debt relief http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/12900/all en-US Slow and Steady Wins the Debt Race http://www.wisebread.com/slow-and-steady-wins-the-debt-race <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/slow-and-steady-wins-the-debt-race" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/4680102985_9943b53fb2_z.jpg" alt="running marathon" title="running marathon" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="240" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>When I woke up to the reality of having $20,000 of credit card debt, I had to face this hard truth &mdash; I didn&rsquo;t get into debt overnight, so I&rsquo;m probably not going to get out of debt overnight.</p> <p>In fact, it took me four and a half years to pay off my debt. There were plenty of times throughout that journey when I wished there was some easy way to just wipe it all out.&nbsp;But there was no easy way. I don&rsquo;t recall ever considering bankruptcy. I racked up all that debt. I needed to pay it all off.</p> <p>So I did. Slowly. Month after month, I sent big checks to creditors, paying dearly for trips I had taken long ago and restaurant meals I no longer remembered.</p> <p>Today, with the perspective that time brings, and with lots of experience helping others struggling with debt, I honestly believe that the slow and steady way out of debt is the best way. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-start-fighting-debt-today">How to Start Fighting Debt &mdash; Today</a>)</p> <h2>The Danger of Fixing Symptoms</h2> <p>For many people buried under a mountain of debt, bankruptcy looks appealing. A quick way to end the pain.</p> <p>However, according to a paper published by the <a href="http://bdp.law.harvard.edu/papers.cfm">Bankruptcy Data Project</a>, a Harvard University-based research group that has studied bankruptcy for over twenty years, one year after filing for bankruptcy, one in four filers were struggling to pay routine bills, and one in three said their overall financial situation was similar to or worse than when they filed.</p> <p>Tossing your debt overboard may feel good for the moment. However, for many people, ditching debt without addressing the underlying causes often turns out to provide only short-term relief.</p> <h2>Lasting Changes Require Changes of the Heart</h2> <p>When I was blindly digging my way into debt, I saw buying stuff as the route to feeling good about myself. I bought things I couldn&rsquo;t afford in order to tell the world I <em>was</em> somebody.</p> <p>I also saw carrying a balance on credit cards as normal behavior. How else did most people get by?&nbsp;</p> <p>I probably could have learned some helpful new behaviors around money without changing these attitudes &mdash; how to use a budget, how to set up an emergency fund, and the like. But without a serious attitude adjustment, I doubt I would have been interested. Or, if I did start dabbling in new habits, they probably wouldn&rsquo;t have lasted very long.&nbsp;</p> <p>A psychiatrist friend tells me that attitudes and behaviors work in circular fashion to bring about change. Behavioral changes tend to alter our attitudes, and attitudinal changes tend to alter our behavior. However, they don&rsquo;t usually happen on the same schedule. While we may be able to force ourselves into some short-term behavioral changes, attitudinal changes take time. You can&rsquo;t just slap on a new conviction like cologne.</p> <h2>Getting on the Slow Track</h2> <p>To be sure, getting out of debt requires behavioral changes. You need to stop going any further into debt. You also need to gather the facts. How much debt do you have?&nbsp;Write it all down, and add it all up. Create a <a href="http://www.soundmindinvesting.com/visitors/res/resources.htm">cash flow plan</a> (AKA, a budget). Then start rolling a <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/a-comprehensive-guide-to-the-debt-snowball-method-0">debt snowball</a>.</p> <p>However, getting and <em>staying </em>out of debt also requires the slower work of heart change. Start by taking a close look at your financial attitudes. Are there any ways of thinking that have contributed to your debt? Have you been buying things you can&rsquo;t afford in order to feel better about yourself, like I did?</p> <p>Acknowledging those attitudes is the first step toward changing them.</p> <p>One of the key attitudinal factors that helped me turn things around was accepting responsibility for my debts. The credit card companies didn&rsquo;t manipulate me into carrying balances on my cards.&nbsp;My parents didn&rsquo;t fail me in some way.&nbsp;</p> <p>It wasn&rsquo;t about beating myself up about my debts; it was about acknowledging the truth. I was responsible for my debts.