using up food http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/12667/all en-US 8 Fancy Ways to Use Leftover Food http://www.wisebread.com/8-fancy-ways-to-use-leftover-food <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/8-fancy-ways-to-use-leftover-food" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/5789019331_c72a8e3285_z.jpg" alt="chicken pot pie" title="chicken pot pie" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="166" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>When it comes to wasting food, a little goes a long way. Throw out a few slices of bread here, some uneaten leftovers there, and before you know it, we&rsquo;ve collectively thrown away millions of tons of food. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, food waste accounted for 14% of all municipal waste in 2010. But in earlier points in history, food waste was a lot less common. In the Great Depression, for example, recipes got creative because food was just too scarce &mdash; and too expensive &mdash; to throw anything edible away. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/waste-not-want-not-stop-throwing-away-your-food">Waste&nbsp;Not, Want Not: Stop Throwing Away Your Food!</a>)</p> <p>These days, food is relatively cheap, at least historically speaking. Thanks to better agricultural, storage, and transport techniques, many Americans have access to all kinds of food at all times of the year at a price that costs them, on average, about 6% of their income. That&rsquo;s a lower percentage than any other country in the world. Even so, wasting food is a bad habit, and not just because it&rsquo;s bad karma when so many other people in the world are going without (although that&rsquo;s worth thinking about). Think about it this way &mdash; every time you throw away food, you&rsquo;re effectively tossing a few dollars in the trash. Fortunately, cooks around the world have created a number of great recipes to <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/simple-strategies-for-using-your-leftover-food">transform those lowly leftovers</a> into something with culinary cachet. Here are some of the best examples.</p> <h3>1. Bread Pudding</h3> <p>You can find bread pudding of all configurations in even the fanciest restaurants these days. But this satisfying dessert has a little secret &mdash; it was designed to use up stale bread. OK, so maybe if you douse it in bourbon whiskey, butter, and eggs like this <a href="http://www.simplyrecipes.com/recipes/bread_pudding/">New Orleans bread pudding recipe</a> does, you&rsquo;re really throwing good after bad by piling a bunch of pricier ingredients into an old loaf of bread. But the results speak for themselves; you can serve this at any dinner party and gobble up the rest for breakfast the next day. Oh, and if you&rsquo;re not a fan of desserts, bread pudding can be savory too, like this recipe for <a href="http://smittenkitchen.com/blog/2010/04/30/leek-bread-pudding/">leek bread pudding</a>.</p> <h3>2. Rice Pudding</h3> <p>Leftover <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-weird-and-wonderful-ways-to-use-rice">rice</a> often gets thrown away because rice tastes so much better fresh. Unless, of course, you turn it into something else. Rice pudding is often my go-to in this case, because it&rsquo;s quick, easy, delicious, and very forgiving. This recipe for <a href="http://notwithoutsalt.com/2010/10/25/pumpkin-rice-pudding/">pumpkin rice pudding</a> is a great variation that can make use of a little extra pumpkin. You can also make <a href="http://joythebaker.com/2009/01/vanilla-bean-rice-pudding/">plain vanilla rice pudding</a>, spice it up <a href="http://www.ecurry.com/blog/desserts-sweets/kheer-indian-rice-pudding-with-nuts-and-saffron/">Indian-style</a>, or even make <a href="http://www.bonappetit.com/recipes/2012/07/apricot-rice-pudding-pops">rice pudding popsicles</a>. And of course, if you&rsquo;re up for dinner rather than dessert, there&rsquo;s always <a href="http://vegweb.com/recipes/leftover-rice-risotto">risotto</a> or <a href="http://www.simplyrecipes.com/recipes/shrimp_fried_rice/">fried rice</a>.</p> <h3>3. Chicken (or Turkey, or Ham, or Beef) Pot Pie</h3> <p>A meat-filled pie always makes great comfort food. It&rsquo;s also a perfect way to clean out the fridge. If you create a flavorful sauce and top it off with a rich, buttery crust, no one will ever know the key ingredients are last night&rsquo;s meat, potatoes, and vegetables. Try this recipe for a classic <a href="http://smittenkitchen.com/blog/2008/11/12/chicken-pot-pie/">chicken pot pie</a>. If you&rsquo;re not a meat eater, improvise with a <a href="http://www.foodrepublic.com/2012/04/18/recipes-vegans-vegetable-pot-pie">veggie</a> or <a href="http://www.thekitchn.com/recipe-vegan-tofu-and-vegetabl-134550">tofu pot pie</a>.