job hunting http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/12197/all en-US Don't Let These 6 Common Job Traps Derail Your Career http://www.wisebread.com/dont-let-these-6-common-job-traps-derail-your-career <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/dont-let-these-6-common-job-traps-derail-your-career" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/i_need_a_break.jpg" alt="I need a break" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Have you run out of novel reasons to call in late to work? Do you keep close tabs on the number of vacation and sick days you have left? Have you fantasized about pulling a Thelma and Louise-style getaway on your Monday morning commute? If so, you may feel trapped by that job you used to love.</p> <p>It's no fun. Feeling trapped in a job you hate can sap your motivation, keep you poor, and lead to all kinds of other stress. Get yourself unstuck by learning why so many people get stuck in the first place. Here a six of the most common career traps.</p> <h2>1. Convincing yourself you're too invested to leave</h2> <p>Being invested in your job is admirable, but at a certain point, the law of diminishing returns kicks in. Ask yourself, &quot;Is my investment paying off? Is the payoff purely financial? Are there hidden costs to my health and relationships that I'm not factoring into the equation?&quot; Consider how moving on might revitalize your career and offer greater rewards. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-reasons-its-never-too-late-for-a-career-change?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Reasons It's Never Too Late for a Career Change</a>)</p> <h2>2. Believing that big promotion is just around the corner</h2> <p>I get it; we're all taught that quitting is bad and that patience is rewarded. But if you're continually passed over for promotions despite working harder and working smarter, something's gotta give. Have a chat with your supervisor to clarify your career path and outline exactly what's needed to progress professionally. If things don't change in a reasonable amount of time, move on. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-ways-to-finally-get-that-promotion-this-year?ref=seealso" target="_blank">12 Ways to Finally Get That Promotion This Year</a>)</p> <h2>3. Confusing your employer with your family</h2> <p>We've all heard the familiar refrain, &quot;We're just one big happy family here!&quot; While the metaphor is lovely, it usually doesn't survive an economic downturn. Without taking anything away from companies that work hard to foster a close and collaborative atmosphere, the employer/employee relationship is an economic one. Your coworkers aren't your siblings and your boss isn't your parent. Pursue your career goals free of these false family obligations.</p> <h2>4. Not realizing you can interview casually</h2> <p>An interview is like a first date; even if things go well, you don't have to get married. There's a big difference between exploring your professional options and turning in a letter of resignation. Chill out. It's perfectly OK to interview casually, learn more about companies that are hiring, and take your time considering new roles. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-ways-to-job-hunt-without-getting-caught?ref=seealso" target="_blank">9 Ways to Job Hunt Without Getting Caught</a>)</p> <h2>5. Waiting to cash in when the company goes public</h2> <p>Sure, sometimes companies go public and faithful employees get a big payday by exercising company stock options. But just as often, companies spend years preparing for an IPO that either never happens or falls flat. Unless you're fully prepared to play the long game &mdash; potentially sacrificing career advancement and happiness in the process &mdash; don't stick around for an iffy IPO.</p> <h2>6. Believing your employer is special</h2> <p>I once had a friend who spent more than 25 years working for the same company. The first five or 10 years were terrific. The firm was small and privately held, provided employees with free lunch every day, and offered a host of convenient services on-site. But when the company went public and had to answer to shareholders, the culture changed dramatically and most of those little perks were cut.</p> <p>Still, my friend endured. She had a difficult time admitting the place was no longer special &mdash; that other employers might actually offer her more valuable benefits and far more progressive work environments. For the next decade, she toiled as new staff came and went, her workload grew, and her stress level skyrocketed. Though she dreamed of moving on, she's likely still there &mdash; holed up in a dark corner remembering the good ol' days.</p> <p>That doesn't have to be you. Let go of what used to be special and move on to something that is.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fdont-let-these-6-common-job-traps-derail-your-career&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FDon%2527t%2520Let%2520These%25206%2520Common%2520Job%2520Traps%2520Derail%2520Your%2520Career.jpg&amp;description=Don't%20Let%20These%206%20Common%20Job%20Traps%20Derail%20Your%20Career"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/Don%27t%20Let%20These%206%20Common%20Job%20Traps%20Derail%20Your%20Career.jpg" alt="Don't Let These 6 Common Job Traps Derail Your Career" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/kentin-waits">Kentin Waits</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dont-let-these-6-common-job-traps-derail-your-career">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-answer-23-of-the-most-common-interview-questions">How to Answer 23 of the Most Common Interview Questions</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-questions-you-should-always-ask-in-an-exit-interview">8 Questions You Should Always Ask in an Exit Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/13-great-reasons-to-quit-your-job">13 Great Reasons to Quit Your Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-the-job-without-saying-a-word">How to Get the Job Without Saying a Word</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/new-job-dont-make-these-7-mistakes-with-your-benefits">New Job? Don&#039;t Make These 7 Mistakes With Your Benefits</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building career traps dead end job employers interviews job hunting quitting stuck Mon, 26 Jun 2017 09:00:12 +0000 Kentin Waits 1966171 at http://www.wisebread.com Here's Why a Late Retirement May Be a Bad Idea http://www.wisebread.com/heres-why-a-late-retirement-may-be-a-bad-idea <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/heres-why-a-late-retirement-may-be-a-bad-idea" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/gold_and_golden_nest_egg_with_time_clock_on_background.jpg" alt="Gold and Golden Nest Egg with time clock on background" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>When it comes to managing finances, many people struggle to keep up with expenses like rent, utilities, credit cards, and student loans. With so many obligations, saving for retirement becomes less of a priority. In fact, according to a 2016 GoBankingRates survey, one in three Americans have no retirement savings at all. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-retirement-planning-steps-late-starters-must-make?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Retirement Planning Steps Late Starters Must Make</a>)</p> <p>If you haven't started saving yet, or your retirement account isn't enough to provide for you, you may be thinking of an alternative strategy. Many people plan on working well into their 60s or 70s rather than depending on their retirement accounts for income.</p> <p>However, while many people expect to work at least part-time through their retirement, it doesn't always go according to plan.</p> <h2>Health issues</h2> <p>While you may expect to be strong and healthy well into your 70s, the reality can be quite different. Your health may deteriorate suddenly, requiring medical attention and rest. Or, you may experience an accident which limits your mobility. You may be physically unable to work, even on a part-time basis. If you relied on working into your retirement to fund your lifestyle, a health emergency can leave you destitute.</p> <p>When it comes to retirement, you should save with the idea that you may not be able to work at all later in life. If you are healthy in your golden years and <em>are</em> able to work, that can be an added bonus which can help you pursue your passions. But it shouldn't be the focal point of your retirement strategy.</p> <h2>Difficulty finding work</h2> <p>Even if you're capable of working, finding a job when you're older isn't always easy. Unemployed workers over the age of 55 can have a difficult time finding a new job.</p> <p>In addition, the modern workforce is changing dramatically and rapidly. There's new technology, and some roles are becoming outdated. Work that you may have done for years may no longer be needed, and you may be untrained to handle new ways of doing business.</p> <p>You may have to go back to school or take on new training, which can be an added expense. And you might be competing against people half your age with the same skills, which can make for a challenging job search.</p> <h2>You become a caregiver</h2> <p>Even if you're healthy and your skills are in demand, you still may not be able to work. If your partner or loved one becomes ill, you may have to dedicate yourself full-time to becoming a caregiver. Your relative's needs may prevent you from going to work.</p> <p>That means both of you may be unable to work, which will be a huge drain on your finances. If you did not save appropriately for the worst case scenario, you both could be in a dire situation.</p> <h2>Your interests may change</h2> <p>When you're in the early stages of your career, you may not be able to fathom the idea of not working. You may think you'd be bored. However, that can change after 30 or 40 years in the workforce. When you reach retirement age, you may realize that you just want to enjoy your golden years without the stress of going into the office. If you do not have your finances in order, that can make your retirement very difficult.</p> <p>While planning to work later can be beneficial for your savings, it's not a reliable retirement strategy. Many things can change before you retire, so it's important to prioritize saving <em>now </em>and prepare for the different possibilities.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/kat-tretina">Kat Tretina</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/heres-why-a-late-retirement-may-be-a-bad-idea">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-5"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-travel-in-retirement-keeps-you-young">6 Ways Travel in Retirement Keeps You Young</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-questions-financial-advisers-hear-most-often">8 Questions Financial Advisers Hear Most Often</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-retirement-planning-changes-when-youre-single">7 Ways Retirement Planning Changes When You&#039;re Single</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-save-for-retirement-when-you-are-unemployed">How to Save for Retirement When You Are Unemployed</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-reasons-an-hsa-is-actually-worth-having">10 Reasons an HSA Is Actually Worth Having</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Retirement health care interests job hunting late retirement long term care saving money working late Thu, 22 Jun 2017 08:00:10 +0000 Kat Tretina 1966195 at http://www.wisebread.com 8 Questions You Should Always Ask in an Exit Interview http://www.wisebread.com/8-questions-you-should-always-ask-in-an-exit-interview <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/8-questions-you-should-always-ask-in-an-exit-interview" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/women_work_discussion_516896268.jpg" alt="Woman asking questions during her exit interview" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Exit interviews are common when someone is leaving a job. And usually, the onus is on the employer to ask the questions. If you're taking a new job offer, they may want to know why you're leaving, or what they could have done to keep you around. If you're being let go, they'll want to make sure you know everything about the package you're receiving, and your legal options.</p> <p>Rarely do people talk about the questions <em>you</em> should ask in your exit interview. Here are eight that can provide invaluable answers.</p> <h2>1. Will my feedback be anonymous?</h2> <p>If you have some important issues to get off your chest, this is a very important question to ask beforehand. You don't want to tear into an awful boss or coworker, only to find out that it has gotten back to them. You may even want to consider if it's worth the risk at all; if you work in similar fields, your paths may cross again in the future.</p> <p>Despite this, you may feel a moral obligation to tell HR all about the problems that certain coworkers caused, for the sake of the people who are left behind. If you must spill the beans, ask this question before you say anything negative or controversial about anyone. You may even want to write something down that can go on record &mdash; minus your name, of course.</p> <h2>2. What did I do well during my time here?</h2> <p>You can phrase this question however you feel most comfortable, but what you're looking for here is feedback on your strengths. What did you do that made a difference to the company? Were you a rock star at certain things? Were you highly prized in areas you didn't even consider?</p> <p>All of this can be great information to take with you to your next job. You may have thought that speaking up in meetings about potential issues with a project was a cause for grief. But it turns out that people really valued you asking those &quot;Devil's Advocate&quot; questions, as it helped with the development of otherwise unconsidered issues. This kind of feedback can really bolster your performance in your next position.</p> <h2>3. Do I have the option to come back here one day?</h2> <p>It may seem like an odd question to ask &mdash; after all, you're probably leaving the company for very good reason. However, &quot;boomerang&quot; employees can be common in some industries, especially if you're leaving to relocate out of state and may one day return. If you're leaving on good terms, this probably won't be an issue. If you're leaving because things went sour with certain people, it may be tricky to return until they, too, have left. If you're being laid off, you should be given the option to apply for other job openings that match your skill-set in the future.</p> <h2>4. What could I have done better?</h2> <p>No one is perfect. Even an employee that is being begged to stay will still have some areas that could use improvement. Now is the time to find out what those shortcomings are, as this will help you become an even better employee for your next company.</p> <p>Don't take any of this feedback personally. You asked the question, and you need to be an adult about the answers you get. Even if things take a turn, and you suddenly find out someone you respected was constantly complaining about you behind your back, just take it in stride. Fix what you think needs fixing, and ignore the petty stuff.