quitting your job http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/14212/all en-US A 5-Step Plan to Quitting Your Job http://www.wisebread.com/a-5-step-plan-to-quitting-your-job <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/a-5-step-plan-to-quitting-your-job" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/7917621950_a646f42387_z_0.jpg" alt="this way out sign" title="this way out sign" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="141" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>That all-too familiar dread is starting to consume you more and more every day. Sundays have become even more depressing than normal. Lunch hours are a godsend even if you're not eating.</p> <p>It's time for you to get out of there. It's time to quit your job.</p> <p>Here's the right way to do it so you don't burn any bridges and set yourself up for success. (See also:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-quit-your-job">How to Quit Your Job</a>)</p> <h2>1. Start a Journal</h2> <p>Take a long look at all the reasons why you want to quit and write them all down. Not just once, but over time.</p> <p>Don&rsquo;t get too Kumbaya about this; the goal isn&rsquo;t a thorough psychological checkup about why you want to quit or what it means in the grand scheme of things.</p> <p>The goal is to just keep track of how you&rsquo;re feeling and what's making you feel that way. It can help keep you focused and might even help you the next time you have to leave a job. We always forget how we felt and why we did the things we did, but if you have it down on paper, it&rsquo;ll be easy to remember your reasons for quitting.</p> <p>Hopefully these thoughts will keep you from falling into a similar situation in the future.</p> <p>And who knows &mdash; you may find that it isn't your job that's actually filling you with dread and you don't have to quit to solve the problem.</p> <p><strong>Action item: </strong>Start a Google Doc entitled &ldquo;Why I&rsquo;m Quitting&rdquo; and write a few sentences at least twice a week about the things that make you want to leave and what you&rsquo;d like to change.</p> <h2>2. Test the Waters</h2> <p>Before you do anything rash, it's important to get a sense for what's out there and start to prepare the world for the awesomeness that is you.</p> <p>Pump up your LinkedIn profile, make sure a Google search doesn't bring up anything embarrassing, and check out the job boards to see what&rsquo;s out there.</p> <p>Now&rsquo;s the time to reach out to former coworkers to get recommendations (on <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/standout-stuff-to-put-on-your-resume">LinkedIn</a>, or check if they&rsquo;re willing to be contacted via phone by prospective employers) and to get the word out that you&rsquo;re looking to make a move.</p> <p>It&rsquo;s amazing to me how many doors open up when you just let people know what it is you&rsquo;re trying to do. I&rsquo;ve had distant connections I hadn&rsquo;t talked to in years volunteer to introduce me to important people in key companies.</p> <p>Talk to your significant other/spouse as well...you don&rsquo;t want to surprise them by suddenly announcing that you&rsquo;re going on an interview (or that you&rsquo;ve already quit!) when they have no idea you wanted to leave your job. It&rsquo;ll save you from at-home drama during a very hectic time.</p> <p>I wouldn&rsquo;t recommend talking to anyone you work with about it, but if you really trust them (and they probably want to leave too), then this can be a great motivator.</p> <p>The goal during this step is to get a sense of what's available, preparing for a move, and get as much help as possible in finding new leads.</p> <p><strong>Action item: </strong>Email people you trust (a mass email is fine) briefly explaining your situation and asking them if they know of any open roles you&rsquo;d be a good fit for. Also include a link to your LinkedIn profile and ask for a quick recommendation.</p> <h2>3. Outline Your Plan</h2> <p>Now that you have a sense of what's out there, it's time to put together a plan of action.</p> <p>You don&rsquo;t necessarily have to have another job lined up (though I&rsquo;d <em>really</em> recommend you do), but you absolutely must have a plan.</p> <p>Financially, I wouldn&rsquo;t just quit. No matter how much you hate it, I&rsquo;d advise you to figure out a way to make it bearable enough that you can find a new job before you quit.</p> <p>If you&rsquo;re so miserable that you feel you can&rsquo;t stay a moment longer, then the next step will become even more important.</p> <p>Your plan should be as detailed as possible; it&rsquo;s the map you&rsquo;ll follow to find your next gig &mdash; one that you&rsquo;ll be happy and feel rewarded for a long time (ideally).</p> <p><strong>Action item: </strong>Start a new Google Doc titled &ldquo;Master Plan&rdquo; and write three tasks, each with three bulleted items below them. Each one is something you need to do and the bullets are how you&rsquo;re going to achieve them. Good ones to start with: Find new job, expand my network, pump up my resume, get an interview, etc.</p> <h2>4. Review Your Books</h2> <p>Money is a crucial part of why we work and what we decide to do for a living. So if you haven&rsquo;t reviewed your finances in a while, please do that ASAP. I always recommend <a href="http://mint.com">Mint.com</a> to easily keep track of all your income and expenses. (Unfamiliar? Check out <a target="_blank" href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-cool-mint-tools-for-manaing-your-money">8 Cool Mint Tools for Managing Your Money</a>.)</p> <p>If you&rsquo;re going to quit your job, you should have a new one waiting for you (remember the Outline Your Plan part?) or have the money to carry you through a period of not having any (or lower) income. Don't have a six-month <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/figuring-the-size-of-your-emergency-fund">emergency fund</a>? Better start saving up...