salary negotiating http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/13210/all en-US Best Money Tips: Avoid These Mistakes in Salary Negotiations http://www.wisebread.com/best-money-tips-avoid-these-mistakes-in-salary-negotiations <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/best-money-tips-avoid-these-mistakes-in-salary-negotiations" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_salary_negotiation_000044424688.jpg" alt="Woman avoiding common mistakes in salary negotiation" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Welcome to Wise Bread's <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/topic/best-money-tips">Best Money Tips</a> Roundup! Today we found some great articles on mistakes to avoid in salary negotiations, how to turn free work into a paying gig, and things you should never flush down the toilet.</p> <h2>Top 5 Articles</h2> <p><a href="http://moneyning.com/career/negotiate-a-higher-salary-by-avoiding-these-5-mistakes/">Negotiate a Higher Salary By Avoiding These 5 Mistakes</a> &mdash; Don't forget about benefits! If you aren't able to get a higher salary, see if you can negotiate for benefits like health insurance, personal time off, and telecommuting options. [MoneyNing]</p> <p><a href="http://www.carefulcents.com/from-free-work-to-paid/">How to Successfully Transition Free Work Into a Paying Gig</a> &mdash; Doing some work for free is necessary to build up your portfolio, but it doesn't pay the bills. [Careful Cents]</p> <p><a href="http://www.savingadvice.com/articles/2015/06/13/1034695_things-you-should-never-flush-down-the-toilet.html">22 Things You Should Never Flush Down the Toilet</a> &mdash; Don't flush cotton balls and Q-tips. They don't break down and can cause clogging in your pipes. [Saving Advice]</p> <p><a href="http://ptmoney.com/the-7-people-you-should-be-talking-with-about-your-finances/">The 7 People You Should Be Talking with About Your Finances</a> &mdash; Ask your parents about the family finances, and about their retirement plans. [PT Money]</p> <p><a href="http://www.cheapism.com/blog/3646/senior-scams">Watch Out for These 12 Scams Targeting Seniors</a> &mdash; Fraudsters often target seniors by pretending to be government agents or grandkids in trouble. [Cheapism]</p> <h2>Other Essential Reading</h2> <p><a href="http://parentingsquad.com/learning-to-listen-with-our-eyes">Learning to Listen With Our Eyes</a> &mdash; In a busy day, how often do we use our ears to listen but divert our eyes elsewhere? When we do this with children, it shows them that it's OK to not pay full attention to someone who is talking to us. [Parenting Squad]</p> <p><a href="http://www.popsugar.com/smart-living/How-Pack-Business-Trip-26294535">6 Best Packing Practices For Business Trips</a> &mdash; Avoid fabrics that wrinkle easily. Instead, go for poly-cotton blends. [PopSugar Smart Living]</p> <p><a href="http://www.csmonitor.com/Business/The-Bite/2015/0616/What-s-behind-the-FDA-ban-on-trans-fats">What's behind the FDA ban on trans fats?</a> &mdash; The FDA recently announced that companies will have 3 years to remove artificial trans fats from their products. [The Monitor]</p> <p><a href="http://www.creditsesame.com/blog/credit-tips-for-college-students/">5 Smart Credit Tips for Recent College Grads</a> &mdash; Make sure you pay your bills on time. It's one of the easiest ways to build your credit your credit. [Credit Sesame]</p> <p><a href="http://www.themoneyprinciple.co.uk/why-education-is-your-best-weapon-in-the-money-making-game/">Why Education is Your Best Weapon in the Money Making Game</a> &mdash; Having a degree is not the same thing as having an education. You can gain knowledge by doing online courses, experimenting, and using every opportunity to learn. [The Money Principle]</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/amy-lu">Amy Lu</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/best-money-tips-avoid-these-mistakes-in-salary-negotiations">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-biggest-mistakes-freelancers-make">The 5 Biggest Mistakes Freelancers Make</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-to-bounce-back-from-job-rejection">4 Ways to Bounce Back From Job Rejection</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/x-exciting-world-cities-you-can-afford-to-retire-in">4 Exciting World Cities You Can Afford to Retire In</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-entry-level-jobs-with-surprisingly-high-salaries">12 Entry Level Jobs With Surprisingly High Salaries</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-write-a-resume-12-steps-to-your-next-job">How To Write A Resume: 12 Steps To Your Next Job</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income best money tips salary negotiating Wed, 17 Jun 2015 19:00:11 +0000 Amy Lu 1460623 at http://www.wisebread.com 15 Career Advice Sites You Should Know About http://www.wisebread.com/15-career-advice-sites-you-should-know-about <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/15-career-advice-sites-you-should-know-about" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/man_working_in_park.jpg" alt="Man working in park" title="Man working in park" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="144" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>There are thousands of sites out there filled with career advice. From figuring out what you want to do and effectively networking to helping you get paid what you deserve, these sites can help you not only land a job you love, but do it better than everyone else. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/25-awesome-websites-to-help-you-get-a-job">25 Awesome Websites to Help You Get a Job</a>)</p> <div> <h2>For Beginners</h2> <p>Don't know where to start? If you're straight out of college and feel like you need a place to grasp the basics, these sites are perfect places to begin.</p> <h4>Job Searching at About.com</h4> <p>There are lots of basics on <a href="http://jobsearch.about.com/">About.com's Job Searching Site</a>; it's a good place to start and get a little bit of everything nailed down. If you have no clue about writing a resume or what happens on an interview, this is a good primer.&nbsp;</p> <h4>Businessweek: Managing Your Career</h4> <p>Businessweek's <a href="http://www.businessweek.com/managing/career/">Managing Your Career</a> site has a variety of articles and really nice sections along the right-hand side, like articles from the Harvard Business Review. Overall, it&rsquo;s like the next step up from the About.com site with lots of general advice.&nbsp;</p> <h4>Brazen Careerist Blog</h4> <p>A great source of advice geared towards young professionals and college students. They&rsquo;ve got great insight on relatively new issues like social media and networking in a digital age. Sample Post: <a href="http://blog.brazencareerist.com/2011/10/17/how-to-take-that-dream-trip-and-boost-your-career/">How to Take That Dream Trip While Boosting Your Career</a></p> <h2>Salary Comparison Sites</h2> <p>Whether you're looking for a new job or want a raise at your current one, it's crucial that you <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/getting-the-most-out-of-salary-comparison-sites">know what the market is paying</a>. Otherwise you're guessing &mdash; and if you try to negotiate without any solid data, you aren't going to make a good case. These sites have the best salary information out there.</p> <h4>Salary.com</h4> <p><a href="http://www.salary.com">Salary.com</a> has a bunch of stuff on it, but the reason why it&rsquo;s great is that getting a salary estimate for a specific job is very fast. Type in the job name and your city, and you&rsquo;re done.&nbsp;</p> <h4>Glassdoor.com</h4> <p>This site is similar to Salary.com, only <a href="http://glassdoor.com">Glassdoor</a> has a job-search engine better integrated into their site. You can also read about each company, its interview process, and reviews by other candidates. It's Salary.com on steroids.&nbsp;</p> <h4>Payscale.com</h4> <p>Their content is a little better than Salary.com, but the reason you&rsquo;re here is to get another data point and an idea of what a position is being paid in your city. <a href="http://www.payscale.com">Payscale</a> asks you for more information before spitting out the number, but it's still worth it.&nbsp;</p> <h4>Indeed.com</h4> <p>They have some cool trending charts that are pretty interesting, but (again) the reason I like <a href="http://indeed.com">Indeed</a> is because it&rsquo;s very fast and easy to get a salary estimate by simply entering the position and the city &mdash; maybe the fastest of the bunch.&nbsp;</p> <h2>Networking</h2> <p>Some people think of networking as something sleazy &mdash; doing a favor in exchange for another favor. Networking is simply knowing people and being known in exchange. These sites are the best way to add new contacts and keep in touch with your current connections.</p> <h4>Facebook</h4> <p>People don&rsquo;t think of Facebook when they think of networking (they pair LinkedIn with work and Facebook with play). But that&rsquo;s the wrong mentality to have when it comes to networking. <a href="http://www.thewriterscoin.com/networking-socializing/">Networking is about socializing</a>, and that&rsquo;s what <a href="http://www.facebook.com">Facebook</a> is all about.&nbsp;</p> <h4>LinkedIn.com</h4> <p>Until you clean up your Facebook profile, <a href="http://www.linkedin.com">LinkedIn</a> is a great way to expand your work contacts. From your former classmates to employees at the company you&rsquo;d like to work for, you&rsquo;ll likely find a way to add some valuable contacts to your network.