</p> <h2>5. Can I use you as a reference in the future?</h2> <p>It may seem like a no-brainer that they'll say yes, especially if you were a good employee, but many companies frown on their staff providing references for ex-employees. If someone from that company provides a glowing reference for a person who turns out to be unreliable, a thief, a sexual predator, or anything else negative, it can come back on the business and bite them.</p> <p>The HR department's job in any company is to look out for the business, not the people who work there. So, if you think you may want to use them as a future reference, ask before you put their name down. Otherwise, they'll typically verify your dates of employment, and that's about it.</p> <h2>6. When can I expect my final paycheck, and how much will it be?</h2> <p>Your final paycheck may not be issued to you on a regular pay period. It may also include unused vacation days, and depending on your company, unused personal days, sick time (although that's rare), and a portion of the annual bonus you were set to receive.</p> <p>Not only do you want to ask about the final total, but when you can expect to receive that amount, and whether it will be a live check or a bank deposit. If the numbers don't add up, say something now. If they don't have final totals yet, make sure you have the phone number of the person in the payroll department.</p> <h2>7. Is there any kind of noncompete in place?</h2> <p>If you were given an employee handbook when you first started, this may be covered in there. But, roles and responsibilities within an organization vary greatly between departments, so now is a good time to clarify. It's possible that you will be asked not to have any contact with your current clients or vendors for at least a year or two, especially if you will be looking to poach current accounts from your company.</p> <p>Legally, you may not have anything to worry about, as this is typically more of a courtesy. How you handle this, of course, is entirely up to you. At the end of the day, you have to do what's right for you and your family, and if there's nothing in writing to stop you approaching people, it's your call. And of course, if they approach you without any prompting, that's another ballgame entirely.</p> <h2>8. What about a severance package and health benefits?</h2> <p>If you're being laid off, your company may have a set severance package in place. Many businesses offer two weeks of pay for every year of service, up to a cap of their choosing. Others give you a set figure (anywhere from a week to a year) regardless of your time there.</p> <p>You'll also need to know what's happening with your health benefits. Unlike most other countries, health benefits are tied to employment in the U.S. and losing coverage can be costly (or even deadly). Will the company continue covering your health insurance, and if so, for how long? What about COBRA? These are important questions to ask, and if they won't continue coverage, ask for more money in your severance to help cover the costs.</p> <p>If you are planning to leave your company soon, make sure you have at least some of these questions ready for your exit interview. And if you suffer a layoff, please remember to ask about your severance and benefits. Good luck!</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-questions-you-should-always-ask-in-an-exit-interview">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-4"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-fun-ways-to-leave-your-job">10 Fun Ways to Leave Your Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-work-perks-you-cant-get-as-a-freelancer">10 Work Perks You Can&#039;t Get as a Freelancer</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-deal-when-you-hate-your-new-job">How to Deal When You Hate Your New Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-financial-moves-to-make-the-moment-you-get-fired">11 Financial Moves to Make the Moment You Get Fired</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-career-tips-you-wish-you-could-give-your-younger-self">7 Career Tips You Wish You Could Give Your Younger Self</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income benefits employment exit interview feedback human resources job hunting Job Interview layoffs quitting severance Fri, 28 Apr 2017 08:31:04 +0000 Paul Michael 1936196 at http://www.wisebread.com 10 Great Careers You Can Have With a Liberal Arts Degree http://www.wisebread.com/10-great-careers-you-can-have-with-a-liberal-arts-degree <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/10-great-careers-you-can-have-with-a-liberal-arts-degree" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_72871715_LARGE.jpg" alt="careers you can have with a liberal arts degree" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>It's quite possible you were warned against getting a liberal arts degree. &quot;It's too broad&quot; or &quot;you won't earn a great living&quot; are statements often hurled at people who pursue liberal arts. Common majors include English, mathematics, communication, history, language, philosophy, sociology, psychology, and the arts (fine art, music, performing arts). However, there are many <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-reasons-librarian-is-still-a-great-career-choice">great careers and opportunities</a> out there that pay an excellent wage, and offer a fulfilling vocation. Here are 10 of the best.</p> <h2>1. Public Relations Director</h2> <p>A <a href="http://study.com/articles/Public_Relations_Director_Job_Duties_Salary_and_Requirements.html">public relations (PR) director</a> is responsible for developing and executing strategies and tactics that will shine a positive light on his or her clients. You've no doubt heard the phrase &quot;that's good PR,&quot; and most of the time, there's a PR director behind the campaign. The director will have climbed the ladder from lower positions in the PR department, and is responsible for managing those people who help make things happen. These days, a lot of PR is done through social media and TV appearances, but it can be done in any number of ways, including stunts, viral videos, promotions, and public appearances. The hours are not typically 9-to-5, but the rewards can be tremendous.</p> <p><strong>Annual salary</strong>: $88,169-$161,449</p> <h2>2. Archaeologist</h2> <p>Before you don the fedora and the whip, realize that archaeologists like Indiana Jones are pure fantasy. But that doesn't mean it's not <a href="http://www.payscale.com/research/US/Job=Archaeologist/Salary">a fun and rewarding career</a>. Archaeology is the study of human activity through the ages, and involves the recovery and analysis of &quot;material culture.&quot; Most archaeologists study human prehistory and history, and a typical week's work could involve surveying, excavating, and analyzing the findings. Where we have been, and how we got here today, are areas of great interest to archeologists. And of course, much of what they recover ends up on display in a museum. </p> <p><strong>Annual salary</strong>: $29,965-$71,266</p> <h2>3. Senior Copywriter</h2> <p>Do you have a way with words? Are you skilled in the art of persuasion? Do you often come up with wild and inventive ideas that would make people sit up and take notice? Then a career as a copywriter could be right up your alley. Most copywriters start out on pitifully low salaries, especially those working in the big name ad agencies. But after 5-7 years, you can land the role of <a href="http://www1.salary.com/CopyWriter-IV-Salaries.html">senior copywriter</a>, and make close to six figures. If you go freelance, you can double, or even triple, that amount. Senior copywriters often go on to become creative directors, and those salaries can hit seven figures in the New York and London shops.</p> <p><strong>Annual salary</strong>: $56,992-$95,357</p> <h2>4. Sales Director</h2> <p>It takes a certain kind of person to excel in sales. The main focus of the sales director is to sell products and/or services through the implementation of national (or even international) sales plans and promotions. The <a href="http://swz.salary.com/SalaryWizard/Sales-Director-Salary-Details.aspx">sales director</a> will have a team of regional sales managers to oversee, and is responsible for the overall performance of the brand's financial success. Sales directors need to excel in negotiating, motivation, building relationships, coaching, market knowledge, developing budgets, and managing complex processes. It's a stressful job, but one that has great financial rewards.</p> <p><strong>Annual salary</strong>: $111,721-$207,227</p> <h2>5. Economist</h2> <p>If you're one of those lucky people who enjoys crunching numbers and researching economic trends, you could make a very comfortable living. An <a href="http://swz.salary.com/SalaryWizard/Economist-Corporate-Salary-Details.aspx">economist</a> typically collects and analyzes data relating to economic issues, designs policies to solve economic problems, and prepares reports for businesses, governments, and individuals. Although math is at the core, economists work in a variety of different fields, including business, health, education, the environment, and energy. The insight of a talented economist can be invaluable, and as such, skilled economists are in high demand &mdash; the salary clearly reflects this.</p> <p><strong>Annual salary</strong>: $80,978-$174,300</p> <h2>6. Sociologist</h2> <p>Sociology gets a bad rap. It's frequently said that people who get a sociology degree mean well, but have not thought things through. Typical jobs synonymous with sociology are social work, roles in correctional facilities, and counselors. All of these positions have a low median wage, but that is only one side of the story. <a href="http://www.truity.com/career-profile/sociologist">Professional sociologists</a> can earn an excellent living. Their workweek involves designing research projects to test theories on social issues, collecting and analyzing data, collaborating with social scientists, and helping government policymakers to create the best possible initiatives. Areas of interest include health, crime, education, family, population, gender, and poverty. And helping others can be extremely fulfilling work.</p> <p><strong>Annual salary</strong>: $43,280-$129,760</p> <h2>7. Real Estate Broker</h2> <p>First, let's establish the difference between a <a href="http://www.payscale.com/research/US/Job=Real_Estate_Broker/Salary">real estate broker</a> and a real estate agent. A real estate broker is a licensed individual who works for him or herself, whereas a real estate agent usually works for a broker or agency. Real estate brokers are typically go-getter types. They are driven, organized, ambitious, and charming. Day-to-day duties include soliciting clients who want to buy and sell properties, marketing those properties, arranging presentations and open houses, organizing paperwork, and supervising agents on the payroll. As it is primarily based on commission, the salary range is vast. Good brokers can earn a very handsome annual salary.</p> <p><strong>Annual salary</strong>: $29,333-$147,741</p> <h2>8. Psychologist</h2> <p>The lines between <a href="http://www1.salary.com/Psychologist-Salary.html">psychology</a> and psychiatry often get blurred. The basic difference is that a psychologist focuses on treating emotional and mental suffering with behavioral therapy; and a psychiatrist is a trained medical doctor, and can therefore prescribe medications and go beyond therapy. But it takes a lot longer to become a trained and licensed psychiatrist. As a psychologist, you will spend the majority of your day interacting with individuals, couples, and groups. It may be emotionally stressful at times. Many psychologists work for themselves, some out of their own homes. You can set your own hours, and feel good knowing you spend every day helping people feel better.</p> <p><strong>Annual salary</strong>: $69,953-$111,703</p> <h2>9. Executive Assistant</h2> <p>If you are exceptionally well-organized, have software and scheduling skills, and are happy jumping whenever a big cheese demands it, then you should look into a career as <a href="http://swz.salary.com/SalaryWizard/Executive-Assistant-Salary-Details.aspx">an executive assistant</a>. Big corporations these days have dozens of high-paid executives, and they all require an assistant to keep everything in order. It will go beyond just answering phones and emails, though. Get ready to conduct research, schedule travel and meetings, coordinate special projects, and supervise a lower tier of assistants and clerical staff. As top executives often work 70-hour weeks, you may be required to come into the office at unusual times. And don't be surprised to get phone calls at 3:30 a.m.</p> <p><strong>Annual salary</strong>: $47,717-$75,320</p> <h2>10. Actor</h2> <p>People with liberal arts degrees have a foundation of skills that make them good with people, and they are usually in touch with their emotions. These are both great qualities for an <a href="http://www.payscale.com/research/US/Job=Actor_%2f_Actress/Salary">aspiring actor</a>. While many actors, male and female, have to work a fairly ordinary day job to support themselves at first, some find their way into Hollywood's spotlight. And they can go from serving food to being served the finest meals in five-star hotels. For someone who makes it all the way to the top, like <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-money-lessons-we-could-all-learn-from-dwayne-the-rock-johnson?ref=seealso">Dwayne Johnson</a> ($64.5 million a year) or Jennifer Lawrence ($46 million a year) &mdash; it's a career that brings incredible rewards.</p> <p><strong>Annual salary</strong>: $20,040-$209,525&hellip;and way beyond!</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-great-careers-you-can-have-with-a-liberal-arts-degree">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-questions-you-should-always-ask-in-an-exit-interview">8 Questions You Should Always Ask in an Exit Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-best-jobs-for-work-life-balance">4 Best Jobs for Work Life Balance</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-things-that-really-annoy-hiring-managers">9 Things That Really Annoy Hiring Managers</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-creative-jobs-with-surprisingly-high-salaries">5 Creative Jobs With Surprisingly High Salaries</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-places-to-find-cheap-or-free-education">6 Places to Find Cheap (or Free!) Education</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income Education & Training artistic talent college degree communications high paying jobs job hunting liberal arts liberal arts degree Tue, 01 Nov 2016 10:30:11 +0000 Paul Michael 1824622 at http://www.wisebread.com 12 Ways to Rekindle Passion for Your Job http://www.wisebread.com/12-ways-to-rekindle-passion-for-your-job <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/12-ways-to-rekindle-passion-for-your-job" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_73237551_MEDIUM.jpg" alt="rekindle passion for your job" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Not loving your job, or even hating it, seems to be a part of life these days. Drew Carey once said, &quot;Oh, you hate your job? Why didn't you say so? There's a support group for that. It's called everybody, and they meet at the bar.