pay http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/1767/all en-US 5 Careers Where Women Earn More Than Men http://www.wisebread.com/5-careers-where-women-earn-more-than-men <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-careers-where-women-earn-more-than-men" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/female_architect_at_work.jpg" alt="Female Architect At Work" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Men in the workplace make more money than women. It's an unfortunate fact that's probably not earth-shattering to read. According to the most recently available government data, women <a href="https://www.bls.gov/cps/cpsaat39.htm" target="_blank">earned 82 cents for every dollar</a> men made in 2016.</p> <p>But there are career fields in which women are the top earners. If you're a woman looking to land on the winning side of the pay gap, these are the careers you should choose.</p> <h2>1. Architecture</h2> <p>According to a 2017 Glassdoor study, women with architecture degrees earn $7,000 more per year on average than men. From Denise Scott Brown to Zaha Hadid, women have made their mark in what is still a male-dominated field, erecting soaring towers, museums, college campuses, Olympic pools, and embassy buildings to much acclaim. All told, the gender pay gap in architecture is a rare 14 percent &mdash; <a href="https://www.glassdoor.com/blog/college-majors-gender-pay-gaps/" target="_blank">in favor of women</a>!</p> <p>Unfortunately, these giant gains for women in the field don't mean that female architects are immune to discrimination.</p> <p>&quot;It's still largely a white, male-dominated field, and seeing a woman at the job site or in a big meeting with developers is not that common,&quot; Yen Ha, a principal at an architecture firm in New York, recently told <em>The New York Times</em>. &quot;Every single day, I have to remind someone that I am, in fact, an architect. And sometimes not just an architect, but <em>the </em>architect.&quot;</p> <h2>2. Music</h2> <p>Taylor Swift is the top-earning female artist, with an estimate by Forbes putting her 2016 income at $170 million. But it's not just celebrity female musicians who are raking in the dough. Across the industry, women are out-earning men. The median base pay for a woman who is five years into a music career is $44,020 &mdash; that's more than $4,000 higher than the median base pay for a man, according to Glassdoor.</p> <p>A recent report by Berkeley College of Music stated that an orchestral musician can make up to $143,000 &mdash; or as little as $28,000. Other music fields with the potential to pay big bucks include music therapy (up to $135,000), music law (up to $150,000) and orchestral, opera, or choir conducting (up to $225,000).</p> <h2>3. Advertising</h2> <p>Women now make up nearly 60 percent of the advertising industry, earning a median salary of $46,500 at the five-year marker. Men, on the other hand, lag behind with a median income of $43,020, according to the Glassdoor study. This does not, however, mean that women dominate the field completely. According to The 3% Conference, a group that advocates for women to hold bigger roles in creative fields, when it comes to higher power positions, such as that of creative director, women make up just 11 percent.</p> <p>If you're looking to break into the advertising field, here are a few helpful tips: Start by interning at an ad agency, where you'll learn the ropes and collect contacts who may be willing to help you down the line. Take an entry level position, even if you believe it's beneath you, and work your way up the ladder. Do freelance work, and aim to either earn enough income to make freelance your full-time gig or wow a hiring agency with your talent.</p> <h2>4. Environmental science</h2> <p>The National Science Foundation reports that women comprise a little more than 40 percent of all U.S. graduate students in science and technology. When you tighten this focus onto the environmental sciences, however, the role of women gets even smaller. Women made up nearly 28 percent of all environmental scientists and geoscientists in the U.S. in 2015. Yet while there's plenty of room for women to claim a larger presence in the field, the women who do enter this field have been out-earning their male peers. Five years into their careers, women in environmental science make an average of $47,000, while men earn $44,000, according to the Glassdoor study.</p> <p>The good news is that green jobs are high in demand. Not only that, but it's now entirely possible to rake in a good deal of money as an environmental scientist. Your best bet is to go for a gig with the federal government. Environmental scientists working for the feds in 2016 earned <a href="https://www.bls.gov/ooh/life-physical-and-social-science/environmental-scientists-and-specialists.htm#tab-5" target="_blank">more than six figures</a> on average, according to data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.</p> <h2>5. Kinesiology</h2> <p>With a median base pay of $43,000, women are the top earners in the study of the mechanics of body movement. Men in kinesiology earn an average of $2,000 less than women in the field, according to Glassdoor.</p> <p>Students with a degree in kinesiology have plentiful employment opportunities: professional sports organizations, corporate fitness programs, sports clubs, spas, hospitals, and Olympic training programs, to name a few.</p> <p>A kinesiology degree can land you a gig in epidemiology, for example, which has a mean annual wage of nearly $78,000, although it's possible to earn <a href="https://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes191041.htm" target="_blank">more than six figures</a>. Other career routes for kinesiology degree holders include physical therapy (more than $87,000) and occupational therapy (more than $84,000).</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/brittany-lyte">Brittany Lyte</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-careers-where-women-earn-more-than-men">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-great-jobs-for-the-next-10-years">8 Great Jobs for the Next 10 Years</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/crime-scene-cleaner-and-4-other-trades-that-pay-surprisingly-well">Crime Scene Cleaner and 4 Other Trades That Pay Surprisingly Well</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-careers-that-pay-women-more-than-men">7 Careers That Pay Women More Than Men</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-essential-facts-women-should-know-before-asking-for-a-raise">5 Essential Facts Women Should Know Before Asking for a Raise</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building career fields college majors high earners pay reverse wage cap salary women Thu, 15 Jun 2017 08:00:14 +0000 Brittany Lyte 1961860 at http://www.wisebread.com The Proper Ways to Discuss Salary in a Job Interview http://www.wisebread.com/the-proper-ways-to-discuss-salary-in-a-job-interview <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/the-proper-ways-to-discuss-salary-in-a-job-interview" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/confident_young_job_applicant.jpg" alt="Confident young job applicant" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Interviewing for a new position can be stressful. It's also a balancing act that can take time, and practice, to perfect.</p> <p>When it comes to salary expectations, the pressure increases exponentially. How much will they pay you? How much dare you ask for? What about benefits, and other deciding factors? The way you play this game can put thousands of extra dollars in your paycheck. So how should you bring it up?</p> <h2>When to discuss salary</h2> <p>There are a few different schools of thought on this. Some people say that you should wait until the person asking the questions mentions it. If they don't bring it up, you stay silent and wait for the next interview (if there is one). Others say that you should bring it up yourself if the interviewer doesn't mention it or skates around the subject. And some people are of the firm belief that you should only discuss salary once you've been offered the job.</p> <p>The fact is, there's no right or wrong answer here. You have to get a feel for how the interview process is going, and also the demeanor of the person doing the interview. If you have an instant rapport with this interviewer, and the meeting is going exceptionally well, you can be fairly confident that bringing up the subject of salary without being prompted will be OK.</p> <p>However, if you have one of those interviews with a cold interviewer behind the desk and very little chitchat, asking about salary in an already tense atmosphere could just make things worse.</p> <p>If the interviewer starts talking about the subject, without actually mentioning salary directly (for instance, they discuss benefits packages, paid time off, sick leave, and so on) then you have a natural &quot;in&quot; to bring it up.</p> <h2>Salary research is imperative</h2> <p>Chances are you already know the salary range for this position. If you don't, be prepared. Before you go into the first interview, or even apply for the job, do your research. Look on sites like Salary.com and Glassdoor.com to find the salaries of people in the position for which you're applying. Get a good range. Then, look at what different companies are paying for that role, and how that salary differs from state to state (or even country to country).</p> <p>You need to understand what you are worth and what the market will pay for someone with your skills and expertise. When you have that information, you put yourself in a position of confidence. Knowledge is power, and you will have a much stronger negotiating position if you have the research to back you up.</p> <h2>Use the anchoring technique</h2> <p>It's a technique widely used by people in sales, advertising, and marketing, and it works. Contrary to popular opinion, <em>you</em> need to come out with the first number in the interview. Old school interviewers and interviewees will say this is risky because you could name a number so high it disqualifies you, or so low you'll miss out on more money. Actually, as long as you've done your research, it's good business, and puts you in control of the discussion. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/this-simple-negotiating-trick-puts-money-in-your-pocket?ref=seealso" target="_blank">This Simple Negotiating Trick Puts Money in Your Pocket</a>)</p> <p>Let's take a hypothetical: You know that this position is worth, say $95,000 a year plus benefits. You also know that you are highly-qualified, have a superb resume, impeccable references, and that the company in question has had trouble filling the role. Therefore, you ask for much more than $95,000. Start at $120,000, or more. You have good reason to want this much money. You are worth it, and every day the company does not have this role filled, they are wasting time and money looking for a candidate. If they really want you, they'll pay it. If they don't, they won't.</p> <p>By anchoring the interviewer to a higher figure, you can eventually haggle your way to a salary that you are comfortable taking &mdash; say $100,000, which may be $5,000 more than the company wanted to spend, but $20,000 less than your asking price. Everyone's a winner.</p> <h2>How to tackle some of the tricky salary questions</h2> <p>You are going to get asked about salary in a variety of ways. Remember, you're in a negotiation; you want the most money for the role and they want to pay as little as possible. Here are some typical questions, and how to handle them.</p> <h2>&quot;What kind of salary range are you looking for?&quot;</h2> <p>Think about that for a second. It's a ridiculous question. They're asking you, &quot;What is the least amount of money you would be willing to take for this role, and what is your high-end?&quot; Do you think they're going to give you the top end of your salary range? Of course not, you've already told them how cheaply they can get you.</p> <p>So, narrow the answer down to something that gives very little wiggle room. For example, &quot;I'm looking for a salary in the high $90s&quot; focuses on a salary that's at least $97,000 a year. If you say &quot;$90,000&ndash;$100,000,&quot; guess what &hellip; you're getting $90,000.</p> <h2>&quot;How much are you currently making?&quot;</h2> <p>This is another nasty question, although it may seem like a perfectly innocent one to ask. You may currently be earning $60,000 a year, but so what? After doing the research, paired with your experience, you know you should be getting at least $80,000 a year for the job to which you're applying.