frugal lifestyle http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/17469/all en-US The NFL's 5 Most Frugal Players http://www.wisebread.com/the-nfls-5-most-frugal-players <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/the-nfls-5-most-frugal-players" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/american-football-iStock_000033233020Small.jpg" alt="american football" title="american football" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Professional football players are among the highest-paid people in America, and yet the story of the bankrupt NFL retiree is so common it's become a stereotype. Sports Illustrated reported that 78% of former <a href="http://www.si.com/vault/2009/03/23/105789480/how-and-why-athletes-go-broke">NFL players experience financial hardship</a> after just two years of retirement.</p> <p>That's no great wonder, when you read about rampant spending of newly rich players, like Chad Ochocinco spending $100,000 for his own <a href="http://bleacherreport.com/articles/775852-7-most-ridiculous-purchases-in-nfl-history/page/2">personalized semi truck</a>. Other players lend to friends and family who see their new salaries as limitless lending accounts, or, as inexperienced investors, sink money into ventures that never pay off.</p> <p>So it's refreshing to hear these five players &mdash; well compensated all &mdash; talk about gas mileage, retirement accounts, and distinguishing &quot;needs&quot; from &quot;wants.&quot; Read on to see who makes the list of the NFL's Most Frugal.</p> <h2>1. Aaron Rodgers</h2> <p><strong>Team</strong>: Green Bay Packers</p> <p><strong>Position</strong>: Quarterback</p> <p>As one of the NFL's top quarterbacks, Rodgers earns about <a href="http://www.forbes.com/profile/aaron-rodgers/">$22 million a year</a> in salary and endorsements. Yet he lives in a relatively ordinary &mdash; <a href="http://www.celebrityhousepictures.com/aaron-rodgers.php">some might even say ugly</a> &mdash; home in a suburb of Green Bay. He <a href="http://www.usatoday.com/story/sports/nfl/packers/2013/06/09/quarterback-aaron-rodgers-q-and-a-mike-mccarthy-/2404843/">mows his own lawn</a>, shops at Piggly Wiggly, and likes to hang out at a modest-looking place called Chives Restaurant.</p> <h2>2. Giovani Bernard</h2> <p><strong>Team</strong>: Cincinnati Bengals</p> <p><strong>Position</strong>: Running Back</p> <p>Bernard signed a $5.253 million dollar contract in 2013, plus a $2.2 million signing bonus &mdash; hefty for a rookie. But instead of buying a custom Hummer with his first paycheck, he <a href="http://sports.yahoo.com/blogs/nfl-shutdown-corner/giovani-bernard-lives-simple-rookie-life-including-driving-223332867.html">drives a minivan</a> he borrowed from his girlfriend's mother. He lives in a modest apartment near the stadium.</p> <p>Bernard knows how unexpectedly hard times can turn life upside down. After his mother died when he was a child, Bernard lived with his father, who owned a dry cleaning business. But when Bernard was in high school, his dad lost the business &mdash; and the two <a href="http://www.providencejournal.com/sports/patriots/content/20141004-trip-to-foxboro-reunites-giovani-bernard-with-friend-who-once-provided-a-home.ece">lost their home</a>. Bernard moved in with the family of his best friend, James White, now a <a href="http://projostats.projo.com/fb/playerstats.asp?id=27658&amp;team=17">running back for the New England Patriots</a>.</p> <h2>3. Antonio Cromartie</h2> <p><strong>Team</strong>: Arizona Cardinals</p> <p><strong>Position</strong>: Cornerback</p> <p>After <a href="http://www.newsday.com/sports/football/jets/antonio-cromartie-an-unlikely-mentor-for-younger-players-dealing-with-financial-issues-1.5386541">blowing an estimated $5 million</a> in his first two years playing football on nine (NINE!!) cars, lavish jewelry, and two homes, Cromartie realized he had spent everything he had coming to him. Instead of spiraling into debt, though, Cromartie wised up, sold the excess stuff, and bought a Prius.</p> <p>&quot;I'll fill it up every two and a half weeks or so, and I'm only spending 33 bucks, while everybody else is spending 80 or 90 bucks a tank,&quot; he told Newsday. &quot;Right now, I'm all about saving money.&quot;</p> <p>He'll need it: Cromartie is the father of 10.</p> <p>Cromartie now has his retirement account fully funded through age 100, and he advises younger teammates on how to avoid making the same mistakes he did.