&quot;</p> <p>Some people are lucky, and always love their jobs, but most of us love it for a while, before forgetting its highlights and focusing on its flaws. However, your current job doesn't have to be a drag. All it takes is a paradigm shift.</p> <h2>1. Write Down the Good Parts of Your Day</h2> <p>There is good and bad in everyone, and in every day. Even on the days that result in you getting home with a scowl on your face, drinking a double scotch, and pulling out your hair for two hours, something good must have happened. True, it may be hard to find, but try and dig.</p> <p>Make a log, on your computer or in a journal. Perhaps a coworker gave you a compliment. Maybe you had a really tasty bagel on the way to work. Or, was the sun shining as you walked from the car or train to your office? When it's something much bigger, like working in a project you really enjoyed, log that in detail. As you look back over your weeks, and months, you'll see a record of enjoyment. That can help make the negative feelings go away.</p> <h2>2. Hang Out With People That Make You Happy</h2> <p>People at work can be a great source of happiness. In fact, all those times that you laughed at work, or felt happiness, most likely came from your interactions with other people. So, find ways to interact more with the people that make you feel good about yourself. And conversely, avoid the people who drag you down. That guy who never has anything good to say about the job, or anyone else, is not going to make you feel great. But the one who lifts your spirits can bring you into a different attitude quickly. Stick with the positive ones.</p> <h2>3. Compare Your Job to One That Sucks</h2> <p>We measure our misery or success by those around us. While you may think you have a job that stinks, do a little digging, and find out what jobs really do suck. You may hate what you do now, but would you rather be doing something demeaning for minimum wage? (And if the answer is yes to that one, maybe you really do <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-careers-you-dont-need-a-ton-of-experience-to-start">need to move on</a>.) Some people in other countries are risking death for barely enough money to feed and clothe themselves. How does your job stack up? If you're still complaining about monotonous data entry, or not having the complete respect of your peers, it may be time to rethink your outlook.</p> <h2>4. Remember What Your Job Allows You to Do</h2> <p>So most of the time, the job is awful. However, what does it allow you to do that isn't awful? Maybe it's the two-week vacation you took to a tropical island. Perhaps it helped pay for the Harley Davidson parked in your driveway, or season tickets to see your favorite sports team. Yes, while your job may not make you happy, it provides the income and security to bring wonderful things into your life.</p> <h2>5. Find the Positive in the Little Things</h2> <p>Looking at the big picture isn't always the best strategy. You have to find joy in some of the smaller aspects of your day-to-day routine. Maybe it's the fact that you get to sit down, put your feet up, and drink coffee a few times a day. Hey, you get paid for it. That's nice. Maybe it's even smaller than that. Your chair felt really comfy, or you got a great parking spot. You don't have to concentrate on the whole day, or the big issues. Find something small, each day, to be thankful for.</p> <h2>6. Take Moments Just for Yourself</h2> <p>Even at work, you can have some &quot;me time.&quot; Employers are required to give you adequate work breaks. Take that time to switch off, completely. That means go outside, walk around, read a book, close your eyes and listen to music, or meditate. It may not always be possible to do that, depending on what you do and where you work, but there should always be an opportunity to find a moment of peace in the daily grind.</p> <h2>7. Ignore What You Cannot Change</h2> <p>You'll often hear people worrying about things that are, to be blunt, completely out of their control. The easiest way to deal with these problems is to shut them out. If layoffs are coming, you will not have any control over that situation, so ignore it. By all means, prepare for the worst, but get on with your day. If the company has a system in place that you blatantly disagree with, but cannot change, then forget about it. If you cannot change something, you are giving it way too much energy by obsessing about it. You'll feel much happier if you accept what is beyond your control.</p> <h2>8. Fix What You Can Change</h2> <p>There may be things in your company that you cannot control, but there are also things you can definitely impact. If you hate the way your office space is set up, see what you can do to change it. Are your hours flexible? Can you get the awful coffee replaced with a better brand? Can you talk about dress code, or suggest new methods of doing things that will save people time? You are never going to change the way the CEO does business, but you may be able to change his mind on having plants in the building, or endorsing &quot;bring your kids to work day.&quot;</p> <h2>9. Get Really, Really Organized</h2> <p>A lot of the stress we encounter in our daily routine comes from a lack of organization and preparation. Too often, we can leave ourselves too little time to get a certain task done. We may rush to work, have a messy office, or miss appointments. Get around this by organizing, and using the latest apps for your smartphone. You can set reminders that take the worry out of a daily schedule. You can log the names and important information about all of your clients and colleagues. Everything can be setup to work smoothly, and with more organization comes less stress, and a better outlook on the job.</p> <h2>10. Take Significant Time Off If You Can</h2> <p>If you really are just completely burned out, get away from it all. Some people, especially in America, are afraid to take time off. They say it looks bad, or they might not be seen as indispensable. There is simply no excuse not to take time off, especially if it drastically changes your attitude. If you have a few weeks of vacation saved up, take them. Even if it's just to stay at home, you need to escape. If you have sick time, use it to heal your mind. And if things have become really bad, <a href="https://www.dol.gov/whd/fmla/">look into FMLA.</a> You can take up to 12 weeks off, every year, and your job will be protected. You will be covered if it's a serious health condition, and <a href="http://thelawdictionary.org/article/what-are-employees-right-to-stress-leave/">depression or stress can be debilitating.</a></p> <h2>11. Find Ways to Take on New Responsibilities</h2> <p>If the daily grind is wearing you down, find something new to do at work. Some factories do this as a way to prevent burnout, rotating people to different stations after a few hours to avoid a lack of concentration, and to keep accidents from happening. If you're always working on the same old stuff, see what you can do to shake things up. Can you swap roles with someone? Can you take on a new task? Can you create a new initiative? You would be surprised how much a change is as good as a rest.</p> <h2>12. Quit Being a Complainer</h2> <p>At the end of the day, your own attitude about your job can drag you down. Henry Ford, among others, said, &quot;Whether you think you can, or you think you can't &mdash; you're right.&quot; Attitude can be the difference between seeing an opportunity for success, or something destined to fail. Complaining also brings others down around you. And that, in turn, can feed into morale issues and bad company culture. So, cheer up. Look at the list above, and find ways to change your outlook. You can bring a spark back to your career that could ignite something huge.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-ways-to-rekindle-passion-for-your-job">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-pearls-of-career-wisdom-from-brian-tracy">6 Pearls of Career Wisdom From Brian Tracy</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-to-bring-up-with-your-boss-at-your-annual-review">10 Things to Bring Up With Your Boss at Your Annual Review</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/escape-your-dying-industry-with-one-of-these-8-careers-instead">Escape Your Dying Industry With One of These 8 Careers, Instead</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-things-that-really-annoy-hiring-managers">9 Things That Really Annoy Hiring Managers</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-ways-youre-being-a-terrible-employee">12 Ways You&#039;re Being a Terrible Employee</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building advice career tips job hunting job search job tips passion pursue your passion work Thu, 13 Oct 2016 10:30:07 +0000 Paul Michael 1811798 at http://www.wisebread.com 8 Terrible Work-From-Home "Jobs" You Should Avoid http://www.wisebread.com/8-terrible-work-from-home-jobs-you-should-avoid <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/8-terrible-work-from-home-jobs-you-should-avoid" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_stressed_computer_94970603.jpg" alt="Woman avoiding terrible work-from-home &quot;jobs&quot;" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Working from home can be very rewarding, and it can provide the type of lifestyle you've been seeking. The number of remote jobs is also increasing, with 20 to 30 million people working from home at least one day a week. If you're ready to start working remotely, it's important to do your due diligence and use <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/tips-for-finding-legitimate-work-at-home-opportunities">reputable job sites</a> to find a legitimate work-from-home job.</p> <p>However, there are some work-from-home jobs that just aren't worth the time or energy. According to FlexJobs, there are <a href="https://www.flexjobs.com/blog/post/7-signs-dream-craigslist-job-scam/">60-70 scams for every legitimate job</a> opportunity, so we've covered some of the most common scams to help save you time on your search. When in doubt, if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.</p> <h2>1. Stuffing Envelopes</h2> <p><a href="https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/articles/0112-envelope-stuffing-schemes">Stuffing envelopes is the oldest scam</a> in the book, dating back to the 1920s. Many people consider this to be a pyramid scheme that will end up costing you more than you make. According to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), the only way to make money from this &quot;job&quot; is to persuade your friends and family to sign up for the same scam that you did.</p> <p>Often, you'll be required to invest in a starter kit, so you'll need to spend money upfront, and typically, the kit never even arrives. It is extremely rare that anyone actually makes money stuffing envelopes, and even if you did make money, it would be in the pennies, or you would only generate income if the mailings generate responses.</p> <h2>2. Craft Making</h2> <p>It may sound like fun to craft for a living, but you will often spend more than you make with these endeavors. If you are required to pay for your own materials upfront, this is a good sign that it's a scam. In fact, most of these companies are making money selling the starter kits, not selling the assembled product. Often, the company will claim that the crafts you assembled don't meet their specifications (even if you assembled them perfectly), so you won't get paid for your hard work and will be left with assembled crafts that you can't use.</p> <h2>3. Costly Billing</h2> <p>Any position that requires you to purchase expensive computer software or equipment upfront is typically a scam. Medical billing &quot;jobs&quot; typically require this. In fact, when it comes to medical billing, the vast majority of offices choose not to outsource their billing services to individuals in order to observe health care privacy rules. Instead, they opt for established companies with on-site, trained workers.</p> <h2>4. Check Cashing</h2> <p>Typically, these types of jobs will require you to cash a check in your personal bank account. You get to keep a portion of the check and send the remainder to the hiring company. In most cases, the check is a fake and you will be held financially responsible. Cashing a check for someone puts the full responsibility on you. This means that if the check bounces, it's your responsibility to repay the debt. Along with potentially costing you money, check-cashing schemes can be illegal.</p> <h2>5. Money Laundering</h2> <p>This scheme works similarly to a check-cashing scheme. You will be asked to transfer money in and out of your personal bank account. This money may have been acquired through illegal means, which means that you could be at risk of having criminal charges brought against you.</p> <h2>6. Filling Out Surveys</h2> <p>Completing online surveys may seem like fun, easy work, but you will only get paid pennies for each one &mdash; meaning it will usually take more than a day to make just $1. These companies usually don't pay out until you've made $20 or more, which can take weeks or even months. It's just not worth your time.</p> <h2>7. Reshipping Services</h2> <p>This &quot;job&quot; may sound simple enough. You are required to accept shipped goods to then repackage and ship them to new locations. However, the items have usually been ordered with stolen credit cards, which means that you could be at risk of prosecution for the transport of stolen goods.</p> <h2>8. Postal Jobs</h2> <p>While working for the post office isn't a scam in itself, one of the most common work-from-home scams is for hidden or &quot;previously undisclosed&quot; federal government jobs, such as post office positions. According to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), any <a href="https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/articles/0083-government-job-scams">federal and postal job postings</a> should be free to apply to and can be found on <a href="https://www.usajobs.gov/">USAjobs.gov</a> or through the <a href="http://about.usps.com/careers/welcome.htm">USPS site</a>.</p> <p>Another common scam is paying someone to help you pass the postal exam. This exam is basically an aptitude test, so it isn't something you need to study for. Therefore, it doesn't make sense to pay for practice exams or tips to help you pass. Some companies will even offer a refund if you don't pass the postal exam, but then won't pony up when you do fail.</p> <h2>How to Avoid a Scam</h2> <p>The best way to avoid a terrible work-from-job is to do your research. Check the company out on the Better Business Bureau, look online for complaints or reviews, and think twice before spending any money on the position. You should be cautious of any job that requires you to <a href="https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/articles/0243-job-scams">pay money upfront</a> for supplies, training programs, or application processing fees. You should never have to pay to get a job. If the job title or description is generic or vague, this can also be a red flag. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-spot-work-at-home-job-scams?ref=seealso">6 Ways to Spot Work-at-Home Job Scams</a>)</p> <p>If you're confident that you're working for a legitimate company, but they still want you to purchase equipment or software upfront, inquire about the return policy if the position doesn't work out. Most importantly, you should never give out your credit card or bank account number to a potential employer. Another red flag is if they ask for any sensitive personal information, such as your social security number or driver's license number. Not only is this a red flag, but it may also put you at risk of identity theft.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F8-terrible-work-from-home-jobs-you-should-avoid&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F8%2520Terrible%2520Work-From-Home%2520Jobs%2520You%2520Should%2520Avoid.jpg&amp;description=8%20Terrible%20Work-From-Home%20Jobs%20You%20Should%20Avoid"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/8%20Terrible%20Work-From-Home%20Jobs%20You%20Should%20Avoid.jpg" alt="8 Terrible Work-From-Home &quot;Jobs&quot; You Should Avoid" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/andrea-cannon">Andrea Cannon</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-terrible-work-from-home-jobs-you-should-avoid">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-4"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-places-to-find-freelance-writing-jobs">6 Places to Find Freelance Writing Jobs</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/day-job-or-freelance-which-is-right-for-you">Day Job or Freelance: Which Is Right for You?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/22-websites-that-will-pay-you-to-write-for-them">22 Websites That Will Pay You to Write for Them</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/17-part-time-jobs-to-do-while-your-kids-are-at-school">17 Part-Time Jobs to Do While Your Kids Are at School</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-make-money-as-a-chat-or-forum-moderator">How to Make Money as a Chat or Forum Moderator</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Extra Income Job Hunting internet scams job hunting job scams job search scams side job work from home work from home jobs Tue, 04 Oct 2016 10:00:15 +0000 Andrea Cannon 1805245 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Get the Job Without Saying a Word http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-the-job-without-saying-a-word <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-get-the-job-without-saying-a-word" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_shaking_hands_78500093.jpg" alt="Woman getting the job without saying a word" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>An interview is something most of us will do several times throughout our careers. Whether it's for a promotion within your current organization, or a <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-use-snapchat-in-your-job-search">new job in a different company</a>, you need to nail every appearance you make. And while what you say is important, how you say it, and the body language you use is crucial. Here are some basic rules everyone should follow.</p> <h2>1. Make a Confident Entrance</h2> <p>It has been said that the interviewer can tell within the first 30 seconds if you are going to be a good fit for the company. And most interviewers have already made up their minds between five and 15 minutes. So you need to walk into the room being very self-assured, without looking arrogant or cocky. Stand up straight, walk with purpose, and be both professional and welcoming. You are happy to be there, without being so enthusiastic that you're as giddy as a puppy meeting its new owner. Offer your hand if they don't immediately offer theirs, and you will be off to a great start. When it's time to leave, apply the same rules.</p> <h2>2. Give a Firm Handshake</h2> <p>The key word here is <em>firm</em>. This is not a competition to see if you can crush the fingers of the person opposite you. Some men see the handshake as a test of manliness and strength, which it is definitely not. Think of the way you would grip a golf club before a swing &mdash; good enough to hold onto it, without trying to crush the steel. It should not last too long, one to three pumps is all you need to get this done and get onto the proceedings. If your handshake is flimsy or limp-wristed, you may be considered weak or insecure, and that is not a good first impression to give.</p> <p>If your hands are clammy or sweaty, find a way to dry them off before you shake. This equates to nervousness or illness, and is not something you want the interviewer to be thinking of. And finally&hellip; it's possible the person interviewing you will not shake hands for their own hygiene reasons. If you extend your hand and don't get one in return, just quickly place your hand back by your side and move on.</p> <h2>3. Make Eye Contact</h2> <p>This is not the same as staring (which some interviewers have said is both unnerving and creepy), or refusing to look away from the interviewer during the entire interview. You simply want to maintain good periods of eye contact, around 10-15 seconds at a time, before breaking to look up into the air when pondering a question, or looking at items around the office while you keep the conversation going. It should feel like you're talking to a friend.</p> <p>If you have a hard time looking right into their eyes, look at their nose, or the space between their eyebrows. They won't know the difference. If you are being interviewed by more than one person, do your best to make eye contact equally with each person, not only the person asking the questions. And remember to smile.</p> <h2>4. Maintain Great Posture</h2> <p>Your usual sitting position in the office is probably far from textbook. Most of us tend to slouch a little in our chairs, even with the advanced in lumbar support. But in an interview, you need to be on your best behavior, and that means sitting up straight without being so stiff that you look like you're on parade. Your posture should look comfortable, but professional. Chest up, shoulders back, spine straight. Keep your hands on your knees or folded in your lap. If you sit back in your chair too much, you look sloppy, and the interviewer may think you're not taking this seriously.</p> <p>On the other hand, if you lean forward too much, you can be considered aggressive. However, doing it from time to time, particularly when the interviewer says something of great interest, is fine. It shows that you are listening more closely, and that is a nice way to express enthusiasm.</p> <h2>5. Mirror Some of the Interviewer's Moves</h2> <p>A person doing a lot of interviews will usually be comfortable, and express positive body language movements. By mirroring (which is also a common way two people on a date will break down barriers and express interest), you are creating a subconscious bond between the two of you. However, it should be subtle, and used infrequently. If you get into a situation that becomes mimicry, you are going to offend or irritate the other person. They cross their hands, you cross your hands. They scratch their ear, you scratch yours. This is a surefire way to irk the interviewer, and you will not be called back.</p> <h2>6. Don't Overdo the Arm Movements</h2> <p>We are creatures that communicate with more than just words. In fact, <a href="http://www.nonverbalgroup.com/2011/08/how-much-of-communication-is-really-nonverbal">over 90% of communication is nonverbal,</a> and that means you are going to make gestures with your face, your body, and your hands. But don't get so excited that you're a windmill. It's okay to use your hands in a minimal way to help get a point across, but don't overdo it.</p> <h2>7. Respect the Interviewer's Personal Space</h2> <p>Most interviews are conducted over a table in an office or conference room, so you shouldn't have to worry too much about boundaries. However, there are times when you may have to get closer to the interviewer, especially if you are showing work from a portfolio, or you are sat facing each other without a table. When this happens, remember personal boundaries and barriers. No one wants a complete stranger getting too close, and it can also expose them to things like strong cologne, body odor, or bad breath &mdash; though hopefully, none of these are an issue.</p> <h2>8. Don't Get Too Relaxed</h2> <p>After a few minutes, you may start to become at ease with the interview process. The interviewer may have done a great job of calming your nerves, putting your fears at ease, and making you feel welcome. By all means, laugh at the interviewer's jokes, if they make them, and engage in more casual conversation if the interviewer is taking that lead. But do not sit back in your chair with your arms behind your head. Don't swing on the back legs of the chair either, or slump and stretch out your legs. These are signs of arrogance. And of course, never swear. No matter how casual the interviewer makes it, you do not want to curse like a sailor in any job interview.</p> <h2>9. Don't Fidget</h2> <p>Picking at your nails. Rubbing your head. Twirling your hair. Scratching your nose. Rapidly shaking one leg up and down. These are all annoying little movements that you may well be making unconsciously. A job interview can be nerve-wracking, and when you're nervous, you might do these things without realizing it. You must get them under control. They will only be perceived negatively. The interviewer will see that you are genuinely nervous. They may also think you're bored, hyperactive, or want to be anywhere but in that room with them. Practice with a friend or relative, and do everything you can to eliminate these fidgety moves.</p> <h2>10. Don't Cross Your Arms</h2> <p>Let's first address this myth that crossed arms mean you're closed off, bored, defensive, or trying to hide something. This is untrue. For some, crossed arms are simply comfortable, or a way of controlling fidgety hands. And science suggests that when you cross your arms, you are actually using both sides of your brain, and are <a href="http://www.today.com/health/are-crossed-arms-ok-body-language-myths-fixes-office-1D79842021">more likely to stay on task</a>.</p> <p>However, the myth has become more powerful than reality. Interviewers have been told to believe the pseudoscience, and when they see crossed arms, they think you're closed off or possibly uptight. In this case, crossing your arms is going to play into the folklore that 90% of interviewers believe to be true, so don't give them that signal.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-the-job-without-saying-a-word">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/make-guerrilla-job-hunting-work-for-you">Make Guerrilla Job Hunting Work for You</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/flashback-friday-the-65-best-career-tips-weve-ever-shared">Flashback Friday: The 65 Best Career Tips We&#039;ve Ever Shared</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/escape-your-dying-industry-with-one-of-these-8-careers-instead">Escape Your Dying Industry With One of These 8 Careers, Instead</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/using-times-new-roman-on-your-r-sum-is-like-wearing-sweatpants-to-an-interview">Using Times New Roman on Your Résumé Is Like Wearing Sweatpants to an Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-ways-to-job-hunt-without-getting-caught">9 Ways to Job Hunt Without Getting Caught</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Job Hunting body language confidence job hunting Job Interview job search resume Thu, 29 Sep 2016 09:30:26 +0000 Paul Michael 1801999 at http://www.wisebread.com 9 Careers You Don't Need a Ton of Experience to Start http://www.wisebread.com/9-careers-you-dont-need-a-ton-of-experience-to-start <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/9-careers-you-dont-need-a-ton-of-experience-to-start" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_police_officer_92304699.jpg" alt="Woman finding career that doesn&#039;t need experience to start" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>So, you don't have a lot of experience, but you don't want to settle for a terrible job. What are your options? Well, you may be surprised to learn that there are careers out there <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-great-side-jobs-you-can-do-on-your-bicycle">offering decent salaries</a> that don't even require a high school diploma, let alone a degree. And since the cost of college these days is so high, continuing education may not even be an option for you. If you're looking for a career that doesn't need any real experience to start, here are nine options worth considering.</p> <h2>1. Private Investigator</h2> <p>You'll see <a href="http://www.bls.gov/ooh/protective-service/private-detectives-and-investigators.htm">private investigators</a> popping up in movies and TV shows all the time, and they seem to live the lifestyle of an action hero crossed with Sherlock Holmes. In reality, a P.I. does not spend his or her time jumping off buildings, embroiled in car chases, and saving the day. Instead, the job involves a lot of research and background checking, and 80% of the work will be done in front of a computer and on the phone. Cases usually revolve around personal disputes, legal issues, or financial troubles &mdash; although sometimes a P.I. will be brought in to help look for a missing person, deliver a subpoena, or track down a relative. Although a background in either law enforcement of the military is the usual path of getting into the business, all you really need is a skill for uncovering information and, in some states, a P.I. license.</p> <p><strong>Average Annual Salary</strong>: $45,610</p> <h2>2. Real Estate Broker</h2> <p>With good people skills and the ability to convince someone to buy something, you could do well in real estate. To get started, you will need to get a license to become an agent, and that requires you to take a 60-hour course. Once you have that, you can either go out on your own, or get a job with a local real estate firm. And after you've tucked a little experience under your belt (usually 1-3 years), you can take another test to become a broker. Then, you can build a network of clients and referrals, and start making some serious money. Although the median salary is just over $70k, top real estate brokers can earn well over $300k per year.</p> <p><strong>Average Annual Salary</strong>: $72,500</p> <h2>3. Delivery Driver</h2> <p>If you have a license to drive an automobile, you can become a delivery driver. You do not need a Commercial Driver's License unless the job you're applying for states it specifically. Delivery driver jobs can range from part-time work at the local pizza place, to handling dangerous substances (known as Hazmat). Once upon a time, you needed a good working knowledge of the local, or sometimes national, roads and highways, but smartphones with built-in GPS and map apps have changed all that. The hours can be long, and not always 9-5, but if you're looking for a job with no experience, this is a good bet.