</p> <h3>4. Banana (or Apple, or Sweet Potato, or Pumpkin) Bread</h3> <p>It&rsquo;s hard to believe that a couple of near-rotten (the closer the better) bananas can make something so good, but few people will turn down a slice of fresh banana bread. There are many ways to make this recipe. My <a href="http://www.runnersworld.com/article/0,7120,s6-242-303-309-11861-0,00.html">all-time favorite banana bread recipe</a> is a classic, but you can also add chocolate chips or spices, or replace some of the banana with other fruit purees. Quick-bread recipes are also great for cleaning up other leftover bits of fruits and vegetables like <a href="http://www.twopeasandtheirpod.com/apple-cinnamon-bread/">apples</a>, <a href="http://www.chow.com/recipes/11150-pecan-and-sweet-potato-bread">sweet potatoes</a>, <a href="http://www.mybakingaddiction.com/pumpkin-bread-recipe/">pumpkin</a>, <a href="http://smittenkitchen.com/blog/2007/07/26/summer-of-the-bats/">zucchini</a>, and <a href="http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Rhubarb-Bread-I/Detail.aspx">rhubarb</a>.</p> <h3>5. Fish Cakes</h3> <p>Leftover mashed potatoes are not all that appealing, especially when the gravy&rsquo;s run out! Fish cakes, shrimp cakes, and crab cakes are all a great way to turn this ingredient into something brand new and delicious. These <a href="http://www.simplyrecipes.com/recipes/cod_fish_cakes/">cod cakes</a> recommend using leftover fish as well as potatoes.</p> <h3>6. French Toast</h3> <p>French toast is a weekend breakfast staple, and one that&rsquo;s a lot quicker and easier to make than pancakes or waffles. Slice up slightly stale bread, dip it into an egg and milk mixture, fry it up, and serve with your favorite toppings. Try this <a href="http://smittenkitchen.com/blog/2011/05/06/creme-brulee-french-toasts/">creme brulee French toast recipe</a> and accompany it with <a href="http://www.jamieoliver.com/recipes/home-cooking-skills/stewed-fruit">stewed fruit</a>. You can even make <a href="http://www.food52.com/recipes/12907_croissant_french_toast">French toast with a croissant</a> (how very French, right?)</p> <h3>7. Casseroles</h3> <p>If you have plain, leftover pasta on hand, you can cobble together some other ingredients from the fridge and make a <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/one-recipe-lots-of-food-10-great-main-dish-casseroles">great casserole</a>. After all, the pasta in these recipes has to be cooked before the whole thing&rsquo;s thrown in the oven. For a classic dinner, try this <a href="http://thepioneerwoman.com/cooking/2009/04/macaroni-cheese/">macaroni and cheese</a>. For something a little different, try this <a href="http://www.recipegirl.com/2011/10/24/chicken-spaghetti-casserole-2/">chicken and spaghetti casserole</a>. You can even turn leftover pasta into a dessert as in this <a href="http://theshiksa.com/2011/07/13/vanilla-noodle-kugel/">vanilla noodle kugel</a> (try saying that five times fast).</p> <h3>8. Soups</h3> <p>If there&rsquo;s a recipe you can throw anything into, it&rsquo;s soup. Whether it&rsquo;s <a href="http://www.skinnytaste.com/2011/11/leftover-turkey-noodle-soup.html">turkey soup</a> after Thanksgiving dinner or <a href="http://steamykitchen.com/21252-split-pea-and-ham-soup.html">ham and split pea soup</a> after Christmas, there&rsquo;s almost no ingredients a soup won&rsquo;t wear well. Next time you&rsquo;re stuck with only a few things in the fridge, start searching recipe sites for the ingredients you have. Chances are, you&rsquo;ll find a soup to match.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/tara-struyk">Tara Struyk</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-fancy-ways-to-use-leftover-food">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/one-recipe-lots-of-food-10-great-main-dish-casseroles">One Recipe, Lots of Food: 10 Great Main Dish Casseroles</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/25-tasty-ways-to-use-chicken-stock">25 Tasty Ways to Use Chicken Stock</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/25-great-non-sandwich-work-lunches">25 Great Non-Sandwich Work Lunches</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/25-things-to-do-with-rotisserie-chicken">25 Things to Do With Rotisserie Chicken</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/food-going-bad-quickly-heres-how-to-fix-it">Food Going Bad Quickly? Here&#039;s How to Fix It</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Food and Drink affordable recipes leftovers using up food Thu, 02 Aug 2012 10:36:42 +0000 Tara Struyk 908071 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Organize Your Pantry and Save Cash http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-organize-your-pantry-and-save-cash <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-organize-your-pantry-and-save-cash" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/cleaning_kitchen.jpg" alt="Woman cleaning a kitchen" title="Woman cleaning a kitchen" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="163" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>The cost of groceries is increasing, and many consumers are on the hunt for better, more efficient ways to save and cut down on their monthly food expenses. While researching sales between retailers and clipping coupons can certainly help, there is a good chance you&rsquo;ll get the most savings by first clearing out your current food pantry and cabinets.