Chemex coffeemaker http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/12613/all en-US Pour-Over Coffee: Better Than Brewed? http://www.wisebread.com/pour-over-coffee-better-than-brewed <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/pour-over-coffee-better-than-brewed" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/Chemex.jpg" alt="Chemex coffeemaker" title="Chemex coffeemaker" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="169" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>If you&rsquo;ve never had a cup of <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/13/magazine/13Food-t-000.html">pour-over coffee</a> before, you&rsquo;re missing out on a great cup. More meticulous than machine-drip coffee, brighter and cleaner than French press brew, and less dangerous than a stove-top percolator, pour-over coffee is often seen as purely the realm of coffee snobs and &ldquo;<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coffee_cupping">cuppers</a>&rdquo;. But that&rsquo;s a shame, because not only is pour-over coffee delicious, it&rsquo;s easier to make than you might initially realize. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/simply-good-coffee-the-chemex-coffeemaker">Simply Good Coffee: The Chemex Coffee Maker</a>).</p> <p>Upon viewing the process of creating a perfect cup of pour-over coffee, your initial reaction might be something along the lines of &ldquo;Why bother? My regular old coffee maker can do this for me.&rdquo; While it&rsquo;s true that pour-over brewing is a bit more labor intensive than pressing the &ldquo;On&rdquo; button on your DeLonghi, the resulting coffee might just change how you view your morning Joe altogether.</p> <h2>How It Works</h2> <p>The idea is pretty straight-forward &mdash; grind your coffee beans, add coffee grounds to the (rinsed) paper cone inserted inside the pour-over container, and pour water carefully over top. The resulting coffee that collects in the carafe or coffee cup reservoir is bright, flavorful coffee that should highlight the best of the roast&rsquo;s flavor without any of the bitterness. Details such as how hot your heat your water, your water-to-coffee ratio, how much you rinse your filter, and your rate and style of pour are entirely up to you. Fortunately, the Internet is full of advice on the topic of <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8h-0ewcbHko">how to brew Chemex coffee</a>.</p> <p>If hand-pouring water over your coffee grounds seems arduous, take heed of some coffee-expert advice. Jesse Raub, author of the java-enthusiast website <a href="http://bitterpress.com/">Bitter Press</a>, tells us that &ldquo;regular drip coffee makers don't evenly wet the coffee grounds, which leaves your coffee unevenly extracted. Hand-pouring the water offers you an easy, controlled method for ensuring even distribution.&rdquo;</p> <h2>Cost Breakdown</h2> <p>It&rsquo;s hard to argue against the elegant simplicity of the pour-over coffee maker itself. Among the most iconic modern pour-over brands are the <a href="http://www.chemexcoffeemaker.com/">Chemex</a> (pronounced &ldquo;KEM-ex&rdquo;) and <a href="http://www.hario.jp/coffee/dripper.html">Hario</a>. Chemex is a favorite among pour-over enthusiasts and fans of simple design for its handmade simplicity; in fact, the Chemex is featured in a <a href="http://www.moma.org/collection/browse_results.php?criteria=O%3AAD%3AE%3A5225&amp;page_number=2&amp;template_id=1&amp;sort_order=1">MoMA collection</a> of objects designed by Peter Schlumbohm, a German innovator who was known for creating simple, usable products for the home. At approximately <a href="http://www.worldmarket.com/product/index.jsp?productId=3765115">$35 for an 8-cup carafe</a>, the Chemex seems like a relative bargain compared to high-end coffee makers.</p> <p>Chemex paper filters cost $8.50 for 100, which a bit less than 10 cents per filter. If you&rsquo;re not a fan of paper filters, the current &ldquo;It Girl&rdquo; of pour-over accessories is the <a href="http://www.amazon.com/Coava-Kone-Pourover-Filter/product-reviews/B004G7PTKE">Coava Kone</a>, a metal filter design to mimic the function of a paper filter, while allowing more aromatic oils to seep through during brewing. Reviewers have generally reported that the Kone produces less sediment than other metal filters. At $55, you can be forgiven for hesitating. But consider that you will never have to worry about running out of paper filters on a lazy weekend again, and the Coava Kone might seem like a relative bargain. And really when you add up the cost ($35 + $55 + shipping), you&rsquo;re still looking at about $100 for a coffee maker that should last a lifetime.</p> <p>The advantage of a pour-over coffee maker (instead of a <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/french-press-coffee">French press</a> or percolator) should be obvious &mdash; the Chemex and Hario are much easier to clean and don&rsquo;t involve nuts and bolts. The Coava Kone can be run through the dishwasher, although more fastidious owners prefer to hand-wash their entire coffee brewing apparatus. And wash it you must, because one of the side effects of an inexpertly cleaned coffee making apparatus is bitter, burnt-tasting coffee (the result of rancid oils that need to be scrubbed away after each use).