. Then go through your children's classroom requirements and check off what you already own. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-effortless-ways-to-save-on-back-to-school-shopping?ref=seealso" target="_blank">4 Effortless Ways to Save on Back-to-School Shopping</a>)</p> <h2>2. Work with your child to set a budget</h2> <p>Kids often love the idea of new things, whether it's clothes or a new lunch box. But replacing everything might not be possible within your budget. Instead, sit down with your child and have them <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-help-your-kid-build-their-first-budget?ref=internal" target="_blank">create their own budget</a>. Tell them how much they have to spend and explain that when that amount is gone, they cannot buy anymore. It can be a helpful way to rein in spending. For example, if your children love clothes, you can remind them of the budget when they want the sparkly purple notebook that is three times the price of a plain one. A budget can help them decide where they want to splurge, and where they are willing to cut back.</p> <p>If the budget has wiggle room, it can also be an opportunity to teach your child about work and pay. Perhaps you can set up a list of chores and payments for each one. As they complete chores, you add some extra money to their school budget.</p> <h2>3. Split costs with another family</h2> <p>Buying in bulk can help you save a great deal on supplies, but finding a place to store the extra materials can be tricky. Instead, try connecting with another family with a child in your kid's class. If you don't know anyone, many schools have class-specific Facebook groups where you can connect with other parents. You can buy supplies like paper, pens, markers, and crayons and then split the cost with them. Everybody wins. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-back-to-school-shopping-hacks-for-big-savings?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Back-to-School Shopping Hacks for Big Savings</a>)</p> <h2>4. Take advantage of dollar stores</h2> <p>Dollar stores can be a stellar budget saver when money is tight. You can purchase everything from notebooks to protractors for a dollar (or less). Depending on the store, there may be special deals as well from limited shipments, such as brand-name markers and crayons. You can start your back-to-school shopping at a dollar store, and then shop at other retailers for the rest of the supplies.</p> <h2>5. Use coupons</h2> <p>Coupons can reduce your expenses, and with the internet, it's easier than ever to find relevant promotions. Use sites like <a href="http://www.retailmenot.com" target="_blank">RetailMeNot</a> or <a href="http://www.couponsherpa.com" target="_blank">CouponSherpa</a> to find discounts at stores like Staples, Target, or Kohl's. Those sites collect all coupons across the web, so you can find the ones you need and use them on the spot.</p> <p>And by installing browser extensions like <a href="https://www.joinhoney.com/" target="_blank">Honey</a>, you can shop leisurely online while the extension finds applicable coupon codes for you. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/these-apps-and-extensions-find-online-deals-for-you-automatically?ref=seealso" target="_blank">These Apps and Extensions Find Online Deals for You &mdash; Automatically</a>)</p> <h2>6. Shop with discounted gift cards</h2> <p>Shopping with discounted gift cards can be a smart way to save a significant amount of money. People who received cards as a gift, or received store credit for a return might decide that they don't have any use for it. Rather than let it sit in a drawer, they can sell it to sites like <a href="http://www.giftcardgranny.com" target="_blank">Gift Card Granny</a>, <a href="http://www.raise.com" target="_blank">Raise</a> and <a href="http://www.giftcardzen.com" target="_blank">Gift Card Zen</a>, who then offer these gift cards at a discount.</p> <p>Depending on the retailer and the amount on the card, the savings can be huge. For example, if your family needs new clothes, you could score a $500 gift card for $440, and that extra $60 could go a long way. When you're on a limited budget, discounted gift cards can help stretch your money to the max.