</p> <p><strong>Average Annual Salary</strong>: $38,326</p> <h2>4. Deckhand</h2> <p>If you like the ocean and want to do some free traveling, a <a href="http://www.indeed.com/salary/Deckhand.html">deckhand</a> could be just the job you're looking for. The deckhands on a cruise ship don't get to do a lot of fun work, but they do get to see a little of the world as part of the job. Duties include monitoring gangways, running ship drills, mopping, sweeping, cleaning, making minor repairs, painting, helping to dock the boat, solving small problems, and basically being a jack-of-all-trades. Deckhands are also needed on dredges, riverboats, fishing vessels, and scows. No experience is needed to start this job, and contracts are usually for six months or longer. After you gain some experience on the ship, you can move up to deck officer, mate, or even captain.</p> <p><strong>Average Annual Salary</strong>: $38,000</p> <h2>5. Police Officer</h2> <p>&quot;To protect and to serve.&quot; It's the motto of many police departments, and if you have what it takes to do it, you could make a fine police officer. All you need is a high school diploma, and to be in good physical shape. Police expert Neal C. Griffin says that great officers exhibit the <a href="http://www.how-to-become-a-police-officer.com/">Five I's: integrity, intellect, industry, initiative, and impact.</a> Therefore, you should also exhibit excellent moral character, have a knack for solving problems, and work well under duress. If this sounds like something you are interested in, you will need to submit an application, complete a written test (called a civil service exam), and take a physical fitness test. After that, you'll undergo a background check before being accepted to an academy for training. This takes six months, after which you'll do 3-6 months of field training.</p> <p><strong>Average Annual Salary</strong>: $48,815</p> <h2>6. Oil Field Worker</h2> <p>When asked about the experience needed in an interview for <a href="http://www.jobshadow.com/interview-with-a-roughneck/">JobShdaow.com</a>, the &quot;roughneck&quot; replied, &quot;You don't even have to have a GED to do this job. In fact a lot of the industry never finished high school, or middle school. There is no educational boundaries for drilling. All you need is a strong back and a lot of common sense.&quot;</p> <p>This 22-year-old who was interviewed is already making over $100K a year, but does warn that it is hard, sometimes backbreaking work, and the 84-hour workweek can be grueling (you work two weeks on, two weeks off). If you can take direction well, don't mind getting your hands dirty, and can manage the schedule, you'll do well in this business, and make a lot of money. Of course, it can also be dangerous work; <a href="http://www.npr.org/2013/12/27/250807226/on-the-job-deaths-spiking-as-oil-drilling-quickly-expands">in 2012,</a> 138 workers died on the job, with the fatality rate eight times higher than the all-industry rate of 3.2 deaths per 100,000 workers.</p> <p><strong>Average Annual Salary</strong>: $69,000</p> <h2>7. Administrative Assistant</h2> <p>Although many companies will look for at least a high school diploma on your resume, there is no experience required to be an administrative assistant. You should have good typing and organization skills, and familiarity with some of the most common software programs (Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint). Admin assistants are usually tasked with filing, making and receiving calls, managing visitors, typing letters, organizing business meetings, and doing other odd jobs around the office. If you excel in the position, you can quickly rise to senior administrative assistant, executive assistant, and even senior executive assistant. The higher up the ladder you go, the greater the perks and the pay. You may get to do a lot of traveling, and attend some pretty fancy industry events, too.</p> <p><strong>Average Annual Salary</strong>: $37,006</p> <h2>8. Security Guard</h2> <p>Don't think that all security guards are strapping six-foot bodybuilders with former military experience. While some positions do require someone with good physical fitness and self-defense training, many are simply asked to report suspicious activity. In fact, many retirees go into security work, and they are in their sixties and seventies.</p> <p>Duties can include sitting in a room watching CCTV monitors, crowd control, and doing regular patrols of the building. It's possible you will have to confront people, but that will be outlined in the job description. If you're young and fit, you could easily get promoted to head up a team of guards, and may eventually get a job at the head office.</p> <p><strong>Average Annual Salary: </strong>$29,083</p> <h2>9. Car Sales Consultant</h2> <p>No experience is needed to sell automobiles, but how much you earn in a year will vary greatly depending on the kind of salesperson you are. Now, the profession gets a bad rap, but the industry has definitely cleaned up its image over the last decade. And with the Internet helping people do a lot more research, sales consultants are much less likely to force bad deals and excessive pricing on customers. Instead, the job is more about selling the great features and benefits of the car, and closing the sale. Interestingly enough, only 20% of a dealership's revenue comes from new car sales; the majority comes from buying and selling used cars for a profit, servicing cars, and financing. Selling cars can be hard work, especially during the weekdays when few people come onto the lots. But if you're good at it, you can easily make over $300K a year selling higher-end cars like BMWs and Audis.</p> <p><strong>Average Annual Salary</strong>: $31,000 + Commission</p> <p><em>Salary information found on </em><a href="http://www.indeed.com/"><em>Indeed</em></a><em>, </em><a href="http://www.payscale.com/"><em>Payscale</em></a><em>, and </em><a href="https://www.glassdoor.com/index.htm"><em>Glassdoor</em></a><em>. </em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-careers-you-dont-need-a-ton-of-experience-to-start">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/your-guide-to-getting-a-job-right-out-of-college">Your Guide to Getting a Job Right Out of College</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/make-guerrilla-job-hunting-work-for-you">Make Guerrilla Job Hunting Work for You</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-the-job-without-saying-a-word">How to Get the Job Without Saying a Word</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-things-that-really-annoy-hiring-managers">9 Things That Really Annoy Hiring Managers</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-best-times-of-year-to-start-a-job-search">The Best Times of Year to Start a Job Search</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Education & Training Job Hunting careers job application job experience job hunting job search job training resume salary Tue, 20 Sep 2016 10:00:09 +0000 Paul Michael 1796100 at http://www.wisebread.com My 2016 Budget Challenge: Where to Find Cheap Training for a New Career http://www.wisebread.com/my-2016-budget-challenge-where-to-find-cheap-training-for-a-new-career <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/my-2016-budget-challenge-where-to-find-cheap-training-for-a-new-career" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_computer_stress_84635733.jpg" alt="Woman finding cheap training for a new career" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p><em>[Editor's Note: This is another episode in Max Wong's journey to find an extra $31,000 this year. Read the whole series </em><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/topic/max-wongs-budget-0" target="_blank"><em>here</em></a><em>.]</em></p> <p>Yesterday, one of my friends asked: &quot;So, what are you working on?&quot; To which I responded: &quot;Um, you know, stuff. All sorts of things. I'm so busy. Uhhhhh, It's kind of boring to explain.&quot;</p> <p>For the past four weeks I've been grinding away at an increasingly long To Do list. It's always been like this. Or, to be accurate, I've always been like this. I always complete the majority of my projects during the last four months of the year. Perhaps it's because 24 years after graduation, I still feel like September is the start of a new year. Or perhaps it's the change of seasons&hellip; even though Los Angeles only has two seasons: vacation weather and unreasonably hot.</p> <p>Or, perhaps I accidentally schedule all my deadlines for every project for December 31st. Regardless of the motivation, my completion panic kicked into high gear one month early this year.</p> <p>I suspect it's the public shaming aspect of this writing exercise that has accelerated my inner clock. After all, it's September and I am still over $21,000 short of meeting my goal of saving $31,000 before the end of the year. If I want to make this goal, I will need to make or save an additional $5,280 <em>per month</em>. Uhn.</p> <p>To that end, I have been working every moneymaking angle available to me from the confines of my house. I am canning my award-winning fig jam in advance of Holiday Craft Fairs, I have applied to every job lead that has come my way (including one that would require me to wear an abaya everyday for a month &mdash; but since I look weirdly cute in a headscarf, this is actually not a bad thing), and I am selling everything I don't completely love on Craigslist and eBay.</p> <p>At the end of June, <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/my-2016-budget-challenge-does-taking-a-regular-day-job-mean-giving-up" target="_blank">I got a really good job lead</a> from my sister. If I can become an expert at Adobe Illustrator and pass her company's skill test, she can hire me for a freelance job that would easily make up my budget shortfall.</p> <h2>Access Free Job Skill Training Via the Library</h2> <p>Once I learned about the job opportunity, I jumped into action. I subscribed to Adobe Illustrator ($30 per month) believing that I would be illustrating everything by the end of the 30-day free trial period. &quot;I totally got this,&quot; I told myself. &quot;I'm going to spend the 4th of July watching 32 hours of Lynda.com tutorials that I can download for free using my Los Angeles Public Library card. Then I will give myself three weeks to cram for the skill test. My education cost will be zero and I can work full time starting in August.&quot;</p> <h2>Cramming Doesn't Work</h2> <p>I started watching the Lynda.com tutorials that same night. Two hours in I began to lose focus to the point that I had to stop and rewind the video several times because I kept spacing out. &quot;Ugh. What is wrong with me? Why am I struggling so hard to learn this?&quot; I asked my best friend. &quot;Well,&quot; she answered, &quot;there's a reason why most college classes are only two hours long. Your brain is actively learning, not binge watching Daredevil, you dummy.&quot;</p> <p>Oh.</p> <p>Now resigned to the fact that I cannot master Adobe Illustrator in one marathon study session, I've had to alter my schedule for total budget domination considerably. Not without a huge amount of denial, I have discovered that my brain can only absorb an hour of technical lecturing per day. So it was 32 days of watching tutorials, not three. I've also had to admit to myself that it's going to take a minimum of 100 hours of practice with the Pen Tool before I have any proficiency. So basically, my free self-education and accelerated learning plan now looks and costs the same as a semester-long class at my local community college, but without teacher office hours so I can actually get one-on-one assistance.</p> <p>What is possibly worse than acknowledging that I am not the quick study I thought I was? The realization that I am now losing paid work hours to unpaid study hours. In order not to backslide into more debt, I will have to get a better-paying job to supplement my job training for a better-paying job.</p> <p>Sigh. Lesson learned?</p> <h2>Progress So Far</h2> <p>My blood tests are fine. My teeth are fine. My boobs are fine. My OCD is&hellip;what it is. My savings this month? Not so much. My regularly scheduled doctors' appointments erased any savings from Mr. Spendypants this pay period as I'm on his health insurance. (Thanks Cutie).</p> <p>Between my new study schedule and my doctor appointments, I only managed to turn in $90 worth in writing work this pay period. Luckily, my bees came through for me and helped me sell $150 in bees and $293.76 in honey. Because I've been under house arrest, and Mr. Spendypants has been working 16 hours a day, we still managed to come out $533.76 ahead, even with all the medical expenses.</p> <p><strong>Goal:</strong> $31,000</p> <p><strong>Amount Raised:</strong> $22,040.17</p> <p><strong>Amount Spent:</strong> $12,153.66</p> <p><strong>Amount Left to Go:</strong> $21,113.49</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/max-wong">Max Wong</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/my-2016-budget-challenge-where-to-find-cheap-training-for-a-new-career">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/my-2016-budget-challenge-job-creation">My 2016 Budget Challenge: Job Creation</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/my-2016-budget-challenge-does-taking-a-regular-day-job-mean-giving-up">My 2016 Budget Challenge: Does Taking a Regular Day Job Mean Giving Up?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/my-2016-budget-challenge-everything-breaks">My 2016 Budget Challenge: Everything Breaks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/my-2016-budget-challenge-reduce-debt-or-save-for-an-emergency">My 2016 Budget Challenge: Reduce Debt or Save for an Emergency?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/my-2016-budget-challenge-what-to-do-with-a-totaled-car">My 2016 Budget Challenge: What to Do With a Totaled Car</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Frugal Living Career and Income budget challenge career skills deadlines debt job hunting job skills learning max wongs budget motivation Fri, 09 Sep 2016 10:00:10 +0000 Max Wong 1788919 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Improve Your Finances Using Social Media http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-improve-your-finances-using-social-media <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-improve-your-finances-using-social-media" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_phone_text_94856801.jpg" alt="Woman learning how to improve finances using social media " title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Social media is about more than just looking at friends' baby photos, posting what you ate for dinner last night, and watching the most recent viral videos. It can actually help you improve your finances, land a new job, and reach your savings goals more efficiently. That's why we've found some of the best ways to improve your finances by getting the most out of social media. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-social-media-can-save-you-money?ref=seealso">6 Ways Social Media Can Save You Money</a>)</p> <h2>&quot;Friend&quot; Your Credit Cards and Bank</h2> <p>Add your credit card issuers and bank to your social media accounts by &quot;friending&quot; or following them. Large institutions usually offer deals to followers, so you can enjoy a lower APR, higher savings interest rate, or other money-saving promos. In fact, according to U.S. News, social media is often the first outlet that banks choose to <a href="http://money.usnews.com/money/personal-finance/articles/2015/06/03/why-the-financial-services-industry-started-tweeting">share news about upcoming deals</a>.