</p> <p>Don't fall into this trap, because you are selling yourself short. Simply answer with something like, &quot;It's an apples to oranges comparison to compare my current salary to this role. If you supply me with more information about the role, the benefits package, the hours, the workload, and so on, I can let you know what salary I am looking for.&quot;</p> <h2>&quot;What are your salary expectations?&quot;</h2> <p>&quot;Ummm &hellip; I'd like as much money as possible please!&quot; Clearly, that's not the right answer, but that's what you're thinking. Again, you need to be realistic based on the research you've done, your current level of experience, and what you can bring to this new firm. There is no harm in saying &quot;That's not a question I can answer until I have a much better grasp on the requirements of the position, and what benefits come with it.&quot;</p> <h2>&quot;We really want you, but can't afford you. Would you take a pay cut?&quot;</h2> <p>If you've already named your price and they ask you this question, don't give up. If they really want you, they should be willing to pay. This is a sly way of setting your expectations low. They're saying &quot;We're cheap, we want to pay the minimum.&quot;</p> <p>Well, until you know what that minimum is, you cannot possibly answer this question. Never say, &quot;I'd consider it,&quot; or, &quot;Sure, if that's what it takes to get my foot in the door.&quot; That's just rolling over for them. Instead, make them put the entire offer on the table first, including benefits, travel allowances, vacation time, sick time, and so on. It's possible that you could take less money than you're earning now if they give you other concessions, like working only four days a week, working remotely, or getting six weeks of paid time off.</p> <p>Remember, salary negotiation is a crucial part of the interview process, but you should not be chastised for wanting a good living wage. Good luck out there.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-proper-ways-to-discuss-salary-in-a-job-interview">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-hired-by-your-dream-company">How to Get Hired by Your Dream Company</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-land-the-job-when-youre-overqualified">How to Land the Job When You&#039;re Overqualified</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-ways-college-grads-can-get-ahead-in-the-job-hunt">11 Ways College Grads Can Get Ahead in the Job Hunt</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-things-you-should-never-include-in-your-cover-letter">7 Things You Should Never Include in Your Cover Letter</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-keep-your-job-search-a-secret">How to Keep Your Job Search a Secret</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Job Hunting advice anchoring technique interviewing negotiations new jobs pay questions research salary strategies wages Tue, 23 May 2017 09:00:11 +0000 Paul Michael 1951908 at http://www.wisebread.com Crime Scene Cleaner and 4 Other Trades That Pay Surprisingly Well http://www.wisebread.com/crime-scene-cleaner-and-4-other-trades-that-pay-surprisingly-well <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/crime-scene-cleaner-and-4-other-trades-that-pay-surprisingly-well" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/crime_scene_tape_000032312458.jpg" alt="Crime scene cleaner and other trades that pay well" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>These days, the dream of owning a home with two dogs, a gaggle of kids, and a white picket fence will cost you something fierce. In most pockets of this country, the <a href="https://www.census.gov/content/dam/Census/library/publications/2014/demo/p60-249.pdf">median U.S. household income</a> of $52,000 simply won't cut it. But you needn't enroll in law or medical school to earn a fine living. In fact, there are several high-paying jobs floating under the radar that can help you earn a desirable salary &mdash; without all those lectures on ethics and anatomy. Read on for our roundup of the <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/17-more-places-to-buy-sell-and-trade-books">top trades</a> that pay surprisingly well.</p> <h2>1. Elevator Repairer</h2> <p>The median pay for an <a href="http://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes474021.htm">elevator repairer</a> in the U.S. is $78,620, and can be as high as $110,000 in places where the job is in demand such as New York, California, Illinois, Oregon, Maine, Massachusetts, and Hawaii. While only 27 people a year <a href="http://abcnews.go.com/US/woman-crushed-york-elevator-accident/story?id=15153573#.T5W5J-3U7zI">die in elevator crashes</a> &mdash; you have a better chance of getting struck by lightning &mdash; more than 10,000 people a year are injured in elevator malfunction incidents. When something goes wrong, an elevator repairer is one of the first people called on the scene for help. Even more common than injuries and deaths are cases of inconvenience: People get stuck inside elevators quite often, which is why this job is well-paid as well as important.</p> <h2>2. Geographer</h2> <p>The job of mapping the world may seem gone with the wind, but there are actually 1,700 modern-day Alexander von Humboldts in the U.S. who track human activity, chart demographic trends, study migration patterns, and, of course, sketch and edit maps of points of interest across our planet. If you're lucky enough to secure a geographer gig &mdash; they are few and far between &mdash; the rewards are handsome. In addition to enjoying a contemporary job rooted in the age of global exploration, you'll earn a <a href="http://www.bls.gov/ooh/life-physical-and-social-science/geographers.htm">median salary</a> of about $75,000. There's more good news: Geographer jobs have a rapid growth forecast rate of nearly 30%, which means new job opportunities are sprouting across the country.</p> <h2>3. Crab Fisherman</h2> <p>If you're looking to make fast cash, a crab fisherman's life may be for you. The dangerous work of collecting crabs from freezing, tumultuous waters is handsomely rewarded. Crab fisherman can earn $60,000 in just two to three months. If that kind of money seems worth the risk of taking on the most dangerous job in the nation, you may want to head to Alaska. Crab fishermen in the 49th state tend to be the highest earners. You do not need a high school degree for this craft, but strength and guts are all but required.</p> <h2>4. Crime Scene Cleaner</h2> <p>Crime doesn't pay. But crime cleanup certainly does. The job of <a href="http://everydaylife.globalpost.com/crime-scene-cleanup-job-duties-2469.html">cleaning up blood and shattered glass</a> and toxic hazards takes a strong stomach, but with a few years experience you can earn upwards of $80,000. It's also not a 9-to-5 gig; you need to be ready to jump into action at a moment's notice. But there are few other occupations that can give you the thrill of feeling like you're living in an episode of <em>CSI: Crime Scene Investigation</em>.</p> <h2>5. Landfill Gas Operator</h2> <p>Landfills contain tons of garbage that produce methane gas, a byproduct of the natural breakdown process. Landfill gas operators remove the gas, which can be dangerous if left unchecked. It's a stinky job &mdash; literally &mdash; but what doesn't stink is the take-home pay. You can <a href="http://www.insidejobs.com/careers/landfill-gas-collection-operator">earn as much as $148,000</a> by monitoring gas levels and diverting excess fumes that could become hazardous.</p> <p><em>Do you work in a high-paying trade? Tell us about it in the comments below!</em></p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <p>&nbsp;</p> <div align="center"><a href="//www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fcrime-scene-cleaner-and-4-other-trades-that-pay-surprisingly-well&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FCrime%20Scene%20Cleaner%20and%204%20Other%20Trades%20That%20Pay%20Surprisingly%20Well.jpg&amp;description=Crime%20Scene%20Cleaner%20and%204%20Other%20Trades%20That%20Pay%20Surprisingly%20Well" data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-config="above" data-pin-color="red" data-pin-height="28"><img src="//assets.pinterest.com/images/pidgets/pinit_fg_en_rect_red_28.png" alt="" /></a> </p> <!-- Please call pinit.js only once per page --><!-- Please call pinit.js only once per page --><script type="text/javascript" async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/Crime%20Scene%20Cleaner%20and%204%20Other%20Trades%20That%20Pay%20Surprisingly%20Well.jpg" alt="Crime Scene Cleaner and 4 Other Trades That Pay Surprisingly Well" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/brittany-lyte">Brittany Lyte</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/crime-scene-cleaner-and-4-other-trades-that-pay-surprisingly-well">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-good-reasons-to-become-a-contractor">8 Good Reasons to Become a Contractor</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-careers-where-women-earn-more-than-men">5 Careers Where Women Earn More Than Men</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-unexpected-costs-of-a-higher-paying-job-offer">4 Unexpected Costs of a Higher-Paying Job Offer</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/didnt-get-the-raise-ask-for-this-instead">Didn&#039;t Get the Raise? Ask for This, Instead</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building employment income labor pay salary trades Tue, 30 Jun 2015 09:00:15 +0000 Brittany Lyte 1469200 at http://www.wisebread.com 10 Things Besides Salary to Negotiate at Work http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-besides-salary-to-negotiate-at-work <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/10-things-besides-salary-to-negotiate-at-work" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/businessmen-conversation-Dollarphotoclub_73754567.jpg" alt="businessmen conversation" title="businessmen conversation" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Fringe benefits. Aren't they great? And one of the best things about being offered a new job is the leverage to negotiate your benefits package, which is often worth thousands of dollars. So don't leave money on the table &mdash; here are 10 things besides salary to negotiate at work. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-negotiate-higher-pay-at-your-next-new-job?ref=seealso">How to Negotiate Higher Pay at Your Next New Job</a>)</p> <h2>1. Retirement Plans</h2> <p>Your company should already have detailed retirement plans in place, but in a few cases, you might be able to negotiate contributions to your 401(k). If your company's plan is unsatisfactory, you may also be able to negotiate higher salary or other perks in lieu of 401(k) matching.</p> <h2>2. Bonuses</h2> <p>Bonuses are subject to an employer's discretion and are generally performance based, but you can establish an expected yearly bonus range up front and negotiate what percentage of your salary to expect. Conversely, if you're risk averse, you might consider negotiating a higher base salary instead of a bonus.</p> <h2>3. Additional Performance Compensation</h2> <p>Though you are a salaried employee, if you're in any type of position where your job is to generate new business, you can discuss additional compensation for bringing deals in the door &mdash; such as commissions, for example. The amount can be equal to a percentage of the total deal amount &mdash; perhaps 1% or more. If you're confident in your sales ability, you may even choose to take a lower salary for such an agreement.</p> <h2>4. Non-Compete Clauses</h2> <p>Some employers add non-compete clauses in their employment agreements. Watch out for the wording of these, because they can prevent you from leaving and immediately going to work at a competing firm, for yourself, or engaging in side work while with the company and for a specified time frame after. In some cases, this can even extend for one or more years after your departure. Non-competes can also prevent you from taking your clients and contact lists with you.</p> <h2>5. Paid Vacation, Holidays, and Sick Days</h2> <p>There are no laws mandating paid vacation, holidays, and sick leave. These are considered fringe benefits and are an agreement between you and your employer. Chances are, your employer has outlined the standard vacation and sick leave limits for all employees, but you can still negotiate additional vacation and sick days if you don't feel the offering meets your expectations.