</p> <h4>Your Alumni Network</h4> <p>Google the school you graduated from (grad or undergrad, it doesn&rsquo;t matter) followed by &ldquo;alumni network.&rdquo; Now sign up and follow the instructions to verify you&rsquo;re an actual alum. Most schools will have a tool that allows you to search other alums and connect with them. Having a school in common is a great buffer to starting a mutually beneficial relationship.</p> <h2>Work Hacks</h2> <p>These are some great sites with fantastic career advice.</p> <h4>Lifehacker</h4> <p><a href="http://lifehacker.com">Lifehacker</a> is all about finding ways to create shortcuts that make us all <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-efficient-ways-to-boost-productivity">more productive</a>, and their career section is filled with helpful tips. Sample post: <a href="http://lifehacker.com/5836507/how-to-use-linkedin-to-increase-your-hirability?tag=career">How to Use LinkedIn to Increase Your Hirability</a></p> <h4>Tim Ferris's Four Hour Workweek Blog</h4> <p><a href="http://www.fourhourworkweek.com/blog">Tim</a> doesn&rsquo;t update as frequently as other sites, but this is a great place to shake you out of the everyday. It's always good to be a little bit &ldquo;out there,&rdquo; and Tim does that well. Sample post: <a href="http://www.fourhourworkweek.com/blog/2011/09/29/8-steps-to-getting-what-you-want-without-formal-credentials/">8 Steps to Getting What You Want Without Formal Credentials</a></p> <h4>The Corner Office (From The New York Times)</h4> <p>One of my favorite features out there, the weekly <a href="http://projects.nytimes.com/corner-office">Corner Office column</a> interviews a high-level executive to find out what they&rsquo;ve learned and how they&rsquo;ve achieved success. It's incredibly insightful and the inspiration for my own <a href="http://www.thewriterscoin.com/announcing-the-ninja-employee-newsletter/">Ninja Employee Newsletter</a>. Sample Post: <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2011/07/17/business/david-sacks-of-yammer-on-fostering-dissent-corner-office.html">Fostering a Culture of Dissent</a></p> <h4>Workawesome</h4> <p>Like Lifehacker, <a href="http://workawesome.com">Workawesome</a> focuses on practical content &mdash; things you can do right now to make your job better and boost your career. From dealing with coworkers to saving time, they have something for everyone. Sample post: <a href="http://workawesome.com/communication/how-to-deal-with-difficult-people/">How to Deal with Difficult People</a></p> <h4>I&nbsp;Will Teach You To Be Rich</h4> <p><a href="http://www.iwillteachyoutoberich.com/blog">Ramit</a> isn&rsquo;t shy about telling you what works and what&rsquo;s a big waste of time. His blunt style might not jibe with some, but his honesty and intense focus on results is refreshing. The site sounds like a scam, but he&rsquo;s anything but. Sample post: <a href="http://www.iwillteachyoutoberich.com/blog/how-i-helped-a-friend-find-her-dream-job-twice/">How I Helped a Friend Find Her Dream Job...Twice</a></p> <p><em>Did I miss any good ones? Please mention your favorite career sites in the comments!</em></p> </div> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/carlos-portocarrero">Carlos Portocarrero</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-career-advice-sites-you-should-know-about">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-17"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-online-tools-to-help-you-land-a-job">5 Online Tools to Help You Land a Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-convince-your-boss-to-let-you-work-from-home-0">How to Convince Your Boss to Let You Work From Home</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-gadgets-every-work-at-home-professional-needs">6 Gadgets Every Work at Home Professional Needs</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-use-technology-to-upgrade-your-career">6 Ways to Use Technology to Upgrade Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/tips-for-joining-an-excellent-startup-company">Tips for Joining an Excellent Startup Company</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Technology blogs career sites networking salary negotiating Thu, 10 Nov 2011 09:48:56 +0000 Carlos Portocarrero 773383 at http://www.wisebread.com Why Women Don't Negotiate http://www.wisebread.com/why-women-dont-negotiate <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/why-women-dont-negotiate" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/4042513788_b6de77ac87_z.jpg" alt="Woman on money" title="Woman on money" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="167" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Back in 2007, I wrote an article on Wise Bread about how women simply need to <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/earn-more-money-by-demanding-it">demand more money when negotiating a salary</a>, either at a new job or an existing one. It's not that I have a long history of excellent salary negotiating skills or anything. Over the years, I've wavered between superb and terrible, depending on what my employment status was at the time. Fully employed but seeking better opportunities? I'm a negotiating whiz. Teetering on the brink of financial collapse? I'm so soft and mushy you could cut me with a butter knife and pay me in Monopoly money. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/conversation-killers-what-s-holding-you-back-from-negotiating">Conversation Killers: What's Holding You Back from Negotiating?</a>)</p> <p>I understand the fundamentals of salary negotiation. I know what my skills are worth in the marketplace. That doesn't mean that I have gotten comfortable with negotiating my salary. Even when I know that I have outperformed expectations and really made a difference in the workplace, I find it extraordinarily difficult to say, &quot;Thanks for the offer of a 1% increase, but I'll be needing at least a 6% pay raise.&quot;&nbsp;</p> <h3>It's Not Just Our Fault</h3> <p>For years I sort of assumed that this lack of skill&nbsp;was due to me being kind of a weenie. Women aren't really taught to be aggressive, and we are afraid of appearing like money-grubbers in front of our colleagues and supervisors. But this is our own problem, right? I certainly assumed so, because many financial gurus (ahem, Suze Orman) taught that a take-no-prisoners attitude was the key to success. I figured that I was simply too weak to get on board and demand more money, and that weakness was my own fault.</p> <p>So, a few weeks ago, when I heard a story on NPR about <a href="http://www.npr.org/2011/02/14/133599768/ask-for-a-raise-most-women-hesitate">women's lack of negotiating skills</a>, I was thinking, &quot;Yo, NPR, I'm really happy for you, and Imma let you finish, but I wrote the BEST ARTICLE OF ALL TIME about this topic four years ago.&quot; Because, honestly, what else is there to say about women learning to negotiate? Women don't haggle well because they find it scary. Women are kind of weak, and they need to learn not to fear demanding more money. That includes me, of course. Despite my own advice about how to negotiate for more, my heart still jumps in my throat during my annual salary review.</p> <p>&quot;Women need to get over that kind of thing,&quot; I muttered, only half-listening to NPR. And then I heard this part of the story:</p> <blockquote><p>[Carnegie Mellon Professor Linda] Babcock showed people videos of men and women asking for a raise, following the exact same script. People liked the man's style and said, &quot;Yes, pay him more.&quot; But the woman?</p> <p>&quot;People found that to be way too aggressive,&quot; Babcock says. &quot;She was successful in getting the money, but people did not like her. They thought she was too demanding. And this can have real consequences for a woman's career.&quot;</p> <p>To be clear, <em>both men and women thought this way. </em>(Emphasis added)</p> </blockquote> <p>The issue is not that women are weak. It's that for women, negotiating is risky. Women are not incorrect in being worried that asking for a raise will make them seem aggressive. They WILL be perceived as aggressive, in a negative way, even when they follow the exact same script as a man, asking for the same thing. In the business world, aggressiveness is seen as a negative trait in women, but a positive one in men.</p> <p><em>We actually know exactly how we will be perceived when we ask for more. </em>Women don't labor under the misconception that asking for higher pay might be seen as aggressive; <em>we live in a world where this is a fact</em>.</p> <p>And it's not just men who see women this way; <em>we see ourselves this way</em>.</p> <p>Part of me wants to say, &quot;Who cares? People need to learn that women can be aggressive.&quot; But this is an ingrained thought process, and those can be hard to change. Also, I've worked at companies with women who I loathed because of their overly aggressive and bossy nature. I'm as bad as anyone else when it comes to thinking that an aggressive, business-minded woman is just, to be frank, kind of a bitch.</p> <h3>What Does Lack of Negotiation Cost Women?</h3> <p>I've been thinking about the Carnegie Mellon study pretty much every day since the story first aired, and it bothers the heck out of me. It bothers me because I can completely believe the results of the study, in which a woman who acts exactly the same as a man is seen by observers as unlikable.</p> <p>On one hand, the study involved a small sampling of people, and only two subjects &mdash; one man and one woman. I have no idea if there really WAS something about this woman who struck totally reasonable study participants as really unlikable. But it's my suspicion that the issue really is deeper than that, and that we expect women to ask for things in a certain way, and men in another way.