</p> <h2>4. Rod Smith</h2> <p><strong>Team</strong>: Denver Broncos (retired)</p> <p><strong>Position</strong>: Wide Receiver</p> <p><a href="http://www.forbes.com/sites/aliciajessop/2012/10/31/not-broke-how-nfl-players-stay-financially-stable-after-the-game-ends/">Smith told Forbes</a> that he lives well in retirement because he always kept his post-NFL life in mind during his playing days, which led him to avoid spending like some of his teammates did: &quot;The most luxurious thing I bought was my house. I wasn't a big jewelry or car guy. I don't have Ferraris and Bentleys. I had a motto that I lived by, 'There are two places I want to look good at: home and practice.'&quot;</p> <h2>5. Prince Amukamara</h2> <p><strong>Team</strong>: New York Giants</p> <p><strong>Position</strong>: Cornerback</p> <p>Amukamara isn't just a professional football player, he's also <a href="http://sports.yahoo.com/blogs/shutdown-corner/outside-game-prince-amukamara-royal-lineage-explains-name-205803570&mdash;nfl.html">Nigerian royalty</a>. Really. And no, he didn't email me about how I could get $100,000 if only I helped him transfer some money.</p> <p>Despite his paycheck and his pedigree, Amukamara isn't a wild spender.</p> <p>Back in 2011, just after leaving the Nebraska Cornhuskers for the NFL, he tweeted that he was &quot;<a href="https://twitter.com/PrinceAmukamara/status/136273464746184704">looking at getting a good deal at Husker Auto</a>.&quot; Apparently he proceeded directly to the <a href="http://www.budgetinginthefunstuff.com/prince-amukamara-a-frugal-football-rookie/">used car section</a> and successfully bargained for a lower price on an SUV by paying cash.</p> <p>A subsequent <a href="http://www.reddit.com/r/nfl/comments/2d5zh7/i_am_prince_amukamara_new_york_giants_cb_and/">&quot;Ask Me Anything&quot; session on Reddit</a> revealed more signs of Amukamara's frugal nature. He said the most common mistake NFL rookies make is &quot;Spending their money on 'wants' and not 'needs'.&quot; He also said that his favorite place to visit when he plays in California is In-N-Out Burger, where meals are under $10.</p> <p>Being thrifty is not the same as being a tightwad, though. Amukamara once spent<a href="http://www.sportsmedia101.com/newyorkgiants/2012/07/20/new-york-giants-prince-amukamara-donates-10000-to-nebraska-high-school-football-program/"> $10,000 outfitting a Nebraska high school football team</a>.</p> <p><em>Have you heard any tales of frugal-minded sports stars? Please share in comments.</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/carrie-kirby">Carrie Kirby</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-nfls-5-most-frugal-players">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-habits-of-highly-frugal-people">7 Habits of Highly Frugal People</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-financial-pitfalls-stay-at-home-parents-should-avoid">5 Financial Pitfalls Stay-at-Home Parents Should Avoid</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/are-you-saving-too-much">Are You Saving Too Much?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-stop-hating-yourself-about-money-and-actually-make-positive-changes">How to Stop Hating Yourself About Money and Actually Make Positive Changes</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-same-actions-will-produce-the-same-results-ten-tenets-for-arranging-your-rich-part-2">The Same Actions Will Produce The Same Results (Ten Tenets for Arranging Your Rich: Part 2)</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Budgeting Lifestyle frugal lifestyle retirement saving thrift wealth Wed, 29 Oct 2014 17:00:08 +0000 Carrie Kirby 1245699 at http://www.wisebread.com There's a Lot to Like About Frugal Living http://www.wisebread.com/theres-a-lot-to-like-about-frugal-living <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/theres-a-lot-to-like-about-frugal-living" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/man-5186622-small.jpg" alt="lifestyle" title="lifestyle" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="167" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>I don't make my own soap, <a target="_blank" href="http://business.time.com/2012/11/05/former-extreme-couponer-admits-its-a-waste-of-time/">do extreme couponing</a>, cut my own hair, or live in a tent.</p> <p>When it comes to being frugal, I'm less of a do-it-yourself kind of guy looking to save pennies, and more into saving bigger amounts of money through methods that take much less work than clipping coupons. (See also: <a target="_blank" href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-frugal-compromises">12 Frugal Compromises</a>)</p> <p>As I wrote about in April on Wise Bread, <a target="_blank" href="http://www.wisebread.com/16-ways-to-kick-start-frugality">kick-starting frugality with a few simple actions</a> &mdash; direct deposit, tracking spending, skipping meals out &mdash; can lead to savings that add up over time. By <a target="_blank" href="http://www.wisebread.com/cutting-the-cable-cord-has-more-than-financial-benefits">cutting cable TV</a>, my family has saved hundreds of dollars in the past year without missing many shows we enjoy. We haven't put the extra savings into a separate account and kept track of the specific dollars saved &mdash; although that would have been a great idea &mdash; but we have seen our cable bill disappear.