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F6-genius-ways-to-stock-up-on-school-supplies&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F6%2520Genius%2520Ways%2520to%2520Stock%2520Up%2520on%2520School%2520Supplies.jpg&amp;description=6%20Genius%20Ways%20to%20Stock%20Up%20on%20School%20Supplies"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/6%20Genius%20Ways%20to%20Stock%20Up%20on%20School%20Supplies.jpg" alt="6 Genius Ways to Stock Up on School Supplies" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/kat-tretina">Kat Tretina</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-genius-ways-to-stock-up-on-school-supplies">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-8-best-ways-to-save-on-back-to-school-supplies-right-now">The 8 Best Ways to Save on Back-to-School Supplies Right NOW</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/flashback-friday-43-genius-ways-to-save-on-back-to-school-shopping">Flashback Friday: 43 Genius Ways to Save on Back-to-School Shopping</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-college-perks-you-might-be-missing-out-on">8 College Perks You Might Be Missing Out On</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/14-dorm-essentials-that-make-student-life-easier">14 Dorm Essentials That Make Student Life Easier</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-back-to-school-items-you-can-buy-used">6 Back-to-School Items You Can Buy Used</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Education & Training Shopping back to school back-to-school shopping kids saving money school shopping school supplies school year shopping tips Thu, 27 Jul 2017 08:30:08 +0000 Kat Tretina 1990978 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Questions to Ask Before Taking Out Student Loans http://www.wisebread.com/6-questions-to-ask-before-taking-out-student-loans <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-questions-to-ask-before-taking-out-student-loans" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_saving_education_coins.jpg" alt="Woman saving education coins" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Americans are more burdened by student loan debt than ever, with the average graduate in their 20s making $351 a month in student loan payments. Suggested changes to the federal student loan program could have even more college students questioning just how much student loan debt they want or can afford.</p> <p>As part of its overall budget plan, the Trump administration would like to eliminate current provisions in which the government pays the interest on student loans taken out by low-income students while the borrower is still in school and for six months after graduation.</p> <p>The Trump administration is also proposing to end the Public Service Loan Forgiveness program. This program allows borrowers who go on to work for the government or for nonprofits to have the remainder of their federal student loans forgiven after they make 10 years of payments.</p> <p>Even though these potential changes might never be signed into law, just the possibility of such changes makes it even more important for students to ask the right questions before they take out federal or private student loans.</p> <p>Here are six questions you should ask before signing up for any student loan.</p> <h2>1. Have you considered all education options?</h2> <p>Your first-choice school might be the most expensive university on your list. You might be able to reduce the amount of money you borrow each year by choosing a less costly option.</p> <p>Instead of attending a private college, you might investigate a public university. Instead of going to an out-of-state school, you might consider going to school in-state, which comes with lower tuition. You could also attend a community college for two years before transferring to a private or public university for the remainder of your college years. These choices could reduce the amount of student loan debt you'll have to take on.</p> <h2>2. Can you cut out room and board?</h2> <p>The College Board reported that the average yearly cost of room and board at a public four-year university stood at $10,440 during the 2016&ndash;2017 academic year. You can save that expense if you attend a college that allows you to live at home while taking classes.</p> <p>Yes, you will lose out on some of the traditional college experience. But taking on less student loan debt might be an acceptable trade-off.</p> <h2>3. Are you borrowing too much for your potential future income?</h2> <p>Certain careers pay more than others. You need to remember this when applying for student loans. You don't want to take on huge debts if you expect to make $40,000 a year when you graduate. But taking on larger amounts of debt might be a solid financial choice if you are working toward a higher-paying degree.</p> <h2>4. How big of a student loan payment are you willing to make once you're working?</h2> <p>Borrowing money might seem easy when you're still in school. After all, you're probably not making payments on these loans yet. But once you're out in the working world, that student loan debt won't seem so benign.</p> <p>You will have to make payments each month. And these payments will come in addition to rent, car payments and, eventually, mortgage payments. Student loan payments become a huge financial burden to many. Before borrowing today, you need to consider how comfortable you'll be making those payments in the future.