</p> <p>Social media is also possibly the best way to get in touch with customer service quickly, as it will allow you to get their attention more easily. Just make sure to keep your account information, address, and any other private information off the message boards and social media pages.</p> <h2>Enjoy Travel and Shopping Deals</h2> <p>There are endless travel and shopping deals available through social media. Retailers often choose social media as the first outlet to announce upcoming sales, so their friends and followers are able to take advantage of the biggest discounts first. Followers are frequently offered early deals, as well.</p> <p>You can find Twitter-specific deals that can save you on everything from rental cars and vacations to eating out and even buying gifts. Before going out to make any purchases, check Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Pinterest to make sure there aren't any deals that you're missing. You can even check social media hashtags, such as #deal, to find the best deals in your area.</p> <h2>Share Goals</h2> <p>Many financial experts recommend sharing your financial goals online. By setting your goals early and sharing them with the people you love, it can help you articulate what you really want and hold you accountable to achieve your goals. In fact, research has shown that making <a href="http://www.fastcompany.com/3047432/work-smart/why-sharing-your-progress-makes-you-more-likely-to-accomplish-your-goals">public statements about goals</a> can help you achieve them more efficiently. However, you never want to reveal anything too personal, such as private information that fraudsters can use against you.</p> <h2>Get Money-Saving Tips</h2> <p>By following your favorite finance site on social media, you can find endless free money-saving tips and updates. You can also find forums and group discussions with unique money-saving ideas and encouragement from others. You can even find good financial and investment advice online.</p> <p>Seeing these tips on a daily basis on your social media pages can also be a good reminder each and every day to protect your hard-earned income. After all, we all need a reminder once in a while that we don't really need that new top or expensive latte in the morning.</p> <h2>Find a New Job</h2> <p>LinkedIn can be an invaluable tool when you're searching for a new job. You can apply for jobs directly through LinkedIn, perfect your resume, and even reach out to potential employers and former colleagues. Contacting them through Facebook or Twitter won't be as effective or as professional as contacting them through LinkedIn.</p> <p>With LinkedIn, once you have created a professional profile, employers and recruiters can even reach out to you with potential job offers. You can also join LinkedIn groups within your field so you are the first to know about potential opportunities. You can even add examples of your work, recommendations from current or previous coworkers, and any honors you've received to better build your online portfolio.</p> <h2>Make Connections</h2> <p>Networking through social media can result in better face-to-face communication, potential job offers, and endless contacts in your field. Simply following someone or sharing their social media posts can be a great first step in networking and making connections.</p> <h2>Build Your Brand</h2> <p>Whether you're promoting your personal business or services, or just want to build your reputation as the best in your field, posting on social media can be a great start. Just make sure to stay consistent so that you can reach as many followers as possible.</p> <h2>Research More Efficiently</h2> <p>Gone are the days of asking for financial suggestions from friends and coworkers. Whether you're looking for a new financial planner or would like information on which investments to make, you can find more information quickly through social media. With a simple social media search, you can find detailed research on the investment product or financial adviser you're interested in.</p> <p>You can also find suggestions for dentists and other service providers in your area through social media. This will ensure you get what you're looking for and don't waste money.</p> <h2>Sell Your Items</h2> <p>If you create and sell items privately, such as through Etsy, social media can be a great free platform for you to advertise your products or services. This can help you bring in more revenue, reach new customers, and show off your work to a limitless audience.</p> <h2>Make Some Extra Income</h2> <p>There are even ways to make some extra income using social media. If you have a large following, you can publish sponsored tweets or sign up for affiliate accounts, where you will receive your own unique link to earn some extra income when followers make purchases using that link. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-make-extra-money-using-social-media?ref=seealso">6 Ways to Make Extra Money Using Social Media</a>)</p> <p><em>Have you followed Wise Bread on social media yet? What are your best tips for improving your finances through social media? </em><em>Please share your thoughts in the comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/andrea-cannon">Andrea Cannon</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-improve-your-finances-using-social-media">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/you-got-a-raise-now-what">You Got a Raise! Now What?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-only-money-advice-youll-actually-listen-to">The Only Money Advice You&#039;ll Actually Listen To</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/heres-how-a-spending-ban-can-help-and-hurt-you">Here&#039;s How a Spending Ban Can Help (and Hurt) You</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-financial-basics-every-new-grad-should-know">The Financial Basics Every New Grad Should Know</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-of-the-coolest-sayings-about-saving">10 of the Coolest Sayings About Saving</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance Technology advice blogs deals extra money Internet job hunting promotions saving money selling shopping social media travel Mon, 25 Jul 2016 09:00:11 +0000 Andrea Cannon 1753337 at http://www.wisebread.com Escape Your Dying Industry With One of These 8 Careers, Instead http://www.wisebread.com/escape-your-dying-industry-with-one-of-these-8-careers-instead <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/escape-your-dying-industry-with-one-of-these-8-careers-instead" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_photographer_96052725.jpg" alt="Woman in dying industry finding modern job" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>No one wants to admit that they're in a dying industry, but it's a hard fact that many of us will have to face at some point in our lives. Once upon a time, there were expert buggy-whip makers, and bowling alley pinsetters. Technology made those jobs extinct. Now, other jobs are in jeopardy, and if you are in a career that is being made obsolete, it's time to start weighing your options. Here are eight modern jobs that you should consider if your job will soon be taken over by robots.</p> <h2>1. Florists: Try Xeriscaping</h2> <p>The humble florist storefront is quickly disappearing, with those costly bouquets being replaced by cheap bunches of flowers from grocery stores and warehouse clubs. Plus, there are online retailers offering much cheaper deals on ready-made designs. If you're a florist, you're in a dying industry. But, you have great design skills that could be taken to another career. Some florists have found that transferring their skills to landscaping, specifically xeriscaping, is a transition that is fairly easy to make. Xeriscaping demands greater knowledge of plants and flowers, but the growing demand for gardens needing less water makes this an ideal industry to get into. Classes for xeriscaping are becoming easier to find in every city. And, it's in a very similar field, with beautiful end results.</p> <h2>2. Travel Agents: Try Travel Blogging</h2> <p>Let's face it, travel agents have been a dying breed for some time. But with the advent of websites like Orbitz, Expedia, Trivago, and Priceline, the need for an experienced travel agent has decreased dramatically. Why bother with the middleman, when you can go directly to the source and save time and money? However, travel agents have a wealth of experience in the travel industry, and that can be put to good use in travel writing and blogging. Contact the big players like National Geographic and the Travel Channel. Google &quot;travel journalism&quot; and you'll be hit with a plethora of sites filled with articles and guides written by experts. It can pay well to be a travel writer, and you also get to explore the world while you do it. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/can-you-really-make-a-living-as-an-ebook-writer?ref=seealso">Can You Really Make a Living as an Ebook Writer?</a>)</p> <h2>3. Sewing Machinists: Try Selling on Etsy</h2> <p>Sewing machinists in the U.S., and other parts of the developed world, are quickly being replaced by people in China, Taiwan, Korea, and India. The profit margins for the manufacturers are just impossible to turn down, and that means U.S. sewing machinists are finding work much harder to come by. Even when they do, it doesn't pay well. So, if you are a skilled sewing machinist, branch out and create your own fashions on Etsy. You'll find it very easy to set up a store. You can find all the patterns you need on eBay and Amazon, and material is affordable when buying in bulk. Then sell your wares (customization can really help to increase sales, too) and keep all of the profit for yourself.</p> <h2>4. Telemarketers: Try Sales</h2> <p>Getting a call from a telemarketer as you're about to sit down for an evening meal is about as fun as having root canal work. The Do Not Call list certainly put a stop to a lot of that, and with so much selling being done online now, the need for real people making cold calls is dying out. Telemarketers often follow a script, but the successful ones have charm and know how to persuade. It is not a big leap to go from telemarketing to general sales, specifically in insurance, automotive, or real estate. The &quot;gift of the gab&quot; you have used can be transitioned easily into a sales role, and for the foreseeable future, there will continue to be a need for skilled professionals who know how to close a sale.</p> <h2>5. Tailors: Try Hairdressing</h2> <p>Although the need for a great tailor will never completely vanish, the current state of the fashion industry is not helping the tailoring business. Custom suits and outfits are expensive, and the rise of affordable fashion that can be purchased online is killing the bespoke market. Plus, many dry cleaners now offer simple alterations and other services once provided by tailors, at a fraction of the price. As a tailor, your skills could be used to create bespoke outfits that could be sold in your own eBay or Etsy store, or you can bite the bullet and try a new career. Hairdressing and barbering is growing in demand, and requires many crossover skills. Yes, you would have to retrain, but your eye for detail will work in your favor.</p> <h2>6. Photo Processors: Try Photography</h2> <p>Just as video killed the radio star, digital killed the photo processor. About 30 years ago, it was a thriving job. The rise of quality, affordable film cameras meant we were taking more pictures than ever, and that required the skills of a photo processor. Now, digital photography is everywhere, and with automated online photo ordering, photo processors are disappearing. If you have photo-processing skills, it may be time to go back into the world of photography and take pictures yourself. Professional photographers are in demand, and if you want to start with stock photo houses, you can get plenty of practice whilst earning a decent wage. Then there are weddings, engagements, births, and so many other occasions.</p> <h2>7. Typing Clerks: Try Medical Transcription</h2> <p>Typing used to be quite a valuable skill. Writing letters, with the correct formatting, was an art form. This was especially true when it was done on a typewriter, which required great planning and execution. Now, everything is done with templates on a computer, and you don't need any skills or training to produce professional quality letters, resumes, and other documents. So, take those typing skills, especially your words-per-minute rate, and apply them to transcription. Doctors and physicians continue to take notes either by hand, or on a voice recorder, and these need to be put into digital records quickly. You can also look into legal transcription and subtitling.</p> <h2>8. Telephone Operators: Try Online Community Management</h2> <p>Few qualifications were needed to have the job of a telephone operator, and it was a good entry-level job. Many people stayed on to make full-time careers of it, but as you know if you've tried to make a call to a big company, speaking to an actual human is very difficult. Sophisticated phone systems and software have replaced the job a person used to do, and now you push buttons to eventually get to the person you want to speak to.</p> <p>If you are a telephone operator, consider switching to the online world of community management. A community manager is responsible for company communication online, and can include PR, social media, content creation, and customer outreach. The skills you learned to be patient and informative can be channeled into community management, and you will create a positive public perception of the company. Digital is only going to get stronger, so now is the perfect time to enter this growing career.</p> <p><em>What other modern careers should people in dying industries try? Share with us!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/escape-your-dying-industry-with-one-of-these-8-careers-instead">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-12"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/your-guide-to-getting-a-job-right-out-of-college">Your Guide to Getting a Job Right Out of College</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-the-job-without-saying-a-word">How to Get the Job Without Saying a Word</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-dream-jobs-youre-never-too-old-to-pursue">9 Dream Jobs You&#039;re Never Too Old to Pursue</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-common-job-hunt-tips-you-should-ignore">8 Common Job-Hunt Tips You Should Ignore</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/flashback-friday-the-65-best-career-tips-weve-ever-shared">Flashback Friday: The 65 Best Career Tips We&#039;ve Ever Shared</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Job Hunting career dying industry job hunting job search modern career modern jobs Wed, 06 Jul 2016 10:00:05 +0000 Paul Michael 1745834 at http://www.wisebread.com Day Job or Freelance: Which Is Right for You? http://www.wisebread.com/day-job-or-freelance-which-is-right-for-you <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/day-job-or-freelance-which-is-right-for-you" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_freelance_work_82597869.jpg" alt="Woman learning if a day job or freelance is right for her" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, one in three American workers earn their keep through a model of work that is <a href="http://www.bls.gov/opub/mlr/2015/article/freelancers-in-the-us-workforce-1.htm">not a traditional 9-to-5 job</a>. Many of these are freelance and contract workers, earning their income from one or more different jobs, and known alternatively as &quot;portfolio careerists&quot; or the slightly less glam &quot;slashers&quot; (as in writer/coach/unicycle performer).