</p> <h2>6. Flex-Time</h2> <p>More and more companies are recognizing that the majority of work responsibilities involve work that can be completed <em>without</em> your physical presence at the office, so negotiate reduced office hours. Substitute them with telecommute hours. You can ask for compressed work days or set days where you don't come into the office at all.</p> <h2>7. Higher Salary to Opt-Out of Health, Dental, Vision, and Life Insurance</h2> <p>You are not required to participate in the company health benefit plans, but if your company has one in place, great &mdash; you have a choice. Should you decide to participate, it'll cost your employer a monthly amount &mdash; let's say equal to 100% of your monthly payment. So, if you're paying $250 per month, your employer is also paying $250 per month. You can speak with executive officers and negotiate a salary increase if you elect to not participate in the company sponsored health plan.</p> <h2>8. Professional Development, Tuition Reimbursement, and Memberships</h2> <p>Companies encourage professional development, as well as joining professional groups and organizations because these activities support your efforts to network and bring in new business. Display your interest in participating in such activities and discuss initiation fees and annual dues. Do the same for independent study and continued education courses you're interested in taking.</p> <h2>9. Transportation and Meal Plans</h2> <p>Ask for a weekly transportation credit and/or meal plan to help you cover the cost of being an employee. These expenses are tax-deductible for self-employed individuals, but come out of your pocket as an employee. After all, your boss is likely writing off a portion &mdash; if not all &mdash; of her expenses. Don't be afraid to casually mention how many companies offer transportation programs and meal plans.</p> <h2>10. Reimbursement of Expenses</h2> <p>If you travel or entertain clients for work, your company will reimburse you for your expenses, but take it a step further by asking for a company credit card if you'll have recurring outlays. This way, you won't have to wait until the following month to be reimbursed.</p> <p><em>Have you negotiated these or any other forms of non-salary compensation at work? What was your strategy?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/qiana-chavaia">Qiana Chavaia</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-besides-salary-to-negotiate-at-work">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-negotiate-higher-pay-at-your-next-new-job">How to Negotiate Higher Pay at Your Next New Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-hidden-costs-of-a-new-job">12 Hidden Costs of a New Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-much-money-should-a-ceo-make">How much money should a CEO make?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/crime-scene-cleaner-and-4-other-trades-that-pay-surprisingly-well">Crime Scene Cleaner and 4 Other Trades That Pay Surprisingly Well</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income benefits negotiation pay salary Tue, 06 Jan 2015 10:00:05 +0000 Qiana Chavaia 1275646 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Negotiate Higher Pay at Your Next New Job http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-negotiate-higher-pay-at-your-next-new-job <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-negotiate-higher-pay-at-your-next-new-job" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/interview-140299853.jpg" alt="handshake" title="handshake" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="167" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Nearly everyone wants to make more money. One of the best ways to get paid more is to ask for more when you are interviewing for a new job.</p> <p>After considering what employment candidates and hiring managers have told me about salary negotiations plus research on this topic, I&#39;ve put together a list of the negotiating tactics that work at key stages of the new hire process. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-find-unlisted-jobs-and-win-every-salary-negotiation?ref=seealso">How to Win Every Salary Negotiation</a>)</p> <h2>Develop Your Negotiating Position Before You Interview</h2> <p>Figure out what you want in a job, including the pay, before you start talking to potential employers. Consider all aspects of compensation, including salary, commission, bonus structure, and benefits, which may include healthcare insurance, vacation time, and 401(k) matches.</p> <h3>Determine Your Value</h3> <p><a href="http://workreimagined.aarp.org/manage-your-career/career-coaching/earn-what-youre-worth-actively-negotiate-your-next-salary/2/">Consult the professional associations in your field</a> and websites such as <a href="http://www.salary.com/">Salary.com</a> and <a href="http://www.payscale.com/">PayScale.com</a> to determine average salaries based on credentials, years of experience, responsibility levels, and geography.</p> <h3>Research Targeted Employers</h3> <p>Find out how compensation is structured using sites like <a href="http://www.glassdoor.com/index.htm">Glassdoor.com</a>; for example, one company may emphasize performance bonuses while another focuses on outstanding benefits. If possible, talk with current and former employees about how they negotiated pay with these companies. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-you-must-learn-about-the-company-before-your-job-interview?ref=seealso">What You Should Learn About the Company Before Your Interview</a>)</p> <h3>Evaluate the Financial Health of Potential Employers</h3> <p>You are more likely to <a href="http://www.jobdig.com/articles/1096/Some_Things_to_Know_Before_Negotiating_Salary_with_a_New_Employer.html">negotiate higher pay with a profitable, growing business with a constant demand for talented people</a> than with a struggling one.</p> <p>After gathering information, establish your priorities. Decide what is firm and what is negotiable in terms of salary and other forms of compensation.</p> <h2>Be Ready to Talk About Money, but Focus on Non-Money Issues</h2> <p>Avoid discussions of money during your first interview so that you and the employer can focus on company needs and job requirements. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-questions-you-must-ask-at-your-next-job-interview?ref=seealso">4 Questions You Should Ask at Your Job Interview</a>)</p> <h3>Emphasize Your Capabilities</h3> <p>During screening and interviewing sessions, show how you are a good fit with the company&#39;s culture and how your qualifications exceed requirements.</p> <h3>Be Clear That Salary Requirements Depend on Job Requirements</h3> <p>If a potential employer asks about your expectations for annual salary, say the amount depends on the position, work content, level of responsibility, etc. <a href="http://www.salary.com/should-i-disclose-salary-requirements/">Have a number in mind if pressed</a> but avoid pay discussions until you have developed a good understanding of the job duties and have proven you are a desirable candidate.</p> <h3>Be Ready to Answer the Current Salary Question</h3> <p>Be prepared to answer questions such as <a href="http://www.theladders.com/career-advice/salary-negotiation-tips-thou-shalt-not-regret-salary-disclosure">&quot;what is your current salary?&quot;</a> or &quot;do you have another offer?&quot; Show confidence in your abilities, even if you are not currently compensated well for your expertise. For example, explain that your current or most recent salary was average in the industry because you received an equity stake in a startup as alternate compensation, earned high levels of per-diem pay for a job that required extensive travel, or had a generous benefits plan that included a pension.</p> <p>Above all, make sure you are truly the candidate the hiring manager wants for the job. As the top-rated candidate, you are worth more than others and can command higher-than-average pay.</p> <h2>Negotiate Politely When You Receive an Offer</h2> <p>Wait until you have an offer in hand before you begin negotiations. After receiving an offer via telephone or a face-to-face meeting, ask for a few days to think about your response. Ideally, wait until you receive an official offer letter that details the salary and other forms of compensation before you develop a counteroffer strategy. When you are ready, open pay discussions politely.</p> <h3>Make Your Counteroffer Pleasantly</h3> <p>Show genuine interest in the position and the near guarantee that if the hiring manager upped the offer, you&#39;d most certainly accept. <a href="http://www.askamanager.org/2012/07/what-to-say-when-you-negotiate-salary.html">For example, you might say &quot;If you were able to do $X, I&#39;d be thrilled to accept</a>.&quot; Stop talking after you make a counteroffer. Let the other party consider your request and respond.</p> <h3>Justify Your Request for More Money</h3> <p>For example, explain that you have ranked as a top-performing sales representative, outshone your peers academically, or improved quality at operations much larger and <a href="http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB124977651986217193">more complex than the one for which you are being considered</a>.</p> <h3>Assure Higher Management of Your Qualifications and Commitment</h3> <p>She may need to get salary approvals from her boss or a committee, so specific reasons why you are worth more are critical. Again, confirm your desire to join the company. The hiring manager needs to know <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=km2Hd_xgo9Q">that you will accept the job if given higher pay</a> as she doesn&#39;t want to advocate for someone who won&#39;t ultimately accept the position</p> <h3>Be Professional Throughout the Process</h3> <p>If you use questionable tactics, landing the job at the price you want is unlikely. Hiring managers want people who are assertive and articulate about their value, not employees who are rude and demanding. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/deal-killers-5-phrases-to-avoid-when-negotiating?ref=seealso">5 Phrases to Avoid When Negotiating</a>)</p> <h3>Make All Your Requests at the Same Time</h3> <p>Don&#39;t ask for (and receive) a higher salary and then push for a better bonus structure at a later date. Say what you want, once. Hiring managers won&#39;t keep advocating for you again and again.</p> <p>Know that many employers expect negotiations. So, when you receive an offer that is below your desired amount, don&#39;t ask &quot;is this offer negotiable?&quot; You don&#39;t need permission to negotiate. Just remember to be respectful in your communications.</p> <h2>Don&#39;t Quit Negotiating If You&#39;ve Been Turned Down</h2> <p>If the employer is unable to give you the pay you want at the moment you ask, but you decide to accept the job anyway, don&#39;t stop trying to get more money. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-ways-to-boost-your-take-home-pay?ref=seealso">How to Boost Your Take-Home Pay</a>)</p> <h3>Ask for a Review After the Employment Trial Period</h3> <p>In this way, <a href="http://work.chron.com/negotiate-desired-salary-8290.html">you can prove your worth to the hiring manager during the first months on the job</a>. By getting a bump in pay early, you can build on a higher base rate for future merit increases.</p> <h3>Find Out Why You Were Denied</h3> <p>Discover reasons why the company may not be able to extend a higher offer initially. Later, when circumstances change (perhaps the firm receives equity funding or you earn a new professional designation), you can ask for more money based on these updates.</p> <p>Understand that you may not get what you want in a salary negotiation. You can only make a compelling case for higher pay; you can&#39;t force a company to pay the rate you desire. But to earn an amount that is fair to both you and the employer, research market rates, determine and explain why you are an outstanding candidate, make a reasonable counter offer, and keep proving and improving your value after you&#39;ve been hired.</p> <p><em>Have you negotiated for a salary at a new job? What worked for you?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/julie-rains">Julie Rains</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-negotiate-higher-pay-at-your-next-new-job">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-4"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-besides-salary-to-negotiate-at-work">10 Things Besides Salary to Negotiate at Work</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/you-should-always-negotiate-a-raise-here-are-10-reasons-why">You Should Always Negotiate a Raise: Here Are 10 Reasons Why</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-much-money-should-a-ceo-make">How much money should a CEO make?