</p> <h2>5. Are there other types of financial aid available?</h2> <p>Before applying for a student loan, make sure you explore all financial aid options with your high school counselor, or the university you plan to attend. Many universities offer merit scholarships to incoming students. You usually don't have to apply for these scholarships. Schools automatically provide them, usually based on your academic performance. Even if you've been offered one, you might be able to persuade your university to provide you with a larger merit scholarship, especially if you are worried that you won't be able to afford the yearly tuition without financial help.</p> <p>There are other types of scholarships, too, that you should investigate. The U.S. Department of Education says that there are several ways for college students to search for scholarships and grants. They should first speak with the financial aid office at the college they are attending. These professionals often have tips for hunting down scholarship and grant money.</p> <p>They can also use the free online <a href="http://www.careeronestop.org/toolkit/training/find-scholarships.aspx" target="_blank">scholarship finder</a> offered by the Department of Education. The department also offers an online list of <a href="https://www2.ed.gov/about/contacts/state/index.html" target="_blank">state grant agencies</a> that students can search to find scholarships and grants in their states.</p> <p>Call your school's financial aid office to discuss options such as work-study programs and possible additional financial help.</p> <h2>6. Can you get by without private loans?</h2> <p>Even if you get grants and scholarships, you may still need student loans. There are two types of student loans to consider: Federal loans offered through the federal government or private loans offered by private lenders. Federal loans are preferable because they usually come with lower interest rates and more flexible repayment programs. Federal loans also provide more options if, after graduating, you find yourself struggling to make payments, including deferment and eventual forgiveness programs.</p> <p>It's far better to rely as much as possible on federal subsidized or unsubsidized student loans. The challenge is that these federal loans have limits; you can only borrow so much each school year.</p> <p>Your school might also offer its own lower-interest loans that would be cheaper than private loans. But if these options still aren't enough, you'll have to determine whether taking out less attractive private student loans to attend college is worthwhile. It might be the only option.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F6-questions-to-ask-before-taking-out-student-loans&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F6%2520Questions%2520to%2520Ask%2520Before%2520Taking%2520Out%2520Student%2520Loans.jpg&amp;description=6%20Questions%20to%20Ask%20Before%20Taking%20Out%20Student%20Loans"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/6%20Questions%20to%20Ask%20Before%20Taking%20Out%20Student%20Loans.jpg" alt="6 Questions to Ask Before Taking Out Student Loans" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dan-rafter">Dan Rafter</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-questions-to-ask-before-taking-out-student-loans">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-unique-ways-millennials-are-dealing-with-student-loan-debt">7 Unique Ways Millennials Are Dealing With Student Loan Debt</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-things-financial-aid-might-not-cover">6 Things Financial Aid Might Not Cover</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-to-make-the-most-of-your-student-loan-grace-period">4 Ways to Make the Most of Your Student Loan Grace Period</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/should-you-borrow-student-loan-money-from-amazon-prime">Should You Borrow Student Loan Money From Amazon Prime?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-money-moves-every-new-college-student-should-make">7 Money Moves Every New College Student Should Make</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance Education & Training college debt repayment federal loans higher education private loans scholarships student debt student loans trump tuition Tue, 18 Jul 2017 08:00:08 +0000 Dan Rafter 1983760 at http://www.wisebread.com Best Money Tips: Ways to Go to College for Free http://www.wisebread.com/best-money-tips-ways-to-go-to-college-for-free <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/best-money-tips-ways-to-go-to-college-for-free" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_college_student_636595452.jpg" alt="Woman going to college for free" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Welcome to Wise Bread's <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/topic/best-money-tips">Best Money Tips</a> Roundup! Today we found articles on ways to go to college for free, money mistakes that people make more than once, and ways to save on a vacation rental.