</p> <p>To be sure, some people with debt problems have gotten into financial trouble by way of horrendous life circumstances. A divorce, an extended period of unemployment, catastrophic medical bills. I don&rsquo;t mean to be insensitive to any of that. But it&rsquo;s been my experience that when a person with debt owns their role in the debt &mdash; and most people with debt played at least <em>some</em> role &mdash; they have a far greater chance of getting and staying out of debt.</p> <p>If you have a lot of debt and you&rsquo;re just beginning the process of getting out from under, I&rsquo;m sure the idea that it may take several years doesn&rsquo;t sound the least bit appealing. However, I&rsquo;m thankful to have taken the long way out. It took time to change my money-related attitudes and cultivate some healthy financial habits. Since paying off the last of my debts some 15 years ago, I have carried no debt other than a reasonable mortgage.&nbsp;</p> <p>I firmly believe that taking the slow road was the key to making changes that have stuck.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/matt-bell">Matt Bell</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/slow-and-steady-wins-the-debt-race">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-debt-management-questions-youre-too-embarrassed-to-ask">5 Debt Management Questions You&#039;re Too Embarrassed to Ask</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/john-cummuta-transforming-your-debt-into-his-wealth">John Cummuta: Transforming Your Debt Into His Wealth</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-do-a-one-day-do-it-yourself-bankruptcy">How to Do a One-Day, Do-It-Yourself Bankruptcy</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/3-times-bankruptcy-is-the-right-move">3 Times Bankruptcy Is the Right Move</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/runaway-debt-can-you-ever-pay-it-back">Runaway Debt, Can You Ever Pay It Back?</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Debt Management bankruptcy debt relief slow and steady Fri, 11 May 2012 10:36:11 +0000 Matt Bell 929129 at http://www.wisebread.com John Cummuta: Transforming Your Debt Into His Wealth http://www.wisebread.com/john-cummuta-transforming-your-debt-into-his-wealth <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/john-cummuta-transforming-your-debt-into-his-wealth" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/financial_work.jpg" alt="Balancing checkbook" title="Balancing checkbook" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="155" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>You have no doubt heard the radio ads (I hear them every day on XM Radio) by John Cummuta, making seemingly impossible claims &mdash; you can be completely debt free, including paying off your mortgage, in around five-to-seven years, using just the money you already make. Wow! And they&rsquo;re backed up by &ldquo;real&rdquo; testimonials. Well, as I always say, if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/is-magicjack-a-scam">Is MagicJack a Scam?</a>)</p> <p>First, let's briefly examine the radio ad that&rsquo;s getting a lot of airplay right now. There are several issues I have with it. Unfortunately, I can&rsquo;t find a copy of it anywhere online for you to listen to, so I have to do this from the notes I have taken after several listens.</p> <p>John starts by saying &ldquo;mortgages should be illegal.&rdquo; Well, I think most people would agree with that one considering the state of the industry and the vast amount of interest you have to pay. But then he says that, after interest, you will pay $400,000 for a $200,000 mortgage&hellip;almost a quarter of a million dollars.</p> <p>Small point, John. Maybe in your world $200,000 is close to $250,000, but $50,000 is quite the buffer zone. It&rsquo;s an old advertising tactic, playing with words in this way to make the numbers sound more grandiose. It&rsquo;s one fifth of a million. This is done deliberately to play off a testimonial later on, when a man says &ldquo;I&rsquo;ll be able to pay off my mortgage in two-and-a-half years, on a thirty year mortgage.&rdquo;</p> <p>See what John has done there? He sets up the average cost of a mortgage as $200,000, more than doubles it to $450,000 with interest, and then has some guy saying he&rsquo;ll be paying his mortgage off in less than three years.</p> <p>This is all designed to make you think you can pay off a huge mortgage in just a few years using the money you already make.</p> <h3>Is It Possible to Pay Off a 30-Year Mortgage in Under Three Years?</h3> <p>Technically, yes. But common sense should override all of this for you. Think, for a second, how on earth is this possible? To pay off the $200,000 in just three years, assuming a low 5% interest rate, would mean a <a href="http://www.usbank.com/calculators/CalculatorServlet?calc_name=MortgageLoan&amp;loan_amount=200000&amp;term=3&amp;interest_rate=5&amp;prepay_type=None&amp;prepay_amount=0&amp;prepay_starts_with=1&amp;by_year=1&amp;submit=Calculate">monthly payment of $5,994.18!