meat http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/2151/all en-US 6 Grocery Purchases That Will Be Cheaper in 2017 http://www.wisebread.com/6-grocery-purchases-that-will-be-cheaper-in-2017 <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-grocery-purchases-that-will-be-cheaper-in-2017" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_grocery_store_477153876.jpg" alt="Woman buying groceries that will be cheaper in 2017" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="143" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>In case you haven't noticed, 2017 is here and bringing a whole bunch of changes.</p> <p>With a new president in the White House, a second hike in interest rates by the Fed since 2006, a long list of U.S. cities with higher minimum wages, and a broad range of changes coming to the states, consumers are still trying to figure out how all of these changes are going to affect them.</p> <p>Cheer up, America! It looks like 2017 may also bring you some serious <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-best-5-credit-cards-for-groceries?ref=internal">savings at the grocery store</a>. The U.S. Department of Agriculture Economic Research Service keeps track of the average prices paid by urban Americans for a series of key consumer goods and services. The latest data from the USDA's Food Price Outlook is showing that you'll save on your grocery runs throughout 2017. Let's break down the six buys that will give you the most bang for your buck this year.&nbsp;</p> <h2>1. Eggs</h2> <p>Continuing their downward trend in prices throughout 2016, eggs are leading the forecast savings with an estimated <a href="https://www.ers.usda.gov/data-products/food-price-outlook/summary-findings.aspx" target="_blank">drop of 3% to 4% in price</a> for 2017. This means that the sightings of a dozen of eggs going for under a buck should become more common in cities across the nation. Even when adjusted for inflation, 2017 is poised to set a record for lowest price of eggs since 2000. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-make-perfectly-cooked-eggs?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Ways to Make Perfectly Cooked Eggs</a>)</p> <h2>2. Fats and Oils</h2> <p>Stay with me on this one; it's not as unhealthy as it sounds. In this category, the USDA goes beyond the usual suspects, such as butter and cooking oil, and includes several familiar food items, including peanut butter and salad dressing. A drop in the prices of fats and oils has a domino effect across prices in several grocery aisles.</p> <p>Back in November 2016, the USDA reported that the prices of fats and oils fell 2.9% from the previous month and were down 2.4% from the previous year. For 2017, the USDA is projecting an additional 3% to 4% drop in prices for fats and oils.</p> <h2>3. Beef and Veal</h2> <p>As forecast back in our guide to <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-necessities-that-will-be-cheaper-in-2016?ref=internal" target="_blank">cheaper buys in 2016</a>, prices of pork products dropped 3.25% to 4.25% throughout the year, according to USDA data. In 2017, the USDA isn't expecting pork prices to drop much, if at all. However, prices of beef and veal are poised to continue to drop an extra 1% to 2% across the nation this year.</p> <p>Higher production outputs of carcasses, larger supplies of beef and veal held in cold storage, and lower prices of both feeder and fed cattle are all contributing to the lower prices of beef and veal. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/25-easy-ways-to-make-cheap-cuts-of-meat-taste-expensive?ref=seealso" target="_blank">25 Easy Ways to Make Cheap Cuts of Meat Taste Expensive</a>)</p> <h2>4. Fresh Vegetables</h2> <p>With all these low prices, you may be having second thoughts about your New Year's resolution to lose weight. Fear not dear dieters, 2017 is also cutting down the prices of fresh veggies to keep you on track for success. While the previous year brought very little savings, the new one is expected to reduce the prices of fresh vegetables by 2% to 3%.</p> <p>When looking for fresh produce in 2017, keep in mind that the prices of fresh fruits are on the rise. The USDA is forecasting an increase of 1% to 2% in the prices of fresh fruits for 2017. Another reason to stick with fresh veggies is that the prices of processed fruits and vegetables are expected to rise up to 1% this year.