</p> <h2>Top 5 Articles</h2> <p><a href="https://christianpf.com/free-college/">7 Ways to Go to College for Free</a> &mdash; Your employer (or future employer) may offer tuition reimbursement programs, especially if your area of study is related to their industry. [SeedTime]</p> <p><a href="http://shebudgets.com/personal-finance/money-mistakes-avoid/69399">20 Money Saving Mistakes People Always Make More than Once</a> &mdash; Bartering is a great way to save money, but don't barter with someone who seems to never hold up their end of the deal. [SheBudgets]</p> <p><a href="http://shoppingkim.com/4-ways-save-big-vacation-rental/">4 Ways to Save Big on a Vacation Rental</a> &mdash; Consider the cost of the amenities that you will (or won't) be using during your vacation. [Shopping Kim]</p> <p><a href="http://blog.wallstreetsurvivor.com/2017/07/05/3-things-consider-buying-rental-property/">3 Things to Consider When Buying a Rental Property</a> &mdash; Use the One Percent Rule to figure out how much you need to charge in monthly rent in order to over the mortgage payment. [Wall Street Survivor]</p> <p><a href="http://www.dontmesswithtaxes.com/2017/07/6-mid-year-tax-moves-to-make-this-july.html">6 midyear tax moves to make this July</a> &mdash; Set up a bunching strategy to make sure you have enough qualified expenses to meet some of the itemized deduction thresholds. [Don't Mess With Taxes]</p> <h2>Other Essential Reading</h2> <p><a href="https://www.popsugar.com.au/smart-living/How-Switch-Off-From-Your-Busy-Job-43214377">4 Ways to Recharge When Your Job Feels 24/7</a> &mdash; Structure your week to include time for all the important things in your life. [PopSugar Smart Living]</p> <p><a href="http://www.frugalvillage.com/2017/07/06/5-alternate-materials-to-use-in-your-house-to-save-money/">5 Alternate Materials to Use in Your House to Save Money</a> &mdash; Metal roofing may cost more upfront, but it's one of the most durable and long-lasting options to cover your house, allowing you to save on repairs and energy expenses. [Frugal Village]</p> <p><a href="http://naturemoms.com/blog/2017/07/06/organized-save-time-money/">How Being Organized Can Save Time and Money</a> &mdash; Being organized makes it easier to stay on top of the nitty-gritty details, like paying bills on time or doing regular maintenance on parts of your home or car. [Nature Moms Blog]</p> <p><a href="http://www.freemoneywisdom.com/financial-tips-preparing-big-future-purchases/">Financial Tips For Preparing For Big Future Purchases</a> &mdash; Avoid luxury purchases. That money would be better spent on something you actually need. [Free Money Wisdom]</p> <p><a href="http://www.savethebills.com/retailers-use-data-get-spend/">How Retailers Use Data To Get You To Spend More</a> &mdash; Retailers are able to track your location once you connect to their in-store Wi-Fi. [Save The Bills]</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/amy-lu">Amy Lu</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/best-money-tips-ways-to-go-to-college-for-free">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/17-more-places-to-buy-sell-and-trade-books">17 More Places to Buy, Sell, and Trade Books</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-surprising-ways-to-pay-off-your-student-loans">8 Surprising Ways to Pay Off Your Student Loans</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-certifications-that-add-big-to-your-salary">7 Certifications That Add Big $$ to Your Salary</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-great-careers-you-can-have-with-a-liberal-arts-degree">10 Great Careers You Can Have With a Liberal Arts Degree</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/get-smart-about-money-with-these-18-free-online-courses">Get Smart About Money With These 18 Free Online Courses</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Education & Training best money tips free college Fri, 07 Jul 2017 16:26:49 +0000 Amy Lu 1979454 at http://www.wisebread.com These 17 Companies Will Help You Repay Your Student Loan http://www.wisebread.com/these-17-companies-will-help-you-repay-your-student-loan <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/these-17-companies-will-help-you-repay-your-student-loan" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/saving_for_education.jpg" alt="Saving for education" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Student loans can dampen the ability of new grads to get on their feet financially, causing stress at home and at work. According to Student Loan Hero, the graduating class of 2016 had an average student loan balance of $37,172 &mdash; up six percent from the year before.