</p> <p>Too often consumers with disorganized cabinets and pantries overspend simply because they can&rsquo;t find anything. They buy excess amounts of stuff they already have. Here are some organization tips that everyone should use to sort out the pantry and make you more effective at grocery shopping. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-grocery-shop-for-five-on-100-a-week">How to Grocery Shop for Five on $100 a Week)</a></p> <h2>Hunt and Gather</h2> <p>Start by clearing your kitchen table, then opening all of your food cabinets and removing everything from the shelves. As you remove items, try grouping them on the table in categories such as baking supplies, soups, and condiments.</p> <h2>Check the Dates</h2> <p>Keep a trash bag and an empty box nearby. As you remove items, check expiration dates and toss the bad stuff. When you find items you know you will never use, put them in a donation box, provided you have never opened/used the items. This box can later go to a local food pantry, soup kitchen, or church organization.</p> <h2>Clean Effectively</h2> <p>Since your food pantry and cabinets likely do not get cleaned weekly, make the most of the empty shelves. Clean and disinfect them thoroughly. Add some grip liner to keep items in place after the space has adequate time to dry.</p> <h2>Make an Inventory</h2> <p>With everything spread out before you, consider the pantry priorities. The things you use most should be placed at a convenient location so you can see immediately when you are running low.</p> <h2>Label Shelving</h2> <p>If you are not living the single life and fear others will mess up your organization efforts, use a labeler or colored tape to designate where things can go. Make categories somewhat generic such as condiments or snacks so as not to micro-organize yourself out of space.</p> <h2>Eliminate the Mess</h2> <p>If you store bags of sugar, sacks of flour, and boxes of cereal, invest in some air-tight canisters. Not only will they help in organization and space-saving, you will also help eliminate the attraction of pests. Don&rsquo;t forget to purchase containers that are in line with the height and width of your shelving space.</p> <h2>Tier It Up</h2> <p>In order to make it easier to see in the back of the cabinets that go three or four rows deep, insert scrap wood or other items from your home that could serve as tiers, boosting the height of the canned goods and other items in the back row, so you can see everything easily at one time without having to rifle through the rows of items.</p> <h2>Restock Wisely</h2> <p>Extra grocery items should be stored up and out of the way. Make a list of how many extra jars of peanut butter you have found. By recording the extras and taping the list inside the pantry door, you&rsquo;ll know right away if you have something you need, even if you can&rsquo;t see it right away. Similarly, if you <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/bulk-buying-101">purchase items in bulk</a>, consider another storage area that is out of the way so your pantry is less cluttered and easier to manage.</p> <p>Spices and smaller items can be stored in a plastic tote or basket so you can remove the whole thing when you need something.</p> <p>Also, consider putting items in categories by expiration dates. Put stuff you need to use first in the front, so you can stop having to toss food out after it expires.</p> <h2>Install a Dry Erase Board</h2> <p>Pick up a dry erase board at the dollar store, and install it inside the pantry or on the back of the cabinet door. When you take the last of something, make a note of it so you can keep your grocery list more accurate, and likely shorter.<strong><br /> </strong></p> <p>Going forward, your pantry and your <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/schedule-regular-fridge-cleanings-to-prevent-food-waste">refrigerator</a> should ideally be free of clutter, kept clean, and regularly organized so that any time you need to, you can glance at the shelves and know immediately what you need and what you don&rsquo;t.</p> <p>And don&rsquo;t forget to drop off that donation box at the local food pantry or soup kitchen. What you don&rsquo;t use or don&rsquo;t like will be appreciated by those who receive it.