</p> <h3>Pour-Over Coffee: Pros</h3> <ul> <li>Clean, minimalist design</li> <li>No moving parts to break</li> <li>Generally cheaper than electric coffee makers</li> <li>Easy to maintain, can be washed in dishwasher</li> <li>Greater control of coffee flavor outcomes</li> <li>No hot plate means your coffee doesn&rsquo;t continue to cook after brewing</li> </ul> <h3>Pour-Over Coffee: Cons</h3> <ul> <li>More work-intensive</li> <li>You officially become a <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-reasons-to-drink-coffee">coffee snob</a></li> </ul> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/andrea-karim">Andrea Karim</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/pour-over-coffee-better-than-brewed">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/simply-good-coffee-the-chemex-coffeemaker">Simply Good Coffee: The Chemex Coffeemaker</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/curing-warts-removing-splinters-and-19-other-bizarre-uses-for-banana-peels">Curing Warts, Removing Splinters, and 19 Other Bizarre Uses for Banana Peels</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-creative-uses-for-stale-cereal">5 Creative Uses for Stale Cereal</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-refillable-things-that-will-save-you-cash">10 Refillable Things That Will Save You Cash</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-best-eco-friendly-water-bottles">The Best Eco-Friendly Water Bottles</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Food and Drink brewing coffee Chemex coffeemaker cooking tools reusable Mon, 16 Jul 2012 09:48:09 +0000 Andrea Karim 939514 at http://www.wisebread.com Simply Good Coffee: The Chemex Coffeemaker http://www.wisebread.com/simply-good-coffee-the-chemex-coffeemaker <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/simply-good-coffee-the-chemex-coffeemaker" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/4337462905_6c35057517.jpg" alt="Chemex" title="Chemex" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="167" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Call me a cynic, but the days are numbered for my electric coffeemaker. How can I be so sure? Well, it's not the first one I've owned, and after three or four years, they all die. I predict it will simply stop brewing, or the heating element that keeps the carafe warm will short out, or some other seemingly simple, yet sufficiently complex issue will require that I scrap it for another.</p> <p>Perhaps all this mechanical failure in the objects around us suggests something about the overly-mechanized nature of our world. Coffeemakers brew coffee, keep the coffee warm, wake us up in the morning and tell us the time. With all of these bells and whistles, aren't we signing on for the failure of a bell here or a whistle there each time we choose a hyper-produced item? How revolutionary would it be if coffeemakers just made coffee? What if I decided not to solve my &quot;coffee-brewing dilemma&quot; with another nuclear option?</p> <p>Recently, I stumbled on a brewing throwback that has always had somewhat of a cult following among serious coffee connoisseurs and is enjoying a growing respect among us regular folks too. The Chemex coffeemaker looks deceivingly simple &mdash; there are no moving parts. It doesn't light up, it doesn't tell time, and there are no alarms that I can see. It is, simply, a glass carafe perfectly designed to efficiently brew the ideal cup of drip coffee.</p> <p>Chemex coffeemakers quietly entered the coffee-brewing world in the late 1940s. Invented by chemist Peter Schlumbohm, Chemex brewers are made from heat-resistant Pyrex glass. Short of a drop kick or bar fight, they're indestructible. The conical shape of the top portion of the carafe, together with a special paper filter, removes sediment, oils, and fats from your final cup &mdash; no bitterness, no grounds, perfect every time. The narrow neck of the carafe fits your hand perfectly and protects it from the hot surface by a band of wood secured with a leather strap. A subtle groove molded in the glass serves as a spout. Just remove the filter and grounds in one disposable package and your brewer becomes your carafe.</p> <p>Chemex brewers may require a bit more hands-on effort, but they are by no means labor-intensive. Simply bring a kettle of water to a boil, insert the Chemex paper filter and grounds into the upper cone of the carafe, slowly pour the hot water over the grounds and voila! The slow drip result is better than your bitter taste buds can imagine.</p> <p>The success of the Chemex's design lies in its restraint. It attempts to do nothing other than brew coffee. Its shape is purposeful, the collar of wood and leather around the neck a functional nod to the Arts and Crafts Movement, when our household objects weren't divorced from the materials around us every day. Brewing and taste aside, it looks absolutely elegant next to my big, clunky, black plastic and stainless steel groaning behemoth. The Smithsonian and The Museum of Modern Art thought so too &mdash; a Chemex is part of the permanent collection of each.</p> <p>So, when your old coffeemaker's brewing days are over (and they will be, sooner than you think), consider a Chemex. I'm not an investor or a salesman &mdash; simply an admirer of good design that gets back to the heart of a thing and pares back form to essential function. Let's skip the Brewmaster 4.0 (with optional iPod docking station, LED nightlight and remote control) and embrace Chemex's 1.0 solution. It will last forever.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/kentin-waits">Kentin Waits</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/simply-good-coffee-the-chemex-coffeemaker">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/pour-over-coffee-better-than-brewed">Pour-Over Coffee: Better Than Brewed?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/french-press-coffee">French Press Coffee: Step-by-Step Guide to Handcrafted Coffee</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-to-get-your-morning-coffee-for-free">8 Ways to Get Your Morning Coffee for Free</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/better-brewing-12-ways-to-make-coffee-at-home">Better Brewing: 12 Ways to Make Coffee at Home</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/stop-being-a-slave-to-starbucks-how-to-quit-caffeine">Stop Being a Slave to Starbucks - How to Quit Caffeine</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Food and Drink brewing coffee Chemex coffeemaker coffee Mon, 18 Oct 2010 13:00:07 +0000 Kentin Waits 263477 at http://www.wisebread.com