</p> <p>For some people, a portfolio career is proof that necessity is the mother of invention. When the economy tanked and jobs were scarce, this was a great way to make ends meet. But it's a very different work environment than a typical full-time job.</p> <p>While it is unsurprising that the number of people taking multiple part-time jobs might rise during a recession, the trends seem to show that these numbers are continuing to grow &mdash; a sign that the days of the traditional model of work are numbered. By 2020, it is anticipated that <a href="http://http-download.intuit.com/http.intuit/CMO/intuit/futureofsmallbusiness/intuit_2020_report.pdf">40% of the American workforce</a> will work as a freelancer, with a mix of part-time, contingent roles. But which is really better? Here are some pros and cons of each lifestyle.</p> <h2>In Favor of Full Time</h2> <p>For now, at least, full time work is still the norm. So what's so attractive about the traditional approach to careers?</p> <h3>1. High Rollers Are Seldom Part-Time</h3> <p>If what you want out of your working career is to rise through the ranks and achieve the status and salary that comes with that, then a full-time, permanent job is definitely the right option for you. While people in portfolio careers certainly <em>can</em> achieve wealth and status in their respective fields, this is much harder to do. If you want a healthy 401K, benefits package, and paid vacation, then stick to the full-time gigs.</p> <h2>2. Society Is Still Structured to Suit Full-Time Employees</h2> <p>Bringing in a steady full-time income, from a company that is established and understood, has a number of benefits above and beyond the cash. Organizing your taxes, planning your retirement, keeping a healthy credit record, and getting a mortgage are all easier with a full-time job than a portfolio. The variety you get with working several part-time or freelance jobs has to be offset by the increased burden of admin. and organization, particularly in a financial sector which has not adjusted to the needs of this population.</p> <h3>3. It Leads to Better Work Relationships</h3> <p>For many people, the reason you get up to go to work is not so much about the work itself, but rather about the people around you. With bonds built over years of employment, your colleagues can often be the closest people to you &mdash; an experience that few freelancers get to share. Consider your social needs carefully before you think too hard about a portfolio career!</p> <h2>The Pros of Freelancing</h2> <p>It's growing at a rapid pace, but will it last? Why is portfolio living attractive to people who could choose a nice, safe 9-to-5?</p> <h3>1. Freelancers Have Multiple Sources of Income</h3> <p>Ironically, a portfolio career might mean better job security than a full-time job. Having multiple income streams means that if one dries up, others can fill its place more easily. Since the economic downturn, more people than ever have found themselves being laid off from their regular jobs. As a portfolio careerist, this can be less of a terrifying option, and more a redirection of your time.</p> <h3>2. You Build a Diverse Set of Skills</h3> <p>One of the reasons that a portfolio career can snowball into a very lucrative choice, is that you naturally develop sets of varied but complementary skills, which can be sold at a premium. Take a freelance writer, who can also take (and sell) a decent photograph, teach writing, or build a personal blog that draws in advertising revenue. Each individual effort links to the next, growing valuable skills all the time.</p> <h3>3. Variety Is a Given</h3> <p>If you're even vaguely thinking about a portfolio lifestyle, then you're probably a fan of new experiences. Since the &quot;same job for life&quot; concept disappeared a generation ago, people have increasingly questioned why staying in one career field is necessary. If you can't climb a traditional career ladder anyway, then why not seek new and varied working experiences. Welcome to the world of portfolio careers.</p> <h2>How to Make Freelancing Actually Work</h2> <p>We are still learning what it looks like to be a successful freelancer. There's probably no single correct way to nail this lifestyle. However, some useful advice has certainly emerged.</p> <p>If you're thinking of taking this route, then remember:</p> <ul> <li><strong>Keep one or two reliable income sources</strong>. Consider an anchor-orbiter model, in which you have one or two steady roles (the anchor), with other work which is more flexible, orbiting around this main income source. This works especially well for people who want to keep some form of a steady job on a part-time basis and build a freelance income on the side.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li><strong>Build up an emergency fund.</strong> And learn to <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-smart-way-to-budget-on-a-freelance-income">budget as a freelancer</a>. With no fixed income, budgeting becomes more complex, even before you start to worry about paying taxes and keeping up insurance and other necessary payments.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li><strong>Nothing is forever.</strong> If you try the portfolio life and it is not for you, there is no reason why you can't take your newly acquired skills and experiences back into a traditional role. In fact, the broadened horizons of having worked independently might even mean you can find a better role than ever.</li> </ul> <p><em>What's your best advice for others looking to follow in your footsteps? Tell us in the comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/claire-millard">Claire Millard</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/day-job-or-freelance-which-is-right-for-you">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-terrible-work-from-home-jobs-you-should-avoid">8 Terrible Work-From-Home &quot;Jobs&quot; You Should Avoid</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-biggest-mistakes-freelancers-make">The 5 Biggest Mistakes Freelancers Make</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-best-jobs-for-work-life-balance">4 Best Jobs for Work Life Balance</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-to-ease-into-a-day-job-after-freelancing">5 Ways to Ease Into a Day Job After Freelancing</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-signs-the-9-to-5-is-right-for-you">8 Signs the 9-to-5 IS Right for You</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income Extra Income Job Hunting 9-to-5 day job freelance freelancer job hunting job search workday working Tue, 28 Jun 2016 09:30:28 +0000 Claire Millard 1740456 at http://www.wisebread.com 3 Reasons You Are More Than Your Job http://www.wisebread.com/3-reasons-you-are-more-than-your-job <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/3-reasons-you-are-more-than-your-job" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_time_out_73913133.jpg" alt="Woman learning reasons she is more than her job" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>In a society where work means everything, retirement can sometimes lead to depression. Many Americans say they can't wait to retire, but the reality is that among men especially, <a href="http://www.thinkadvisor.com/2014/06/30/the-secret-sadness-of-retired-men">retirement can mean loss</a> &mdash; of identity, values, and more. When a retired person can't attach that identity to something else, he or she needs to find an outlet like gardening, traveling, or the like. Unfortunately, sometimes that feeling doesn't translate.</p> <p>That's why you should make sure that your identity isn't wrapped up in your work, no matter what stage you're at in your career. Don't let it define you, because when it's over, you'll feel lost, and like you don't belong anywhere. You see this played out a lot in sitcoms, when women let the men they're dating determine their identity. It's similar. You want to find your identity and then go after <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/my-2016-budget-challenge-does-taking-a-regular-day-job-mean-giving-up">what you're passionate about professionally</a>, not the other way around. It's hard when you're a fresh college graduate and you aren't sure what your future holds.</p> <p>But there is hope. Here are a few reasons that you should not let your job determine your identity. Just let it be a small part of what fulfills you.</p> <h2>You Have Other Interests</h2> <p>While you should always take pride in your work, you shouldn't let it determine how you feel about your life. The most important parts of your life are the things you love. Whether it be your friends or family or traveling or food, find a passion in something rewarding, but not necessarily financially feasible. You have to find something else that gets you out of bed every morning. And if what you're most passionate about does get you out of bed every morning, make sure you have a balanced life after work.</p> <h2>It Can Always Come to an End</h2> <p>You will never realize that your life is your job until you lose it. When you lose your friends, your after-work activities, and your lunchtime connections, it becomes harder to regain your composure and self-worth. Make time to have hobbies outside of work &mdash; volunteer, play sports, find a church, synagogue, or mosque &mdash; whatever might connect you with others. That way if something does happen, you have a support system to fall back on.</p> <h2>You Have to Put Yourself First</h2> <p>When the company you work for gets mixed up in something or is blamed for something and it hits the press, people think of you. And sometimes if you go to bat for the company, you are entangled in whatever is happening. This has happened to me before, especially when I worked with people who were litigious. Make sure you don't let how people feel about the place you work translate to how they feel about you. Business is just that, and you need to protect yourself, above all else.</p> <p>All of this is hard to stomach because, as Americans, we spend most of our lives thinking about what we want to be when we grow up, what we would rather be doing when we finally do grow up, and how we wish we had done one thing or another after we retire. Live life now, while you still can. Travel, read, and experience new adventures. Don't let your 9-to-5 take over your life, just let it fund your life.</p> <p><em>How do you determine your identity?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/jennifer-holder">Jennifer Holder</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/3-reasons-you-are-more-than-your-job">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/your-stressful-job-may-be-making-you-healthier">Your Stressful Job May Be… Making You Healthier?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-frugal-ways-to-reduce-workplace-stress">10 Frugal Ways to Reduce Workplace Stress</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-to-deal-when-you-work-with-someone-you-hate">8 Ways to Deal When You Work With Someone You Hate</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-warning-signs-that-it-is-not-the-job-for-you">6 Warning Signs that It Is Not the Job for You</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-to-turn-your-stress-into-money">8 Ways to Turn Your Stress Into Money</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income anxiety career depression job hunting job stress jobs sadness stress stress relief work Mon, 27 Jun 2016 10:00:08 +0000 Jennifer Holder 1738700 at http://www.wisebread.com 5 Careers That Offer Student Loan Forgiveness http://www.wisebread.com/5-careers-that-offer-student-loan-forgiveness <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-careers-that-offer-student-loan-forgiveness" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_69856403_XLARGE.jpg" alt="looking for a job with student loan forgiveness" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>If you are like millions of other graduates, you might've experienced sticker shock when you received your first student loan bill after graduation. While taking out a student loan to complete your degree seemed like a good plan at the time, you might be having some regrets when faced with the monthly payments.</p> <p>Thankfully, there are a lot of careers that offer student loan forgiveness. Look into one of these fields to kiss your student debt goodbye.</p> <h2>1. Public Service</h2> <p>Federal Perkins loans can be forgiven if an individual qualifies through full-time employment and has not consolidated their loans. The loan forgiveness is not based on what job you do, but who you work for.<a href="https://studentaid.ed.gov/sa/repay-loans/forgiveness-cancellation/public-service"> Qualifying employers</a> include:</p> <ul> <li>Government organizations at any level (federal, state, local, or tribal);</li> <li>Not-for-profit organizations that are tax-exempt under Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code;</li> <li>Full-time positions at AmeriCorps and Peace Corps.</li> </ul> <h2>2. Doctor</h2> <p>It is hard to feel like a successful doctor when the majority of your paycheck goes to your student loan repayment. Thankfully, you can find a list of scholarships and Federal loan forgiveness programs through the&nbsp;<a href="https://services.aamc.org/fed_loan_pub/index.cfm?fuseaction=public.welcome&amp;CFID=1&amp;CFTOKEN=D3ADCE60-B544-6679-82EB218E8D3F6455">Associations of American Medical Colleges</a>.</p> <p>Many of the loan forgiveness programs for doctors require employment in a Health Profession Shortage Areas (HPSA) or a Medically Underserved Area.</p> <p>The&nbsp;<a href="https://www.lrp.nih.gov/">National Institutes of Health (NIH)</a> offers up to $35,000 per year in loan repayment for highly qualified health professionals going into biomedical or biobehavioral research careers.</p> <p>You can also take your stethoscope overseas and qualify for loan forgiveness through the military service. The&nbsp;<a href="http://www.navy.com/careers/healthcare/medicine.html#ft-education-opportunities">Navy Financial Assistance Program</a> offers tuition coverage for current medical students, as well as student loan forgiveness or grants for those with their medical degree.</p> <p>See:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-tax-tricks-to-try-if-youre-stuck-with-student-loans?ref=seealso">8 Tax Tricks to Try if You're Stuck With Student Loans</a></p> <h2>3. Teacher</h2> <p>Teaching is a calling, and many people feel the call to instruct the next generation. So it's only fair that the government helps lighten the debt load of those devoted to teach. Teachers can gain loan forgiveness through the same public service loan forgiveness programs mentioned above.</p> <p>Teachers also can qualify for the Federal Teacher Cancellation for Perkins Loans. For teachers with a Perkins loan, 15% of your loan can be canceled when you teach for one year in a low-income area. If you teach for five years, your full loan will be forgiven.