buying a car http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/17382/all en-US 7 Reasons to Love That Used Car Smell http://www.wisebread.com/7-reasons-to-love-that-used-car-smell <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/7-reasons-to-love-that-used-car-smell" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/car-4899810-small.jpg" alt="car" title="car" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="167" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>If you love that new car smell and aren't willing to settle for a &quot;new car smell&quot; scented air freshener, you'll need to be prepared to pay a hefty premium for your new car. If, however, you're willing to allow another owner to drive the first 15,000 miles or more, then you'll be able to save thousands of dollars. (See also: <a target="_blank" href="http://www.wisebread.com/save-on-car-maintenance-with-these-5-diy-tips">Save on Car Maintenance With These 5 DIY Tips</a>)</p> <p>As an extra benefit, you'll probably also find that there are a couple of non-financial benefits to buying a used car, too.</p> <h2>1. Less Depreciation</h2> <p>Until they are considered an antique, every vehicle depreciates as time passes. However, the depreciation is more intense the newer the car. <a target="_blank" href="http://www.edmunds.com/car-buying/how-fast-does-my-new-car-lose-value-infographic.html">Edmunds.com reports</a> that a new car will typically depreciate 11% the minute you take it off the lot. Furthermore, after the first year your &quot;new&quot; car is typically worth 19% less than you paid for it.</p> <p>That's a lot to pay to be the first person to have the honor of spilling coffee all over the center console.</p> <h2>2. Lower Purchase Price</h2> <p>Do you like driving newer cars with fewer miles? Why not focus on <a target="_blank" href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-save-money-buying-a-new-car-and-be-happy">buying cars</a> that are about a year old and have 15,000 miles? There's still a lot of good car left, and you can save yourself 20% compared to buying the car new.</p> <p>Typically, if you're looking for newer used cars, you can find great deals because people who are selling cars after a year are usually just coming to the realization that they cannot afford the vehicle any longer. Their motivation to sell and your desire <a target="_blank" href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-game-of-haggling-how-to-get-a-great-deal-on-a-used-car">to get a great deal on a used car</a> is a perfect combination.</p> <h2>3. Lower Insurance Costs</h2> <p>There is a direct correlation between the value of your vehicle and the amount of insurance you'll pay. Thus, if you buy a car that is at least a year or two old, you'll pay <a target="_blank" href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-tips-to-save-on-car-insurance">lower insurance premiums</a>.</p> <h2>4. Reduced Taxes and Registration Fees</h2> <p>Depending on your state, you may not be required to pay sales tax on a used vehicle. New Hampshire, Delaware, Oregon, and Montana don't charge sales tax for a new car. In Georgia, you'll pay sales tax if you buy a car from a dealership, but not if it is a private sale.</p> <p>Every state has different registration fees, and those fees can vary based on the age of a vehicle. For example, in Montana if a car is 0-4 years old, you'll pay $217 to register the car. However, if the car is older than 11 years old, you'll pay $28.</p> <h2>5. More Money for Real Investments</h2> <p>Opportunity cost dictates that the more you spend on a vehicle, the less you'll have for something else. If you have $4,000 tied up in a vehicle, then you <em>don't</em> have $4,000 to use towards retirement, college savings, or any other worthy savings goal that has the potential to increase in value.</p> <h2>6. Door Dings Are Not Your Problem</h2> <p>Some people who have new cars insist on parking a long way from the entrance to the store. Why? They are afraid that their new, shiny, glossy car might get a nick or a ding. But you're not worried. Not in the least.</p> <h2>7. And Neither Is Spilled Juice</h2> <p class="MsoNormal">A colleague may spill coffee on the upholstery. A kid might write on the door panel. A stone may ding your windshield. Your dog will leave dog hair all over the back seat.</p> <p>When you buy a car that already has a little personality, your spills, marks, and stains will just become another chapter in the story of that vehicle. Sure, it will be frustrating when something happens, but being the first to witness the desecration of a perfect car is <em>even more frustrating</em>.</p> <p><em>Do you usually purchase new or used vehicles? Can you think of any additional benefits of buying a reliable used car?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/craig-ford">Craig Ford</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-reasons-to-love-that-used-car-smell">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/3-reasons-why-you-should-never-buy-a-new-car">3 Reasons Why You Should Never Buy a New Car</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/17-things-car-salesmen-dont-want-you-to-know">17 Things Car Salesmen Don&#039;t Want You to Know</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/a-used-car-salesman-reveals-dirty-tricks-and-how-to-beat-them">A Used Car Salesman Reveals Dirty Tricks (and How to Beat Them)</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-much-should-you-spend-on-a-new-car">How Much Should You Spend on a New Car?