quitting http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/16866/all en-US Why Now's the Right Time to Jumpstart Your Career http://www.wisebread.com/why-nows-the-right-time-to-jumpstart-your-career <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/why-nows-the-right-time-to-jumpstart-your-career" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-629805626.jpg" alt="now&#039;s the time to improve your career" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics' has shown an interesting trend in the years since the Great Recession: More Americans are quitting their jobs than ever.</p> <p>The Bureau's Job Openings and Labor Turnover (JOLTS) reports show some surprising numbers. In July 2014, <a href="https://www.bls.gov/news.release/archives/jolts_09092014.pdf" target="_blank">2.5 million Americans</a> voluntarily left their jobs, leaving the national quit rate at 1.8 percent. Compared to 2017, those numbers have increased dramatically: <a href="https://www.bls.gov/news.release/archives/jolts_09122017.pdf" target="_blank">3.2 million people</a> quit their jobs this past July, at a rate of 2.2 percent.</p> <p>You may be wondering why people are leaving their jobs in such droves. It's good news. The trend indicates that workers are finding new, better jobs, and the JOLTS data shows that more job openings and opportunities are available than in years past. How can you take advantage of this employment trend? By bettering your career path. Here's your game plan.</p> <h2>1. Request better workplace benefits</h2> <p>According to Glassdoor, three out of five people report benefits and perks as being among the top deciding factors in accepting a new job. And <a href="http://www.frac.tl/employee-benefits-study/" target="_blank">88 percent of respondents</a> to a 2017 Fractl survey reported that they would even give &quot;some&quot; or &quot;heavy&quot; consideration to a lower-paying job with better health, dental, and vision insurance compared to a higher-paying job with less impressive health benefits.</p> <p>It doesn't end at health insurance, however. Job-seekers are increasingly interested in other benefits such as flexible working hours, student loan repayment, more vacation time, additional fund options in retirement plans, and free day care. As employers are competing more fiercely to attract and retain qualified workers from a shrinking pool of talent, you have a stronger case for asking for additional benefits. Generally, it's cheaper for employers to provide a benefit to an existing employee rather than hiring someone new, so the economics are on your side.</p> <h2>2. Seek education and development options</h2> <p>A college degree can boost your lifetime income by a matter of millions. The problem is that the average graduate from the class of 2016 owed $37,172 in student loans, up 6 percent from the year before. And that number keeps growing. This is why today, we're seeing more and more employers offering student loan repayment as a benefit. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/these-17-companies-will-help-you-repay-your-student-loan?ref=seealso" target="_blank">These 17 Companies Will Help You Repay Your Student Loan</a>)</p> <p>Even better, many employers are going one step beyond student debt reduction and are looking to prevent it in the first place:</p> <ul> <li>AT&amp;T pays employees up to $3,500 per year for approved courses.</li> <li>Fidelity Investments reimburses employees 90 percent of qualifying education costs (up to $10,000 per year).</li> <li>Nvidia reimburses employees up to $5,250 each year for qualified job-related educational expenses.</li> <li>Smuckers reimburses up to 100 percent of tuition costs for approved college courses.</li> </ul> <p>Completing a degree on your company's dollar empowers you to improve your career path within your current employer &mdash; and future ones.</p> <h2>3. Work on soft skills</h2> <p>The idea of the ultimate expert working in a dark corner is long gone. Even in the fields of engineering or programming, employers value people who get on well with others and can work as part of a team. Knowing how to get along and communicate with your peers is key for your career growth, wherever that path may take you.</p> <p>Cat got your tongue? Work on your communication, public speaking, and leadership skills with Toastmasters International for about $110 for the first year. And then practice those skills every day on the job. When the next big career opportunity comes knocking, you'll have a leg up on the competition. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-ways-to-improve-yourself-for-100-or-less" target="_blank">10 Ways to Improve Yourself for $100 or Less</a>)</p> <h2>4. Become a thought leader</h2> <p>Information is power, but so is the ability to deliver that information in a meaningful way. Companies are always looking for subject matter experts who can make presentations, serve on discussion panels, or contribute to industry journals or publications. Depending on your company policies, you may be able to receive additional income for these activities or just the reimbursement of eligible expenses involved with those activities.</p> <p>The true value of becoming the face of your organization is that you're increasing both your value to the company and building your own personal brand. Both of which may come quite handy for the next time that you ask for a raise, receive an offer from another employer, or decide to set up your own shop.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fwhy-nows-the-right-time-to-jumpstart-your-career&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FWhy%2520Now%2527s%2520the%2520Right%2520Time%2520to%2520Jumpstart%2520Your%2520Career.jpg&amp;description=Why%20Now's%20the%20Right%20Time%20to%20Jumpstart%20Your%20Career"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/Why%20Now%27s%20the%20Right%20Time%20to%20Jumpstart%20Your%20Career.jpg" alt="Why Now's the Right Time to Jumpstart Your Career" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/damian-davila">Damian Davila</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-nows-the-right-time-to-jumpstart-your-career">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-4"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-questions-you-should-always-ask-in-an-exit-interview">8 Questions You Should Always Ask in an Exit Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-reasons-its-never-too-late-for-a-career-change">6 Reasons It&#039;s Never Too Late for a Career Change</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-15-coolest-silicon-valley-job-perks-you-wish-you-had">The 15 Coolest Silicon Valley Job Perks You Wish You Had</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-perks-you-should-be-demanding-from-your-employer">6 Perks You Should Be Demanding From Your Employer</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-credit-card-perks-that-make-life-easier-and-way-more-fun">11 Credit Card Perks That Make Life Easier and Way More Fun</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income benefits education job hunting opportunities perks quitting skills unemployment rate Tue, 26 Sep 2017 08:30:11 +0000 Damian Davila 2026862 at http://www.wisebread.com 8 Keys to Quitting a Job Like a Professional http://www.wisebread.com/8-keys-to-quitting-a-job-like-a-professional <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/8-keys-to-quitting-a-job-like-a-professional" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/i_quit_my_job.jpg" alt="I Quit My Job" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>This is it: You're ready to quit. You've been dreaming of this moment for months (or years) and you are all set to let the company know you're moving on. Well, before you throw down your resignation letter and waltz out of the door, take some time to make sure you do this the right way.</p> <h2>1. First and foremost &mdash; Are you sure you're ready to quit?</h2> <p>Like, really sure? Because once you hand in your notice, you've put yourself on a path that leads directly out of that company. So, make sure you're leaving for the right reasons.</p> <p>Some people act irrationally after a major upheaval or event at work, and hand in their notice while they're still in a cloud of anger and frustration. If you have been feeling this, and have decided &quot;I've had enough,&quot; then take at least a few days to cool off and think it over. Talk to people you trust, and explain the situation. They may agree with you, and say that you're working in a toxic environment that is hurting your health. But, they may say that you have a good job with good coworkers, and that you're blowing things out of proportion.</p> <h2>2. You might not be required to give two weeks' notice</h2> <p>Most states in the U.S. have something called &quot;at-will employment.&quot; This means your employer can terminate you at any time, without any reason at all, and without any kind of warning. Conversely, you have the exact same rights with regard to leaving. You can quit at any time, for whatever reason (even if you don't have one), and walk out of the door without giving notice.</p> <p>Some employers like to have it both ways. They will be more than happy to let you go at the drop of a hat, but the company handbook states that you are required to provide a minimum of two weeks' notice. This is just something the company wants, but cannot enforce. If you live in an at-will employment state, two weeks' notice is not required. But, if you don't provide it, and leave the company in the lurch, you are potentially burning a valuable bridge. You always want to leave on good terms if you can, so unless the situation requires an immediate exit, give your employer the two weeks they expect.</p> <h2>3. Write an excellent resignation letter</h2> <p>Now is the time to start working on a resignation letter. If you have been at the company less than a year, you don't have to go overboard. Be polite, explain briefly that you are moving on to a new stage in your career, and thank the company for the opportunity they gave you. If you have a lot of years under your belt with the company, you may also want to add in some of the significant achievements and successes you had at the company, and call out people who genuinely made a difference to you, and helped you grow.</p> <p>You may be tempted to throw people under the bus in this letter, or point out everything that is wrong with the company. Don't do it. This is a permanent record, signed by you, and that can come back to bite you.</p> <h2>4. Hand in your notice on a Friday</h2> <p>There are all sorts of reasons to wait until Friday to hand in your notice. Midweek is just an odd time, and on a Monday or Tuesday, you are catching people as they are about to dive into a full week of work. Doing it on a Friday is best. It gives you and your employer the rest of the day, and the weekend, to think about it and come to terms with the decision. If you are a key member of the team, your boss will likely need to come up with a game plan on how to replace you. He or she may also want to make you a counteroffer, asking you to sit on your resignation and think it over. For this reason, Friday is the most strategic day to hand in your notice.</p> <h2>5. Be positive and productive in your final weeks</h2> <p>You've handed in your two weeks' notice, and now you can just coast for the next 14 days, right? Well, not so fast. It can be tempting to slack off, take long lunch breaks, arrive late, leave early, and have a general disregard for the rules you used to obey. But that is not going to sit well with a company that is still paying your salary.</p> <p>You can have the &quot;What are they gonna do, fire me?&quot; attitude, but it's not professional. You have history with this company, it has paid your salary and probably provided health benefits, and you owe it to the company, and yourself, to act as professionally as you did before you resigned. In some cases, if you don't have another job to go to, the company may well ask you to stay on as a contractor, at a higher rate of pay, until they find your replacement. They will not offer this if you are just treating the job as a joke.</p> <h2>6. Help the company through the transition</h2> <p>After you resign, you should offer your services in finding your replacement. You should also be willing to speak to the departments you work with on a regular basis, and ask them what you can do in your final two weeks to make sure everything runs smoothly once you are gone. Do they need certain files or contact names? Do they need you to show them how certain processes are managed, from inception through completion? Take this time to ensure that when you leave, the ship is not sinking without you.</p> <h2>7. Don't use the exit interview as a complaining session</h2> <p>A lot of people who resign have some sharp words for the human resources department, or the owner of the company. And while it is OK to point out areas of improvement, you should do it in the most constructive way you can.</p> <p>This should not be the time to do corporate assassinations on people who've crossed you over the years. If you have genuine concerns about some of the people you are leaving behind due to a toxic work environment, then by all means bring those up. But be delicate about it. Talk about the need for improved communication, or more flexible working hours and telecommuting. Give them a checklist that makes them think you really want the company to flourish after you depart.</p> <h2>8. Stay in touch</h2> <p>Seriously, don't burn a bridge. You don't know what could happen in the future, and a company that you have a history with can be a powerful ally when you need help. If you ever need to pick up contract work or come back in a different role, you will want to have people to reach out to.