</p> <p>The reasons why I became frugal may differ from yours, but I think they can offer insight into the importance of exploring the real reasons for being frugal before jumping in and doing everything you can to save money. There are different forms of satisfaction, I've learned, and some are worth the time and savings, and others just don't seem to be worthwhile.</p> <p>Here are some of the main reasons why I became frugal.</p> <h2>I Like My Time</h2> <p>By saving more money, I can work less. As <a target="_blank" href="http://www.ushistory.org/franklin/info/">Ben Franklin</a> realized about 300 years ago, a penny saved is a penny earned. That's a motto I follow daily, figuring that if I save money by not spending it, I'll have fewer bills to pay and thus won't need to work as much to pay the bills I do have.</p> <p>I work as a freelance journalist, meaning I set my own hours and can decide if I want to take on extra work. Like a squirrel harvesting acorns for the winter, I try to keep busy when I can, but with summer arriving and my daughter being out of school soon, I plan on working less this summer, so I can take care of her.</p> <p>Not everyone can be in this situation, I realize. Having a full-time job with benefits, and a family and a mortgage to take care of, requires commitment of at least 40 hours per week at work. But if you stop buying new books, for example, and go to the library and take that $50 a month that you would have spent each month aside, that's a few less hours you need to work in a month. So when the boss asks you to work overtime, you'll know that you don't have to rely on that overtime pay and can instead go home and spend the time with your family and maybe teach your kids how to cook dinner.</p> <h2>I Don't Like Throwing Money Away</h2> <p>Money is meant to be enjoyed and provide the freedom to do what you want to do. I'd like to be a millionaire, as anyone would, but even if I was, I don't think I'd spend it on things I enjoy doing myself. I don't like cooking <em>every</em> night, but even if I could afford it, I wouldn't want to go out to eat every night or hire a personal chef. I enjoy cooking and do it not only because it's healthier and cheaper than eating at a restaurant, but because it's fun.</p> <p>The same logic goes for buying books &mdash; or at least hardcover books. I can't see the point in spending almost $30 on a hardcover book when they're either free at the library, or I can find other books to read in paperback. It may not sound like a big frugal step, and I don't put aside the hundreds of dollars I save each year by doing this, but there's some satisfaction in knowing I'm not spending as much money as I used to on something that I can easily save money on by going to the library every few weeks. I still buy books, and I'm happy for authors to make money, but I usually only buy paperbacks or ebooks when I travel.</p> <h2>I Like Being Prepared for a Rainy Day</h2> <p>Ever since I had my first paper route as a kid, I've saved for something: new bike, comic books, college, car, retirement, wedding, home, home improvement project, child, vacation, and potential job loss, among other things I'm sure I've forgotten. After all of the monthly expenses are paid, it's difficult to have enough money left over to put aside in savings. If it's an important enough life event, such as retirement or my child's college fund, the money is automatically transferred to such an account each month.</p> <p>Saving money through frugality &mdash; such as not buying coffee and having that extra $25 a month automatically moved from a checking account to a savings account that's set aside for a Hawaiian vacation, for example &mdash; is an easy way to find that extra money for the rainy day fund, or something more fun.</p> <h2>I Like Being Prepared for a Thunderstorm</h2> <p>When I was laid off at a newspaper five years ago, I wasn't a lavish spender and had good saving habits to help me get through some time when I didn't have a steady paycheck coming in. Already being frugal (and knowing how to find other ways to save money) helped me reconsider my spending habits and not go into credit card debt. Partly out of necessity, frugality has become a life-long habit that is teaching me more ways to save money.