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-simple-steps-to-discovering-your-true-salary-potential">6 Simple Steps to Discovering Your True Salary Potential</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income negotiation pay raise salary Mon, 02 Dec 2013 10:30:53 +0000 Julie Rains 1098853 at http://www.wisebread.com Reality TV: Does It Pay to Apply? http://www.wisebread.com/reality-tv-does-it-pay-to-apply <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/reality-tv-does-it-pay-to-apply" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/4131904992_7d6f96d7bb.jpg" alt="reality tv" title="reality tv" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="188" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Reality television has exploded in recent years with top stars bringing in large sums for their exploits. Kate Gosselin of &quot;Kate Plus 8&quot; reportedly makes $250,000 per episode. Mike &quot;The Situation&quot; Sorrentino of the Jersey Shore will make $5 million in 2010. And Kim Kardashian makes about that much annually.</p> <p>You may not have eight kids or live in New Jersey, but what if you'd like to update your kitchen? While most of us are probably happier watching TV than appearing on it, there are financial benefits to reality television that could make applying for a show worthwhile.</p> <h2>Do It Yourself</h2> <p>After purchasing a pre-war apartment, New York City-based artist <a href="http://www.arianaboussardreifel.com/">Ariana Boussard-Reifel</a> got an idea.&quot;The apartment was in disastrous condition with holes in the walls and floor, exposed electrical wires and general chaos,&quot; said Boussard-Reifel. &quot;It had to be gutted and I knew that to renovate it to my level of taste was going to be out of my budget.&quot;</p> <p>Rather than rack up debt to complete the renovation, she decided to try her luck on reality TV. She ended up on a show called &quot;<a href="http://www.diynetwork.com/10-grand-in-your-hand/apartment-alterations/index.html">10 Grand in Your Hand</a>&quot; on the DIY network. &quot;I had been watching the DIY channel to pick up skills and thought: Why can't I be on this?&quot; said Boussard-Reifel. Thanks to the show, she saved nearly $16,000 on a renovation worth $30,000. Sponsors donated high-end products, including $2,000 in Kohler sinks and faucets, and $6,000 in exotic and sustainable hardwood flooring.</p> <p>Being on the show had other benefits too &mdash; like a set deadline for her project. Doing the work herself meant she maintained control over aesthetic decisions, which was important to her. &quot;The apartment is now quite beautiful, all new and I have a great story to tell guests,&quot; she said.</p> <h2>Tell Your Story</h2> <p>There's no harm in applying for a reality show that might help you reach a goal quicker than an old-fashioned savings plan. Whether you want to remodel your kitchen, travel the world, or buy a new wardrobe, there is a reality show for your dream. The key is convincing a casting director that you're the best choice for the show.</p> <p>&quot;Think about who you are and what you have to offer. You may not think the fact that you are from a small farm town or can speak five languages because you moved a lot as a kid with Army parents is interesting, but to the millions that are watching, these qualities are exactly what make you so endearing,&quot; <a href="http://risatanania.com/">Risa Tanania</a>, a top reality casting director in New York City, says.</p> <p>Casting directors have an uncanny ability to read people, often forming an opinion within two minutes. When submitting a video or going to an audition, catch their attention quickly. &quot;This isn't to say you should juggle while you speak. Frankly, that gets a little annoying. But consider your energy at your highest point and then multiply that by 10,&quot; recommends Tanania. &quot;Get excited. If you aren't excited about the prospect of being on the show, why would we be [excited] about watching you?&quot;</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/lauren-lyons-cole">Lauren Lyons Cole</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/reality-tv-does-it-pay-to-apply">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-awesome-money-making-hobbies">10 Awesome Money-Making Hobbies</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-surprising-sources-of-celeb-income">6 Surprising Sources of Celeb Income</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-clever-ways-people-are-making-money-from-pok-mon-go">8 Clever Ways People Are Making Money From Pokémon GO</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-social-media-stars-who-earn-way-more-than-you">5 Social Media Stars Who Earn Way More Than You</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-great-side-jobs-for-book-lovers">6 Great Side Jobs for Book Lovers</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Entertainment Extra Income pay reality tv Tue, 05 Oct 2010 11:36:13 +0000 Lauren Lyons Cole 252083 at http://www.wisebread.com Should I Take a Job That Pays Less Than Unemployment? http://www.wisebread.com/should-i-take-a-job-that-pays-less-than-unemployment <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/should-i-take-a-job-that-pays-less-than-unemployment" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/confused.jpg" alt="" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="166" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p class="MsoNormal">The statistics are in.<span style="">&nbsp; </span>While the unemployment rate was last counted at 8.5%, the underemployment rate (those who quit looking for work or have taken part-time jobs in lieu of a desired full-time job) is up to 15.6%.<span style="">&nbsp; </span>So what should you do if you&rsquo;re offered a lower-paying job while on unemployment?<span style="">&nbsp; </span>Should you take it?<o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><a href="http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=newsarchive&amp;sid=apllk4murp0I">The Bloomberg story</a> that cited the 15.6% rate of underemployment makes several good points.<span style="">&nbsp; </span>First, it acknowledges that gaining employment isn&rsquo;t always what it seems.<span style="">&nbsp; </span>Secondly, it points out that there are many unemployed who are no longer receiving unemployment benefits.<span style="">&nbsp; </span>And so we&rsquo;re left with this nagging question of what to do:<span style="">&nbsp; </span>Should you take that part-time or lower-paying full time job or just stay on unemployment until something better comes along?<span style="">&nbsp; </span>Here are expert tips for both sides of the argument:<o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b style="">You Should Take That Job</b><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></p> <p class="MsoNormal">Many career and living experts say, &ldquo;Go for it.&rdquo; Here&rsquo;s why:<o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></p> <p class="MsoNormal">1.&nbsp;&nbsp; <b style="">It Shows That You Have What it Takes</b><span style="">&nbsp; </span>-<span style="">&nbsp; </span>&ldquo;Most employers will find candidates much more marketable and hirable when employed (regardless of how much money they are making) as opposed to staying home and having the government take care of them,&rdquo; says Jim Luzar, president of Sales Consultants of Brookfield.<span style="">&nbsp; </span>He goes on to say that &ldquo;While the extra money is nice, candidates will in the long run benefit because they are keeping their skills sharpened for the future. &nbsp;Additionally, it shows courage, drive and guts when you do this, three traits that I personally look for in anyone I hire or place.&rdquo;<span style="">&nbsp; </span><o:p></o:p>&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">J.F. (Jim) Straw, of the <a href="http://www.businesslyceum.com/">Business Lyceum</a>, shared a story of a man who took a low-paying job in a TV repair shop during the <st1:place w:st="on">Silicon Valley</st1:place> tumble years ago (when others in his field were holding out for a better job.)<span style="">&nbsp; </span>&ldquo;He found a job in his career field before any of the others.<span style="">&nbsp; </span>Why?&nbsp; Because the potential employers saw a man who wanted to work ... as evidenced by his taking the low paying job.<span style="">&nbsp; </span>It is easier to get a job, when you have a job.&rdquo;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">2.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<b style="">It Exposes You to More Opportunities</b> &ndash; Certainly, there are ways to grow within a company &ndash; even if the initial job description is low on the pay scale. Karen Wilson-Dooley, a <a href="http://www.acareersolution.com/">certified career management coach</a>, encourages job-searchers to ask, &ldquo;<span style="">what opportunities are there for advancement with this employer and will I be able to increase wages / position within a respectable length of time? You may consider accepting the position after researching potential opportunities to grow with that company and increase your salary over time.&rdquo;</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="">3.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</span><b style="">It May Give You Back Your Benefits</b> &ndash; Karen also echoes the sentiments of many who&rsquo;ve acknowledged the value of employer-based health insurance, 401K matches, and life insurance.<span style="">&nbsp; </span>&ldquo;<span style="">Unemployment compensation does not provide fringe benefits that a potential employer may provide. Therefore, you need to ask yourself if you are covered under a spouse&rsquo;s insurance policy and, if so, how much it is costing you to buy coverage under the spouse&rsquo;s policy vs. a policy you may have with your own employer.&rdquo;<span style="">&nbsp; </span>For many, a decent benefits package may be reason enough to take a lower-paying job.</span><span style=""><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><b style="">You Should NOT Take That Job</b><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></p> <p class="MsoNormal">There are many who say just the opposite, however.<span style="">&nbsp; </span>Here&rsquo;s why:<o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></p> <p class="MsoNormal">1.&nbsp;&nbsp; <b style="">It Can be a Sign of Desperation</b> &ndash; When Beth Colley of <a href="http://www.chesres.com/">Chesapeake Resume Writing Service</a> was asked if there were any benefits to taking a job that paid less than unemployment, her answer was straight to the point:<span style="">&nbsp; </span>&ldquo;None, what-so-ever.&rdquo;<span style="">&nbsp; </span>She says that &ldquo;Job seekers tend to adopt a desperation mode and give up. When career professionals accept lower paying jobs they typically begin to develop a pattern of instability, jumping from one job to the next for a few extra dollars an hour. This pattern of instability wreaks havoc in terms of resume development and does more to damage a person&rsquo;s morale and employment opportunities than increase it. Just because someone is earning a pay check, it doesn&rsquo;t necessarily mean they are being productive.&rdquo;<o:p></o:p>&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal">What can job seekers do instead?<span style="">&nbsp; </span>Beth recommends taking time to build an effective network of supportive colleagues who can give you quality job leads and do short-term contract work that can provide a livable wage while building their resume.<span style="">&nbsp; </span>(Note that contract work must be reported, and may cause you to be ineligible for unemployment compensation.)</p> <p class="MsoNormal">2.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<b style="">It Can Take Time Away from Job-Searching</b> &ndash; With many interviews scheduled during working hours, it can be hard to take time away from your new lower-paying job to find better work.<span style="">&nbsp; </span>Understand that unemployment may give you the freedom to keep putting 110% into your career search, and that working a lesser job may get you stuck in a rut of not having enough time for better pursuits.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">3.