</a> That&rsquo;s over $71,000 a year! How many people in America make $71,000 after taxes? And even if you do, the next three years will be pretty tough, as you&rsquo;ll have no money for, well, anything else. No food. No heat. No cars. Just a huge mortgage payment.</p> <p>Clearly, unless you&rsquo;re rich to begin with, you can&rsquo;t pay off a 30-year, $200,000 mortgage in just three years. This is a clear case of misdirection. The guy in the testimonial doesn&rsquo;t tell you how much he owes on his mortgage, how long he has to pay it off, or what he earns. It&rsquo;s a meaningless statistic. I could pay off a 30-year mortgage in one week if I just had one more payment left on it.</p> <h3>So How Does Cummuta's Program Actually Work?</h3> <p>Let&rsquo;s look at the program more broadly. I've talked to several financial advisors over the last few weeks, and they know all about John Cummuta's scheme. It's not a scam in the true sense of the word. It does work, or rather, it can work if you have the money. But therein lies the rub, as you'll see later on.</p> <p>The plan is based on the principal idea of <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Debt-snowball_method">debt snowballing</a>. You list all of your debts, smallest to largest, and then commit to paying them off one by one. You pay the minimum on every debt except the smallest, to which you pay as much as you afford. When that's paid off, you add the money you were formerly paying on the smallest debt to the next-smallest debt, and again pay as much as you can afford. This creates an avalanche of money that consumes the debts as each one is paid off. It also gives you great satisfaction as you check each bill off your list.</p> <p>Now, what I have just told you is the essence of the John Cummuta plan, a plan that costs a lot of money. When I called to inquire, it was five payments of $79.95. It could be more or less now; they may test different price models in different areas at different times. But $400 for advice you can find easily for free on the Internet, well, that seems pricey.</p> <h3>Can You Be Debt Free in Five to Seven Years? Let's Try It Out!</h3> <p>Does it even work? Yes and no. Let's model a debt plan using John Cummuta's method. I will use the <a href="http://www.census.gov/prod/2010pubs/acsbr09-2.pdf ">median U.S. income of approximately $52,000</a> (PDF) for this plan.</p> <p>I will also use the $200,000 mortgage that John himself uses as an example in his ads, and assume you have been paying it off for 10 years at 5% APR. And I will add some average debt, like credit cards and car loans.</p> <ul> <li>$52,000 <a href="http://www.calculator.net/take-home-pay-calculator.html?cannualincome=52000&amp;cpayfrequency=Monthly&amp;cfilestatus=MarriedJoint&amp;callowance=2&amp;cdeduction=500&amp;cstatetax=5&amp;ccitytax=0&amp;cadditionat1=no&amp;x=0&amp;y=0">after taxes and 401k ($500 pre-tax)</a> is around $3,020/month. We shall round it to $3,100, just to be nice.</li> </ul> <p>Now, the debt figures:&nbsp;</p> <ul> <li>Mortgage: $162,000 at 5%<strong> </strong>($200,000 after 10 years of payments)</li> <li>Credit Cards: <a href="http://www.creditcards.com/credit-card-news/credit-card-industry-facts-personal-debt-statistics-1276.php ">$14,000 at 13%</a> &mdash; $420 minimum payment (3%)</li> <li>Car Loan 1: $18,045 at 6% (This assumes the<a href="http://articles.moneycentral.msn.com/SavingandDebt/SaveonaCar/ABCsForAGreatCarLoan.aspx"> average $24,800 purchase price</a>, a $415 minimum payment, and 50 months left of the average 72-month loan.)</li> </ul> <p>And as the average family has two cars...</p> <ul> <li>Car Loan 2: $12,540 at 6% (This assumes a lower purchase price of $20,000, a $391 minimum payment, and 36 months left of 60.)&nbsp;</li> </ul> <p>These are all based on averages I found. Some people have much more debt, including <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/student-loans-how-to-make-post-college-decisions">student loans</a>, home equity loans, and so on. But we'll keep this simple.</p> <h3>OK, Let's Do a Debt Snowball!</h3> <p>Here's one I created using a <a href="http://www.debt-free-christian.com/debt-snowball-calculator.html">debt snowball calculator</a> online.</p> <p><img width="500" height="639" alt="" src="http://i.imgur.com/fLbH7.jpg" /></p> <p>Adding no extra payments and using the figures above, it came to 115 months to pay everything off. That's nine-and-a-half years to be debt free. Not bad, and that's just using the money you earn right now. The combined debt is $2,299.00 per month, leaving your family a tight $801 per month for food, heating, clothing, and all those other household expenses. Something tells me you won't be adding much to your savings plan over the next 10 years.