</p> <p>While it's daunting to see that number rise, the good news is that, in an effort to recruit and retain the best hires, a growing number of employers have started programs to help employees pay back those hefty student loans. Here are a few of those companies helping workers get out of debt.</p> <h2>1. Chegg</h2> <p>In April 2015, tutoring and study services company Chegg announced its college loan reduction plan for full-time employees in partnership with Tuition.IO, a company that provides a web-based platform for tracking and managing student loan payments. This benefit has an annual cap of $1,000 (less taxes), but has no cap on the total amount an employee can receive.</p> <h2>2. ChowNow</h2> <p>ChowNow has found this perk so useful in hiring talent that the company decided to double it from when it first started offering it to employees. The Los Angeles-based online food ordering company has an employer-paid student loan assistance program that matches up to $1,000 a year of employee payments.</p> <h2>3. CommonBond</h2> <p>Since December 2016, this lending marketplace platform has been granting $100 per month to its employees to pay down student loans. While CommonBond limits the perk at $1,200 per year, the company continues helping its employees until they fully pay off their student loans. Employees also have the option to refinance their student loans with CommonBond. On average, student borrowers save over $14,000 when refinancing through CommonBond, according to the company.</p> <h2>4. Credit Suisse</h2> <p>The financial services company doesn't offer a lump sum benefit to its employees, but instead provides a 0.25 percent discount on interest rates to workers that refinance their student loans with online lender SoFi.</p> <h2>5. Connelly Partners</h2> <p>Boston-based ad agency Connelly Partners works with Gradifi to offer a student loan repayment plan that improves the longer the employee stays with the company. Like a 401(k) plan, the agency matches up to $100 per month of its employees' debt payments. Employees who stick around for at least six months receive a $1,000 student loan payment bonus. Those who work for the company for five years receive another $1,000 bonus for the sixth year.</p> <h2>6. Fidelity Investments</h2> <p>The financial services firm makes an annual $2,000 direct payment to employees' student loan servicers, up to a total of $10,000. If your career with Fidelity requires you to continue your education, then Fidelity will reimburse you 90 percent of qualifying costs (up to $10,000 per year) of a work-related degree or certification program. You must have worked for the company for at least six months to qualify.</p> <h2>7. Kronos</h2> <p>Based in Chelmsford, Massachusetts, the workforce management software provider has partnered with solutions provider Student Loan Genius to pay up to $500 per year to help employees pay down student debt.</p> <h2>8. LendEDU</h2> <p>Since February 2016, the online marketplace for student loan financing has paid $2,400 per year ($200 per month) to employees with student loan debt.</p> <h2>9. Martin Health System</h2> <p>Employees working in the nursing field at Martin Health System in Florida can receive up to $2,000 per year to help pay down their student loans. In addition to this benefit from Martin Health System, Florida nurses can also work in areas with staff shortages to qualify for the state's Nursing Student Loan Forgiveness Program or the federal Perkins Loan Cancellation for Nurses and Medical Technicians.</p> <h2>10. Moonlite Bunny Ranch</h2> <p>In 2015, Dennis Hof, the owner of the legal brothel Moonlite Bunny Ranch in Nevada, promised to match 100 percent of his employees' student loan payments for two months, up to the full amount that they made during that period.</p> <h2>11. Natixis Global Asset Management</h2> <p>All Natixis employees receive an annual $1,000 student loan repayment benefit, up to $10,000 over a 10-year period. The company used to require that workers reached five years of employment in order to receive a lump sum benefit of $5,000, but did away with the requirement in July 2016.</p> <h2>12. Nvidia</h2> <p>This computing giant offers comprehensive student loan repayment options. First, employees working at least 20 hours per week who graduated within the previous three years can apply for a reimbursement of $6,000 a year for qualifying student loan payments, up to $30,000. Second, employees who successfully refinance their student loans with SoFi receive a bonus ranging from $200 to $500 and pay no loan origination fees. Third, employees who need to go back to college can receive a reimbursement of up to $5,250 each year for qualified job-related educational expenses, including tuition and books, as long as they earn at least a B average.