</p> <p>So, use LinkedIn and social media to stay in touch. Send the occasional email to people you know there, asking how they're doing. Be a friend to them. It can really pay dividends should your departure become a mistake.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F8-keys-to-quitting-a-job-like-a-professional&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F8%2520Keys%2520to%2520Quitting%2520a%2520Job%2520Like%2520a%2520Professional.jpg&amp;description=8%20Keys%20to%20Quitting%20a%20Job%20Like%20a%20Professional"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/8%20Keys%20to%20Quitting%20a%20Job%20Like%20a%20Professional.jpg" alt="8 Keys to Quitting a Job Like a Professional" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-keys-to-quitting-a-job-like-a-professional">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-never-to-bring-up-in-a-job-interview">5 Things Never to Bring Up in a Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-questions-you-should-always-ask-in-an-exit-interview">8 Questions You Should Always Ask in an Exit Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-transition-to-a-new-career-after-30">6 Ways to Transition to a New Career After 30</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-things-to-do-on-your-first-day-at-a-new-job">6 Things to Do on Your First Day at a New Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-good-reasons-to-become-a-contractor">8 Good Reasons to Become a Contractor</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building burning bridges employment human resources leaving a job professional quitting two week's notice working Mon, 11 Sep 2017 08:30:08 +0000 Paul Michael 2017192 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Ask for Your Old Job Back After Leaving http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-ask-for-your-old-job-back-after-leaving <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-ask-for-your-old-job-back-after-leaving" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/anxious_woman_during_business_interview.jpg" alt="Anxious woman during business interview" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Every day, people dream of quitting their jobs to move on to greener pastures. And then, that glorious day happens: You get a new job offer and start planning your &quot;I quit&quot; speech. But for some reason, things don't work out with the new gig. The company folded soon after you started, or maybe the new job just wasn't a good fit. Suddenly, you need to go back to your old job. What do you do now?</p> <h2>First, assess the damage</h2> <p>How did you quit? Was it a polite and respectful resignation letter, with a send-off party and tearful goodbyes? Well, no worries &mdash; in this case you probably won't have much trouble getting your foot back in the door. If you were a great employee, you are a known quantity and need less time to get up to speed; in fact, you're actually a superb candidate.</p> <p>However, not everyone leaves on such good terms. If you quit in spectacular, dramatic fashion, you've got a problem. Still, even burned bridges can be repaired. Take stock of how you left, what you did, and what impression your former employer has of you. Then you can figure out the steps you need to take to get back in their good graces.</p> <h2>Contact current employees that you know</h2> <p>You will know at least a handful of people who still work at the company you quit. Hopefully, you have a great relationship with them. Now is the time to reach out and see exactly what kind of ground you stand on.</p> <p>First and foremost, find out if your old job is even available anymore. It's highly likely the position was filled, but maybe your former colleagues can let you know if there are other suitable positions open.</p> <p>Probe them to also see how management, and the hiring manager in particular, feels about you. Has your name come up a lot in conversation, in a positive or negative way? Are you missed? Would they secretly kill to have you back, or were they glad to see the back of you? The answers to these questions will help you in your approach to your old boss. You don't want to be tone deaf when first approaching him or her about a job.</p> <h2>Lay the groundwork &mdash; carefully</h2> <p>It takes baby steps to get back in the door. You cannot assume that you will be welcomed back with open arms to a ticker-tape parade. Even if you left on the very best terms, you still have to be humble about your approach. And if you parted ways on bad terms, even more so.</p> <p>Start by making a call (not sending an email) to the person responsible for the position you're interested in. Do not go to the human resources department: If you attempt to get the job through the usual channels, you will be doing yourself a disservice. Remember, you have history with this company, and you know people. Human resources is primarily there to protect the company, and they will not be looking to rehire someone who quit. They can get involved once you have gained momentum, and have senior people in the company ready to go to bat for you.</p> <h2>Get ready to eat a whole lot of crow</h2> <p>It's time to kiss your pride goodbye and approach this as you would a partner with whom you've had a falling out &mdash; even if you left on good terms. If you are looking to get your exact same position back, tell the hiring manager that you made a mistake in leaving. You loved your job and you will do whatever it takes to get back in the door. You miss your work colleagues. You miss the food in the cafeteria. You miss Hawaiian shirt Fridays. And be genuine: If you fake this, it will be glaringly obvious.</p> <h2>Make sure you can explain why you left</h2> <p>You still may be asked &quot;If the job was so great, why did you leave in the first place?&quot; That can really stump you if you're not prepared. Here, you will have to be a little economical with the truth, or downplay some of the reasons.</p> <p>For instance, many people leave because of a bad relationship between a boss or coworker. If that boss or coworker is still around, how does that play out? You can explain there were some misunderstandings that got out of hand, or that you had differences that you have worked through and resolved. You can be completely honest if it was something out of your control that didn't work out, like moving to a different state. Just make sure you can allay any fears the hiring manager may have about your return. If they suspect that you could up and leave again, or that you'll cause trouble, you won't get back in.</p> <h2>Be open to getting less for the same role</h2> <p>If you're looking to get your exact same job back, you're in no position to make any kind of demands, and the employer knows this. It's possible that your old company will take you back with the same benefits and salary that you had before, but there's absolutely no guarantee. They know you need this job, and they can play that to their advantage.</p> <p>Now, some companies will have a benefits policy that they have to stick to. For example, if you return within 12 calendar months of leaving, all of your former benefits, including vacation days, sick days, personal days, 401(k) match, and employee discounts will be reinstated. So, if you left the company after 10 years of service, and come back within the year, it could just be a continuation of those 10 years. But not all companies do this.</p> <p>Chances are, if you left with four weeks of vacation per year, you'll be coming back with the standard two weeks. And your salary could be cut to whatever the going market rate is for that position. After years at the company with raises and promotions, you may have left earning more than most people in your position earned. Expect that to be ironed out in your return.</p> <p>Overall, making a return to an old job is very doable. Just be prepared to turn up the charm, make a whole lot of apologies, and start on a lower rung of the ladder than the one on which you left. Good luck.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fhow-to-ask-for-your-old-job-back-after-leaving&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FHow%2520to%2520Ask%2520for%2520Your%2520Old%2520Job%2520Back%2520After%2520Leaving.jpg&amp;description=How%20to%20Ask%20for%20Your%20Old%20Job%20Back%20After%20Leaving"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/How%20to%20Ask%20for%20Your%20Old%20Job%20Back%20After%20Leaving.jpg" alt="How to Ask for Your Old Job Back After Leaving" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-ask-for-your-old-job-back-after-leaving">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-keep-your-job-hunt-from-busting-your-budget">How to Keep Your Job Hunt From Busting Your Budget</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/job-hunting-with-a-long-employment-gap">Job Hunting With a Long Employment Gap</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-crucial-job-searching-steps-most-people-skip">6 Crucial Job Searching Steps Most People Skip</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-ways-college-grads-can-get-ahead-in-the-job-hunt">11 Ways College Grads Can Get Ahead in the Job Hunt</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/job-search-tips-that-will-get-you-a-job-in-2012">Job Search Tips That Will Get You a Job in 2012</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Job Hunting advice applying for jobs eating crow job interviews networking pride quitting Tue, 29 Aug 2017 08:30:08 +0000 Paul Michael 2010038 at http://www.wisebread.com 5 Money Moves That Will Ruin Your Mortgage Application http://www.wisebread.com/5-money-moves-that-will-ruin-your-mortgage-application <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-money-moves-that-will-ruin-your-mortgage-application" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/housing_market_risk.jpg" alt="Housing market risk" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>When applying for a mortgage, you shouldn't do anything that will cause a bank to question your ability to repay the loan. You don't need perfect finances to get a mortgage, but it's in your best interest to have a basic understanding of loan requirements. The more you know, the less likely you are to make mistakes that can ruin your application. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/make-these-5-money-moves-before-applying-for-a-mortgage?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Make These 5 Money Moves Before Applying for a Mortgage</a>)</p> <p>Here are a few missteps to avoid if you're thinking about buying a house.</p> <h2>1. Paying for everything with cash</h2> <p>Using cash for everyday purchases is one way to avoid debt. But just because cash is king in your world doesn't mean you should cast off credit cards.</p> <p>Unless you're fortunate enough to pay cash for a house, you'll need to apply for financing, which requires a credit history. And the only way to build credit is to use credit. Without any type of credit profile, a mortgage underwriter can't assess whether you're capable of responsibly managing a home loan.</p> <p>In the lending world, no credit can be just as damaging as bad credit. So before applying for a home loan, establish credit by getting a credit card or another type of loan. You don't have to drive yourself into debt with it, but you should demonstrate a pattern of timely payments and responsible borrowing. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-use-credit-cards-to-improve-your-credit-score?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Use Credit Cards to Improve Your Credit Score</a>)</p> <h2>2. Carrying too much debt</h2> <p>While it's in your best interest to have a responsible credit profile, if you start spending money on stuff you don't need and get in over your head, you could hurt your chances of a mortgage approval. Maxing out credit cards can raise your <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/this-one-ratio-is-the-key-to-a-good-credit-score" target="_blank">credit utilization ratio</a> and lower your credit score. Credit utilization is the percentage of your credit card debt compared to your credit limit.</p> <p>If you go overboard and accumulate too much debt, there's also the risk of falling behind on payments. Late payments are another credit score killer that can destroy any chance of qualifying for a mortgage.</p> <p>To avoid problems with a mortgage approval, get into a habit of paying off credit card balances in full every month. If you carry a balance, keep it small &mdash; ideally below 30 percent of your credit line.</p> <p>If you've already been approved for a mortgage, don't make any major purchases before closing on the home purchase. This includes buying furniture or financing a new car. New debt increases your debt-to-income ratio, which can affect your approval.</p> <p>Since you won't know your actual mortgage costs until a few days before closing, hold off spending money on new furniture or appliances to ensure you have enough cash on hand.</p> <h2>3. Co-signing for someone else</h2> <p>Co-signing a loan for a friend or relative is a noble deed (one that I do not personally recommend), but it's imperative that you're fully aware of the consequences of this decision. Co-signers are not silent partners on loan documents. By signing your name, you become a joint debt holder; as such, a co-signed debt appears on your credit report and counts toward your debt-to-income ratio. This is because you're responsible for the loan if the primary signer stops paying. (And if this happens, you could be in big trouble financially!)</p> <p>Once you are ready to apply for a mortgage, your lender takes a co-signed debt into consideration when calculating your debt-to-income ratio. Unfortunately, with a co-signed debt on your credit file, a lender might say you owe too much to take on additional debt and deny your mortgage application.