</p> <p>The problem with this expectation is that it ultimately hurts women. Knowing that we are going to be seen as unlikable when we state our cases for getting a raise makes us less likely to ask for a raise.</p> <blockquote><p>&quot;I tell my graduate students that by not negotiating their job at the beginning of their career, they're leaving anywhere between $1 million and $1.5 million on the table in lost earnings over their lifetime,&quot; Babcock says.</p> <p>And her figure doesn't even include company retirement contributions, which are also based on a share of salary.</p> </blockquote> <p>See that? Not asking for a raise can make a difference of $1 million in lost earnings over your lifetime. That's not just&nbsp;worrisome; it's&nbsp;tragic.</p> <h3>What Should Women Do?</h3> <p>How should women negotiate pay raises? After all, it's not fair to lose $1 million in earnings over the course of your career. According to the researchers who conducted the study:</p> <blockquote><p>Babcock and Harvard researcher Hannah Riley Bowles wanted to find a way for women to ask for more yet avoid this societal backlash. They tested various strategies and found some that do work. Women can justify the request by saying their team leader, for example, thought they should ask for a raise. Or they can convince the boss their negotiating skills are good for the company. The trick, Babcock says, is to conform to a feminine stereotype: appear friendly, warm, and concerned for others above yourself.</p> </blockquote> <p>I cannot possibly describe how much this idea rankles my Mount Holyoke-educated feminist brain. What is this, <em>Mad Men</em>? Why on Earth should I present myself as more concerned for everyone other than myself when asking for more money? Why shouldn't I expect to be able to present my case for increased salary in an honest way, regardless of whether or not the presentation isn't immediately palatable to a superior? Isn't that how social change occurs?</p> <p>On the other hand, which issue is more important at the moment: My salary or the societal expectations that are placed upon women? I don't mean to suggest that I alone, by negotiating like a man, will somehow change the course of cultural norms and allow women to be at least as aggressive as men in the realm of salary negotiations. I alone do not have that kind of power.</p> <h3>My Negotiation Debate</h3> <p>Should I still charge forward and hope that other women will do the same, thus forever changing the way that female negotiating skills are looked at? Or should I use my feminine wiles to increase my salary, even if it means communicating in a way that I find, frankly, rather repressive? I've certainly used womanly charms to get what I wanted before, even though I am rather loathe to admit it. Then again, I don't know if flirting with a store clerk for a discount is actually hurtful to my fellow women, because it seems like such a harmless act.</p> <p>When it comes to the world of salary negotiation, I am certainly torn. My salary, and its steady, incremental increase are crucial to my long-term <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-steps-for-a-womans-financial-self-defense">financial security</a>. As such, my concern over my salary might outweigh my concern for how women, and American women in particular, are forced to be passive-aggressive in their requests for increased monetary compensation. Wouldn't it be nice, though, if this was an issue that had already been resolved?</p> <p><em>How do other women feel about this? Would you rather be straightforward in your negotiating? Or have you already worked out a system for asking for pay raises?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/andrea-karim">Andrea Karim</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-women-dont-negotiate">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-signs-you-arent-making-enough-money">6 Signs You Aren&#039;t Making Enough Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-answer-23-of-the-most-common-interview-questions">How to Answer 23 of the Most Common Interview Questions</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-signs-your-company-is-going-under">10 Signs Your Company Is Going Under</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-words-to-never-use-in-a-job-interview">10 Words to Never Use in a Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/make-guerrilla-job-hunting-work-for-you">Make Guerrilla Job Hunting Work for You</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Job Hunting asking for a raise how to ask for a raise negotiating contracts salary negotiating women pay gap women's money Wed, 02 Mar 2011 13:00:13 +0000 Andrea Karim 492857 at http://www.wisebread.com