</p> <p>If health insurance is a big deal to you (you get sick a lot or have a family on your plan), make sure you&rsquo;ll be covered through any appointments or procedures that will draw down that emergency fund.</p> <p><strong>Action Item:</strong> Tally up your cash and your monthly expenses for the past three months and see how long you can go without a job (or what you need to make at the next job). If the math doesn't add up, make sure you alter your plan to adjust for that.</p> <h2>5. Quitting Time</h2> <p>You've done all the work and now is no time to let up; it's time to be the best damn quitter there ever was. And that means following some simple rules:</p> <p><strong>Don't Burn Bridges</strong></p> <p>Be respectful, cordial, and helpful (if you can).</p> <p><strong>Don't Check Out</strong></p> <p>It will leave a negative impression on the people you'll one day want a recommendation from &mdash; work hard until the end.</p> <p><strong>Don't Delay</strong></p> <p>Look back at your journal &mdash; there's a reason you're leaving, so don't forget that.</p> <p><strong>Be a Model</strong></p> <p>Help with the transition, give at least two weeks, and do what you can to make it easy for your employer. It will pay off in the long run.</p> <p><strong>Action Item: </strong>Memorize the previous four bullets and make sure you re-read them when you're about to give notice and during the two weeks you count down the days until you're set free.</p> <p>Once you've done all the legwork and made sure you'll be moving into a better situation, you've earned the right to pull the trigger. Don't forget to be nice about it...you may wind up working with some of the people you're leaving behind in a few years.&nbsp;</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/carlos-portocarrero">Carlos Portocarrero</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/a-5-step-plan-to-quitting-your-job">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-to-do-when-you-want-to-quit-your-job">What to Do When You Want to Quit Your Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-quit-your-job">How to Quit Your Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-answer-23-of-the-most-common-interview-questions">How to Answer 23 of the Most Common Interview Questions</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/this-interview-technique-will-get-you-hired">This Interview Technique Will Get You Hired</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-jobs-that-pay-over-50k-and-dont-require-a-bachelors-degree">5 Jobs That Pay Over $50K and Don&#039;t Require a Bachelor&#039;s Degree</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Job Hunting acheiving goals emergency fund quitting your job Wed, 05 Dec 2012 11:24:32 +0000 Carlos Portocarrero 955765 at http://www.wisebread.com What to Do When You Want to Quit Your Job http://www.wisebread.com/what-to-do-when-you-want-to-quit-your-job <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/what-to-do-when-you-want-to-quit-your-job" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/barista.jpg" alt="Barista" title="Barista" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="167" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>I&rsquo;m in Arizona this week with a few old friends. In the desert, everything seems to be in sharp relief: earth, scrub, cloudless sky. If only everything in life were so clear! When I have tough decisions to make, it often feels like I&rsquo;m under water, where emotion clouds my judgment. It made me think about the last time I quit a job, when nothing was clear. I was fraught with indecision, anxiety, and doubt. Maybe the stress that change brings is normal, but every time I&rsquo;ve quit a job, I&rsquo;ve spent a lot of time thinking about how best to do it. Because while marching in, throwing down your resignation, and enunciating each detail of your long suffering and dissatisfaction is certainly satisfying in the moment, its drawbacks may come back to haunt you. If moving on to a new job is on your mind, here are some things to consider when you give your notice. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-quit-your-job">How to Quit Your&nbsp;Job</a>)</p> <h3>Remember: It&rsquo;s Just a Job</h3> <p>I often get really tied up in my work &mdash; it&rsquo;s easy to because I spend so much time doing it. But at the end of the day, it&rsquo;s a just a job. Today your job may feel like your heart and soul, but 10 years down the road, you&rsquo;ll probably be unable to distinguish the cubicle you&rsquo;re sitting in now from the ones that came before it &mdash; or after. This is why quitting is often so important. You may have to work to live, but it&rsquo;s your family, your friends, and the things you love that are really worth sticking it out with for the long term. If your job isn&rsquo;t compatible with your life &mdash; or the life you want to live &mdash; it&rsquo;s time to move on.</p> <h3>Make Sure You Can Afford to Quit</h3> <p>Whether you love your job or not, most people spend hundreds or thousands of hours of their lives working for one main reason &mdash; the money. No matter how much you think you hate your job, you&rsquo;ll really be kicking yourself if you find yourself unemployed and unable to pay your bills. Before you quit, work on getting another job, even if it&rsquo;s only a temporary one that&rsquo;ll keep you going while you look for the perfect position. I know it is oh so tempting to quit your job on the spot, but your life is not a Hollywood movie, and this dramatic approach is unlikely to have a happy ending &mdash; particularly in the current job market.</p> <p>If you have a savings account that will pay your basic expenses for at least six months, quitting might be a reasonable risk to take. Just be sure to put some thought into whether your current situation is really bothering you enough to warrant tapping into your emergency fund. And remember that any current dissatisfaction with your job is likely to evaporate as soon as you walk out the door, while the financial repercussions of quitting in a huff may stick with you for years.