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<b style="">It Can Mess with Your Long-Term Plan</b> &ndash; While there are occasions for taking a lower-paying job in the field of your choosing, there&rsquo;s little to be gained from taking the first job you can get.<span style="">&nbsp; </span>&ldquo;This is not typically the best move,&rdquo; advises Katie Philips of Snelling Professional Services.<span style="">&nbsp; </span>&ldquo;The long term needs to be considered.&nbsp; Where do you want to be in 3-5 years?&nbsp; What path will get you there- does this job take you a step further along that path?&nbsp; If not, strongly consider looking for a different one.<span style="">&nbsp; </span>If the job does take you along the career path that you desire to go down, I&rsquo;d encourage you to take the opportunity (even if the pay might be less) because it&rsquo;s an investment in your future.&nbsp; Maybe you take 1 step back to take 2 steps forward- that&rsquo;s a good move.&nbsp; But just accepting any job for a paycheck is not going to better your career in the long term. Period.&rdquo;<o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="">As you can see, there is often not a straight &ldquo;yes&rdquo; or &ldquo;no&rdquo; answer for every situation.<span style="">&nbsp; </span>By being diligent about creating a long-term plan for your career, carefully assessing each opportunity that comes along, and keeping a positive attitude about you, your chances of landing a career (and not just a job) improve dramatically.<span style="">&nbsp; </span>Best of luck with whatever works for you!</span>&nbsp;</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/linsey-knerl">Linsey Knerl</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/should-i-take-a-job-that-pays-less-than-unemployment">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/earn-more-money-by-demanding-it">Earn More Money by Demanding It</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/13-great-reasons-to-quit-your-job">13 Great Reasons to Quit Your Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/crime-scene-cleaner-and-4-other-trades-that-pay-surprisingly-well">Crime Scene Cleaner and 4 Other Trades That Pay Surprisingly Well</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-job-myths-boomers-should-stop-believing">6 Job Myths Boomers Should Stop Believing</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building job pay unemployment Wed, 15 Apr 2009 16:37:09 +0000 Linsey Knerl 3051 at http://www.wisebread.com How much money should a CEO make? http://www.wisebread.com/how-much-money-should-a-ceo-make <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-much-money-should-a-ceo-make" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/fatcat.jpg" alt="" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="167" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Ah, to be the head of a large American corporation... can you imagine what <a href="http://www.ips-dc.org/reports/070829-executiveexcess.pdf">life must be like at the top</a>?&nbsp;</p> <ul> <li>In 2007, the CEOs of large U.S. companies&nbsp;were paid in one day what the average US worker makes in an entire year. With an average pay of $10.8 million annually, over 364 times the pay of the average American worker. (Looking at median pay, however, brings the pay ratio closer to <a href="http://assets.opencrs.com/rpts/RL33935_20070322.pdf">179 to 1</a>.)</li> <li>CEO pay has increased 45% in the past ten years. Contrast this with the fact that the federal minimum wage increase, which just went into effect, gives bottom-rung workers roughly 7% less money, in real terms, than they were making a decade ago.</li> </ul> <p>Is this fair? Is it just?</p> <p>I myself am ambivalent on the issue. On one hand, in a capitalist society, there really isn't any limit to how much money a person can earn, technically. And there are many cases in which the CEO of a company actually conceived of and founded the company - shouldn't such an individual have the right to make oodles of money from his or her ideas? After all, some of the biggest companies in the world were started in someone's garage or home office.</p> <p>On the other hand, many of the CEOs at big US corporations did not build the company from the ground up. They might be immensely talented individuals, but do they deserve to be paid over $10 million a year, to say nothing of stock options, and perks like use of the company's jet?</p> <p>What about poorly performing CEOs? And severance packages? How much should companies pay a CEO to leave? According to the Kellogg School of business, leaving a company can be as lucrative as heading it up. Look at the severance packages for the following ex-CEOs:</p> <ul> <li>Robert Nardelli (Home Depot) - $210 million</li> <li>Michael Ovitz (Disney)&nbsp;- $140 million</li> <li>Stephen Hilbert (Conseco)&nbsp;- $72 million</li> <li>Carly Fiorina (Hewlett-Packard) - $21 million</li> </ul> <p>Is this money well-spent? Anyone who runs a small business in middle America would tell you that it doesn't seem logical to give more money to someone who is performing poorly just to make them go away. Can you imagine firing, say, someone who works for your home cleaning business because they've done a terrible job, and offering them several thousand dollars to never work for you again?</p> <p>There are a number of economic factors that play into these scenarios, usually involving risk and&nbsp;stock volatility&nbsp;(a good but oddly apologetic article on the issue can be found <a href="http://insight.kellogg.northwestern.edu/index.php/Kellogg/article/are_large_ceo_severance_packages_justified">here</a>). Compensation packages are often meant to help protect the reputation of a departing CEO. According to the Kellogg School, &quot;Research also suggests that companies offer incoming CEOs a greater amount of ex-ante severance pay when requesting a confidentiality agreement.&quot;</p> <p>I'm trying to fathom what this really means. As someone who has signed countless confidentiality agreements without ever getting access to the coporate jet, what gives CEOs the impression that their discretion can be bought? When Fiorina left HP, her compensation package included &quot;financial counseling&quot;. What kind of counseling do you need when you're walking away with $21 million? <em>Put it mostly in savings?</em></p> <p>Publicly-traded companies are run by corporate boards who&nbsp;determine&nbsp;a CEO's pay and benefits. Board members are usually experienced leaders from other large corporations whose expertise is called upon. However, many corporate boards comprise members whose individual goals often include becoming CEOs of major US firms themselves, so it is in their interest to provide lucrative (or excessive) compensation packages to the chief executive officer.</p> <p>This has raised the question as to who, exactly, should decide how much a CEO makes? What if a company's employees had the right to vote on a compensation package for their leaders? Should a company's shareholders have a binding vote? Should there be a cap on how much an individual can earn?</p> <p>I have no easy answers, but the question has been weighing on my mind as of late. What do you think?</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/andrea-karim">Andrea Karim</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-much-money-should-a-ceo-make">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-besides-salary-to-negotiate-at-work">10 Things Besides Salary to Negotiate at Work</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-negotiate-higher-pay-at-your-next-new-job">How to Negotiate Higher Pay at Your Next New Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/crime-scene-cleaner-and-4-other-trades-that-pay-surprisingly-well">Crime Scene Cleaner and 4 Other Trades That Pay Surprisingly Well</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-tricky-interview-questions-successful-ceos-always-ask">5 Tricky Interview Questions Successful CEOs Always Ask</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income CEO companies cost of living Fortune 500 pay pay raise pay scale salary Fri, 08 Aug 2008 17:47:04 +0000 Andrea Karim 2301 at http://www.wisebread.com The Federal Minimum Wage Increases This Week - Are You Getting a Pay Raise? http://www.wisebread.com/the-federal-minimum-wage-increases-this-week-are-you-getting-a-pay-raise <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/the-federal-minimum-wage-increases-this-week-are-you-getting-a-pay-raise" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/firstpaycheck.jpg" alt="My first paycheck" title="My First Paycheck" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="227" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>On July 24th, 2008, the Federal minimum wage in The United States will i<a href="http://www.dol.gov/esa/whd/flsa/">ncrease from $5.85 per hour to $6.55 per hour </a> in accordance to the 2007 amendment to the Fair Labor Standards Act. This is a 70 cent or approximately 12% increase from last year. Are You getting a pay raise?</p> <p>I am guessing that for most people the answer is &quot;no&quot; because many businesses already pay more than the Federal Minimum Wage to compete for workers. Additionally, more than 20 states have their own minimum wage laws that give workers higher minimum wages than the Federal rate. For example, in California the <a href="http://www.dir.ca.gov/Iwc/MinimumWageHistory.htm" target="_blank">minimum wage is already $8.00 per hour this year</a> . </p> <p>Some have argued that a raise in minimum wage would hurt small businesses, but according to <a href="http://www.prweb.com/releases/2007/2/prweb506201.htm">a survey conducted last year</a> , only 3 percent of the small businesses they surveyed paid their workers only the Federal minimum wage, and 6 percent paid only the state minimum wage. The remaining 91%, of small businesses already pay their workers more than the minimum wage so there is not much for them to worry about. </p> <p>Next year the Federal minimum wage will rise again to $7.25 and stop there until there is more legislation. Some states already index their minimum wage increases to inflation and adjust it annually so the next increase also may not have too much of an impact on businesses that already pay above the minimum wage. </p> <p>As always, you should know your rights as a worker no matter where you work. If you earn close to the minimum wage, then you should check your state&#39;s labor laws for the most updated minimum wage rates. If the law says that you are supposed to receive an increase in pay then you should make sure that you are paid the right amount on the effective date. If applicable, your workplace should also display a new poster informing you of the new minimum wage rates.</p> <p><em>Are you getting a pay raise due to this law?  Will it help you significantly in this economically challenging year? </em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/xin-lu">Xin Lu</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-federal-minimum-wage-increases-this-week-are-you-getting-a-pay-raise">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/will-45-mortgage-rates-jumpstart-the-housing-market">Will 4.5% mortgage rates jumpstart the housing market?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/are-you-doing-bad-things-with-your-money">Are You Doing Bad Things with Your Money?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/tips-for-finding-legitimate-work-at-home-opportunities">Tips for Finding Legitimate Work at Home Opportunities</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/when-should-you-say-no-to-those-who-want-to-borrow-money-from-you">When Should You Say No to Those Who Want to Borrow Money from You?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-should-you-do-when-you-are-asked-to-repay-an-overpayment-of-severance">What should you do when you are asked to repay an overpayment of severance?</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance Career and Income Consumer Affairs laws minimum wage money pay Tue, 22 Jul 2008 05:40:05 +0000 Xin Lu 2255 at http://www.wisebread.com HOW MUCH?! The free stuff you’ll have to pay for, sooner or later. http://www.wisebread.com/how-much-the-free-stuff-you-ll-have-to-pay-for-sooner-or-later <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-much-the-free-stuff-you-ll-have-to-pay-for-sooner-or-later" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/406547_1688 copy.jpg" alt="Not free" title="Not free" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="238" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>I flew to New York for business over the weekend. As I looked at the list of $8 pay-per-view movies and $5 snacks available, my mind went back in time to a few years ago, when free beers flowed, meals were complimentary and in-flight movies were standard. Then I looked around at other free services that have gone bye-bye, including free air for your tires, free doggie bones at the butchers, extra cheese on pizzas, school supplies, national parks and the good old 411 operator assistance, and I wondered…what else will soon cost you?