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/is-this-the-best-search-engine-ever-for-new-used-cars">Is This the Best Search Engine Ever for New &amp; Used Cars?</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Cars and Transportation buying a car depreciation used car Tue, 23 Apr 2013 09:37:28 +0000 Craig Ford 973517 at http://www.wisebread.com How Much Should You Spend on a New Car? http://www.wisebread.com/how-much-should-you-spend-on-a-new-car <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-much-should-you-spend-on-a-new-car" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/1584456085_e37c59807c_z_0.jpg" alt="new car" title="new car" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="166" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Unlike many other expenses, you're in the driver's seat when it comes to the cost of a new car.</p> <p>If you live in an expensive area like New York City or San Francisco, you'll probably pay a lot for housing, but you don't have to spend a lot, or anything, on a car. You have plenty of mass transit options, after all. But if you live elsewhere, you don't have to pay a lot for a car, either. You <em>don't </em><em>need </em>all those options, a ton of horsepower, or the largest vehicle. Most car salesmen are paid on commission, so they're motivated to sell regardless of whether or not you actually need &mdash; or can afford &mdash; the vehicle. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/17-things-car-salesmen-dont-want-you-to-know">17 Things Car Salesmen Don't Want You to Know</a>)</p> <p>Unfortunately, too many middle income families purchase vehicles they cannot afford. A study by Interest.com shows that median income families in all but one major city, Washington, D.C., cannot afford the average price Americans paid for new trucks and cars.</p> <p>The website's 2013 <a href="http://www.interest.com/auto/news/car-prices-outpace-median-income/" target="_blank">Car Affordability Study</a> used the 20/4/10 rule (more on that, below) and data on income, auto insurance, and vehicle sales tax rates from the U.S. Census Bureau, the National Association of Insurance Commissioners, and other information sources to determine what median income families in the largest 25 metro areas should spend on new vehicles.</p> <p>It found that affordability ranges widely. For instance, median income car buyers in the Washington, D.C., area could afford $31,940, enough for a luxurious BMW X1 crossover, while buyers in Tampa, Fla., could afford just $14,516, enough for a subcompact Chevrolet Sonic.</p> <p>The variations are due to wide ranges in incomes, tax rates, and car insurance. For example, median incomes range from $86,680 in Washington to $43,832 in Tampa. Sales taxes range from 9.8% in Seattle to 0.0% in Portland, Ore.</p> <p>&ldquo;What this research indicates, more than anything, is that a lot of Americans are spending too much money on their cars,&rdquo; says Mike Sante, managing editor of Interest.com.</p> <h2>Use the 20/4/10 Rule to Control Car Expenses</h2> <p>How to you know if you can afford a new car? The answer is the 20/4/10 rule.</p> <p>In a nutshell, the rule says buyers should:</p> <ul> <li>Put down at least 20%</li> <li>Finance the vehicle for no more than four years</li> <li>Keep total monthly vehicle expense &mdash; including principal, interest, and insurance &mdash; under 10% of gross income</li> </ul> <p>Let's take a closer look at each of those rules.</p> <h2>20% Down</h2> <p>Putting 20% or more down makes sure you don't assume a loan that's too large. A significant down payment reduces the amount of interest you'll pay by reducing the size of your loan. If you lack 20% of the price, in cash, it's a sign the vehicle is too costly for you.</p> <h2>Finance for No More Than Four Years</h2> <p>Lenders may offer longer loan time frames, but they're not to your advantage.</p> <p>The longer the repayment period, the more costly the loan and the longer you wait before the car becomes yours. A shorter loan also lets you cancel <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-tips-to-save-on-car-insurance">expensive collision and comprehensive insurance</a> that lenders require, but you may not need. The common guideline is to drop collision insurance if your car is worth less than $3,000 or the annual premium is 10% or more of the car's book value.</p> <h2>Total Expenses Under 10% of Income</h2> <p>You shouldn't put more than 10% of your monthly income into a vehicle. Less than 10% is even better. In fact, less than about 30% of your income should go toward repaying <em>all of your loans put together</em>. Lenders may offer loans with longer terms, as well as loans with no down payments, but that doesn't mean you should accept those offers.