</p> <h2>5. Avocados</h2> <p>Speaking of fresh fruits, the price of an avocado is one that might be an exception to the USDA forecast for 2017. If you were paying attention at the store, you may have noticed that the prices of avocados were much higher than usual. For example, some stores in California were commanding as much as $3 per avocado. The same thing was taking place across several grocers here in Hawaii.</p> <p>The culprit for these high prices was the interruption in harvesting caused by disputes between avocado growers and packers in Mexico. The disagreements resulted in a dramatic drop of exported Mexican avocados to the U.S. from a projected <a href="http://www.thepacker.com/news/mexico-avocados-resume-full-production" target="_blank">40 million pounds</a> to just 13.7 million in October 2016. Fortunately, an agreement was reached in November 2016 and Mexican harvesting of avocados is now back to normal. As more and more millions of Mexican avocados enter the market in the next couple of weeks, the prices of the green fruit are expected to drop.</p> <p>Given the expected lower prices of avocado for 2017, you could start taking better advantage of all of the different uses of this nutrient-rich fruit. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-unexpected-uses-for-avocados?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Unexpected Uses for Avocados</a>)</p> <h2>6. Whole Foods Products</h2> <p>Yes, there are actually <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-foods-that-are-actually-cheaper-at-whole-foods?ref=internal" target="_blank">buys that are cheaper at Whole Foods</a> than most major food chains. And to continue to meet the high expectations of its shareholders, Whole Foods is rolling out two key initiatives in 2017 that will drive down the prices of many of its products.</p> <p>First, Whole Foods has been offering its 365 Everyday Value brand at its regular stores for quite some time. Given that many of the products under the 365 brand are cheaper than those at major grocers, Whole Foods decided to open 365 by Whole Foods Market stores that only sell those products. Currently, there are only three 365 stores (Los Angeles, California; Lake Oswego, Oregon; and Bellevue, Washington), but there are 16 more scheduled to open in 2017 and beyond.</p> <p>Second, Whole Foods has introduced a <a href="https://rewards.wholefoodsmarket.com" target="_blank">rewards program</a> across 24 regular stores across New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Texas. The rewards program offers a 10% discount on the first purchase and additional discounts as you continue to shop using the program. Also, all 365 by Whole Foods Market stores automatically participate in a separate rewards program that offers an instant 10% off on close to 120 items per week.</p> <h2>The Bottom Line: Eat at Home More Often in 2017</h2> <p>In 2017, it will be cheaper for you to eat in than to eat out. The USDA is expecting prices of food away from home to increase from 2% to 3%, while those of food at home to only increase from 0.5% to 1.5%. Shop smart and prep more home meals and you'll be able to pocket some extra cash this 2017.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/damian-davila">Damian Davila</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-grocery-purchases-that-will-be-cheaper-in-2017">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-stay-on-budget-while-eating-paleo">How to Stay on Budget While Eating Paleo</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-foods-that-are-actually-cheaper-at-whole-foods">6 Foods That Are Actually Cheaper At Whole Foods</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-off-season-foods-that-are-destroying-your-grocery-budget">5 Off-Season Foods That Are Destroying Your Grocery Budget</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-save-a-ton-by-eating-soup-every-day-and-never-get-bored">How to Save a Ton by Eating Soup Every Day (and Never Get Bored!)</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/31-foolproof-ways-to-lower-your-grocery-bill">31 Foolproof Ways to Lower Your Grocery Bill</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Shopping 2017 eggs food costs forecast groceries meat price drops produce saving money USDA Whole Foods Tue, 10 Jan 2017 10:00:13 +0000 Damian Davila 1870051 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Stay on Budget While Eating Paleo http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-stay-on-budget-while-eating-paleo <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-stay-on-budget-while-eating-paleo" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/man_eating_healthy_43050240.jpg" alt="Man eating healthy on a budget" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Let's admit this upfront: It is <em>calorically impossible</em> to eat paleo as cheaply as you can eat a frugal version of the standard American diet. It's a simple fact that non-paleo foods like grains, potatoes, and legumes are vastly cheaper per calorie than the meat and fresh veggies that one associates with paleo eating.