</p> <h2>I Like Leaving a Smaller Environmental Footprint</h2> <p>Buying fewer things and <a target="_blank" href="http://www.wisebread.com/twenty-five-things-to-do-with-old-jeans">using what you have until it dies</a> means less things to throw in the landfill, and ultimately, fewer things being produced because you're not buying them. I try to use the things I own for as long as they work. I've had the same clock radio that wakes me up every morning since 1986, I've used personal computers until they're dead, I don't get a new phone every year, my bike is more than 20 years old, and I drive a 1991 Acura Integra.</p> <p>We recently started leasing a solar power system on our roof to generate electricity. Since it's a lease and not a purchase, we pay for it by buying the electricity we produce each month. The idea is that with locked-in rates over the term of the solar lease, we'll save a little money if our regular electric provider raises rates. I don't expect to save much money, but one advantage is that the solar power we use isn't polluting the environment like the electricity we previously got was. In the scheme of things it's a small step, but it's a start in our family polluting less.</p> <p>Of all of these reasons for becoming frugal, buying time by saving money is my favorite. Time is limited, and while I enjoy my work, there are many more things I'd rather be doing than working so I can pay bills I don't need to have.</p> <p><em>Why have you embraced the frugal lifestyle?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/aaron-crowe">Aaron Crowe</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/theres-a-lot-to-like-about-frugal-living">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-nfls-5-most-frugal-players">The NFL&#039;s 5 Most Frugal Players</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/frugal-factors-what-traits-do-most-savers-share">Frugal Factors: What Traits Do Most Savers Share?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-much-personal-finance-info-should-you-share">How Much Personal Finance Info Should You Share?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/its-the-21st-century-why-is-your-money-stuck-in-the-20th">It&#039;s the 21st Century — Why Is Your Money Stuck in the 20th?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-meditation-can-make-you-a-money-master">6 Ways Meditation Can Make You a Money Master</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Lifestyle frugal lifestyle Wed, 05 Jun 2013 10:24:35 +0000 Aaron Crowe 977186 at http://www.wisebread.com Frugal Factors: What Traits Do Most Savers Share? http://www.wisebread.com/frugal-factors-what-traits-do-most-savers-share <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/frugal-factors-what-traits-do-most-savers-share" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/686242690_3c57429ae1_z.jpg" alt="friends" title="friends" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="166" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>As I get older, I find myself more and more inclined to spend time with those who share my views on frugality, simple living, and saving. It seems as my age increases, so does my resolve to be quite open about my frugal ways. I guess that&rsquo;s either drawn like-minded folks toward me, or repelled others &mdash; perhaps it&rsquo;s done a bit of both simultaneously. The more I think about it though, the clearer it becomes &mdash; frugal folks do share a set of traits, values, or ways of living that bind us together and help us recognize each other in unlikely places. (See also:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.wisebread.com/30-signs-that-you-were-raised-by-frugal-parents">30 Signs You&nbsp;Were Raised by Frugal Parents</a>)</p> <p>After a bit of observation and introspection, I&rsquo;ve compiled a list of frugal factors &mdash; primary traits that we frugal folks share. Now, it&rsquo;s by no means a comprehensive list or the least bit scientific. Instead it&rsquo;s a character study of what it means to live simply in an age when &ldquo;more&rdquo; is often synonymous with &ldquo;better&rdquo;. So, here goes; I think frugal folks usually...</p> <h2>1. Recognize the Golden Mean</h2> <p>If you&rsquo;re watching your dimes and dollars, you tend to recognize more quickly the optimal amounts of nearly everything. Not too much and not too little, the golden is all about finding balance.</p> <h2>2. Buy for Quality, Durability, and Timelessness</h2> <p>Let&rsquo;s face it &mdash; we&rsquo;re human, and sometimes buying things is downright fun. But frugal buyers focus less on the transaction and more on the benefits of that transaction over time. We look for quality, we buy for durability and functionality, and tend to gravitate toward timeless looks that will never go out of style.