</p> <p>Of course, the 20/4/10 rule is only a guideline, not a rule set in stone. Another guideline says car expenses, including car payments, insurance, and repairs, should not exceed 20% of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-ways-to-boost-your-take-home-pay">your monthly take home pay</a>.</p> <p>Instead of using formula as a one-size-fits-all template, use it as a guideline but also understand your expenses, talk to different lenders about loan options, and be honest about what you can afford.</p> <p><em>Are you in the market for a new car? How are you determining your budget?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/michael-kling">Michael Kling</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-much-should-you-spend-on-a-new-car">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/try-these-6-money-saving-challenges-now">Try These 6 Money-Saving Challenges Now</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/ask-these-4-important-questions-before-signing-any-loan">Ask These 4 Important Questions Before Signing Any Loan</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/speed-past-car-debt-with-this-simple-timing-trick">Speed Past Car Debt With This Simple Timing Trick</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/17-things-car-salesmen-dont-want-you-to-know">17 Things Car Salesmen Don&#039;t Want You to Know</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-freedom-of-a-debt-free-life">The Freedom of a Debt-Free Life</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Budgeting Cars and Transportation Debt Management buying a car car financing loans Thu, 04 Apr 2013 09:48:34 +0000 Michael Kling 971530 at http://www.wisebread.com 17 Things Car Salesmen Don't Want You to Know http://www.wisebread.com/17-things-car-salesmen-dont-want-you-to-know <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/17-things-car-salesmen-dont-want-you-to-know" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/3666101234_f74fccb6a3_z_0.jpg" alt="car salesmen" title="car salesmen" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="141" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Regular readers of the content aggregator Reddit.com may have seen a post recently asking car salesmen <a target="_blank" href="http://www.reddit.com/r/AskReddit/comments/19996t/car_salesmen_of_reddit_whats_something_you_dont/">to confess their greatest fears</a>.</p> <p>The response was overwhelming; over 7,500 comments were posted. As I read through the list (it took hours!) I jotted down some recurring themes. From those notes I have identified car salesmen's 17 greatest fears and weaknesses. (See also:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.wisebread.com/guide-to-buying-a-used-car-without-going-crazy">Guide to&nbsp;Buying a Used Car Without Going Crazy</a>)</p> <p>If you're in the market for a new or used car anytime soon, this list could save you a lot of money. (By the way, I use &quot;salesman&quot; and &quot;salesmen&quot; but this obviously refers to both men and women in the auto sales force.)</p> <h2>1. Your Smartphone Is Your Most Powerful Weapon</h2> <p>Years ago, car dealerships and their sales force held all the cards, and buyers held very few. But that has changed completely. Now, with information and sites like Edmunds.com's <a target="_blank" href="http://www.edmunds.com/car-buying/how-to-use-tmv.html">True Market Value</a> (TMV), Autotrader, eBay Motors, and access to car experts in the palm of your hand, you have effectively marginalized the car salesman. You know what they paid for the car, what their mark up is, when they bought it, what their bottom line is, everything. You can, in essence, make haggling a thing of the past. However, if you leave your phone at home, then you better have a terrific memory and be able stick by your guns. Proof is power.</p> <h2>2. You Can Win the Game Before Setting Foot on a Lot</h2> <p>The Internet has done wonders for the humble consumer. With it, you can email 20 dealers within a 50 mile radius, tell them what you're looking for, and ask them to send you back a quote. From those quotes, pick the lowest couple and take those to any dealership you want. They'll usually be forced to match it, destroying whatever profit margin they were hoping for. And before you feel too bad, the dealerships get massive bonuses by hitting certain sales targets. They can give you the car at cost and still walk away with a nice pile of cash.</p> <h2>3. Be Wary of Salesmen Who Leave to Let You &quot;Talk it Over&quot;</h2> <p>I actually had this happen to a friend of mine, and I laughed when I saw it come up in the comments.</p> <p>If you somehow manage to get stuck in the salesman's office haggling over numbers, he may receive a call and leave to let you and your partner &quot;talk it over.&quot; This is an old trick that some dealers use to listen in on your conversation, letting them know instantly just what your bottom line is. If it happens, whispers or text messages to each other may be a good way to combat eaves dropping.</p> <h2>4. You Are Being Screwed on Your Trade In</h2> <p>If the car you're trading in is in good condition, you won't be getting a good deal on it.