</p> <h2>13. Powertex</h2> <p>The clothing design company was among the first businesses in Wisconsin to partner with Gradifi to offer a student loan repayment assistance program. Powertex gives eligible employees $100 per month for student loan payments for up to six years.</p> <h2>14. PricewaterhouseCoopers (PWC)</h2> <p>Associates and senior associates at the consulting firm receive $100 per month ($1,200 a year) toward student loan payments for up to six years.</p> <h2>15. SoFi</h2> <p>Many employers partner with SoFi to offer a student loan repayment assistance program. The online lender also offers its own eligible employees $200 per month to help them fully pay back student loans.</p> <h2>16. Staples</h2> <p>The office supply retailer offers top-performing full-time employees $100 a month for three years, for a total of $3,600 in student loan assistance. To maintain their eligibility, employees must meet set criteria throughout the entire three years.</p> <h2>17. Aetna</h2> <p>As of January 2017, the health care company matches employees' student loan payments of up to $2,000 per year, with a lifetime maximum of $10,000. The program is available to employees who have graduated within the previous three years from an accredited institution.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fthese-17-companies-will-help-you-repay-your-student-loan&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FThese%252017%2520Companies%2520Will%2520Help%2520You%2520Repay%2520Your%2520Student%2520Loan_0.jpg&amp;description=These%2017%20Companies%20Will%20Help%20You%20Repay%20Your%20Student%20Loan"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/These%2017%20Companies%20Will%20Help%20You%20Repay%20Your%20Student%20Loan_0.jpg" alt="These 17 Companies Will Help You Repay Your Student Loan" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/damian-davila">Damian Davila</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/these-17-companies-will-help-you-repay-your-student-loan">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-to-get-student-loan-debt-forgiveness">8 Ways to Get Student Loan Debt Forgiveness</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-you-didn-t-learn-in-college-but-you-should-have">10 Things You Didn’t Learn in College (but You Should Have)</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-stop-student-loans-from-ruining-your-life">How to Stop Student Loans From Ruining Your Life</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-job-hunting-roadblocks-millennials-must-overcome">5 Job Hunting Roadblocks Millennials Must Overcome</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/college/college-resources">40+ College Resources for Parents and Students</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Education & Training Job Hunting college companies contributions education employee benefits jobs loan repayment plans student loans Thu, 22 Jun 2017 09:00:10 +0000 Damian Davila 1968233 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Earn $1,000 a Month or More as an Online Tutor http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-earn-1000-a-month-or-more-as-an-online-tutor <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-earn-1000-a-month-or-more-as-an-online-tutor" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/web_chat.jpg" alt="Web chat" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>If you're on a tight budget, want to accelerate debt repayment, or need extra money to save for an emergency fund, a side gig can be a smart way to boost your income.</p> <p>One of the most lucrative side gigs is tutoring. Whether you work well with children or prefer helping college students, you can earn up to $1,000 a month tutoring just a few hours a week. And there are many sites out there that eliminate the work of finding clients and marketing yourself; they connect you directly with customers and handle the administrative work.</p> <p>Below are five online tutoring companies that allow you to earn money on your own schedule.</p> <h2>1. Chegg</h2> <p><a href="https://www.chegg.com/tutors/" target="_blank">Chegg</a> connects students with tutors in a range of subjects, including science and mathematics. Unlike some tutoring sites, Chegg works with students from middle school through college. Rates start at $20 an hour, and top tutors can make as much as $1,000 a month.</p> <p>You can tutor whenever you want, depending on your availability; Chegg offers tutoring 24/7. Chegg pays weekly, so it's great for someone who needs extra money quickly. And you can earn more by tutoring high-demand subjects, such as calculus or computer science.