</p> <h3>If You're Doing It, Do It Soon</h3> <p>I&rsquo;ve seen a lot of people who were really unhappy in their jobs but stuck around anyway. Their lack of enthusiasm really showed, and it didn&rsquo;t help their reputation around the office. Quitting a job is uncomfortable, but if you already know you aren&rsquo;t going to be happy where you are, start working on a plan to get out. Persisting in a job you hate will only make you bitter, and most people just don&rsquo;t do a great job of hiding that from their coworkers for eight hours a day. Your grouchy behavior may even reduce your chances of getting references from your coworkers; if it goes on long enough, it could put you at risk of being fired. Quit your existing job the minute it&rsquo;s financially possible. Letting go will take the weight off your shoulders &mdash; and allow you to leave with your reputation intact.</p> <h3>Root Out References</h3> <p>If you&rsquo;ve worked somewhere for a while and did your best, chances are you&rsquo;ve made a few friends who can speak to your abilities. You&rsquo;ll no longer be seeing these people every day, so be sure to ask them if they&rsquo;d mind being a reference while you&rsquo;re still well acquainted. If they agree, get their phone numbers and emails so that you can provide them to potential employers. You don&rsquo;t need a lot of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-great-job-references">references</a>, but if you have managers or supervisors who are happy with your work, that&rsquo;s a good place to start. Coworkers can make good references too, just be sure to choose someone that you trust will speak well of you. Finally, avoid spending your last week or two of work Facebooking about how eager you are to leave. Instead, work hard to leave things in order for your replacement and make that transition easier for your coworkers &mdash; they'll remember you for it.</p> <h3>Prepare Yourself</h3> <p>Quitting one job and starting another can be a rewarding experience &mdash; but also a very stressful one. Rather than assuming that the rest of your life will be an easy downhill ride once you move on, be prepared to experience stress and even sadness. I have liked something about nearly every job I've had, and despite being grateful for being able to move on, I always miss the people I met, the tasks I covered, or even the coffee shop I visited before each workday began. I like routine; chances are that if you've been working full-time for any length of time, you do too.</p> <p>One great way to deal with the stress and disorientation that disconnecting from a job can entail is to give yourself a week or two away from work between jobs. If you can afford the time off, it will give you some time to decompress, destress, and arrive at your new job ready to take on the world. If that's not an option for you financially, consider going away for the weekend.</p> <p>The bottom line is that if you break your routine, it should feel out of the ordinary, not as if you're playing hooky on a Wednesday afternoon. This is why if you quit your job outright and are looking for another, it may be a good idea to develop a plan for how you will spend your time. While sitting at home and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/massive-list-of-things-to-do-while-watching-tv">watching reality TV</a> probably sounds pretty sweet while you're still working full time, spending too much time as a couch potato could affect your job search and even lead to depression. if you plan to be at home for any length of time between jobs, make a plan to take a scheduled break. Once that time's up, set your alarm in the morning, get up, and get the ball rolling on your job search. This will help you keep perspective and momentum, and set you up for success.</p> <h3>Say Goodbye</h3> <p>If you aren&rsquo;t happy at your job, quitting can be the right thing to do &mdash; I know, I&rsquo;ve done it! But no matter how desperate you are to get out, don&rsquo;t let frustration or anger cloud your long-term judgment. If you resign in the most polite and professional way possible, you&rsquo;ll be able to make a clean break from your job and move on to something better.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/tara-struyk">Tara Struyk</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-to-do-when-you-want-to-quit-your-job">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/a-5-step-plan-to-quitting-your-job">A 5-Step Plan to Quitting Your Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-quit-your-job">How to Quit Your Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-answer-23-of-the-most-common-interview-questions">How to Answer 23 of the Most Common Interview Questions</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-personal-finance-rules-to-live-by-in-your-40s">6 Personal Finance Rules to Live By in Your 40s</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-subtle-signs-youd-make-a-good-boss">12 Subtle Signs You&#039;d Make a Good Boss</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building emergency fund quitting your job what to do when unemployed Tue, 17 Jan 2012 10:36:26 +0000 Tara Struyk 860828 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Quit Your Job http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-quit-your-job <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-quit-your-job" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/office.jpg" alt="Woman getting ready to leave work" title="Woman getting ready to leave work" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="167" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Quitting your job can either be the greatest day of your life or the most nerve-wracking event you have had to face. Whatever emotional roller coaster you are riding, there are certain rules of etiquette you need to adhere to in order to not burn any proverbial bridges that can ultimately affect your future employment opportunities.