</p> <h2>4. Not saving enough cash</h2> <p>You need cash for a home purchase &mdash; a <em>lot </em>of cash. Nowadays, many mortgage programs require borrowers to bring cash to the table. This includes a down payment between 3.5 percent to 5 percent or higher, as well as funds for closing (between 2 percent and 5 percent of the sale price). It doesn't matter how much you earn: If you can't show enough assets, you can't get a mortgage. Build up this cushion first before diving into the homebuying process. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-easy-ways-to-start-saving-for-a-down-payment-on-a-home?ref=seealso" target="_blank">4 Easy Ways to Start Saving for a Down Payment on a Home</a>)</p> <h2>5. Quitting your day job</h2> <p>Don't quit your day job if you're planning to buy in the near future &mdash; at least, not yet.</p> <p>Qualifying for a mortgage involves demonstrating long-term financial stability. This is why lenders require a borrower's most recent paycheck stubs and the previous year's tax returns. Self-employed people can purchase a home like anyone else, but they have to provide one to two years of profitable business tax returns, where their income either increases from year to year or remains roughly the same.</p> <p>It doesn't matter how much you're making today as a self-employed borrower. If a lender has reason to believe that your income isn't consistent or stable, you might not get a loan. So if you're thinking about buying, stick with your job until closing, and then become your own boss. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/denied-a-mortgage-heres-how-to-fix-it-fast?ref=seeaslo" target="_blank">Denied a Mortgage? Here's How to Fix It Fast</a>)</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fthe-5-best-travel-adapters&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F5%2520Money%2520Moves%2520That%2520Will%2520Ruin%2520Your%2520Mortgage%2520Application.jpg&amp;description=5%20Money%20Moves%20That%20Will%20Ruin%20Your%20Mortgage%20Application"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/5%20Money%20Moves%20That%20Will%20Ruin%20Your%20Mortgage%20Application.jpg" alt="5 Money Moves That Will Ruin Your Mortgage Application" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/mikey-rox">Mikey Rox</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-money-moves-that-will-ruin-your-mortgage-application">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-benefits-of-carrying-a-mortgage-into-retirement">5 Benefits of Carrying a Mortgage Into Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/should-you-pay-your-mortgage-off-early">Should You Pay Your Mortgage Off Early?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-mortgage-details-you-should-know-before-you-sign">5 Mortgage Details You Should Know Before You Sign</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-surprising-things-lenders-check-besides-your-credit-score">4 Surprising Things Lenders Check Besides Your Credit Score</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-home-buying-habits-we-can-learn-from-millennials">4 Home-Buying Habits We Can Learn From Millennials</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Real Estate and Housing cash co-signing credit history credit utilization debt debt to income ratio home buying homeownership money mistakes mortgages quitting Wed, 16 Aug 2017 08:30:07 +0000 Mikey Rox 2003615 at http://www.wisebread.com Don't Let These 6 Common Job Traps Derail Your Career http://www.wisebread.com/dont-let-these-6-common-job-traps-derail-your-career <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/dont-let-these-6-common-job-traps-derail-your-career" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/i_need_a_break.jpg" alt="I need a break" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Have you run out of novel reasons to call in late to work? Do you keep close tabs on the number of vacation and sick days you have left? Have you fantasized about pulling a Thelma and Louise-style getaway on your Monday morning commute? If so, you may feel trapped by that job you used to love.</p> <p>It's no fun. Feeling trapped in a job you hate can sap your motivation, keep you poor, and lead to all kinds of other stress. Get yourself unstuck by learning why so many people get stuck in the first place. Here a six of the most common career traps.</p> <h2>1. Convincing yourself you're too invested to leave</h2> <p>Being invested in your job is admirable, but at a certain point, the law of diminishing returns kicks in. Ask yourself, &quot;Is my investment paying off? Is the payoff purely financial? Are there hidden costs to my health and relationships that I'm not factoring into the equation?&quot; Consider how moving on might revitalize your career and offer greater rewards. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-reasons-its-never-too-late-for-a-career-change?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Reasons It's Never Too Late for a Career Change</a>)</p> <h2>2. Believing that big promotion is just around the corner</h2> <p>I get it; we're all taught that quitting is bad and that patience is rewarded. But if you're continually passed over for promotions despite working harder and working smarter, something's gotta give. Have a chat with your supervisor to clarify your career path and outline exactly what's needed to progress professionally. If things don't change in a reasonable amount of time, move on. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-ways-to-finally-get-that-promotion-this-year?ref=seealso" target="_blank">12 Ways to Finally Get That Promotion This Year</a>)</p> <h2>3. Confusing your employer with your family</h2> <p>We've all heard the familiar refrain, &quot;We're just one big happy family here!&quot; While the metaphor is lovely, it usually doesn't survive an economic downturn. Without taking anything away from companies that work hard to foster a close and collaborative atmosphere, the employer/employee relationship is an economic one. Your coworkers aren't your siblings and your boss isn't your parent. Pursue your career goals free of these false family obligations.</p> <h2>4. Not realizing you can interview casually</h2> <p>An interview is like a first date; even if things go well, you don't have to get married. There's a big difference between exploring your professional options and turning in a letter of resignation. Chill out. It's perfectly OK to interview casually, learn more about companies that are hiring, and take your time considering new roles. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-ways-to-job-hunt-without-getting-caught?ref=seealso" target="_blank">9 Ways to Job Hunt Without Getting Caught</a>)</p> <h2>5. Waiting to cash in when the company goes public</h2> <p>Sure, sometimes companies go public and faithful employees get a big payday by exercising company stock options. But just as often, companies spend years preparing for an IPO that either never happens or falls flat. Unless you're fully prepared to play the long game &mdash; potentially sacrificing career advancement and happiness in the process &mdash; don't stick around for an iffy IPO.</p> <h2>6. Believing your employer is special</h2> <p>I once had a friend who spent more than 25 years working for the same company. The first five or 10 years were terrific. The firm was small and privately held, provided employees with free lunch every day, and offered a host of convenient services on-site. But when the company went public and had to answer to shareholders, the culture changed dramatically and most of those little perks were cut.</p> <p>Still, my friend endured. She had a difficult time admitting the place was no longer special &mdash; that other employers might actually offer her more valuable benefits and far more progressive work environments. For the next decade, she toiled as new staff came and went, her workload grew, and her stress level skyrocketed. Though she dreamed of moving on, she's likely still there &mdash; holed up in a dark corner remembering the good ol' days.</p> <p>That doesn't have to be you. Let go of what used to be special and move on to something that is.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fdont-let-these-6-common-job-traps-derail-your-career&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FDon%2527t%2520Let%2520These%25206%2520Common%2520Job%2520Traps%2520Derail%2520Your%2520Career.jpg&amp;description=Don't%20Let%20These%206%20Common%20Job%20Traps%20Derail%20Your%20Career"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/Don%27t%20Let%20These%206%20Common%20Job%20Traps%20Derail%20Your%20Career.jpg" alt="Don't Let These 6 Common Job Traps Derail Your Career" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/kentin-waits">Kentin Waits</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dont-let-these-6-common-job-traps-derail-your-career">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-answer-23-of-the-most-common-interview-questions">How to Answer 23 of the Most Common Interview Questions</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-ways-youre-being-a-terrible-employee">12 Ways You&#039;re Being a Terrible Employee</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-questions-you-should-always-ask-in-an-exit-interview">8 Questions You Should Always Ask in an Exit Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-keys-to-quitting-a-job-like-a-professional">8 Keys to Quitting a Job Like a Professional</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/13-great-reasons-to-quit-your-job">13 Great Reasons to Quit Your Job</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building career traps dead end job employers interviews job hunting quitting stuck Mon, 26 Jun 2017 09:00:12 +0000 Kentin Waits 1966171 at http://www.wisebread.com 8 Questions You Should Always Ask in an Exit Interview http://www.wisebread.com/8-questions-you-should-always-ask-in-an-exit-interview <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/8-questions-you-should-always-ask-in-an-exit-interview" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/women_work_discussion_516896268.jpg" alt="Woman asking questions during her exit interview" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Exit interviews are common when someone is leaving a job. And usually, the onus is on the employer to ask the questions. If you're taking a new job offer, they may want to know why you're leaving, or what they could have done to keep you around. If you're being let go, they'll want to make sure you know everything about the package you're receiving, and your legal options.</p> <p>Rarely do people talk about the questions <em>you</em> should ask in your exit interview. Here are eight that can provide invaluable answers.</p> <h2>1. Will my feedback be anonymous?</h2> <p>If you have some important issues to get off your chest, this is a very important question to ask beforehand. You don't want to tear into an awful boss or coworker, only to find out that it has gotten back to them. You may even want to consider if it's worth the risk at all; if you work in similar fields, your paths may cross again in the future.</p> <p>Despite this, you may feel a moral obligation to tell HR all about the problems that certain coworkers caused, for the sake of the people who are left behind. If you must spill the beans, ask this question before you say anything negative or controversial about anyone. You may even want to write something down that can go on record &mdash; minus your name, of course.</p> <h2>2. What did I do well during my time here?</h2> <p>You can phrase this question however you feel most comfortable, but what you're looking for here is feedback on your strengths. What did you do that made a difference to the company? Were you a rock star at certain things? Were you highly prized in areas you didn't even consider?</p> <p>All of this can be great information to take with you to your next job. You may have thought that speaking up in meetings about potential issues with a project was a cause for grief. But it turns out that people really valued you asking those &quot;Devil's Advocate&quot; questions, as it helped with the development of otherwise unconsidered issues. This kind of feedback can really bolster your performance in your next position.</p> <h2>3. Do I have the option to come back here one day?</h2> <p>It may seem like an odd question to ask &mdash; after all, you're probably leaving the company for very good reason. However, &quot;boomerang&quot; employees can be common in some industries, especially if you're leaving to relocate out of state and may one day return. If you're leaving on good terms, this probably won't be an issue. If you're leaving because things went sour with certain people, it may be tricky to return until they, too, have left. If you're being laid off, you should be given the option to apply for other job openings that match your skill-set in the future.</p> <h2>4. What could I have done better?</h2> <p>No one is perfect. Even an employee that is being begged to stay will still have some areas that could use improvement. Now is the time to find out what those shortcomings are, as this will help you become an even better employee for your next company.</p> <p>Don't take any of this feedback personally. You asked the question, and you need to be an adult about the answers you get. Even if things take a turn, and you suddenly find out someone you respected was constantly complaining about you behind your back, just take it in stride. Fix what you think needs fixing, and ignore the petty stuff.</p> <h2>5. Can I use you as a reference in the future?</h2> <p>It may seem like a no-brainer that they'll say yes, especially if you were a good employee, but many companies frown on their staff providing references for ex-employees. If someone from that company provides a glowing reference for a person who turns out to be unreliable, a thief, a sexual predator, or anything else negative, it can come back on the business and bite them.