</p> <p class="MsoNormal">This is by no means a comprehensive list, or even a correct one. It’s just speculation, based on the trends I have noticed and free services that have already started to disappear in certain states or other countries. </p> <p class="MsoNormal"><strong>1: Shopping Carts.</strong><br />In England, decades ago now, grocery stores began to charge for carts. You would get your coin back though, it was simply intended as a way to ensure you returned you cart to the store or the cart bay in the parking lot. However, many airports (including DIA in my state) now charge a mainly non-refundable fee for luggage carts and I see the same thing happening in grocery stores. Would it really bother you too much to put 25 cents into a cart to ease your burden? Probably not. But the stores would make millions from this little venture. There would be a small initial investment to retro-fit the carts with the money-collecting devices, but they’d soon make that money back. After that, it’s all pure profit.</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><strong>2: Tax on Internet purchases.</strong><br />Right now you only pay for tax on a purchase that originates in your state, but I can see that changing very soon. There’s just too much money to be made, the Internet is always going to be cheaper regardless of tax, and most states need the money more than Quasimodo needs back surgery. Look for taxes to be paid on everything in the next few years. It’s going to happen; it’s just a case of when. </p> <p class="MsoNormal"><strong>3: Condiments.</strong><br />Last year, I found myself in a fast-food burger chain. I’m not proud of it but I was hungry and short of cash. Anyway, when I asked for honey mustard dipping sauce I was charged 25 cents. Yep. 25 cents for a small container of MSG and sugar. I challenged this and they let me have it free, but most people aren’t as annoying as I am. It wasn’t the money; it was the principle of the thing. But I can soon see every fast food chain, and even the cheaper restaurants, charging extra for your ketchup, mustard and BBQ sauce. </p> <p class="MsoNormal"><strong>4: Using cups, plates and cutlery.</strong><br />Don’t think it could happen? Think again. A friend in the UK recently told me that he saw a small charge on his bill for cutlery usage. It was explained to him that this small charge went towards excellent cleaning services and polishing for the cutlery! It will no doubt take a while to filter into every eatery, but next time you ask for a paper cup or plastic knife and fork at a fast food chain, don’t be surprised if a charge comes with your request.</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><strong>5: Answering the call of nature.</strong><br />Many restrooms already carry a small fee, it’s where the term “to spend a penny” comes from. But I see this becoming standard across the US as companies and states struggle to keep the bathrooms in tip-top condition on their own dime. Don’t worry though, in this electronic age you won’t need to carry a bunch of loose change. You’ll just have to swipe your card to get into the bathroom. But $1 per “donation” will soon add up. (I wonder if it will be tax-deductible on business trips?)</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><strong>6: Drink refills.</strong><br />This is already beginning to phase out. My local Subway charges 25 cents for refills, and many other smaller chains and family-owned restaurants have a sign saying “no free refills.” It’s ironic, because as a UK native I’ve never had free refills. I spent my whole life savoring my one soda, ensuring it would last through the whole meal. Now, having been in the states, I’m slurping through an average of two when I eat out. Looks like I’ll have to get used to paying for that refill again.</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><strong>7: Roads.</strong><br />I sometimes use a toll-road to get to work, usually when I’m late for a meeting or just want to avoid the rush hour traffic. But at $2.50 each way, it can really add up during the working week. Now, I know we already technically pay for our roads with taxes. But with budgets for bridge and road repair already stretched way beyond their limits, I can see roads requiring more and more money from you in the form of extra taxation on gasoline and other travel-related purchases, or conversions to toll-roads in some areas. </p> <p class="MsoNormal"><strong>8: Clean Air.</strong><br />Am I entering into the realm of the ridiculous? Well, ask someone 40 years ago if they would pay more for a gallon of water than they would for a gallon of gas and they’d laugh in your face. But bottled water is now a billion-dollar business. With pollution still an issue in most states, I can see a time coming when you’d pay extra to breathe purified air, or scented air, or nutrient-fortified air. Ok, ok, probably not likely anytime soon. But Soylent Green’s dirty, dry, pollution-filled air may be surrounding you sooner than you think. How much would you then pay to fill your lungs with fresh, crisp air? For an interesting take on this, check out a play by Ben Elton called Gasping. It tackles the very subject of privatised air.</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u17/02774FE6.jpg" alt="Gasping" title="Gasping" width="116" height="200" /> </p> <p><a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0413736709?ie=UTF8&amp;tag=wisebread07-20&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=0413736709">Ben Elton Plays: Gasping</a><img src="http://www.assoc-amazon.com/e/ir?t=wisebread07-20&amp;l=as2&amp;o=1&amp;a=0413736709" width="1" height="1" /></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><strong>9: Network TV shows.</strong><br />So, technically most of us already pay a little for network TV via our cable or satellite company. But, if you’re really old fashioned you can pick up the broadcast on a pair of rabbit ears for nothing. I don’t expect that network TV as a whole will become a pay-per-view service like HBO or Starz, but here’s what I do predict. In time, certain shows will become pay-per-view, just like boxing matches or other sports events. Shows like Survivor and Lost get huge ratings, and I have already heard rumblings in the industry of adding a price to these shows. Nothing major, maybe $2 per episode (something they’ve been testing with iTunes) but enough to rake in a whole bunch of extra dough. And just because you’re paying, don’t think it will be ad free. </p> <p class="MsoNormal"><strong>10: Library rentals.</strong><br />This one I don’t mind so much because I’ll happily support my library. As I’ve said in the past, libraries are a great resource for DVDs and CDs as well as books. But sadly, libraries are lacking adequate funding and I am sure prices will soon be added to certain higher-end rentals, like new releases and multi-media. It may not be much, perhaps 25 cents for each item, but it would make a whole lot of extra cash for the poor library services. Expect to see this one really soon, it’s already happened in many parts of London. </p> <p>If you can think of other “free” services or products that will soon go bye-bye, I’d love to hear about them. Now, go and enjoy your free ketchup packets and complimentary shopping carts while you still can.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-much-the-free-stuff-you-ll-have-to-pay-for-sooner-or-later">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-4"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-psychology-of-free-and-its-power-over-you">The Psychology of Free, and Its Power Over You</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/free-category-on-craigslist-to-be-renamed-haul-away-my-old-bulky-broken-crap-for-free">“Free” category on Craigslist to be renamed “Haul away my old, bulky, broken crap for free.”</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-ways-to-get-the-most-out-of-a-home-warranty">10 Ways to Get the Most Out of a Home Warranty</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-federal-minimum-wage-increases-this-week-are-you-getting-a-pay-raise">The Federal Minimum Wage Increases This Week - Are You Getting a Pay Raise?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-most-important-free-piece-of-paper-youll-ever-receive">The most important FREE piece of paper you&#039;ll ever receive.</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Consumer Affairs free pay rights services unfair Thu, 29 Nov 2007 05:06:11 +0000 Paul Michael 1438 at http://www.wisebread.com 10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/job_sucks_386940218_fe07dcbc9f.jpg" alt="my job sucks" title="my job sucks" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="333" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>I appreciated Sarah's <a href="/10-important-signs-your-job-might-be-worth-staying-at">post today</a> about determining the positive aspects of a work environment. You should read that post before you read this one.</p> <p>As someone who has had to make the decision to leave more than one <a title="&quot;I Hate My Job&quot; Guide" href="http://www.wisebread.com/i-hate-my-job">lousy job</a>, here's my counterpoint top 10: how to know when to leave. I don't take the decision to quit lightly, and I don't think anyone should. See if the problems can be fixed first.</p> <p>Some of my advice here involves big ideas (Ask for a raise!) that should not be undertaken lightly. Research tactics first before acting.</p> <p><strong>1. You dread coming to work in the morning. </strong></p> <p>You wake up and want to cry yourself back to sleep. This ONLY happens on the days you work, and didn't happen with other jobs you've held.</p> <p><strong>Fix?:</strong> Ask yourself if there was anything else that you could be doing at the same company that wouldn't suck so much. Staying with one company can be good for your career, but sometimes you need to change responsibilities to alleviate boredom.</p> <p><strong>2. You are putting lots of energy into the job, but not making the kind of project and/or overall progress that you feel is reasonable. </strong></p> <p><strong>Fix?:</strong> Ask yourself if you are putting energy into the right areas. Are you spending all of your time arranging meetings and conference calls and not able to put your all into the actual work? Unless you are a project manager, arranging people-to-people face time can take up lot precious work time. Can someone else handle that for you? If your company can't provide reasonable support, you might want to look for one that can.</p> <p><strong>3. You are putting no energy into the job because doing so makes you want to stab your eyes out with a sharpened number 2 pencil. </strong></p> <p><strong>Fix?:</strong> Put down the pencil. If you hate the job with the passion of a thousand burning suns, ask yourself why, honestly answer yourself, and find a job in which the same problem can not occur.</p> <p><strong>4. Your lunch break is spent bitching to your coworkers about how much you hate being where you are. </strong></p> <p>This is a really bad sign, even if you are being goaded into disliking the work even more by listening to other department's woes.</p> <p><strong>Fix?:</strong> Stop bitching to your coworkers. Change the subject, talk about positive things. Listen to people, but give NOTHING away, especially when it comes to criticizing your boss or peers. Word gets around. Shut yer trap.</p> <p><strong>5. Your boss irrationally hates you. </strong></p> <p>This happens sometimes - some people feel that their bosses hate them when their bosses are merely being, you know, bossy.</p> <p>My first job straight out of college was for a company that did a lot of field sales and merchandising. It so happened that the head of my department was out on maternity leave when I was hired. I was in charge of managing dozens of sales accounts from around the country. The system that was in place was really archaic, and I was working weekends just to keep up with the demands of the sales people.