</p> <p>But here's the thing: Nobody living in a rich country has any trouble getting enough calories. What's in desperately short supply are things like flavor, nutrition, and variety. A paleo-style diet gives you those things, and can do so at quite a frugal price, if you're prepared to be strategic about it.</p> <p>Wise Bread writer Max Wong offers a list of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/20-ways-to-eat-paleo-for-super-cheap">20 Ways to Eat Paleo for Super Cheap</a>, and that's an excellent place to go for some specific tips. What I want to offer is a model for thinking about how to design a diet that's nutritious, paleo, and <em>frugal</em>.</p> <h2>Why Paleo?</h2> <p>Let's start with why you're eating paleo, which I'm going to speculate is for health benefits. I'm guessing that because you're calling it <em>paleo</em> (or primal or ancestral). If you had more social, environmental, or political motivations you'd probably use other terms &mdash; whole food, slow food, locavore.</p> <p>It almost doesn't matter what you call it, because all these terms refer to ways of eating that solve the same problem: It's unhealthy to build your diet around eating large quantities of a small number of foods that mechanized farming and government subsidies have made super cheap.</p> <p>Half the problem is that industrial agriculture tends to produce foods that are cheap, but less nutritious.</p> <p>The other half is that those cheap foods are processed into ingredients for the industrial production of edible foodlike substances <em>that are all the same</em>. They may seem different from one another, but when you dig down, they're really all just sugar, fat, and starch from corn, soybeans, wheat, and potatoes. (Plus a little salt.)</p> <p>And that sameness is the biggest problem, even bigger than the individual foods having lower quantities of important nutrients. We know from the historic and prehistoric record of agricultural people all over the world that it is possible for agricultural people to eat a healthy diet. But when agricultural people end up eating large quantities of just a few things, their skeletons show signs (such as stunted growth) of ill health. This brings us to rule one.</p> <h2>Rule One: Eat a Wide Variety of Nutritious Foods</h2> <p>Paleolithic people got variety automatically. It was a different kind of variety than modern people think of. We think of eating a wide variety of foods <em>every day</em> (because that's easy if you have a supermarket). Paleolithic people, on the other hand, ate a wide variety of foods <em>every year </em>&mdash; but many days they probably ate a whole lot of the same thing. On a day that they killed a large animal, it's likely everybody ate mostly meat. On a day that some kind of fruit was ripe, everybody ate mostly fruit. On a day that someone found a patch of tubers, I bet everybody ate a lot of tubers.</p> <p>It turns out that's okay. Eat a wide variety of foods every year, and your body can handle a few days now and then when you eat a whole lot of the same thing. (It probably helps if there are also days when you can't find a lot of anything, and end up trying to fill your stomach with tiny amounts of a dozen different things scrounged up wherever you can find them.)</p> <p>Nutritious foods are easy: just eat food, and not industrially produced edible foodlike substances. Yes, you can upgrade to organic (or local, or free-range, or pasture-raised), but just eating <em>food</em> gets you most of the way there.</p> <p>Wide variety is trickier for us non-paleo people, because we do have a supermarket, so we have the option of just eating our favorite foods every day.</p> <p>The rule &quot;eat food&quot; turns out to be a great guide to getting nutritious foods. My efforts to come up with a similar rule to guide us to getting a wide variety have not yet produced anything as simple or pithy. The best I've come up with so far is based on the fact the reason Paleolithic people got their wide variety was seasonality.</p> <h2>Rule Two: Respect Seasonality</h2> <p>Seasonality provides two great clues for anyone who wants to eat paleo on the cheap, but who is getting most food from the supermarket:</p> <ol> <li>If it's always cheap regardless of season, eat it rarely.