</p> <p>To apply, you need to create an account with your email or Facebook login. Chegg will prompt you to enter your information, areas of expertise, and qualifications. You'll receive a decision from the company within a few days.</p> <h2>2. StudyPool</h2> <p><a href="https://www.studypool.com/" target="_blank">StudyPool</a> offers tutoring sessions in over 30 subjects. Online tutors can set their own deadlines and prices. According to the company, some of the top-earning tutors can make salaries well into the six-figures.</p> <p>Unlike other platforms, StudyPool allows students to pose questions to tutors, and a price is set for each question. For example, a student could post a question about a physics problem and offer $7 for help. You can choose as many or as few questions as you'd like to answer.</p> <h2>3. Tutor.com</h2> <p><a href="https://www.tutor.com/" target="_blank">Tutor.com</a> connects you with students of all ages for tutoring sessions in a range of subjects, including accounting, economics, and college essay writing. According to Glassdoor, Tutor.com contractors report making approximately $11 an hour, but some subjects pay even more.</p> <p>To be eligible, you must be a citizen of either the United States or Canada. Tutor.com can be a great source of income for college and graduate school students. While other companies require you to have a degree to accept clients, Tutor.com just asks that you be at least a college sophomore.</p> <p>Sessions are available day and night, seven days a week, so you can work on your own schedule. However, unlike some other sites, Tutor.com does require you to commit to at least five hours a week.</p> <h2>4. VIPKid</h2> <p><a href="https://t.vipkid.com.cn/" target="_blank">VIPKid</a> specializes in connecting Chinese students with English language instructors. The children you work with are between the ages of four and 12. All sessions are one-on-one with an individual child via webcam.</p> <p>With VIPKid, there's no need to spend hours planning classes and materials; VIPKid provides class materials for you. You just need to review the curriculum before each class. The pay rate can be as high as $22 an hour, with incentive bonuses for student performance and number of classes you complete.</p> <p>To be eligible to become a VIPKid tutor, you must have at least a bachelor's degree. You can submit your resume and application online. If the company selects you to proceed, you will undergo an interview, a class demonstration, and a mock session. If you pass these steps, VIPKid will have you sign a six-month contract and you can begin teaching.</p> <h2>5. Wyzant</h2> <p><a href="https://www.wyzant.com/" target="_blank">Wyzant</a> allows tutors to set their own rates, which can give you more flexibility and earning potential. In fact, some Wyzant tutors turn it into a full-time job and earn over $50,000 a year.</p> <p>Wyzant caters to a broad range of customers, from high school students who need help preparing for the SATs to college students who need to be coached in physics or engineering. You can set your own hours and take on as many or as few clients as you like. While you can tutor online with Wyzant, you can also offer in-person sessions for an additional fee for local customers.</p> <p>To become a Wyzant tutor, you must complete a profile and take a subject proficiency exam in your desired area of study. You can only tutor in subjects if you pass the exam.</p> <h3>Bottom line</h3> <p>Working as an online tutor can be a lucrative side gig that accommodates the other demands on your schedule. You can make extra money using just a few spare hours to accelerate debt repayment or build up your savings.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/kat-tretina">Kat Tretina</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-earn-1000-a-month-or-more-as-an-online-tutor">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-to-make-money-during-a-semester-abroad">7 Ways to Make Money During a Semester Abroad</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-college-expenses-you-arent-saving-for">9 College Expenses You Aren&#039;t Saving For</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-get-paid-to-learn">6 Ways to Get Paid to Learn</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-money-saving-hacks-every-college-student-should-try">8 Money-Saving Hacks Every College Student Should Try</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-i-made-400-in-10-days-by-selling-an-online-course-i-created">How I Made $400 in 10 Days by Selling an Online Course I Created</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Education & Training Extra Income classes college students kids online jobs side gigs students teaching tutors Mon, 19 Jun 2017 08:00:12 +0000 Kat Tretina 1965739 at http://www.wisebread.com