</p> <p>When the department head returned to work after about 3 months, I could tell from the second we met that she had it in for me. Nothing I did was right, no amount of work was enough. While receiving rave reviews from coworkers and other supervisors, I could tell that this particular boss was going to wear them down with her constant complaining about my work.</p> <p>I gave my two weeks notice 48 hours after she returned to work, paving the way for her to hire her nephew for my position. She was elated. Such is life.</p> <p><strong>Fix?:</strong> Politely quit, or if you have the time, let them fire you and sue the pants off of them.</p> <p><strong>6. You've bounced laterally around the company for years without a promotion. </strong></p> <p><strong>Fix?:</strong> Have you gained any skills during your career mambo around the corporation? Think about it - do you really bring valuable skills to the table? Are you unfairly being denied a promotion, or do you work for an industry (government, civil service) in which it's damn near impossible to fire you? If you think you're worth it, you often have to ask for a promotion. Make a list of everything that you have done to make your workplace better. If it's not much of a list, put your nose to the grindstone.</p> <p><strong>7. You're not being given what you were promised. </strong></p> <p>When you first started working, did they tell you that they had an educational fund for employees that seems to have disappeared? Did that 401K never materialize? Are other employees sensing that they were sold a fantasy job, too? During the dotcom boom, it was really common for companies to more or less offer to pay for your MBA as long as you kept working with them - then they blew their cash on limo trips to the vineyards and off-site gatherings for the sales team in Vail.</p> <p><strong>Fix?:</strong> If you had a goal in mind for this job, but the job is keeping you from the goal, consider finding something better. If you can achieve the goals on your own, such as taking night classes to earn that extra degree or certificate, then do it on your own and find a better job with your newfound skills.</p> <p><strong>8. You've slept with one, or more, of your coworkers and things ended badly. </strong></p> <p>First of all, don't do this. But if you do, get out while the gettin's good.</p> <p><strong>Fix?:</strong> Apologize if you can. Try to set things right if you've wronged them.</p> <p><strong>9. There's this exiled Nigerian businessman's widow who's wiring you a bunch of money, and you get to keep a few hundred thousand. </strong></p> <p>Seriously, you should quit your job and <em>move to Canada if this happens</em>.</p> <p><strong>10. You're making the same amount of money that you were when you first started working for the company. Five years ago.</strong></p> <p><strong>Fix?:</strong> Ask for a raise. Even if you are doing the same work, as long as you are a valuable employee, you should be eligible for some kind of raise.</p> <p><strong>11. You've just found a better deal.</strong></p> <p>Better pay is nice, but really fun jobs don't always pay well. The <a title="Job hunting tips" href="http://www.wisebread.com/lost-my-job-tips-for-the-recently-laid-off">high-paying jobs</a> are often the most tedious, so money alone isn't everything. My buddy Richard finally left his little non-profit job because he wanted to make some real money, but it was an all-around good decision. And I mean, for everyone. Richard wanted to be the manager of his team, and his team hated his pushy leadership style. So finding another position was a win-win - he gets more money and more leadership potential, and his old team can breathe a sigh of relief and go back to smoking pot on their lunch breaks.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <p>&nbsp;</p> <div align="center"><a href="//www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F10%20Important%20Signs%20That%20Your%20Job%20Sucks.png&amp;description=10%20Important%20Signs%20That%20Your%20Job%20Sucks" data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-config="above" data-pin-color="red" data-pin-height="28"><img src="//assets.pinterest.com/images/pidgets/pinit_fg_en_rect_red_28.png" alt="" /></a> </p> <!-- Please call pinit.js only once per page --><!-- Please call pinit.js only once per page --><script type="text/javascript" async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <h2 style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</h2> <h2 style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/10%20Important%20Signs%20That%20Your%20Job%20Sucks.png" alt="10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks" width="250" height="374" /></h2> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/troy-hadley">Troy Hadley</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-5"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/is-this-job-worth-it">Is This Job Worth It?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-times-you-should-demand-a-raise">5 Times You Should Demand a Raise</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-absolute-worst-ways-to-ask-for-a-raise">The Absolute Worst Ways to Ask for a Raise</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-unexpected-costs-of-a-higher-paying-job-offer">4 Unexpected Costs of a Higher-Paying Job Offer</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/earn-more-money-by-demanding-it">Earn More Money by Demanding It</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building 401k boss career education goals job leave pay quit raise salary work Wed, 02 May 2007 01:18:57 +0000 Troy Hadley 585 at http://www.wisebread.com Earn More Money by Demanding It http://www.wisebread.com/earn-more-money-by-demanding-it <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/earn-more-money-by-demanding-it" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/money_4.jpg" alt="" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="167" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p class="heading">The hardest part of negotiating a work contract is the pay. I despise having to demand a certain amount of money, even though I am well aware that I deserve a certain amount of money. That&#39;s why I love working with job recruiters - they set the rates, and they usually do their best to get you the most money, because, let&#39;s face it, they&#39;re taking quite a bit more off the top of it.</p> <p>But for freelance work, or if negotiating your own salary, you&#39;re on your own. And that is one of the most terrifying things for me.</p> <p>It&#39;s odd, really. When I go through the interview process, I&#39;ll get questions like, &quot;So, you think you can learn C++ in a week?&quot; and I can say &quot;Sure, no sweat&quot; without batting an eye. But when the hiring manager finally gets around to &quot;Alright, let&#39;s talk money&quot;, my heart leaps into my throat and I feel like I am going to hyperventilate.</p> <h4>History - They Told Me to Aim Low</h4> <p>This attitude is a product of my experience. I&#39;ve had many interviews where the salary was discussed only at the very end. Terrified that I will knock myself out of the running by demanding too much, I would always aim low. Sometimes, that would mean that I got paid very little to do a lot or work. Other times, I would be told that $10 an hour is a LOT of money for someone with only 6 years of working experience. And sometimes, I believe that I have knocked myself out of the running by undervaluing my work.</p> <p>This is a problem for most women. Thus, this article is written from a female perspective, but it can apply to men, too. </p> <p>The fact that I am so bad at <em>expecting</em> to make money is odd. I&#39;m a feminist, and I was raised by feminists. I went to a women&#39;s college, where being a feminist is more or less standard, unless you are one of the &quot;conservative&quot; women who believes that places like Smith and Barnard are actually finishing schools and not modern colleges. My college, strangely enough for all of their talk about empowering women, didn&#39;t do much to help us learn to negotiate salaries. At all. </p> <p>When I graduated with my degree and headed to New York City to find work, the first bit of job advice I got was &quot;Don&#39;t aim to high. Pretend that you really just want a stable job with a stable salary. You get your foot in the door, then you advanced after a few years. Don&#39;t show ANY ambition.&quot; </p> <p>Another method for negotiating pay that I was taught to use was to find out what the pay range is before stating your rate or desired salary. Sometimes this works, and the <a href="http://www.salary.com/advice/layouthtmls/advl_display_Cat8_Ser9_Par26.html">manager will happily tell you</a>; other times, you can go back and forth with one of those &quot;What do you want to be paid?&quot; - &quot;Well, what&#39;s the pay range?&quot; - &quot;It varies. What do you want to make per hour?&quot; - &quot;How about you tell me how much the position can pay me, and I&#39;ll tell you if it&#39;s acceptable?&quot; - &quot;Well, what&#39;s acceptable to you?&quot; kind of bullshit loops that gets you nothing in the end.</p> <p>This, and a need not to appear greedy, has me in a panic when it comes time for me to explain what my time and skills are worth, in hard dollars. I know I&#39;m not alone in this behavior, because it&#39;s a common and <a href="http://www.vault.com/nr/newsmain.jsp?nr_page=3&amp;ch_id=402&amp;article_id=7286802&amp;cat_id=1102">well-studied phenomenon</a> among women. There are <a href="http://money.cnn.com/2006/02/28/commentary/everyday/sahadi_paytable/index.htm">some jobs in which women are paid more than men</a>, but mostly, we lag behind.</p> <p>There are lots of theories as to why this is. Some people would like you to believe that maternity leave reduces our productivity and thus, we get paid less over all. Some people believe it&#39;s part of the inherent sexism that we still deal with in our society (more on this in another blog post). </p> <p>I&#39;m not in the mood to crunch the numbers, but I will say this: part of the reason we don&#39;t get paid as much as men is <strong>because we don&#39;t expect to get paid as much as men</strong>.</p> <p><a href="http://www.queercents.com/2006/10/27/how-to-ask-for-more-money/">Queercents </a>covered this a while back, but it bears repeating. According to <a href="http://www.forbes.com/work/2006/06/28/leadership-business-basics-cx_tw_0629womennegotiating.html?partner=rss">Forbes.com</a>:</p> <p class="blockquote">Here&#39;s a startling fact: By not negotiating their salaries, many women sacrifice more than half a million dollars by the end of their professional lives. &quot;That is pretty scary,&quot; says Linda Babcock, the Carnegie Mellon University economics professor who researched that figure. Babcock surveyed M.B.A. students who graduated in 2002 and 2003 and found that those who negotiated received 7% to 8% more than what they were initially offered. And of those two graduating classes, 52% of the men negotiated, compared to only 12% of women. Over time, that adds up, since percentage raises are based on a person&#39;s current salary. &quot;Women leave a lot of money on the table,&quot; says Babcock, who also co-authored the book, <em>Women Don&#39;t Ask</em>. </p> <h4>Put Your Monetary Past Behind You</h4> <p>Now, I think that employers should always state the pay range for any position. I don&#39;t like reading things like &quot;Competitive&quot; or &quot;Commensurate with experience&quot; in the Pay section of a job posting. I&#39;m sure this is done to weed out people who just look for high-paying jobs, but still, it makes it very difficult. &quot;Competitive&quot; is a very subjective term. But since this is the game that we all must partake in, I have to say this:</p> <h4>Aim high.</h4> <p>It doesn&#39;t matter how much money you make right now. It matters how much you are worth, and how much you want to make.</p> <p>I&#39;d probably still be making a crap salary if I didn&#39;t have a hiring manager take pity on me and double my pay in one fell swoop. During a bad point in Seattle&#39;s economy, I was working my butt off at a company in which the writers made 30K per year while the web designers made something like 75K. What can I say? I was desperate for work, so I took a salary that I knew didn&#39;t reflect half of what I was worth. </p> <p>When a manager at a local tech firm interviewed me for a new job, he asked me how much I wanted to be paid. I stammered a bit, and said something like, &quot;Well, I guess $22 an hour or maybe... yeah. Like, $22.