</p> <p>Sure, you're armed with the Kelley Blue Book (KBB) trade-in price and resale price, but those numbers are hogwash. Dealers use something called the National Automobile Dealers Association (NADA) database, which gives them a much more realistic idea of what they can get for your trade. Some of the salesmen reported KBB values that undervalued cars by $5,000 or more. Your best bet is to get a copy of the <a target="_blank" href="http://www.nadaguides.com/">NADA value for your car</a>. Or, if you can, <a target="_blank" href="http://www.wisebread.com/best-of-personal-finance-how-to-sell-your-car-on-craigslist">sell it privately instead</a>.</p> <h2>5. There Are Mark-Ups Aplenty on the Sales Stickers</h2> <p>Dealerships refer to them as &quot;bumper stickers&quot; because that's where they bump up the price of the car. Little extras like VIN etching, fabric protectants, sealants, and other &quot;must have&quot; additions can all be done by you at home, usually for way less. Ask to see the original invoice, and compare it to the bumper sticker. That's what you really want to look at. If they refuse, go elsewhere. And even then, the invoice doesn't tell the whole story. See fear number 10, below.</p> <h2>6. You Have the Power to Control the Sale</h2> <p>Those two things below your waist, called legs, are a sales weapon.</p> <p>If at any time you don't feel good about the sale, you can walk away. Often, the salesman will hit you with a much lower offer when you get up out of your seat and tell them you've decided against it. Remember, they can't do the deal without you, and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-7-laws-of-negotiation">you are always in a position to say, &quot;NO</a>.&quot; You lose nothing but a few hours of your time; they lose a commission and a bonus.</p> <h2>7. The Dealership's Extended Warranties Are for Suckers</h2> <p>Even if you get the salesman to agree to a price that is basically what the dealership paid for the car, you still have to go to that back room; the room where the deal is sealed.</p> <p>Whether you lease, finance it, or plonk down a wad of cash, they'll try to push every single option they can on you. That includes an extended warranty that you can buy way cheaper from someone else. The dealership makes a lot of money on these service contracts. Don't fall for this. As one of the salesmen pointed out, the finance manager is actually a salesman, too. They're going to do whatever they can to squeeze more money out of you before you leave.</p> <h2>8. The Four Square Is Designed to Manipulate You</h2> <p>There have been many, many negative articles written on the four square worksheet, and with good reason.</p> <p>The four square sheet is a way for the salesman to &quot;play&quot; with the numbers and make you think you're getting a great deal. Usually, the first time they come to the table with it, the numbers are so insulting you'll want to walk out. That's intentional. They can't look like miracle workers if they give you a reasonable price. And then the numbers game is played out, but the price of the car rarely goes down more than a few bucks. However, there's a better way to show just how this is used to trap you into a price you really don't want to pay. <a target="_blank" href="http://arthurfontes.hubpages.com/hub/How-To-Use-The-Four-Square-System-To-Sell-Cars">Read this article,</a> written by car salesmen FOR car salesmen. It's quite an eye opener. And as one redditor advised, tell them not to bring out the four square worksheet or you're leaving. That puts you in a position of power, and they'll know you're no sucker.</p> <h2>9. Salesmen Have Ways to Mess With Your Head</h2> <p>You drive into a dealership with your trade in. The salesman looks it over, nodding, giving the usual chit chat. But he'll ask things like &quot;does it have power steering?&quot; or &quot;does it have a sunroof?&quot; He already knows the answer. He knows the spec of the car and what it's worth. He just wants you to say NO a lot. And by saying no over and over, you start to devalue your trade in, and expect less for it. Get the NADA value, and whatever he asks you, just keep that number in your head.</p> <p>Another method is taking the keys from your trade in before you sit down at the negotiation table. It's a lot harder to walk away when you don't have your keys on you. They know this, and will often give the keys to a third party, like their sales manager. Now, they have to hunt him down before you can get your keys, and that will take a while. Long enough for them to have another crack at you.</p> <h2>10. Never Offer to Pay Invoice for Your Vehicle</h2> <p>You hear people say it all the time. &quot;I'm paying invoice for that car, not a cent more.&quot; Well, go ahead, it's better than paying the MSRP. But very few people will pay MSRP anyway. And the invoice price of the car is not telling you the whole story. The dealership gets dealer holdbacks, customer rebates, and factory-to-dealer incentives. This is money they can take off the sales price and offer to you, but they won't just hand it over without a fight. These incentives are usually not even advertised, but they can save you thousands.