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/tisha-tolar">Tisha Tolar</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-organize-your-pantry-and-save-cash">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-to-make-the-most-of-a-tiny-kitchen">7 Ways to Make the Most of a Tiny Kitchen</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-pantry-tricks-that-save-you-big">9 Pantry Tricks That Save You Big</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/cooking-for-beginners-10-recipes-for-kitchen-newbies">Cooking for Beginners: 10 Recipes for Kitchen Newbies</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-best-thermoses">The 5 Best Thermoses</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-best-aluminum-and-stainless-steel-water-bottles">The 5 Best Aluminum and Stainless Steel Water Bottles</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Food and Drink Home Organization food pantry kitchen organization using up food Wed, 11 Jan 2012 11:36:36 +0000 Tisha Tolar 860820 at http://www.wisebread.com Waste Not, Want Not: Stop Throwing Away Your Food! http://www.wisebread.com/waste-not-want-not-stop-throwing-away-your-food <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/waste-not-want-not-stop-throwing-away-your-food" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/2712005646_fcfcef5b8e_z.jpg" alt="watermelon rinds" title="watermelon rinds" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="141" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Americans waste a lot of food. Every year, we throw away approximately <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2008/05/18/weekinreview/18martin.html">30 million tons of food</a>. Don't worry (or do!), we're not alone; apparently those goody-goody Swedes throw away roughly a quarter of the food that they buy. Sure, we might be composting like crazy these days, but still, when you think about it, throwing away that much food is still a waste of money. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-ways-to-cut-waste-when-feeding-kids">10 Ways to Cut Waste When Feeding Kids</a>)</p> <p>My grandmother, who spent a better part of her childhood in Nazi prison camps, instilled in her children a strong conviction that wasting food was downright sinful. I've never gotten over that lesson, so I live in a rather paranoid world where refusing to take home your leftovers from a night of Chinese food is almost on par with punching a kitten: It's just not done. I have become rather adept at using up leftovers. The food that I find myself wasting these days turns out to be stuff that I never previously thought of as <i>food</i>, per se.</p> <p>This past summer, I was meandering through a local farmers market when I came across a stall manned by a Hmong farmer and his wife. On display he had dozens of different vegetables that I had never seen before. Something I was rather surprised to see included was the leftover greenery from the harvest of summer squash. I asked the gentleman who was bagging up my purchase about the squash stems and leaves. Having recently had a terrible experience with undercooked taro leaves, I was leery of anything new and exciting, and the greenery of most gourds is covered in tiny thorns that scratch the skin &mdash; not exactly something that I was eager to ingest.</p> <p>Seeing my apprehension, the farmer laughed and said, &quot;These are scratchy, but not if you cook them for loooong time, like we do.&quot; Intrigued, I looked up <a href="http://www.ifood.tv/network/squash_leaves/recipes">recipes for squash leaves</a> online later that day, and found that squash greens are used in <a href="http://philippinesfoodrecipes.blogspot.com/2010/06/laksa-laksa-bean-noodles-with.html">laksa</a>, a noodle soup common in Southeast Asia. I had happily eaten squash blossoms before, but never the greens.</p> <p>Intrigued, I started thinking about other greens from our gardens and refrigerators that we throw away once the harvest is over.</p> <h3>Carrot Greens</h3> <p>Carrot tops can be boiled for soup stock, along with things like celery and fennel bottoms, fennel fronds, woody herb<strong> </strong>stems, and the rinds of hard cheese, bones, and<strong> </strong>apple cores. You still end up throwing away the leftover bits, but at least you're getting all the flavor out first. If you're feeling more adventurous, you can <a href="http://blogs.smithsonianmag.com/food/2009/11/03/eat-your-carrot-greens/">use carrot greens</a> in a way akin to parsley.</p> <h3>Cauliflower Leaves</h3> <p>These are often removed from a head of cauliflower before you buy, but if they are still attached, you can cook them with the cauliflower. They're just like cabbage.</p> <h3>Broccoli and Cauliflower Stems</h3> <p>This might seem like a no-brainer, but lots of people discard the stems from broccoli and cauliflower. Just thinly slice the stems and cook with the rest of your veggies. Stems contain fiber and nutrients, too.</p> <h3>Radish Greens</h3> <p>The tops of a bunch of red radishes or daikon are a spicy treat. Because they are often sandy, I triple wash mine before cooking.</p> <h3>Pea Greens</h3> <p>Anyone from China can tell you that <em>dou miao</em> are a delicacy. Sauteed with garlic and sesame oil, <a href="http://localfoods.about.com/od/sidedishes/qt/sauteepeagreens.htm">pea greens</a> are healthy and delicious.</p> <h3>Watermelon Rinds</h3> <p>You probably already know that you can <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-guaranteed-easiest-way-to-make-your-own-pickles">pickle</a> watermelon rind, but you can also simply cook with it &mdash; it acts very much like the Chinese winter melon that is so popular in soups. Watermelonrind.com has a <a href="http://watermelonrind.com/">big list of rind recipes</a> that you can print out (staring at that web site might cause severe eye strain). Try to ignore all of the brand name recommendations; you can use any brand of cumin that you want when making <a href="http://watermelonrind.com/watermelon-rind-curry-recipe.html">watermelon rind curry</a>.