</p> <p>The HR department's job in any company is to look out for the business, not the people who work there. So, if you think you may want to use them as a future reference, ask before you put their name down. Otherwise, they'll typically verify your dates of employment, and that's about it.</p> <h2>6. When can I expect my final paycheck, and how much will it be?</h2> <p>Your final paycheck may not be issued to you on a regular pay period. It may also include unused vacation days, and depending on your company, unused personal days, sick time (although that's rare), and a portion of the annual bonus you were set to receive.</p> <p>Not only do you want to ask about the final total, but when you can expect to receive that amount, and whether it will be a live check or a bank deposit. If the numbers don't add up, say something now. If they don't have final totals yet, make sure you have the phone number of the person in the payroll department.</p> <h2>7. Is there any kind of noncompete in place?</h2> <p>If you were given an employee handbook when you first started, this may be covered in there. But, roles and responsibilities within an organization vary greatly between departments, so now is a good time to clarify. It's possible that you will be asked not to have any contact with your current clients or vendors for at least a year or two, especially if you will be looking to poach current accounts from your company.</p> <p>Legally, you may not have anything to worry about, as this is typically more of a courtesy. How you handle this, of course, is entirely up to you. At the end of the day, you have to do what's right for you and your family, and if there's nothing in writing to stop you approaching people, it's your call. And of course, if they approach you without any prompting, that's another ballgame entirely.</p> <h2>8. What about a severance package and health benefits?</h2> <p>If you're being laid off, your company may have a set severance package in place. Many businesses offer two weeks of pay for every year of service, up to a cap of their choosing. Others give you a set figure (anywhere from a week to a year) regardless of your time there.</p> <p>You'll also need to know what's happening with your health benefits. Unlike most other countries, health benefits are tied to employment in the U.S. and losing coverage can be costly (or even deadly). Will the company continue covering your health insurance, and if so, for how long? What about COBRA? These are important questions to ask, and if they won't continue coverage, ask for more money in your severance to help cover the costs.</p> <p>If you are planning to leave your company soon, make sure you have at least some of these questions ready for your exit interview. And if you suffer a layoff, please remember to ask about your severance and benefits. Good luck!</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-questions-you-should-always-ask-in-an-exit-interview">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-13"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-nows-the-right-time-to-jumpstart-your-career">Why Now&#039;s the Right Time to Jumpstart Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-keys-to-quitting-a-job-like-a-professional">8 Keys to Quitting a Job Like a Professional</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-deal-when-you-hate-your-new-job">How to Deal When You Hate Your New Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-fun-ways-to-leave-your-job">10 Fun Ways to Leave Your Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-things-that-really-annoy-hiring-managers">9 Things That Really Annoy Hiring Managers</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income benefits employment exit interview feedback human resources job hunting Job Interview layoffs quitting severance Fri, 28 Apr 2017 08:31:04 +0000 Paul Michael 1936196 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Reasons It's Never Too Late for a Career Change http://www.wisebread.com/6-reasons-its-never-too-late-for-a-career-change <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-reasons-its-never-too-late-for-a-career-change" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-509227828.jpg" alt="Woman learning it&#039;s never too late for a career change" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Life's too short to spend your workday being unhappy. If you're dreading going into the office, it's time to grab your career by the horns and switch things up. It's never too late &mdash; and here's why. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-signs-you-should-quit-your-job?ref=seealso" target="_blank">8 Signs You Should Quit Your Job</a>)</p> <h2>1. You shouldn't wake up every morning dreading the workday</h2> <p>I've been my own boss for the past nine years, ditching the nine-to-five grind shortly after moving to Manhattan in 2008. I didn't like working a thankless job every day while I made somebody else better off than myself. I chose a harder road &mdash; it's not easy paying your bills on time when you're responsible for your own income &mdash; but it's provided me a freedom that has facilitated an overall happiness in my life.</p> <h2>2. Your skills may be transferable (or you can learn new ones)</h2> <p>Many people are afraid they're not qualified for a career change, but unless you have a very specific job with specific qualifications, chances are your skills are transferable. But even if what you want to do requires a particular skill that you're lacking, you still may be able to find educational resources to help you learn. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-make-a-major-career-switch-without-going-back-to-school?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Make a Major Career Switch Without Going Back to School</a>)</p> <h2>3. You're never too old to start something new</h2> <p>I might sound like one of those motivational posters here, but you're only limited to what you limit yourself to. Perhaps you're hesitant to apply for a certain job because you think you're too old. But it's important to ask yourself first &mdash; too old for what, for whom?</p> <p>You'll never know what the outcome of a situation will be unless you throw yourself into it. You have to apply to a job to know whether or not you're qualified. Every individual brings his or her unique perspective &mdash; and yours may be the one the company is looking for. Either way, it's worth a shot, and certainly better than sitting at home feeling sorry for yourself.</p> <h2>4. It doesn't matter how many years you've invested in your current company</h2> <p>I hate to break this to you, but, in all likelihood, your company will drop you like a bad habit when it no longer has any use for you. As such, you shouldn't feel obligated to stay with an organization just because you've been there forever and they've been good to you. That's great, and you should probably thank them for it, but that doesn't mean you owe them a lifetime of service (especially if you don't have a pension). If you feel like it's time to move on, it's time to move on. Eat the farewell cake, say your goodbyes, and press ahead.</p> <h2>5. You can probably accommodate a change of income</h2> <p>Most of us are looking for upward financial mobility when changing careers, but it's not the end of the world if the job that will make you happy pays a bit less. I'm not encouraging you to send yourself or your family into debt because of it, but if you have the option to downsize your life and reduce your monthly budget to accommodate your new, lower-paying career, by all means do it. Money isn't everything. If you can live just fine with less of it and still wake up with a smile on your face, you're doing something right.</p> <h2>6. Many companies also want to switch things up</h2> <p>The traditional workplace is undergoing massive changes to accommodate modern appetites for flexible hours, less commuting, working from home, and so on. Top candidates take roles at one company for a few years before being offered something more interesting and moving on. Companies no longer expect lifelong service in the way they used to, and these changing attitudes have paved the way for businesses in general to be more flexible in the way they attract talent.</p> <p>All of this means that now, more than ever, it's easier to take the plunge and try a new career.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/mikey-rox">Mikey Rox</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-reasons-its-never-too-late-for-a-career-change">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-nows-the-right-time-to-jumpstart-your-career">Why Now&#039;s the Right Time to Jumpstart Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-transition-to-a-new-career-after-30">6 Ways to Transition to a New Career After 30</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-4-jobs-people-quit-the-most">The 4 Jobs People Quit the Most</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-signs-you-should-quit-your-job">8 Signs You Should Quit Your Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/protect-future-earnings-by-negotiating-the-right-starting-salary">Protect Future Earnings by Negotiating the Right Starting Salary</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income career changes happiness income jobs never too old quitting resigning skills working Thu, 27 Apr 2017 20:00:10 +0000 Mikey Rox 1934993 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Deal When You Hate Your New Job http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-deal-when-you-hate-your-new-job <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-deal-when-you-hate-your-new-job" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-529254969.jpg" alt="Man learning how to deal when he hates his new job" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>In 1994, I started a new job in an entirely new field. The gig seemed perfect: It was a step up financially, it was ripe with opportunity &hellip; and it was a complete disaster.</p> <p>Within days, I had a sinking feeling that my new dream job was actually a nightmare. But I was stuck. Without a clear plan, I stayed in that job for two years and hated nearly every minute of it. If your new job feels like a bad dream, here are seven things you can do.</p> <h2>1. Determine if it's the job or the transition</h2> <p>Starting a new job is a huge change, and one that can be very stressful. It's easy for that stress to be misinterpreted and misplaced. Ask yourself, &quot;Is it the job I hate, or is it the transition?&quot; Many times, once we settle into a new job, get acquainted with co-workers, and begin to understand the expectations, that &quot;nightmare job&quot; becomes just a job.</p> <h2>2. Focus on the good</h2> <p>OK, so you've determined that it's the job &mdash; not the transition itself &mdash; that's the nightmare. Now what? At the risk of sounding like a blind optimist, focus on the good. It can help you tolerate a job when there are no other options immediately available. What duties do you enjoy? Are there co-workers that make the day-to-day grind easier to manage? Is there a nearby coffee shop or park where you can unwind for a few minutes every afternoon? All of those things, even though small, are positives you can look forward to.</p> <h2>3. Retreat</h2> <p>Sometimes the smartest strategy is a hasty retreat. Contact the supervisor of your previous job and explain the circumstances &mdash; you made a career misstep and would like the opportunity to return to your old job. If you left on good terms, if the position is still open, and if you're willing to eat a little crow, this tactic just might work.</p> <h2>4. Set a deadline</h2> <p>Toiling away at a job you hate year after year can sap your motivation and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-that-job-you-hate-keeps-you-poor?ref=internal" target="_blank">keep you poor</a>. If you have a financial cushion, don't stay in a nightmare job one minute longer than necessary. Set a deadline for your departure and stick to it. In the meantime, <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-resume-mistakes-that-will-hurt-your-job-search?ref=internal" target="_blank">polish your resume</a>, <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/30-minutes-to-a-linkedin-profile-that-gets-you-hired?ref=internal" target="_blank">build a better LinkedIn profile</a>, and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-come-up-with-1000-in-the-next-30-days?ref=internal" target="_blank">save aggressively</a> so you can weather gaps in employment.</p> <h2>5. Work your network</h2> <p>There's a kernel of truth to the adage, &quot;It's not what you know, it's whom you know.&quot; If you need to find a new job quickly, tap into the power of your professional network. To avoid the deadly &quot;job hopper&quot; wrap, frame your situation carefully but honestly. Be ready to explain to potential employers why your new job is a bad fit, what you learned from the experience, and how you're applying those lessons in your current job search. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-10-best-networking-tips-for-people-under-40?ref=seealso" target="_blank">The 10 Best Networking Tips for People Under 40</a>)</p> <h2>6. Be willing to take a step backward</h2> <p>Even if going back to your old job is out of the question, be willing to take a temporary step backward. Though it may bruise your ego, a strategic step down the career ladder allows you to regroup, plan your next move, and build additional experience in a more positive environment.