&quot; He stared at me for a few seconds, and then said, &quot;I&#39;m going to put you in at $35 an hour.&quot; That&#39;s what my skill level typically brought in, and it&#39;s what I should have been making all that time. But I didn&#39;t know enough to demand that much, so frightened was I of being unemployed.</p> <h4>Stick to Your Guns</h4> <p>I have an annoying habit of being wishy washy about pay. The truth is, for freelance work, I do have a wide range of rates. If I&#39;m doing copy writing for a web site about bunny rabbits, then I charge much less than I would for highly technical documentation. So, I&#39;ve found it necessary to view the work before stating my rates, but I do like to give an estimate beforehand. I&#39;ve finally just typed up a Word doc that states my hourly rate in a very matter-of-fact manner.</p> <p>I have noticed, however, that it can be very easy to be manipulated into taking less than you are worth. For instance, a couple of months ago, I began an assignment writing some simple documents for a software company. I had stated my lowest acceptable hourly rate via email. The employer agreed to this readily. </p> <p>When speaking to the manager on the phone, however, I was asked again to state my desired rate. I reminded him that his had been discussed already via email, and I sensed some hesitation on his end of the line. My heart fluttered around in my chest and I thought to myself, <em>I&#39;m asking too much</em>. I asked if this was still fine, and he suggested that I accept $5 less per hour, because the company was small. I felt my stomach falling into my feet as I agreed.</p> <p>A few minutes later, I decided to grow a spine. I wrote the manager back and told him that we had agreed upon a base rate, and that was the rate, regardless of the size of his company. I explained that I understood if he needed to find someone who would work for less, but that I simply wasn&#39;t going to be able to do the work for less than I had stated.</p> <p>And he accepted it. I was pretty sure he wouldn&#39;t, but he did.</p> <p>I&#39;m aware that it&#39;s only $5 an hour difference, but over the course of the contract, that was an extra $1200 in my pocket (or in this case, towards a loan that I need to pay off). </p> <h4>Negotiate Without Fear</h4> <p>We all need to be aware how much our time and skills are worth (Bob Bly writes extensively about this on his web site, and he has an argument about time versus money that I will pick apart in a few days), but this is particularly important for women. We have not yet reached the point where we feel like we can demand high wages. Part of this is a lack of information - it&#39;s hard to know what a <a href="http://www.salary.com/personal/layoutscripts/psnl_default.asp">job should pay</a>. But this is research that should be performed beforehand, so do that work before you talk to the hiring manager about pay.</p> <p>The aforementioned Forbes article has some tips on how to <a href="http://www.forbes.com/work/2006/06/28/leadership-business-basics-cx_tw_0629womennegotiating.html?partner=rss">negotiate salary</a>. </p> <p>Here are some of my personal tips for negotiating a good wage:</p> <ol> <li>Practice maintaining eye contact when you talk about money. Don&#39;t look away or down. If you are discussing it on the phone, be sure not to sound particularly nervous. It&#39;s OK to pause when you are speaking, but don&#39;t fill gaps with <strong>ums</strong> and <strong>ahs</strong>.</li> <li>Practice stating your desired wage in the mirror. Don&#39;t let your face get all weird on you. Ask a friend to guide you through it, too, so you can say it to a live person.</li> <li>State your hourly rate or desired income without shame. For example: &quot;I expect to make $25 per hour.&quot;</li> <li>Don&#39;t let your voice get all high and squeaky. In fact, make certain that you speak in a low but clear voice. It&#39;s probably a male thing, but a deeper voice implies authority.</li> <li>If the manager winces at you, don&#39;t say anything. Maintain eye contact and keep silent. It&#39;s their job now to ask if you will take less.</li> <li>If they do ask if you can take less, ask if your requested wage is above the expected range for the position. If you are feeling ballsy, ask what other people who work in the same position are being paid. They can&#39;t tell you about individual employees&#39; pay, but they can tell you the range.</li> <li>Is the highest end of the pay range pretty close to what you want to make? Is it way too low? Also, never never accept anything below the highest pay rate of the range. Pretend it&#39;s not a range at all. Take the highest number, and assume that that is the least amount of money that you can possibly take.</li> <li>If they give you a range in which the highest pay is close to what you want to make, you have some choices: </li> </ol> <ul> <li>Saying that you&#39;ll go ahead and take the lower rate of pay might make you look like a chump. My favorite way to handle this is to say something like, &quot;Well, I&#39;d like you to consider raising the rate. My skills and experience make me worth every penny. If you can&#39;t consider a higher rate for me, perhaps we can discuss bonus schedules or expected pay raises over time.&quot; </li> <li>Let them know that you&#39;ll think about it. &quot;I&#39;d like to take some time to consider this. Can I get back to you in a couple of hours?&quot;. In a way, this is a face-saving move. You can then really think about if you want the job at that pay rate, and if you do, you can write an email expressing your excitement about the firm, and accepting the highest end of the pay range.</li> </ul> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/andrea-karim">Andrea Karim</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/earn-more-money-by-demanding-it">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-6"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/is-this-job-worth-it">Is This Job Worth It?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-good-reasons-to-become-a-contractor">8 Good Reasons to Become a Contractor</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/should-i-take-a-job-that-pays-less-than-unemployment">Should I Take a Job That Pays Less Than Unemployment?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-to-actually-take-all-your-vacation-days-this-year">7 Ways to Actually Take All Your Vacation Days This Year</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building benefits freelance gig hourly rate job pay wage gap work Thu, 29 Mar 2007 18:39:17 +0000 Andrea Karim 415 at http://www.wisebread.com Does it pay to be a jerk? http://www.wisebread.com/does-it-pay-to-be-a-jerk <p><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/wisebread_imce/Coulter_poster.jpg" alt=" " width="252" height="342" /></p> <p>Ann Coulter recently managed to remind us that she&#39;s still around by <a href="http://www.slate.com/id/2161258/nav/tap1/">saying yet another stupid thing</a>. </p> <p>Now, I&#39;m not going to defend or attack Coulter. I think what she said was a dumb attempt at a bad joke, but I&#39;m not interested in what Ann believes. I&#39;m interested in how she manages to survive by doing little more than upset people.</p> <p>Of course, the press eats it up for fear of appearing biased and liberal. Fox News let Alan Colmes &quot;talk tough&quot; to Coulter before letting all the other commentators talk about just <a href="http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,256949,00.html">how great she is</a>. This is how Coulter remains relevant. Even she seems to be aware of just how boring the whole routine has become. As she said to Alan Colmes on Hannity &amp; Colmes:</p> <p class="blockquote">I mean, this is the same thing we go through every six months. I say something, the same people become hysterical, and that&#39;s the end of it.</p> <p>And I think she&#39;s right. Even though some more conservative people have jumped up to condemn her comments, this doesn&#39;t hurt her. As Fox News Pat Caddell said:</p> <p class="blockquote">It was very funny. They were raising money with it. So at least you raised money for them, Ann, but I&#39;m sure it won&#39;t hurt any of your book sales either.</p> <p>Ah. There&#39;s the rub. <em>It won&#39;t hurt any of her book sales</em>. No, quite the contrary, it will actually help them. It doesn&#39;t matter that some people think that Ann went too far or that some <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2007/POLITICS/03/05/coulter.ads/index.html">companies pulled their ads off of her website</a>. What matters is that we are talking about her. <strong>A lot.</strong></p> <p>Offending people is Coulter&#39;s job, her schtick. Like a lot of other political commentators, Coulter exists mainly to stir up people&#39;s emotions. And her usual method is to be offensive. Bullying people is how she makes her living, and it doesn&#39;t seem to hurt her. Ever. But I wonder if it applies in the real world. Is Coulter a bully hyperbole, an extreme example of bad behavior getting good results?</p> <p>Is being a bully financially savvy? Does it pay to be a jerk?</p> <p>I know I&#39;m showing my liberal colors (pass the tofu, please) by linking to This American Life, but ruminating on Coulter&#39;s book sales reminded me of an episode of that show called Mean Friends. It&#39;s a great show, one of my favorites, and in Act 2, the shows producers put together a little experiment (to listen to the show for free, go to <a href="http://www.thislife.org/">This American Life</a> and search for show 245; the date is 9/5/03). </p> <p class="blockquote">Does Niceness Pay? In which we conduct a little scientific experiment – on tape – with hidden microphones - about whether niceness pays. We wire two waitresses with hidden microphones. They&#39;re superfriendly to half their tables; and aloof to the other half. They examine their tips to see which generates more profits. </p> <p>I&#39;m going to go ahead and spoil it: niceness, in this experiment, does not pay. The aloof tables pay more in tips. Why is this? I can&#39;t imagine a time in which I tipped someone well for not-so-hot service, but apparently it works for some people.</p> <p>We already know that <a href="http://transcripts.cnn.com/TRANSCRIPTS/0308/28/se.13.html">beautiful people make more money</a>, on average, than not-so-beautiful people. <a href="http://money.cnn.com/2006/09/14/news/funny/drinking_earnings/index.htm?postversion=2006091414">People who drink more earn more</a> than people who don&#39;t imbibe (is that because only beautiful people can get into the good bars and clubs?). We&#39;ve all seen this in action, so it&#39;s no surprise. But what about mean people? Can you earn more by being a bully? Or is it such a niche market that only a select few can manage it?</p> <p>I don&#39;t see much in the way of research in this area, possibly because &quot;mean&quot; is pretty hard to quantify. Are the people that we often perceive of as bullies really just extremely aggressive, outspoken people who ruffle feathers but tell it like it is? </p> <p>What about Wise Breaders? Think of the most successful people that you know, even if they aren&#39;t close to you - are they jerks? Have you ever done better in your job or career by bullying someone? </p> <object width="425" height="350"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/uxgVuB3TyaU" /><param name="wmode" value="transparent" /><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/uxgVuB3TyaU" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" wmode="transparent" width="425" height="350"></embed></object><br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/andrea-karim">Andrea Karim</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/does-it-pay-to-be-a-jerk">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/three-reasons-to-stop-freaking-out-about-socialism">Three reasons to stop freaking out about socialism</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-things-to-know-before-retiring-abroad">9 Things to Know Before Retiring Abroad</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/jar-of-nothing-the-perfect-present-for-the-picky-prick-in-your-life">Jar of Nothing: the perfect present for the picky prick in your life</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/crime-scene-cleaner-and-4-other-trades-that-pay-surprisingly-well">Crime Scene Cleaner and 4 Other Trades That Pay Surprisingly Well</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Extra Commentary Ann Coulter commentary jerk pay politics This American Life Wed, 07 Mar 2007 00:41:32 +0000 Andrea Karim 327 at http://www.wisebread.com