</p> <p>Be sure to check with your state to see what special teacher loan repayment programs there are. Here are just a few:</p> <ul> <li><strong>California:</strong> <a href="http://www.csac.ca.gov/doc.asp?id=111">APLE</a></li> <li><strong>Maine:</strong> <a href="http://www.famemaine.com/files/Pages/education/borrowers/Maine_Loan_Programs.aspx">Educators for Maine</a></li> <li><strong>Iowa:</strong> <a href="http://www.iowacollegeaid.gov/content/iowa-teacher-loan-forgiveness-program">Teach Iowa Scholar Program</a></li> <li><strong>New York:</strong> <a href="http://www.teachnycprograms.net/">Teach NYC </a></li> <li><strong>Texas:</strong> <a href="http://www.hhloans.com/index.cfm?objectid=a85b6795-9731-b000-c93ca1848b604db8">Teach for Texas</a></li> <li><strong>Mississippi:</strong> <a href="http://riseupms.com/state-aid/mtlr/">Mississippi Teacher Loan Repayment Program</a></li> </ul> <h2>4. Lawyer</h2> <p>Tempted by earning big figures down the road, many potential lawyers take on huge amounts of debt to make their career dream come true. Luckily, there are a few student loan forgiveness programs available just for lawyers.</p> <ul> <li><strong>Attorney Student Loan Repayment Program</strong>: In order to retain lawyers in the field, current employees are able to apply for the assistance program. Only certain loans apply, and current employees must have at least $10,000 in federal loan debt to qualify. To see which loans qualify, visit&nbsp;<a href="https://www.justice.gov/oarm/frequently-asked-questions-0#c">Justice.gov</a> for more information.</li> <li><strong>John R. Justice Student Loan Repayment Program</strong>: For lawyers working in the public sector, the&nbsp;<a href="https://www.bja.gov/Funding/JRJStateAgencies.pdf">John R. Justice Student Loan Repayment Program</a> offers $10,000 to $60,000 in loan forgiveness to eligible lawyers working as public defenders.</li> <li><strong>Herbert S. Garten Loan Repayment Assistance Program</strong>: This program awards 70 attorneys up to $5,600 in award money each year for student loan debt. This award comes with more strings than the other two. Eligible candidates must be employed by one of the&nbsp;<a href="http://www.lsc.gov/grants-grantee-resources/our-grantees">program's grantees</a> and have at least $75,000 in outstanding loan debt.</li> </ul> <h2>5. Dentist</h2> <p>Future dentists, here is something to smile about. You can also qualify for loan forgiveness on either the national or state level.</p> <p>National programs include service with the military. The Army offers the&nbsp;<a href="http://www.goarmy.com/amedd/dental/corps_benefits.jsp">Active Duty Health Profession Loan Repayment Program</a> (ADHPLRP) and the Healthcare Professionals Loan Repayment Program (HPLR). The Airforce offers Air Force Active Duty Health Professions Repayment Program (ADHPLRP). All of these programs offer up to $40,000 to $50,000 in debt repayment per year. Research each individual program to know about maximum caps, eligibility criteria, and other benefits.</p> <p>And the&nbsp;<a href="http://www.ada.org/~/media/ADA/Education%20and%20Careers/Files/dental-student-loan-repayment-resource.pdf">American Dental Association</a> has a full list of state-level programs that offer loan forgiveness.</p> <h2>Finding and Qualifying for Student Loan Forgiveness Programs</h2> <p>It's important to note that many of these careers cannot grant student loan forgiveness if your loan does not qualify. This means that if your loan is in default or in a grace period, or you are still attending school, companies may not be able to make qualified loan payments. Also, most student loan forgiveness programs are for federal loans only, and private student loans will not be forgiven. Finally, inquire with your college or university's financial aid department for more available loan forgiveness programs.</p> <p><em>Are you planning on using loan forgiveness for your student loans? Share with us!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/ashley-eneriz">Ashley Eneriz</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-careers-that-offer-student-loan-forgiveness">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-ways-youre-being-a-terrible-employee">12 Ways You&#039;re Being a Terrible Employee</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/escape-your-dying-industry-with-one-of-these-8-careers-instead">Escape Your Dying Industry With One of These 8 Careers, Instead</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-best-jobs-for-work-life-balance">4 Best Jobs for Work Life Balance</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-easy-ways-to-avoid-student-loan-debt">12 Easy Ways to Avoid Student Loan Debt</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/contributing-to-a-roth-versus-paying-down-debt">Contributing to a Roth Versus Paying Down Debt</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Debt Management career career path job hunting student loan student loan debt student loan forgiveness Thu, 23 Jun 2016 09:00:04 +0000 Ashley Eneriz 1736930 at http://www.wisebread.com 12 Ways You're Being a Terrible Employee http://www.wisebread.com/12-ways-youre-being-a-terrible-employee <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/12-ways-youre-being-a-terrible-employee" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/10275265.jpg" alt="" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>You may think that being a good employee is all about doing great work, and nothing more. Actually, that's quite far from the truth. A great employee builds great relationships at work, takes the initiative, and cares about the success of the company. If you are making four or more of the following blunders at work, you're quickly on your way to becoming a terrible employee. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-reasons-you-deserve-to-get-fired?ref=seealso">12 Reasons You Deserve to Get Fired</a>)</p> <h2>1. You're All About the Gossip</h2> <p>Every workplace has gossip and rumors. Good employees will ignore it, brush it off, or just avoid talking about anything that is idle chatter. Bad employees, however, relish the opportunity to talk about anything from company problems and other coworkers, to rumors of layoffs, mergers, or people about to get fired.</p> <p>If you find yourself being drawn into watercooler gossip, you have several options. First, you can simply make an excuse and walk away. Or, you can deftly change the subject to something non-gossip related. Finally, you can always talk to HR about some of the malicious gossip flying around, and they should look into it.</p> <h2>2. You Are Never on Time</h2> <p>Late for work. Late for meetings. Late for everything. Some people consider lateness to be the height of bad manners, and they have a point. When you are late, you are saying, &quot;my time is more important than your time,&quot; or even &quot;I really don't care what you think, I'll turn up when I'm ready.&quot; Maybe you're just really bad with time management, or you have a rotten commute that makes it hard to get in on time. But if everyone else in the office can get in on time, you really have no excuse. Use your smartphone to give you alerts well before your workday begins, so you have plenty of time to get where you're going. Do what you can to be on time, because nothing says &quot;terrible employee&quot; like someone who isn't even around.</p> <h2>3. You Complain &mdash; A Lot</h2> <p>We all have gripes with our jobs. There is no perfect workplace, and there will always be things that could be better. Yes, it's fine to bring up issues when they need to be addressed. But there is a big difference between occasionally alerting your boss to an issue, and whining in every meeting and one-on-one. They say that the &quot;squeaking wheel gets the grease&quot; and to some extent, that's true. However, in a work environment, it is usually much easier to replace that squeaking wheel. If you have complaints, see what you can do by yourself to solve them. If the issue is with a coworker, talk it out with them first. If there is a problem with equipment, or scheduling, bring solutions to the table. Don't be &quot;that&quot; employee &mdash; the one everyone avoids talking to because they cannot stand the tirade of negativity coming their way.</p> <h2>4. You Won't Do Anything Beyond Your Job Description</h2> <p>No doubt you have heard something like this coming from a coworker; &quot;Look, I'm not paid to do that, so I'm not doing it.&quot; Or, &quot;That's not my job, why should I?&quot; It is not uncommon these days for job descriptions to be very fluid as technology advances, and cutbacks hit firms everywhere. Sometimes, what you're being asked to do may be well beyond your job description, but if you can do what is being asked of you, step up and do it. The chances are, everyone is being asked to hit a few curveballs, and deal with things outside of their usual scope of work. Do your part, chip in, and you'll be valued. If it gets ridiculous, though, then you have the right to say something. You should not be doing the jobs of two or three people, but at least show your commitment before raising concerns.</p> <h2>5. You Spend Too Much Time Slacking Off</h2> <p>The distractions are everywhere. Many of us work on computers every day, and the Internet is right there, beckoning us. A few minutes shopping on Amazon, read the latest headlines, then a quick check of Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, and SnapChat. Before you know it, you've spent an hour or more doing nothing productive. This is actually stealing. Your employer is paying you for that time, and you should be doing the work they pay you for.</p> <h2>6. You Take Credit for Work Others Have Done</h2> <p>Nothing kills morale in a workplace like someone else taking the glory for a project that isn't theirs. If you have ever done this, or do it often, you are being a terrible employee. Businesses operate on the idea that it's a team environment, with each person doing his or her part to make the whole company successful. By swooping in and taking credit for the hard work other people have done, you are creating an atmosphere of distrust and negativity. Coworkers will be less likely to share with you, communication will break down, and the whole department you work in can become soured and tough to work for. If you are given credit for a job by accident, step up immediately and tell the boss who actually did the work.</p> <h2>7. You Abuse Those Sick Days</h2> <p>Coming in to work sick is bad enough. You're not going to be at your best, and you run the risk of giving other people in the office your illness. But what's worse is doing it so you can call in sick when you're perfectly healthy to enjoy a day off. Sick days are there for a reason. The company is giving you paid time off to heal, or feel better. To abuse this so you can go to a ball game or spend a day by the pool is just not fair, to anyone. Next time you're sick, use a sick day. When you need a personal day, use one of your vacation days.</p> <h2>8. You Make a Lot of Mistakes</h2> <p>We're all human. We all make mistakes, and the occasional error here or there should never be cause for concern (unless those errors result in something catastrophic). However, if your work is always coming back to you for revisions, or your manager receives constant complaints of poor quality work, then you need to get your act together. Whether it's constant grammatical errors in an office environment, to shoddy work on a building site, mistakes made weekly, or even daily, should not be tolerated. Plus, it often falls on other employees to fix your errors, burdening them with extra work because you can't get it right. In this case, you must try harder to clean up your act.</p> <h2>9. You Play the Blame Game</h2> <p>Finger pointing is one aspect of office politics that never fails to cause problems. When something goes wrong, if you're one of the first people to start assigning blame to others, you're not being a team player. Yes, maybe it was Janice in accounting who messed up. But maybe you should talk to her first and see what happened. Maybe it was really you, but you know you can slime your way out of it by throwing blame in someone else's direction. Don't be a finger pointer. If you made a mistake, own it. If someone else did, let him or her fess up. You don't want to be seen as the one who rats at the first opportunity.</p> <h2>10. You Swear Like a Sailor</h2> <p>Admittedly, there are some workplaces that have no problem with this kind of language. Certainly most places involving manual labor are not going to care about f-bombs. But in a professional environment, swearing constantly is just not&hellip; well, professional. Imagine having a meeting with a lawyer about an important case, and being greeted with a tirade of colorful language more at home in a Guy Ritchie movie. Would you trust this lawyer? Does he or she seem like the best person for the job? Maybe you'll go with the lawyer who doesn't sound like Vinnie Jones. Swearing in meetings can also make people feel uncomfortable, to the point that they will speak to HR about it. This will reflect badly on your manager, and your department, and bad language can actually be viewed as harassment.</p> <h2>11. You Steal</h2> <p>What's a few paperclips, right? Or a ream of paper? And hey, why pay for toilet paper when you can grab a couple of rolls from the bathroom? It may not feel like you're doing anything wrong when you take a items worth pennies. However, multiply this by every employee in the building, and suddenly your company is losing thousands of dollars every year in &quot;liberated&quot; goods. If you need the items to work from home, that's fair enough. But if you're snagging paper from the copier to print out your tax returns, or taking coffee filters for your machine at home, you are stealing from your employer. It's not a gray area. It's theft.</p> <h2>12. You're Not Proactive</h2> <p>Imagine being a firefighter and walking into a burning building only to see a fellow firefighter standing there watching it burn. &quot;Why aren't you putting out this fire?!&quot; you yell. He or she responds with, &quot;You didn't ask me to.&quot; That may seem like a ridiculous scenario, and it would never happen because firefighters know better. But in other places, it happens all the time. Good employees will take the initiative. They will solve problems without being asked. They will initiate new projects that can benefit the company. Bad employees will wait for the order, and do nothing until it is given. Don't sit there waiting to be asked. What can you do to help? What can you do to create opportunities? Be the go-getter.</p> <p><em>Does this sound like you or any of your coworkers? </em></p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F12-ways-youre-being-a-terrible-employee&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F12%2520Ways%2520You%2527re%2520Being%2520a%2520Terrible%2520Employee.jpg&amp;description=12%20Ways%20You're%20Being%20a%20Terrible%20Employee"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/12%20Ways%20You%27re%20Being%20a%20Terrible%20Employee.jpg" alt="12 Ways You're Being a Terrible Employee" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-ways-youre-being-a-terrible-employee">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. 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