</p> <h2>7. Once you're back on track, purge it from your resume</h2> <p>Mistakes happen, but there's no need to document each one permanently on a resume. If your nightmare job was short-lived, don't include it in your work history. Instead, own the mistake on a personal level. Use it to learn more about yourself, improve how you research new career opportunities, and &mdash; perhaps most importantly &mdash; make sure all your future jobs are nightmare-free.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/kentin-waits">Kentin Waits</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-deal-when-you-hate-your-new-job">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-questions-you-should-always-ask-in-an-exit-interview">8 Questions You Should Always Ask in an Exit Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-fun-ways-to-leave-your-job">10 Fun Ways to Leave Your Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/they-offered-you-a-promotion-and-no-pay-raise-now-what">They Offered You a Promotion and No Pay Raise. Now What?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-super-cool-ways-people-have-quit-their-jobs">6 Super-Cool Ways People Have Quit Their Jobs</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-you-must-do-before-you-quit-your-job">5 Things You Must Do Before You Quit Your Job</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income bad job employment job offers networking new job quitting resumes Fri, 31 Mar 2017 08:30:31 +0000 Kentin Waits 1915859 at http://www.wisebread.com Taking a Work Leave? Here's How to Prepare http://www.wisebread.com/5-smart-ways-to-prepare-for-a-job-leave <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-smart-ways-to-prepare-for-a-job-leave" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/father_son_baby_505122600.jpg" alt="Man finding smart ways to prepare for a job leave" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>You may be looking to take some time off from work to stay home with your children. Or perhaps you have a new business venture you'd like to get after.</p> <p>Leaving the traditional workforce is something people do for a variety of reasons. I left my 9-to-5 a little over five years ago to stay home with my daughter. It was a big transition, both personally and professionally. I can tell you firsthand, though, that if you're smart about it &mdash; it may be one of the best moves of your life.</p> <h2>1. Make a Budget</h2> <p>If you don't already have a budget, make one &mdash; today. It's incredibly important before you take a job leave to understand how much money you have, where it's going, and how you'll deal once you don't have a steady paycheck coming in. Making a budget can be an enlightening or frightening process, but you definitely want to look before you leap into the financial unknown.</p> <p>To start, write out exactly how much money will be coming in after you leave your job. Then write out how much money goes out between fixed expenses (housing, student loans, car payments, etc.) and variable expenses (groceries, entertainment, clothing, travel). Don't forget big items like health care, either. After that, you can look for opportunities to cut your budget for the big change. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/build-your-first-budget-in-5-easy-steps?ref=seealso">Build Your First Budget in Five Easy Steps</a>)</p> <p>While you're at it, try saving as much as you can and building an emergency fund. My husband and I actually spent a good part of the year before I left my job trying to live within the budget we'd need after the baby. Any money we saved in the meantime went directly into our bank account.</p> <h2>2. Get Introspective and Creative</h2> <p>Leaving your job may mean making some pretty tough sacrifices. Maybe you won't be able to buy new cars or go on vacation. Maybe you'll need to stop eating out or even downsize your home. There will likely be days when you will ask yourself: &quot;Why am I doing this again?&quot;</p> <p>Having a long, hard talk with yourself (or several) will help you solidify the motivations for your leave. They will become stronger and stronger in your mind. Sure, you may hit some difficult or tricky times, but if you are passionate about the reason, you'll have the perseverance to continue on and figure out solutions.</p> <p>If you're feeling on the fence about it all, you may want to get creative. Meet with your HR department to explore other opportunities. Maybe you could scale back to working part-time. Maybe your department offers a more flexible schedule. Or maybe there are other jobs in your community that would afford you the time you're looking to gain.</p> <h2>3. Practice, Practice, Practice</h2> <p>After chatting with HR, I discovered that the university where I used to work offered up to eight months of unpaid child care leave. Before I decided to quit my job for good, I let my boss know that I wanted to take the maximum amount of leave. During this time off, our family continued to practice what life would be like &mdash; and what our budget would be like &mdash; without my paycheck. It wasn't a totally easy transition.</p> <p>For example, within the first month of my leave, our furnace died. It was the dead of winter, so we had to dip deep into the emergency fund earlier than expected. A few months after that we had a major roof leak. This is where our savings and budgeting really came into play.</p> <p>In the end, we realized that we would be fine because we had planned for these types of minor disasters. I had moments of doubt, though, and I was thankful to know that I had a job waiting for me if I needed it. Find out what type of temporary leave options are available to you. A trial run is a wonderful opportunity to see if your plans will work out in real life. Think of it as a pair of training wheels.</p> <h2>4. Leave on Good Terms</h2> <p>Even if you hate your job, you don't exactly want to leave burning all your bridges in the process. Of course, you may find yourself with a boss who doesn't completely understand or support your decision. And that's okay. What you can do, though, is to ease the transition for everyone involved as much as possible. That will help you leave on the best of terms.</p> <p>Give your boss plenty of notice before your leave. You may even want to, as I did, ask if you might return to your workplace in the future. Though my boss wasn't thrilled to be losing a dependable worker, he ultimately understood and respected my reasons for leaving.</p> <p>I left scrupulous notes for my replacement, organized all my digital and paper files, and even offered to be available for a short while if anyone had questions. On my last day, we shook hands and I felt confident &mdash; and still do &mdash; that I could apply for future positions.</p> <h2>5. Keep Your Toes Dipped</h2> <p>When I left my job, I wasn't totally sure how long it would work out. On paper, things were looking good. In practice, well, we kept hitting some financial roadblocks. I knew I wanted to stay home with my daughter, but I also knew that bringing in some money would be helpful. Keeping my resume and skills relevant was another important thing to me.</p> <p>That's when I started looking around for freelance writing work. Some of my friends were working on different gigs, so I reached out to them. Networked. I asked tons of questions and even got some leads on jobs. In the years since, I've worked at home anywhere between five and 30 hours a week. I've had a lot of situations in my life where I've needed to scale back or almost entirely from freelancing. Still, I have these jobs on my resume.</p> <p>I'm keeping current. (And I'm enjoying it, too!) Even if you don't want to actually work during your time off, you can volunteer. You can absolutely include volunteer work on your resume. Experience is experience. And the great thing about volunteering is that you can often put it on your own schedule.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/ashley-marcin">Ashley Marcin</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-smart-ways-to-prepare-for-a-job-leave">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-single-parents-can-juggle-retirement-savings-too">How Single Parents Can Juggle Retirement Savings, Too</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-smart-financial-gifts-to-give-your-kids-this-year">6 Smart Financial Gifts to Give Your Kids This Year</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-money-conversations-parents-should-have-with-their-adult-kids">7 Money Conversations Parents Should Have With Their Adult Kids</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-prepare-your-kids-to-live-on-their-own">How to Prepare Your Kids to Live On Their Own</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-fun-games-that-teach-your-kids-about-money">6 Fun Games That Teach Your Kids About Money</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Family budgeting emergency funds extended leave job leave one income family quitting stay at home parent workforce Wed, 04 Jan 2017 10:30:33 +0000 Ashley Marcin 1867991 at http://www.wisebread.com 13 Great Reasons to Quit Your Job http://www.wisebread.com/13-great-reasons-to-quit-your-job <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/13-great-reasons-to-quit-your-job" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_000090506469_Large.jpg" alt="looking for a good reason to quit his job" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>How many times have you rehearsed that &quot;I quit&quot; speech in your head? How often do you stare out of the window, wishing you were in a different job, or pursuing a more interesting career? So many of us want to be in a job that really fulfills us, but so few of us dare to make that leap. Well, if you are looking for a reason to quit, here are 13 that should fire you up. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-super-cool-ways-people-have-quit-their-jobs?ref=seealso">6 Super-Cool Ways People Have Quit Their Jobs</a>)</p> <h2>1. There's a Better Job Out There</h2> <p>The grass is always greener, right? This is often a justification to stay in your current position, because things could always get worse. But things could also get a whole lot better, and the chances of you currently being in the best job you'll ever have are slim. It's easy to become complacent and accept that this is the job for you, but there are other jobs out there with your name on them. Amazing jobs, and careers, that will make you look back on the one you have now and wonder why it took you years to move on. Of course, you won't know unless you look, so start checking out what's available.</p> <h2>2. You're Doing More Work for Less Money</h2> <p>When a company starts asking you to take on extra responsibilities, for the same money (or even less), then you may want to consider looking into another job. It's always good to take on extra work if it means you grow and learn new skills, but it should be rewarded. If the company is dangling a possible promotion in front of you, do whatever you can to find out it's a real offer. Some people work 60+ hour weeks for years on the promise of a promotion that will never come.</p> <h2>3. Your Job Is Literally Killing You</h2> <p>Stress is considered one of the biggest killers of modern times. It weakens our immune system, leads to higher blood pressure, and can be the cause of a lot of heart problems. It can also lead to substance abuse and marital troubles, and can break up friendships. If the job you are in right now is causing you so much stress that life is becoming hard to take, you need to find another job, or a different career. It's just not worth the risk.</p> <h2>4. You're Starting Your Own Business</h2> <p>What better reason is there to quit your job than to become your own boss? We've all dreamt of that freedom, the flexible hours, the satisfaction of creating something successful. But, so few of us do it because it's a risk. Quitting a corporate job, or one with steady hours and health benefits, in favor of going it alone &mdash; well that's tough.</p> <p>What if you fail? What if no one buys your product or service? What if you quit a good job only to be out of work soon after? That &quot;what if&quot; game can be paralyzing, but think of it the other way. What if you're laid off next week? What if your business could be the next Google, or Pixar? What if you are holding on to something safe for something that could be amazing? Think about it.</p> <h2>5. You're Not Wanted</h2> <p>Your opinion used to be valuable. Now, it's not required, or it's straight-up ignored. You used to be at important meetings. Not so any more. You used to travel to different locations, and meet with clients. Now you're permanently stuck behind your desk. All of these are signs that you are being overlooked. Or worse, the company is getting ready to let you go. If you feel like you are no longer wanted, you should move to a place that really does want you.</p> <h2>6. Your Company Is in Trouble</h2> <p>It could be financial trouble. It could be legal trouble. It could be a corporate takeover, or a merger that will result in massive layoffs. You should have a good feel for this, and if you sense danger, it may be time to pull the plug and move on, before you're caught in the crossfire. You certainly don't want to be in a situation where your 401K or severance package disappears.</p> <h2>7. You're Phoning It In</h2> <p>If you are on autopilot, doing just enough to keep your job, or are giving the minimum amount of effort, you need to move on. First, it's possible that your lack of effort could actually be dangerous, especially if you're working in a field that requires maximum concentration. Your apathy could also put others in danger &mdash; imagine a doctor who doesn't pay attention. But even in an office job, phoning it in is a big sign that you are in the wrong position.