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>If it's only cheap during a season, eat it in large quantities while it's cheap.</li> </ol> <p>Taken together, these two rules solve most of the problems with the standard American diet. By rarely eating the stuff that's cheap all the time, you avoid the things that Paleolithic people rarely ate. By eating the good stuff in quantity when it's cheap, you get the wide variety you need without breaking your budget.</p> <p>Finally, if you want to keep your overall diet under budget, we also need rule three.</p> <h2>Rule Three: Reject No Foods</h2> <p>Paleo is often described in terms of what not to eat, such as no legumes and no grains. But that's crazy. We <em>know</em> Paleolithic people ate both grains and legumes. (How do we know this? Because neolithic people domesticated both grains and legumes, and there's no way they'd have done that if they weren't already eating tasty peas and seeds of ancient grasses when they found them in the wild.)</p> <p>Dairy is a special case. Paleo people probably never had access to milk, but lactose tolerance has evolved in humans at least twice (once in Europe and once in Africa). If you're descended from either of those populations, go ahead and consider that dairy may be a healthy food for you.</p> <p>Of course, if you know that grains, or lentils, or dairy, or potatoes cause problems for you, then don't eat whatever it is. But, if you don't have specific issues with this or that particular food, go ahead and include it <em>among the great variety</em> of things you eat. Just don't turn foods like that into a major source of calories &mdash; or if you do, only make them a major source of calories for a few days, a few times a year.</p> <h2>What About Those Calories?</h2> <p>As I said earlier, it is calorically impossible to eat paleo as cheaply as eating a grain, potato, and legume diet. However, you didn't decide to eat a paleo diet because you thought it would be cheaper; you decided to eat it because you thought it would be <em>healthier</em>. If you have implicitly accepted the idea that it's going to cost more, the issue is <em>how much more?</em> And that brings us back to the title of this post. It's called &quot;How to Stay on Budget While Eating Paleo,&quot; because the <em>budget </em>is the key.</p> <p>Of course answering the question &quot;How to eat paleo on a budget&quot; with &quot;Make sure the budget is big enough,&quot; is not what Wise Bread is all about, and that's why I started with rule one above. Following that rule, more than following anyone's fantasy rules about what Paleolithic people ate, is what's going to give you your best chance at good health.</p> <p>Having said that, let me point you again to <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/20-ways-to-eat-paleo-for-super-cheap">Max Wong's article</a>, which is packed with ideas for getting paleo food for less. There are the obvious ways: gardening, fishing, <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/foraging-not-insane-useless-or-impossible">gathering</a>, gleaning, bartering, etc. There are the adventurous ways: eating organ meats, insects, or <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/recession-survivor-would-you-eat-bugs-and-roadkill-to-cut-the-grocery-bill">even roadkill</a>. (See &quot;snout to tail&quot; cooking and eating.) There are the leftist ways, like <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/is-a-farm-share-a-smart-buy-for-your-household">joining a CSA</a>, and the right-wing ways, like hunting your own meat. There are the simple ways, like buying more eggs, and the complicated ways, like <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/real-eggs">raising chickens</a> for your own eggs.</p> <p>Even if you do all those things, it remains true that getting most of your calories from grains and legumes is going to be cheaper than any alternative. I actually have a post <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/healthy-frugal-eating">Healthy, Frugal Eating</a> that walks you through creating a menu on that basis &mdash; but note that even it starts with vegetables.</p> <p>If switching to paleo eating means skipping most of the grains and legumes, where do you get your calories? First, by eating even more fresh vegetables. Second by eating plenty of meat and nuts.</p> <p>&quot;But all those things are expensive!&quot; you are no doubt saying, and yes, on a per-calorie basis, they are, and that's what your budget is for. You will get enough calories either way. How much money you're willing to spend will have a great influence on what form those calories take.