</p> <h2>11. Never Talk About Your Down Payment Up Front</h2> <p>The salesman will ask early on &quot;how much are you going to put down?&quot; It seems like a reasonable question, but you're giving up a bargaining chip way too early. One story talks about an old man who had $10,000 to put down on a truck, and the dealership basically upped the price of the truck to offset that down payment. In effect, the old man threw it away. Wait until you know the &quot;Out the Door&quot; price of the vehicle before you talk about a down payment.</p> <h2>12. Monthly Payments Are Deceptive</h2> <p>You should have a figure in your head of what you can afford to pay for the car, NOT for the monthly payment. The reason is simple. A dealership can mess with the figures, the length of the loan, and the APR, and reduce your monthly payment, but you could end up paying even more for the car than you first agreed to. Look at the final cost, and only the final cost. If your monthly price for that is too high, you're spending more than you want to.</p> <h2>13. Hail-Damaged &quot;Bargains&quot; Are Marked Way Too High</h2> <p>If the cars at the dealership get hail damage, they're going to mark them down and sell them to you at a discount. Great, a bargain, if you don't mind the dents. But the dealership has insurance policies on the cars on the lot, and they've already been reimbursed for that damage. The dealership is not passing all of that on to you, so you're generating some nice profit for them.</p> <h2>14. Non-Factory After-Market Options Are a Huge Rip Off</h2> <p>Many dealers will add &quot;extras&quot; to the car that cost them pennies on the dollar. Pin striping, rims, spoilers, stereo systems, alarms, you name it, they'll throw it in.</p> <p>Negotiate from the invoice price, not the padded sticker price. You don't need to pay $250 for a few bucks worth of pin striping. You don't need floor mats that cost $200. If it's non-factory, ask for it to be taken off. All of it. Do it yourself, or <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-to-find-a-reputable-mechanic">get a trusted mechanic</a> to do it. And you can also get your tinting and clear bras done elsewhere for around HALF the price the dealership will charge.</p> <h2>15. You Get the Best Deal From the Internet Salesman</h2> <p>This was the one point that kept coming up over and over.</p> <p>When you go through the Internet sales department, the dealership already knows that you know certain things. They know you're a savvy shopper, that you're looking around, and that you're comparing prices. The Internet salesman will start at a much lower price than the salesman on the lot. In short &mdash; don't walk onto the lot unless you're going in to meet the salesman you've been dealing with online.</p> <h2>16. Get Your Own Financing Before You Buy</h2> <p>You can negotiate way better terms in advance, with a <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-benefits-and-drawbacks-of-credit-unions">credit union</a> or another financial institution. Don't leave it up to the dealership; get this all pre-approved before you walk in.</p> <h2>17. You Can Cancel Those Service Contracts Within 30 Days</h2> <p>So you get caught up in the financial meltdown and agree to pay for a lot of extras, including the extended warranty, tire protection, and so on. Well, you are not stuck with them. You can cancel within 30 days and get your money back. You can also use this to your advantage. Agree to the service contracts if you get money taken off the price of the car. The dealership makes way more from the service plans than the car anyway, so they'll be happy to make the deal. When you cancel, you're in the money.</p> <p>There were many more tips in the <a target="_blank" href="http://www.reddit.com/r/AskReddit/comments/19996t/car_salesmen_of_reddit_whats_something_you_dont/">reddit.com thread,</a> which I urge you to read. And remember, these all came from people who make a living selling cars. This is straight from the source, and well worth remembering.</p> <p><em>Are you a car salesman with more information to share? Let us know in comments below.</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/17-things-car-salesmen-dont-want-you-to-know">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/a-used-car-salesman-reveals-dirty-tricks-and-how-to-beat-them">A Used Car Salesman Reveals Dirty Tricks (and How to Beat Them)</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-easy-diy-car-repairs-to-save-big">8 Easy DIY Car Repairs to Save Big</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-smart-auto-finance-options">6 Smart Auto Finance Options</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-much-should-you-spend-on-a-new-car">How Much Should You Spend on a New Car?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/fight-your-speeding-ticket-save-yourself-some-dough">Fight Your Speeding Ticket, Save Yourself Some Dough</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Life Hacks Cars and Transportation buying a car car dealerships car salesmen marketing tricks Wed, 13 Mar 2013 11:36:34 +0000 Paul Michael 969713 at http://www.wisebread.com