</p> <p>Ideally, one of the most important considerations you need to make when you plan to quit your job concerns what your next move will be. If you are quitting your job because you are dissatisfied with your position, your employer, or issues with co-workers, consider what your Plan B will be. If you quit without thinking, you may be jeopardizing your <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/are-your-finances-fragile">financial stability</a>, not to mention your ability to get a new job.</p> <p>Here are some basic guidelines to follow in order to walk away from your current employer with dignity. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a>)</p> <h3>Give Adequate Warning</h3> <p>As soon as you are confident that you are going to quit your job, provide your employer with adequate notice. Most employers have specific protocol outlined in their employee handbook that dictates how long in advance you need to file your notice of resignation. Use the guidelines, but still provide as much advance notice as possible. While you may not feel obligated to help an employer that you are leaving, it is the ethical thing to do and is, in essence, part of your job duties.</p> <h3>Provide Notice Professionally</h3> <p>While there may be situations that necessitate an employee walking into a supervisor&rsquo;s office and yelling &quot;I quit!,&quot; it is in your best interest to type up a formal notification of your decision to quit your position. Date the letter and, in a professional tone, outline your intention to leave your employment, noting the date you intend to leave. Keep a copy of the note for your files and hand-deliver it to your immediate supervisor or other management personnel as dictated in your employee handbook.</p> <h3>Don&rsquo;t Tell Lies</h3> <p>It is important for you to be upfront about your intentions to leave your job. Your supervisor may ask what your future plans are, and you are not obligated to divulge specific information if you do not want to do so. However, you can let them know the reasons you are moving on such as a better opportunity, more money, or shorter commute. Depending on your relationship with your employer, you should reveal what feels comfortable. If you have signed a non-compete agreement and your new position will violate that agreement, you may face legal issues with your soon-to-be former employer. Don&rsquo;t lie just to keep yourself out of trouble.</p> <h3>Remain Professional</h3> <p>Networking is one of the most important factors in the business world. Whether you are turning to <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-reasons-to-become-self-employed">entrepreneurial pursuits</a> or heading off to another large corporation, who you know can make a difference. If you burn your bridges with colleagues and supervisors, there may come a time later when you could benefit professionally from such contacts. Maintain your professionalism throughout the rest of your employment. Your ability to remain professional will also likely benefit you should you need professional references for future employment. Don&rsquo;t slack on the job just because you don&rsquo;t plan to stay long. Your productivity and on-the-job performance may be reported to your next employer through your professional references.</p> <h3>Meet With Human Resources</h3> <p>Some companies have additional steps required of each departing employee, including exit interviews and the like. If these final steps are not completed, it can delay your last paycheck. Check in with human resources to be sure you have attended to the necessary details. You also will need to clarify matters such as how to <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/left-a-job-do-a-rollover">roll over your 401(k)</a> or 403(b) and what you need to do with your health insurance coverage.</p> <h3>Take Only What&rsquo;s Yours</h3> <p>When you finally are ready to leave your post, take only the belongings that are yours and leave company property where it belongs. It can create a conflict of interest or even a bad taste in the mouth of your former employer to find you have absconded with office supplies, computer software, or other company belongings. Some companies will go so far as taking legal action, so only take what is yours rather than risk ruining your reputation.</p> <h3>Be Courteous to the Next Guy/Gal in Line</h3> <p>Any kind of insider information about your job specifics would probably be appreciated by the next hire. Leaving behind an organized, detailed list of must-knows is not required but would be a professional courtesy. From computer passwords to filing codes, any related information left behind can make the transition easier.</p> <p>Leaving your job may be a whirlwind time, but use good judgment and keep things positive as you move onto the next phase of your career.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/tisha-tolar">Tisha Tolar</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-quit-your-job">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/a-5-step-plan-to-quitting-your-job">A 5-Step Plan to Quitting Your Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-bad-networking-habits-that-will-kill-your-job-prospects">15 Bad Networking Habits That Will Kill Your Job Prospects</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-answer-23-of-the-most-common-interview-questions">How to Answer 23 of the Most Common Interview Questions</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-set-career-goals-when-you-lack-direction">How to Set Career Goals When You Lack Direction</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-ace-your-next-coffee-interview">How to Ace Your Next Coffee Interview</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Job Hunting networking quitting your job starting a new job Thu, 30 Jun 2011 09:48:41 +0000 Tisha Tolar 600370 at http://www.wisebread.com