</p> <p>Following rule two (eat large amounts of whatever is cheap when it's in season) costs nothing and does not compromise your efforts to go paleo. You can get a bunch of cheap calories that way, and the seasonal variety comes along for free.</p> <p>Once you're eating paleo, following rule three (allow limited quantities of less paleo foods) lets you upgrade the quality of your more paleo foods without seriously compromising the paleo-nature of your overall diet. A meal where you get half your protein from a legume might save enough money to upgrade the meat that provides the other half of your protein: grass-fed, pasture-raised, local, organic, or whatever upgrade means the most to you.</p> <p>Paleolithic people followed rule one &mdash; eat a wide variety of nutritious foods &mdash; automatically. You're at a disadvantage &mdash; you have a supermarket &mdash; so it's less automatic for you, but you can follow rule one as well. If you do, you can eat paleo on a budget.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/philip-brewer">Philip Brewer</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-stay-on-budget-while-eating-paleo">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/20-ways-to-eat-paleo-for-super-cheap">20 Ways to Eat Paleo for Super Cheap</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-save-a-ton-by-eating-soup-every-day-and-never-get-bored">How to Save a Ton by Eating Soup Every Day (and Never Get Bored!)</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/31-foolproof-ways-to-lower-your-grocery-bill">31 Foolproof Ways to Lower Your Grocery Bill</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/save-big-at-these-4-discount-supermarkets">Save Big at These 4 Discount Supermarkets</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/20-easy-ways-to-stretch-your-grocery-dollars">20 Easy Ways to Stretch Your Grocery Dollars</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Food and Drink Health and Beauty Shopping budgeting diet food costs groceries legumes meat non-processed foods paleo paleolithic diet Mon, 31 Oct 2016 09:30:20 +0000 Philip Brewer 1822948 at http://www.wisebread.com 20 Ways to Eat Paleo for Super Cheap http://www.wisebread.com/20-ways-to-eat-paleo-for-super-cheap <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/20-ways-to-eat-paleo-for-super-cheap" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/happy_woman_gardening_000029690376.jpg" alt="Woman learning how to eat paleo for super cheap" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>For many people, a high protein, low carbohydrate (AKA paleo) diet results in better nutrition and weight loss. However, since <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/thinking-of-going-on-a-diet-heres-how-to-figure-out-which-one-is-right-for-you">paleo diets</a> are more reliant on meat and exclude inexpensive staple foods such as grains, beans, and root vegetables, they can be costly. Luckily, there are a number of ways to cut the grocery bill and eat paleo at the same time.</p> <h2>1. Eat Adventurously</h2> <p>Honestly, if you are going to be preachy about paleo, then you better be eating bugs. That's really how our Paleolithic ancestors got much of their protein. They weren't eating bacon. In fact, 80% of the world's population <a href="http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/bugs-for-dinner/">still eats insects</a> as a regular part of their diet because they are, in a word, delicious. Seriously, tarantula tastes like crab. Personally, I crave cricket tacos, but bug purists Angelina Jolie and Salma Hayek forgo the tortilla and eat them straight like potato chips.</p> <p>Bugs are also an excellent source of cheap protein. For example, crickets are a complete protein, have twice the amount of B12, and 60% less saturated fat than ground beef.</p> <p>And, unlike beef, pork, or poultry, bugs have a much lower risk of transferring disease to humans. They epitomize clean eating. (The only caveat to eating bugs: Because they are close cousins to shellfish, people with shellfish allergies should not eat insects, even in larval form.)</p> <p>If you are too squeamish to try one of the 1700 different edible bugs, then try finding exotic recipes for unloved animal parts such as liver, tripe, or feet. Although I hate liver and onions, I love liver pâté. Liver is rich in iron, copper, and vitamin A. If you have ever eaten a McRib sandwich you've already eaten tripe, so you might as well enjoy the far superior <a href="http://www.food.com/recipe/tripe-florentine-455135">Florentine recipe</a>. Since I am one of those people who believe the skin is the best part of roasted poultry, I am a crazy fan of duck and chicken feet as they are 100% chewy yumminess.