</p> <h2>3. Make the Connection Between Time, Labor, and Things</h2> <p>Unless you&rsquo;re spending lottery winnings (and congratulations, if you are), there&rsquo;s an inseparable connection between time, labor, and things. The price of any item or service is directly related to labor and labor is directly related to time. More visceral than the idea of money, we know that things cost <i>time</i>.</p> <h2>4. Live Below Our Means</h2> <p>If things really do cost time, why spend all of it year in and year out? The frugal among us typically understand that living below our means helps us to save and ultimately helps preserve our future time and labor.</p> <h2>5. Understand the Real Cost of Ownership</h2> <p>Most things we purchase require an ongoing and indefinite cash outlay. Cars break down, high-def TVs inspire us to upgrade our cable service, printers need ink, suits need dry-cleaning &mdash; even our adopted <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-much-it-costs-to-own-a-dog">pets need food and good care</a>. Savers understand that the act of buying often means agreeing to pay for years to come, and we plan accordingly. &nbsp;</p> <h2>6. Distinguish Between Needs and Wants</h2> <p>For those who can differentiate between<a href="http://www.wisebread.com/25-products-you-think-you-need-but-really-don-t"> the things we need and the things we want</a>, life is a whole lot simpler. It&rsquo;s easier to prioritize, to control spending, to live within a budget, and to truly (madly, deeply) enjoy a splurge.</p> <h2>7. Embrace Satisfaction</h2> <p>We all live in a world that&rsquo;s suspicious of satisfaction. If you don&rsquo;t aspire to own a bigger house, buy a newer car, take more exotic vacations, install a spa bathroom, or build an outdoor kitchen, you&rsquo;re viewed with a combination of pity and mistrust. But for those less driven by upgrades, the peace that comes from satisfaction can be priceless.</p> <h2>8. Understand the Difference Between Spending and Investment</h2> <p>Frugal folks often get painted with a broad brush; people think we penny-pinch and save no matter what. But, of course, that&rsquo;s a false notion. More accurately, we understand the difference between spending money and making an investment. And we do our share of each &mdash; with awareness. Buying six pairs of new shoes is spending money; buying one versatile pair for work and everyday use is an investment. Taking a cab three times a week is spending money; buying a bike is an investment.</p> <h2>9. Avoid the Use of Credit</h2> <p>Credit is easy, tempting, and often habit-forming. Savers understand the pitfalls of compounding interest on unsecured consumer debt and we avoid it at all costs.</p> <h2>10. Know When to Seize an Amazing Deal</h2> <p>One of the most unsung skills of frugality is knowing how to spend. <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/buying-calendar">When an amazing deal presents itself</a>, frugal folks recognize it immediately and know what to do. When spending now means saving later, we can whip out our wallets as fast as the next guy.</p> <p>I&rsquo;m sure there are more I&rsquo;ve missed, but these qualities seem to form the foundation of frugal living. Each idea is learned personally, one at a time, often through trial and error. Also, at this risk of sounding sappy, each idea unites us in a sort of movement that&rsquo;s rethinking consumerism, excess, and debt-as-a-lifestyle. So, take some to time recognize all your frugal neighbors out there, share some tips, some adventures, and maybe even a cup of coffee. You have a lot to talk about.</p> <p>Do you see yourself in this list? Is there an important trait I&rsquo;ve missed? What&rsquo;s your journey been like as you&rsquo;ve grown into your own frugality and what do you still struggle with?</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/kentin-waits">Kentin Waits</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/frugal-factors-what-traits-do-most-savers-share">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-nfls-5-most-frugal-players">The NFL&#039;s 5 Most Frugal Players</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-dreams-you-wont-achieve-unless-you-live-below-your-means">5 Dreams You Won&#039;t Achieve Unless You Live Below Your Means</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/theres-a-lot-to-like-about-frugal-living">There&#039;s a Lot to Like About Frugal Living</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-much-personal-finance-info-should-you-share">How Much Personal Finance Info Should You Share?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-meditation-can-make-you-a-money-master">6 Ways Meditation Can Make You a Money Master</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Lifestyle challenges to frugality frugal lifestyle live below your means Wed, 27 Mar 2013 10:36:33 +0000 Kentin Waits 971472 at http://www.wisebread.com