</p> <h2>8. Other Locations Are Calling Your Name</h2> <p>It's scary to move to a different city, or state. And another country, well, that's a mighty big leap. But what a leap! There is so much of the world to see, and every country has different opportunities, and new people waiting to meet you. Realistically, is it more likely that the place you're currently in is the pinnacle of existence? Or is it more likely that you're settled, and moving would be a lot of stress and headaches? Start thinking about those places you always wanted to see when you were a kid. Can you do the job you're doing now in one of those places? Can you move there? A completely different, and exciting life is waiting for you in another part of the world.</p> <h2>9. You're Going Nowhere</h2> <p>In any career, whether it's in a corporate office, or under the hood of a car, you want to go places. Not literally &mdash; although travel is a great perk &mdash; but you should be learning, growing, and being promoted. When your job stops giving you those opportunities for growth, you have to assess the situation. How long has it been since you learned something new? Do you think you'll ever get a promotion again? Are you simply treading water? If you are going nowhere, you need to find a job that will give you those opportunities again.</p> <h2>10. You Just Hate It</h2> <p>If you dislike certain aspects of your job, but overall it's still a good position, well, you just have to suck it up. Very few jobs are perfect. However, if you dread going to work every morning, and every waking hour at your company is a living hell for you, then you have to quit. Life is too short to spend 40 hours of every week being miserable. What else can you do? Where can you go? Is a career change possible? You may feel trapped, but there are always options.</p> <h2>11. You're Done With Office Politics</h2> <p>The gossip. The rumors. The back-stabbing. Having to play favorites. If it's all getting too much for you &mdash; and let's face it, it shouldn't even exist &mdash; then you should start looking for a new place to work. However, before you move to another place, do some digging. Ask around. Look at reviews on a website like Glassdoor. The last thing you want to do is make a move only to find the office politics even worse at your new job.</p> <h2>12. You're Ready for a New Challenge</h2> <p>It's not that you dislike the job you're in. It's not even that you're unhappy with the pay, the people, or the work. It's just that what you're doing is no longer challenging you. You can do this job, and do it well, but you feel the need to dive into something that will really push you. Something that will often get your pulse racing, or make you experience that &quot;can I really do this?&quot; feeling. Well, yes, you can. If you push yourself. And think of the satisfaction you'll get from that.</p> <h2>13. You Just Won the Lottery</h2> <p>Hey, weirder things have happened.</p> <p><em>What are some other great reasons to quit your job? Share with us in the comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/13-great-reasons-to-quit-your-job">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-4"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-questions-to-ask-before-you-quit-your-job">6 Questions to Ask Before You Quit Your Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-4-jobs-people-quit-the-most">The 4 Jobs People Quit the Most</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-signs-your-company-is-going-under">10 Signs Your Company Is Going Under</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-ace-your-next-coffee-interview">How to Ace Your Next Coffee Interview</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building career path job job search quit quit your job quitting Wed, 27 Apr 2016 10:30:04 +0000 Paul Michael 1698448 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Questions to Ask Before You Quit Your Job http://www.wisebread.com/6-questions-to-ask-before-you-quit-your-job <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-questions-to-ask-before-you-quit-your-job" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_000076142827_Large.jpg" alt="should i quit my job?" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Your boss drives you crazy. You work long hours for not enough pay. And there's no promotion in sight. You're finally ready to quit your job and hunt for a position that pays better, is more interesting, and doesn't require that you live at your office.</p> <p>Be careful. You might spend hours practicing your big &quot;goodbye&quot; speech, but before you take that step, make sure to ask yourself the right questions before you start packing up your cubicle. Depending on the answers, you might find that now isn't the best time to jump back into the job market. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-4-jobs-people-quit-the-most?ref=seealso">The 4 Jobs People Quit the Most</a>)</p> <h2>1. Are You Establishing a Bad Pattern?</h2> <p>Companies don't want to hire job hoppers, a.k.a. employees who jump from job to job every other year. If leaving your current position might label you as a job hopper &mdash; you've already bailed on two jobs in the last three to four years, say &mdash; you might hurt your chances at landing a new position.</p> <p>You might be ready to leave your current position behind. But if your resume is already filled with short stays at several companies, it might make more sense to tough it out for another year or so.</p> <h2>2. How Big Is Your Emergency Fund?</h2> <p>Yes, unemployment is down. But that doesn't mean that finding a new job is going to be easy. So how large of an <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/is-your-emergency-fund-big-enough-to-keep-you-afloat">emergency fund</a> do you have, and how long can you survive without a new job before you'd have to start dipping into your retirement savings or abusing your credit cards?</p> <p>If you don't have enough saved to cover your daily living expenses for at least six months, you might reconsider leaving your job. Instead, hold onto your current job and build up that emergency fund first. Then, when you have saved the money you need, you can start your search for a new job with confidence.</p> <h2>3. Do You Have Any Leads on a New Job?</h2> <p>It can be exhilarating to leave your old job and all its daily annoyances behind. But do you have any connections that can help you find your new job? Are you leaving your current position &mdash; and its regular paycheck &mdash; without any leads on a new job?</p> <p>Doing so can be risky. There is still plenty of competition for the best jobs. If you're relying on online want ads only to help you find your new position, you might want to put your dramatic exit speech on hold. Take the time to work with your network of past coworkers and supervisors to make sure that you have at least a few leads on a new job before plunging into the market.</p> <h2>4. Have You Tried to Resolve the Problems at Your Current Job?</h2> <p>Looking for a new position is practically a full-time job itself. It's also a frustrating and, at times, exhausting one. So before you hit the market, have you taken any steps to resolve the problems you are facing at your current position?</p> <p>Now, some problems can't be fixed. If you hate the work you do, there's no resolving that. But if you face conflicts with a superior, don't like your hours, or feel underappreciated, you might be able to fix these issues. And if you do, you won't have to put yourself through the stress of a job search.</p> <p>Before leaving your cubicle behind, ask yourself if you've taken all the steps possible to resolve whatever current problems you are facing.</p> <h2>5. What Are Your Long-Term Career Goals?</h2> <p>It's easy to forget about your career dreams when you're immersed in the daily activities of meeting deadlines and crafting proposals. But before you jump into the jobs market, ask yourself if searching for a new job today will help you meet your long-term career goals.</p> <p>You might find that going back to school while holding onto your current job is a better choice. Maybe taking on freelance work on the side &mdash; with your current employer's permission &mdash; will get you closer to landing your dream job. Maybe you'll have to jump to a lower-paying job to eventually reach your ultimate career goals.</p> <p>Don't enter the job market without first considering your long-term goals and dreams. Yes, you might find a better-paying job with more manageable hours. But if you do so at the expense of your professional dreams, then your new position won't be an improvement at all.</p> <h2>6. Who Else Will Your Decision Affect?</h2> <p>Quitting your job could have a big financial impact on your spouse or children. Before making this move, ask yourself if this move will negatively affect them. Cutting down on restaurant meals and entertainment isn't the worst sacrifice that you can ask of your family. But don't expect your loved ones to shoulder more serious financial burdens &mdash; like the possibility of losing your home or car &mdash; because you won't be able to afford those payments if you don't find a new job quickly.</p> <p>Quitting your job is easier when others don't depend on your income. Take a long look at how a long job search might hurt your loved ones. Don't leave your current job unless you have a solid plan for finding new work quickly.</p> <p><em>What was your process before quitting your job? Share with us in the comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dan-rafter">Dan Rafter</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-questions-to-ask-before-you-quit-your-job">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-5"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/13-great-reasons-to-quit-your-job">13 Great Reasons to Quit Your Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-4-jobs-people-quit-the-most">The 4 Jobs People Quit the Most</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/getting-by-without-a-job-part-1-losing-a-job">Getting by without a job, part 1--losing a job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-a-job-learn-the-secret-from-a-bad-movie">How to get a job--learn the secret from a bad movie</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-great-jobs-for-people-who-hate-the-9-5">10 Great Jobs for People Who Hate the 9-5</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income bad boss job job satisfaction job search quit your job quitting two weeks notice Thu, 31 Mar 2016 10:00:14 +0000 Dan Rafter 1682213 at http://www.wisebread.com The 4 Jobs People Quit the Most http://www.wisebread.com/the-4-jobs-people-quit-the-most <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/the-4-jobs-people-quit-the-most" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_000066495397_Large.jpg" alt="this job has a high turnover rate" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>With the January 2016 unemployment rate at 4.9%, the downward trend of U.S. unemployment that we have been experiencing since March 2014 continues. However, as with everything else, the devil is in the details.</p> <p>Having a job right now doesn't mean that you'll be holding that same job within the next year or so. And if you hold one of the four following jobs, high turnover rates indicate you'll be leaving a lot sooner than that.</p> <h2>1. Most Jobs at Amazon</h2> <p>In August 2015, the New York Times released a big exposé on <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2015/08/16/technology/inside-amazon-wrestling-big-ideas-in-a-bruising-workplace.html?_r=0">Amazon's work environment</a> based on the accounts of more than 100 current and former &quot;Amazonians.&quot; While it's understandable that the online giant has to fight tooth-and-nail to preserve its position as the top retailer in the world, the expectations to deliver may be too overwhelming for most employees.</p> <p>&quot;Nearly every person I worked with, I saw cry at their desk,&quot; reported one employee in books marketing during an interview. &quot;You know that tomorrow you're going to look around and some people are going to have left the company or been managed out,&quot; wrote another former employee in advertising and marketing.</p> <p>According to a 2013 Payscale survey, the <a href="http://www.payscale.com/data-packages/employee-loyalty/full-list">median employee tenure</a> at Amazon is one year, ranking third to last in the Fortune 500 list. Working at Amazon may not only be a short stint, but also can affect your future job prospects. While the work conditions are grueling at Amazon, those same high expectations appear to consistently churn out individuals with a strong work ethic who are in high demand by some Seattle recruiters. Still, other local recruiters stay away from former Amazon employees because of their pugnacious nature.</p> <h2>2. Jobs in the Life Insurance Industry</h2> <p>On the same Payscale survey, many Forbes 500 companies in the life insurance industry had a low median employee tenure as well:</p> <ul> <li>Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Company: 0.8 year</li> <li>American Family Life Assurance Company of Columbus (AFLAC): 1 year</li> <li>New York Life Insurance Company: 1.4 years</li> <li>The Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Company: 1.6 years</li> <li>Guardian Life Insurance Company of America: 4.7 years</li> <li>Metropolitan Life Insurance Company (MetLife): 5 years</li> </ul> <p>One of the main challenges of jobs in the life insurance industry is that they require you to stick around to actually start making a decent salary through referrals and residuals, yet those same jobs have a high churn rate (lots of personnel leaving within a short period of time). Difficulty in closing sales, high level of competition, and investment in certifications are some of the reasons for people to quit.</p> <h2>3. Registered Nurses (RNs)</h2> <p>The U.S. is facing a potential shortage of registered nurses. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor of Statistics, the <a href="http://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/registered-nurses.htm">average growth rate</a> for all occupations is 7% for the period from 2014 to 2024, while that for the registered nurse profession is 16%!</p> <p>Some surveys indicate that 43% of newly licensed hospital-based RNs leave their first jobs within three years of employment. On average, 17.5% of newly licensed RNs call it quits after just their first year. That rate is even higher for RNs in the East South Central region, with 25% of them leaving their first job.</p> <p>The high turnover rate is caused by several factors, including high stress, lack of colleague support, and high pressure from supervisors. While the 2014 median pay was $66,640 per year for RNs, many nurses feel that they are underpaid due to the long hours they are required to work. Some nurses work 12-hour shifts (sometimes longer), which leads to a <a href="http://www.rasmussen.edu/degrees/nursing/blog/nursing-debate-8-hour-shifts-vs-12-hour-shifts/">series of health issues</a>, including obesity, heart disease, stroke, hypertension, glucose regulation, GI disorder, and reproductive problems.</p> <h2>4. Jobs in Leisure and Hospitality Industry</h2> <p>According to data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics' Job Openings and Labor Turnover (JOLTS) program, the turnover rate in the <a href="http://www.bls.gov/news.release/jolts.nr0.htm">leisure and hospitality industry</a> has gone up for the fourth year in a row.</p> <p>Here is a comparison to provide some context. In December 2015, <a href="http://www.bls.gov/news.release/jolts.t09.htm#jolts_table9.f.p">3.3% of workers</a> in all U.S. non-farm industries left or were fired from their jobs. During the same period, 5.7% of workers in the leisure and hospitality industry lost or quit their jobs! That's the highest turnover rate of all industries tracked by the JOLTS program.</p> <p>With the average production and nonsupervisory employee making <a href="http://www.bls.gov/iag/tgs/iag70.htm#earnings">only $12.67 per hour</a> and being able to work 25 hours per week, it's not a surprise that employees have to change jobs to chase higher wages. With many of those employees making close to the hourly minimum wage, even the offer of a dollar extra per hour can be a strong motivator to switch jobs. Some of those workers are even opting to move to cities with current or scheduled higher minimum wages (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-american-cities-with-the-highest-minimum-wage?ref=seealso">6 American Cities With the Highest Minimum Wage</a>).</p> <p><em>What are other challenging jobs with high turnover rates?</em></p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <p>&nbsp;</p> <div align="center"><a href="//www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fthe-4-jobs-people-quit-the-most&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FThe%204%20Jobs%20People%20Quit%20the%20Most.jpg&amp;description=The%204%20Jobs%20People%20Quit%20the%20Most" data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-config="above" data-pin-color="red" data-pin-height="28"><img src="//assets.pinterest.com/images/pidgets/pinit_fg_en_rect_red_28.png" alt="" /></a> </p> <!-- Please call pinit.js only once per page --><!-- Please call pinit.js only once per page --><script type="text/javascript" async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p>&nbsp;</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/The%204%20Jobs%20People%20Quit%20the%20Most.jpg" alt="The 4 Jobs People Quit the Most" width="250" height="374" /></h2> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/damian-davila">Damian Davila</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-4-jobs-people-quit-the-most">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-6"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-questions-to-ask-before-you-quit-your-job">6 Questions to Ask Before You Quit Your Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/13-great-reasons-to-quit-your-job">13 Great Reasons to Quit Your Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-reasons-its-never-too-late-for-a-career-change">6 Reasons It&#039;s Never Too Late for a Career Change</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-signs-you-should-quit-your-job">8 Signs You Should Quit Your Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-a-job-learn-the-secret-from-a-bad-movie">How to get a job--learn the secret from a bad movie</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income horrible jobs job search jobs quit your job quitting turnover rates Tue, 01 Mar 2016 10:00:11 +0000 Damian Davila 1663953 at http://www.wisebread.com 3 Times When You Should Absolutely Quit http://www.wisebread.com/3-times-when-you-should-absolutely-quit <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/3-times-when-you-should-absolutely-quit" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_ripping_contract_000061725482.jpg" alt="Woman deciding to quite her job" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Ask the average American about a time he or she quit something, and it's likely the answer will either be a dodge or some sort of self-deprecating joke. But as bad a reputation as quitting has, sometimes quitting while you're ahead (or before you get even further behind) can be the best, most intelligent, and bravest course of action.</p> <p>In fact, psychology professor Carsten Wrosch who has done research on the psychology of quitting has found that &quot;people who are better able to let go when they experience unattainable goals&hellip;experience less depressive symptoms, less negative affect over time&hellip;lower cortisol [the stress hormone] levels, and they have lower levels of systemic inflammation&hellip;and they develop fewer physical health problems over time.&quot;</p> <p>Whether you agonize over letting go of large or small goals, here are three times when it really does <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-you-must-do-before-you-quit-your-job">make sense for you to quit</a>:</p> <h2>You Are Worried About Your Sunk Costs</h2> <p>A sunk cost is the time, money, or resources that have already been spent, and cannot be recouped, on a particular project or goal. Sunk costs should have no bearing on whether or not you continue with a project, because the money has already been spent and cannot in any way affect the outcome.</p> <p>But something called the sunk-cost fallacy is a big reason why many people are unable to give up on a lost cause. According to Stephen J. Dubner, of Freakonomics fame, &quot;The <a href="http://freakonomics.com/2011/09/30/the-upside-of-quitting-full-transcript/">sunk-cost fallacy</a> is when you tell yourself that you can't quit because of all that time or money you spent. We shouldn't fall for this fallacy, but we do it all the time.&quot;</p> <p>For instance, a newly-minted doctor who realizes during his first year of residency that medicine is no longer the career he wants might stick with it anyway to keep from wasting all of that time he spent in school.</p> <p>What he fails to recognize is the fact that the time was &quot;wasted&quot; anyway, since he doesn't want to be a doctor. Becoming a doctor now would be wasting even more time because he'll be following a path he is not actually interested in.</p> <p>When you contemplate quitting, the only costs you should consider are <em>opportunity costs</em>. Those are the costs of continuing along your current path. For every dollar or hour or resource you spend in any endeavor, you have one less to spend elsewhere.</p> <p>Our hypothetical doctor should consider the opportunity cost of finishing his residency; he will have less time to do what he really loves to do. When he looks at the possibility of quitting in that way, it is clearer that becoming a doctor will cost him much more than just the time that has already been wasted.</p> <h2>Your Decision is Influenced by Others</h2> <p>When considering the opportunity costs of quitting, the waffling new doctor might worry that his parents will be disappointed in him for leaving the profession. That is certainly a valid concern and a real opportunity cost. But it is also making a decision based upon other people's opinions, rather than choosing what will make him happy. Unfortunately, many people give up their own happiness in order to avoid such social pressure.</p> <p>In particular, the social stigma of divorce can make unhappy couples decide to tough it out so they can claim they did not &quot;give up&quot; on the marriage. While divorce has a real opportunity cost in terms of others' disappointment and social stigma, that cost should not be weighted as heavily as the potential benefits and actual costs to the couple themselves.</p> <p>And the social pressure to persist can trickle down to much smaller decisions. For instance, I am an avid reader, but I tend to be commitment-phobic about starting to read something new &mdash; because I don't want to give up on a book halfway through. I feel an obligation to finish any book I start, but I honestly couldn't tell you why. I am not actually obligated to anyone to read a book from beginning to end. I would be happier and read more if I gave up this sense of obligation.</p> <h2>You're Not Enjoying Yourself</h2> <p>Whatever it is that you're considering quitting probably started off as enjoyable. Maybe you have been sending the novel you wrote to agents and publishers for years and have nothing but a stack of rejections to show for it. Now you dread sitting down to write and are almost afraid to check your mailbox. You're not having fun anymore.</p> <p>Often, what's going on here is <a href="http://moneyning.com/money-beliefs/how-loss-aversion-in-behavioral-economics-explains-your-irrational-money-choices/">loss aversion</a>. You have committed to the idea of becoming a published writer, and you're afraid that if you quit writing now you'll miss the big break that is just around the corner. After all, there are plenty of success stories of individuals who made it only after years and years and years of persistence.</p> <p>But if you have stopped enjoying the work, then you are committing yourself to persistence for its own sake, which is incredibly difficult to maintain. Letting go of the goal can help you be happier.</p> <h2>Quitting: The Path to Happiness (and Success)</h2> <p>Though it's unlikely that quitting will ever become socially acceptable, the fact of the matter is that becoming a strategic quitter can make your life better. Steve Levitt, the other half of the Freakonomics team, advocates learning to fail quickly. If you can quickly figure out which projects and goals are likely to fail, then you can strategically quit.</p> <p>That will help you to put your energy into the projects and goals that are most important and most likely to succeed.</p> <p><em>When was quitting the right choice for you? Tell us about it in comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/emily-guy-birken">Emily Guy Birken</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/3-times-when-you-should-absolutely-quit">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-7"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-use-the-holiday-quiet-time-to-boost-your-career">How to Use the Holiday Quiet Time to Boost Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-7-best-free-tools-to-improve-your-work-performance">The 7 Best Free Tools to Improve Your Work Performance</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/25-easy-ways-to-make-someone-happy-today">25 Easy Ways to Make Someone Happy Today</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dont-let-these-6-common-job-traps-derail-your-career">Don&#039;t Let These 6 Common Job Traps Derail Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-keys-to-quitting-a-job-like-a-professional">8 Keys to Quitting a Job Like a Professional</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Life Hacks Career Building happiness loss aversion quitting sunk costs Thu, 28 May 2015 17:00:06 +0000 Emily Guy Birken 1432587 at http://www.wisebread.com 5 Things You Must Do Before You Quit Your Job http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-you-must-do-before-you-quit-your-job <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-things-you-must-do-before-you-quit-your-job" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_thinking_quitting_000056385736.jpg" alt="Woman getting prepared to quit her job" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Making the decision to quit your job is both scary and exhilarating. Many of us dream of quitting our jobs to have more freedom, greater earning potential, and fmore lexibility with our schedules. As you go from dream to reality, there are certain steps to take to make sure you're prepared before the big leap.</p> <p>Of course, money in the bank is vital to making a smooth transition, but there are several other critical financial concerns. Here are five important things to do before quitting.</p> <h2>1. Calculate Your Bare Essentials Budget</h2> <p>What is your total budget for all of your household expenses? What portion of this is made up of the essentials like housing, insurance, food, gas, and utilities? Calculate this &quot;bare essentials&quot; budget, omitting discretionary things like dining out, travel, or entertainment.</p> <p>Your bare essentials budget is important to calculate in the event you have low or no-income months. You'll be able to prioritize the important bills be paid first, leaving less essential expenses to be paid last. During months where you have more income than normal, you can use the extra funds to allocate to less important expenses.</p> <h2>2. Build Up a Savings Cushion</h2> <p>Based on the minimum amount of money you need to make each month to cover your bare essentials expenses, your next step is to stash away a cushion of savings. At the very least, you want to make sure you have enough saved up for six months worth of essential expenses.