</p> <h3>Potato Skins</h3> <p>I'm honestly baffled by anyone who would peel a potato and not eat the skin; the flavor and texture of potato skins is my favorite part of a French fry. But if you're a mashed potato purist, keep the clean potato skins to the side and fry them up as a crunchy topping for meats or salads.</p> <h3>Squash Seeds</h3> <p>Also big in China, salted watermelon and pumpkin seeds are a delicious snack. Although many <a href="http://allrecipes.com//HowTo/roasting-pumpkin-seeds/Detail.aspx">roasted pumpkin seed recipes</a> call for an oven temp of 325&deg;F, you can also cook the seeds at 250&deg;F over a longer period. Try seasoning with kosher salt and spicy Indian masalas, like <a href="http://www.ishopindian.com/mdh-kitchen-king-masala-pr-21923.html">Kitchen King</a>, before roasting.</p> <h3>Garlic and Onion Tops and Flowers</h3> <p>You'd have to be living under a rock not to know how useful garlic scapes are in cooking. While it's true that most grocery stores carry only the bulbs, if you grow your own garlic and onions or buy yours from a local farmer's market, you can take advantage of the whole plant.</p> <h3>Banana Peels</h3> <p>Yes, you can eat banana peels. If chopped finely, they add a distinct (if unfamiliar) flavor to savory dishes, including this <a href="http://www.vahrehvah.com/Banana+Skin+Sabji:6703">Indian curry dish</a>, and this recipe, which <a href="http://www.indianrelish.com/main/recipe/banana-skin-and-cow-pea/">combines banana peels with black eyed peas</a>. One enterprising chef and writer even made <a href="http://www.notquitenigella.com/2010/10/05/banana-skin-cake/">banana peel cakes</a>. Banana peels can also be used, like many fruit peels, to create <a href="http://www.thefilipinoentrepreneur.com/2008/04/06/how-to-make-banana-peel-vinegar.htm">homemade vinegar</a>.</p> <h3>Coffee and Coffee Grounds</h3> <p>Used coffee grounds are great in the garden as slug deterrent, but <a href="http://www.ehow.com/how_5226430_tenderize-meatbeef-naturally-coffee.html">leftover coffee is also a meat tenderizer</a>. Leftover coffee grounds can also be used in recipes that call for a lot of chocolate, like cake or homemade truffles.</p> <h3>Tomato Greens</h3> <p>Gardeners are often loath to part with the fragrant tomato greens. I've always been told to avoid tomato greens due to toxic chemicals contained therein. Well, it turns out that their toxic reputation* may not be so deserved, because<a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/29/dining/29curi.html?pagewanted=2&amp;_r=1&amp;ref=dining"> tomato greens are in use at Chez Panisse</a> and other establishments, and have been since 1987 (see page 2 for citation).</p> <p><em>* While no conclusive data has shown tomato greens to be particularly toxic, you should exercise restraint when eating any plant that you haven't previously consumed. Tomatine, the toxin that exists in tomato vines and green tomatoes, both of which are technically edible, is dangerous in large doses. So don't go eating a pound of tomato vines.</em></p> <h3>Animal Parts</h3> <p>Most of us don't deal in <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/so-you-think-youre-a-carnivore">whole hunks of animals</a>, but who hasn't stared down a sack of giblets at Thanksgiving and wondered why turkey hearts were so unappetizing? I'm not fond of kidneys, myself, but I have a newfound appreciation for deep-fried gizzards. Liver and marrow make meat and tomato sauces more rich, thick, and satisfying.</p> <p><em>Are there fruit and vegetable parts that you have found a use for? How about unusual cuts of meat?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/andrea-karim">Andrea Karim</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/waste-not-want-not-stop-throwing-away-your-food">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-produce-workers-guide-to-choosing-fruits-and-vegetables">The Produce Worker&#039;s Guide to Choosing Fruits and Vegetables</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-not-to-buy-at-a-farmers-market">What NOT to Buy at a Farmers Market</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-best-cooking-oils-for-your-heart-and-wallet">The Best Cooking Oils: For Your Heart and Wallet</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/my-2016-budget-challenge-finding-food">My 2016 Budget Challenge: Finding Food</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-decorative-plants-you-can-eat-too">6 Decorative Plants You Can Eat, Too</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Food and Drink Green Living Cooking eat more for less food waste grocery shopping reduce grocery bill using up food vegetables waste less Fri, 29 Oct 2010 13:00:12 +0000 Andrea Karim 211349 at http://www.wisebread.com