</p> <p>But Cummuta estimates five-to-seven years.</p> <p>Well, let's aim for the high end. Seven years.</p> <p>To get everything paid off in 84 months, you'd have to add an additional $650/month to the debt snowball. That leaves an impossible $151/month to live off.</p> <p><img width="500" height="185" alt="" src="http://i.imgur.com/1cfg6.jpg" /></p> <p>Want it paid off in five years? Hey, Cummuta can make it happen.</p> <p>Just add an additional $1,620/month to the original debt snowball, instead of that measly $650.</p> <p><img width="500" height="215" alt="" src="http://i.imgur.com/q3dRN.jpg" /></p> <p>YES! You'll be debt free in five years! But there is the tiny hurdle of figuring out how to survive on -$849/month. Reading Wise Bread may help, but surviving on negative $849 seems tough for even the most frugal shopper.&nbsp;</p> <h3>For Most Of Us, Being Debt-Free in Five Years Is Insanely Tough (If It's Even Possible)</h3> <p>These are all just examples done with average U.S. figures. You may have more debt and more income. You may have less debt and less income. But the Cummuta plan seems to be one of extreme sacrfice to the point of having no life at all. If you want to become debt free in five-to-seven years, you'll have no social life, food will be scarce, you won't be able to afford to drive anywhere, no one gets <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-classy-gift-ideas-for-any-time-of-year">gifts</a>, clothing is out, and you may just lose your sanity, too.</p> <p>Yes, debt snowballing is a good idea. I think it's a good way to pay off debt, if you do it right and set reasonable goals. But you don't need to pay John Cummuta hundreds (or tens of thousands) of dollars to figure it out. And please, don't set yourself a goal like five years unless you have some major income left over each month that you're stashing in a Swiss bank account.</p> <p>Be careful everyone. Do your research on John Cummuta and other debt programs before you hand over your precious money to anyone. These debt elimination plans seem to be good for one person and one person only &mdash; the one selling them to you.&nbsp;</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/john-cummuta-transforming-your-debt-into-his-wealth">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dealing-with-nasty-debt-collectors">Dealing with Nasty Debt Collectors</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dealing-with-debt-credit-counselors">Dealing With Debt: Credit Counselors</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-money-moves-to-make-as-soon-as-you-conquer-debt">7 Money Moves to Make as Soon as You Conquer Debt</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/netspend-the-story-of-the-visa-debit-card-we-did-not-apply-for">netSpend: The Story of the Visa Debit Card We Did Not Apply For</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/debit-or-credit-which-one-should-you-choose-at-the-checkout">Debit Or Credit? Which One Should You Choose At The Checkout?</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Budgeting Consumer Affairs Debt Management debt relief debt snowball scams Wed, 20 Apr 2011 10:24:07 +0000 Paul Michael 527727 at http://www.wisebread.com Runaway Debt, Can You Ever Pay It Back? http://www.wisebread.com/runaway-debt-can-you-ever-pay-it-back <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/runaway-debt-can-you-ever-pay-it-back" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/moving_train.jpg" alt="moving train" title="moving train" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="240" height="180" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Do you ever hear a song that reminds you of someone from your past? I used to know a student named Andy who was always up to his eyeballs in debt. Every time I hear the tune &quot;Runaway Train&quot; by Soul Asylum, I think about Andy&rsquo;s massive debt and how this song probably captured the way he felt about it.</p> <h2>Runaway Debt</h2> <p>I don&rsquo;t know what the song&rsquo;s lyrics are actually about, but I imagine many people struggling to pay off their debts sometimes feel like they&rsquo;re on a runaway train. Let's take a look at some of the lyrics and what we can learn from them.</p> <h3>&quot;It seems no one can help me now&quot;</h3> <p>When you&rsquo;re drowning in debt, it&rsquo;s easy to feel alone and beyond help. The crazy thing is, when you feel the farthest from help is probably when you need it the most.</p> <p>Family and friends might not be able to help you financially, but they can lend moral support and help you find professional guidance. Look out for companies trying to take advantage of your situation; the FTC has some tips for dealing with <a href="http://www.ftc.gov/bcp/edu/microsites/moneymatters/dealing-with-debt-relief-services.shtml">debt-relief services</a>.