</p> <p>Anything you save up in excess of this amount is gravy, and can be used to help jumpstart your new career, or as a backup/emergency savings plan. When I quit my full-time accounting job to start a freelance business, I was only able to save up four months worth of expenses in a savings account. We had some unexpected medical emergencies, so I wasn't able to save up as much as I would have liked. But since I knew what my bare essentials budget figure was, I was able to make ends meet until my new business took off.</p> <h2>3. Create a Viable Income Plan</h2> <p>Now that you know how much you need to save, how are you going to bring in enough money to cover the bills and create a savings cushion? Before giving up a steady paycheck, you must first craft a plan for replacing this income.</p> <p>Do you have another job lined up? Are you planning to freelance and work with clients (or a combination of both)? What happens if this plan doesn't work? How will your budget survive during months when you don't have regular money coming in?</p> <p>These are all important questions that need answers before you can confidently quit your job. Create a &quot;quitting your job&quot; plan and prepare for additional variables in the event that you're forced to change plans.</p> <h2>4. Research Health Care Options</h2> <p>Since health insurance coverage is now mandated by federal law, you'll likely face a tax penalty if you let your current coverage lapse. Whether you become self-employed or find a part-time job, you'll need to research the best options available for health care.</p> <p>A good place to start is by chatting with your current health insurance company, or by comparing plans on the <a href="https://www.healthcare.gov/">federal marketplace</a> or a third-party site like <a href="https://www.ehealthinsurance.com/">eHealthInsurance</a>. Make sure to explain your new choice of employment, as this will have a big impact on what your monthly premium and health insurance coverage will be.</p> <h2>5. Rollover Your Retirement Account</h2> <p>If you've been contributing to a 401(k) plan through your current employer, you will no longer be able to do this when you quit. But this is money you earned throughout your career, so it's rightfully yours. Make sure you rollover your retirement accounts to a new individually-managed service.</p> <p>Seek out a financial advisor, or chat with your current HR department so you're educated on what options are available. Generally speaking, whatever type of employer-funded account you have will have to be rolled over into a different retirement account, unless you plan to move to another job that offers employer-funded retirement accounts.</p> <p>Once you've taken these simple steps to prepare for quitting, you'll be able to move forward with confidence, knowing that you have a solid plan in place.</p> <p><em>Are you in the process of quitting your job? What are some other concerns to prepare for?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/carrie-smith">Carrie Smith</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-you-must-do-before-you-quit-your-job">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-8"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/you-got-a-raise-now-what">You Got a Raise! Now What?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-super-cool-ways-people-have-quit-their-jobs">6 Super-Cool Ways People Have Quit Their Jobs</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-bounce-back-from-a-bankruptcy">How to Bounce Back From a Bankruptcy</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-money-conversations-parents-should-have-with-their-adult-kids">7 Money Conversations Parents Should Have With Their Adult Kids</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-financial-resolutions-you-can-conquer-before-new-years">10 Financial Resolutions You Can Conquer Before New Year&#039;s</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance Career and Income budgeting employment leaving job quitting saving money Fri, 01 May 2015 11:00:22 +0000 Carrie Smith 1402480 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Super-Cool Ways People Have Quit Their Jobs http://www.wisebread.com/6-super-cool-ways-people-have-quit-their-jobs <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-super-cool-ways-people-have-quit-their-jobs" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_quits_job_000026250932.jpg" alt="Woman quits her job in a cool way" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>When you're working at a job that you hate, sometimes there's only one antidote to cure your stress, boredom, anger, and frustration: quitting. Most of us have indulged in a few fantasies of finally walking out the door, of telling the boss what you think of her, of reclaiming your dignity, of showing that manager what you're made of, of never looking back&hellip; but unfortunately, those outrageous abdications of gainful employment are easier said than done. After all, you probably need the money. And a good reference. Dignity be damned.</p> <p>Oh well. If shouting &quot;I quit!&quot; isn't in the cards for you right now &mdash; or ever &mdash; at least daydreaming about it can help make the day more bearable until you professionally, respectfully, resign.</p> <p>Here are a few people who threw caution to the wind and quit their jobs in a spectacular fashion. In most cases, following suit is not recommended, but here's hoping that their stories help soothe your sense of indignation while you look for a better gig.</p> <h2>1. Emergency Job Evacuation</h2> <p>Maybe it was a case of the so-called &quot;Monday blues&quot; that tipped flight attendant Steven Slater over the edge, or maybe it was the passenger who whacked him in the head with a piece of luggage and refused to apologize. Either way, Slater's decision to finally end his 20-year career at JetBlue in 2010 happened in an instant. After arguing with the passenger &mdash; who opted to direct an expletive at Slater rather than apologize &mdash; Slater got on the airplane's PA system and directed the same obscenity at the flight's 200 airline passengers as the plane sat on the tarmac at John F. Kennedy airport. Then he activated the <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/10/nyregion/10attendant.html?_r=0">plane's emergency slide</a>, grabbed two beers from the flight attendant's galley and slid down the chute. Bon voyage!</p> <p>Of course, Slater was arrested at his home soon after. While he avoided jail time on charges of criminal mischief, he was forced to pay a hefty fine to JetBlue and served a year of probation. He has, however, become a minor celebrity, and now works as a commentator and observer for the aviation industry.</p> <h2>2. &quot;F*** it, I Quit.&quot;</h2> <p>Being on live TV is stressful. You always have to be on. You always have to be at your best. You have to say the right thing. And, if you want to keep working in the industry, on-air probably isn't the best venue for quitting your job. But then, TV news reporter Charlo Greene had other aspirations.</p> <p>In September, 2014, while finishing a news segment for KTVA, a local news station in Anchorage, Alaska, Greene covered a report about the Alaska Cannabis Club &mdash; a business that claimed to be the only legal medical marijuana resource in Alaska &mdash; and an impending ballot on whether to legalize recreational marijuana use in the state. That's when Green veered off script, revealing that she was the owner of the club, and was dedicating all her time and energy to campaigning for marijuana legalization. She signed off that night by dropping an F-bomb &mdash; and <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eRPYaWLtgWg">quitting on air</a>.</p> <p>&quot;There comes a time in each and every one of our lives when we must choose to continue to spectate or stand up for what's right,&quot; Greene said in a video she released the following day. Some thought Greene was acting, well, high, but recreational marijuana use was legalized in Alaska in February of this year.</p> <h2>3. Resignation Dance Video</h2> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Ew_tdY0V4Zo" width="560" height="315" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></p> <p>Not all resignations are abrupt and angry. Some disgruntled workers like to go out having a good time. In 2013, Marina Shifrin quit her job at Next Media Animation with some dramatic style by&nbsp;<a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ew_tdY0V4Zo">dancing around her office</a> to Kanye West's &quot;Gone.&quot; Shifrin posted her video &mdash; and officially announced her resignation &mdash; on YouTube, where it garnered 15 million views in a month's time. The twist is that the company Shifrin worked for specialized in making short, comedic viral videos. Shifrin's &quot;I Quit&quot; may have surpassed them all. The brazen stunt also helped her launch a new career as a writer and comedian.</p> <h2>4. Marching On Out With Fanfare</h2> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/9A4UGtM4hDQ" width="560" height="315" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></p> <p>Many people dream of quitting with fanfare and marching out in triumph. In 2011, Joey DeFrancesco added a <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9A4UGtM4hDQ">live marching band</a> when he quit his job in room service at a hotel. Disgruntled with long hours, difficult management, and trouble forming a union, DeFrancesco enlisted the help of the What Cheer? Brigade, a 19-piece brass band for which he played trumpet. After tossing his resignation letter at his boss and announcing that he'd quit, DeFrancesco's band played boisterously as he marched out of the building &mdash; all the while recording what would become a viral video on YouTube (of course!)</p> <h2>5. Signing Off at the Super Bowl</h2> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/gf0vzLgF-OI" width="560" height="315" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></p> <p>Sometimes, people quit their jobs to pursue a dream of starting their own business. In 2014, Gwen Dean teamed up with GoDaddy and appeared in a <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gf0vzLgF-OI">Super Bowl ad</a> where she looked squarely into the camera and said, &quot;Hi Ted, I quit.&quot; Dean was a licensed refrigeration machine operator and Ted was her boss, who was supposedly at home watching the game. Dean's resignation made waves in the media. She's now working on her business, Puppets by Gwen, where she makes puppets and puts on shows at birthday parties, schools, and hospitals.</p> <h2>6. Via Op-Ed in the New York Times</h2> <p>A company's perceived lack of integrity can quickly undermine employee morale, but while most disgruntled workers quietly move on to other jobs, some choose to speak up. That's what Greg Smith did when he publicly resigned from his job at Goldman Sachs, where he worked as the executive director and head of the firm's United States equity derivatives business in Europe, the Middle East, and Africa. on March 14, 2012, an&nbsp;<a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/14/opinion/why-i-am-leaving-goldman-sachs.html?pagewanted=all&amp;_r=0">op-ed piece</a> written by Smith ran in the New York Times. In it, Smith called out his employers for the &quot;toxic and destructive&quot; environment at the company, and for putting profit above the company's clientele.</p> <p>The company later investigated his claims and worked to discredit him, saying that he was denied a big raise and promotion shortly before quitting. So was Smith a bitter employee or a brave defender of integrity? The world may never know. But it's probably safe to assume he won't ever be hired on Wall Street again.</p> <h2>7. A Sweet, Regretful Goodbye</h2> <p>Not all resignations are nasty and mean-spirited. When Chris Holmes resigned from his job for the U.K. Border Agency at Stansted Airport, it wasn't because he hated his job, his boss, or his coworkers. In fact, Holmes' resignation was borne of a positive change &mdash; the birth of his first child and his desire to pursue a career as a baker. So, Holmes served up his notice &mdash; and a slice of brilliant advertising for his new business &mdash; by <a href="http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2310023/Mr-Cake-resignation-Chris-Holmes-quits-job-Stansted-Airport-icing-cake.html">announcing his resignation</a> in buttercream and icing. Holmes said he aimed for the resignation to be good natured, and one that &quot;left a nice taste in their mouths.&quot; Now that's a delicious way to begin a new career.</p> <p><em>What&rsquo;s the craziest way you&rsquo;ve heard of someone resign?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/tara-struyk">Tara Struyk</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-super-cool-ways-people-have-quit-their-jobs">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-9"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-you-must-do-before-you-quit-your-job">5 Things You Must Do Before You Quit Your Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-questions-you-should-always-ask-in-an-exit-interview">8 Questions You Should Always Ask in an Exit Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-deal-when-you-hate-your-new-job">How to Deal When You Hate Your New Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-fun-ways-to-leave-your-job">10 Fun Ways to Leave Your Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-keys-to-quitting-a-job-like-a-professional">8 Keys to Quitting a Job Like a Professional</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income employment frustration funny leaving job quitting Tue, 24 Mar 2015 09:00:09 +0000 Tara Struyk 1351140 at http://www.wisebread.com