</p> <p>There are legitimate debt-counseling organizations that can help you; a good place to start looking is the <a href="http://www.nfcc.org/FirstStep/firststep_01.cfm">National Foundation for Credit Counseling</a> (NFCC). The NFCC is the country&rsquo;s largest and oldest nonprofit credit-counseling network.</p> <h3>&quot;I'm in too deep; there's no way out&quot;</h3> <p>One of the discouraging things about high-interest debt is that it&rsquo;s really easy to get &ldquo;buried&rdquo; by the interest payments.</p> <p>You feel like all your payments are going to just pay off the interest, and you&rsquo;re not even putting a dent in the amount you borrowed.</p> <p>Like any really discouraging situation, you may be tempted to give up and walk away from the debt, but that&rsquo;s probably the worst thing you can do. Filing for bankruptcy is an option, but not the one you should consider first.</p> <p>Your debtors want their money back and may be willing to work with you to renegotiate the terms of the loan to make it more likely you&rsquo;ll be able to pay it back.</p> <h3>&quot;This time I have really led myself astray&quot;<em> </em></h3> <p>We're human, and we all make mistakes &mdash; some worse than others. When you&rsquo;re stumbling under a crushing load of debt, the reality of your situation can really get you down.</p> <p>Not everyone&rsquo;s battle with debt has self-inflicted wounds, but often one or more decisions you&rsquo;ve made have contributed to the problem. While it&rsquo;s good to take responsibility for those mistakes and make changes so they won&rsquo;t happen again, dwelling on the past can slow your climb out of debt.</p> <p>You don&rsquo;t have to be destined for a debt-ridden life because of your past choices. Getting hung up on bad decisions, misfortune, being a victim, or being treated unfairly can take your focus off of digging out of debt.</p> <h3>&quot;Bought a ticket for a runaway train&quot;</h3> <p>This line says to me, &ldquo;I did this to myself.&rdquo; However, it&rsquo;s a lyric that comes with the benefit of hindsight.</p> <p>Would you get on a train you knew was going to jump the track? I&rsquo;d hope not. Chances are you probably had a much different destination in mind when you set out. Looking back, you wouldn&rsquo;t do it again.</p> <p>Sure, things might have crashed and burned somewhere along the way, but don&rsquo;t beat yourself up about it. What would you do if you were literally on a runaway train? Probably find a way to get off as quickly as possible&hellip;sounds like the way to go to me.</p> <h3>&quot;Like a madman laughin' at the rain: little out of touch, little insane&quot;</h3> <p>Tens of thousands of dollars in debt is enough to make anyone a little crazy. It weighs on your mind and probably every financial decision that you make.</p> <p>If your debt truly has put you into a stupor of denial or avoidance, maybe you need a wake-up call to snap you out of it. Of course, when you're consumed by something, it can be tough to realize you need some intervention. This is where the people you surround yourself with become really important.</p> <p>You want to be around people who care about you and are willing to put themselves on the line to help you out. A good support system is important to helping you beat your debt.</p> <h2>Getting Out of Debt</h2> <p>Just like the song &quot;Runaway Train,&quot; the experience of being in debt is full of emotion. Sometimes our emotions can drag us down to a real low point, but don't let them derail your efforts for getting out of debt. Just remember, there are many people who were once in a similar situation and made it out of debt. You can too.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/ben-edwards">Ben Edwards</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/runaway-debt-can-you-ever-pay-it-back">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-4"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/john-cummuta-transforming-your-debt-into-his-wealth">John Cummuta: Transforming Your Debt Into His Wealth</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/debt-free-living-is-attainable-if-you-want-it-you-can-have-it">Debt-Free Living IS Attainable: If You Want It, You Can Have It</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/slow-and-steady-wins-the-debt-race">Slow and Steady Wins the Debt Race</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/debt">Debt Management Resources</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-best-0-balance-transfer-credit-cards">The 5 Best 0% Balance Transfer Credit Cards</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Debt Management debt relief music pay off debt Tue, 04 Jan 2011 14:00:14 +0000 Ben Edwards 420627 at http://www.wisebread.com