</p> <h2>2. Buy the Unfashionable Cuts of Meat</h2> <p>One of the reasons to make friends with your butcher is preparation advice. Cheap cuts of meat like neck bones or chicken feet are cheap for a reason &mdash; the average American doesn't know how to cook them. Good butchers can tell you how to cook everything from pigs' knuckles to oxtail for optimal flavor and texture.</p> <h2>3. Don't Waste Food</h2> <p>This seems like a no-brainer, but Americans throw away 30% of their food each year. Use your bones for stock. Leftover bacon grease makes anything fried in it taste that much better. Use wilted vegetables and leftovers to make <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/thursday-night-soup-delicious-soup-from-leftovers">Thursday Night Soup</a>.</p> <h2>4. Grow Your Own</h2> <p>Did you know that you can <a href="http://www.snapgardens.org/">buy seeds</a> and food plants with SNAP EBT benefits (food stamps)? So, even if you are on the barest of food budgets, you can supplement your diet with your own organic produce.</p> <h2>5. Create a Food Cooperative With Your Neighbors</h2> <p>It's very hard to grow all your own food. However, if you grow food communally, it is very easy to produce a huge amount of food that can be shared between neighbors. Your block only needs one <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/gadzukes-10-ways-to-use-up-your-zucchini-bounty">zucchini plant</a>. Trust me on this.</p> <p>Even if your entire neighborhood has black thumbs, consider joining forces to buy staple goods like nuts or olive oil in bulk to save money. You could even buy an entire cow to split with your friends.</p> <h2>6. Join a CSA (Community-Supported Agriculture) Program</h2> <p>A CSA is a subscription service for locally produced food. Some CSAs even offer meat, dairy, and other specialty items like honey.</p> <h2>7. Barter for Food</h2> <p>Since I am a beekeeper and an experienced food preserver, I use food in jars as currency. I have been working for the last few years to build a barter economy in my neighborhood. My goal is to procure 50% of my food through barter. While I love to get cold, hard cash for my products, I trade honey and jam for free-range chickens, ducks, and eggs with a local poultry farmer. (Both of us think we are getting the better deal.)</p> <p>But don't think you have to be a gardener to barter for food. Babysitting, home repair, and car trips to the airport are all excellent barter currencies. Recently I crocheted legwarmers for a friend in return for five pounds of hand-shelled pecans and five pounds of soap nuts for laundry.</p> <h2>8. Make Friends With Your Local Food Producers</h2> <p>I never ever have to pay for fertilizer for my garden. My friend the poultry farmer drops off bags of chemical-free chicken manure for me whenever I want. While having your own personal poop fairy isn't thrilling to anyone who doesn't garden, I also get a ton of food that is perfect for eating but won't sell at the farmer's market from farmer friends. Bruised fruit can be pureed into juice, frozen for sorbet or cooking, or turned into preserves.</p> <h2>9. Go Late to the Farmers Market</h2> <p>If you aren't pining for that one special thing that always sells out early, then go to the farmers market at the end of the day. Even Los Angeles-based farmers who go to a different neighborhood market every day still end up throwing away a lot of food that won't last another day, is bruised, or is otherwise not worth the gas money to transport it to the next location. Usually, they are happy to give you a good deal on produce that won't last another day.</p> <h2>10. Shop More Often</h2> <p>Americans tend to bulk buy more than Europeans. As a result, our refrigerators are much larger and we tend to waste more food. Unless you have a huge family, you will not be able to eat through 22 cubic feet of food before it goes bad. Also, if you shop several times a week, you will have a better chance of getting produce that hasn't been sitting around for six days in the store, and getting deals in the meat and deli departments on food that is just hitting it's expiry date. It doesn't matter if the sell by date on the bacon is tomorrow if you are cooking it tonight.</p> <h2>11. Use Coupons</h2> <p>Contrary to popular belief, it is possible to find coupons for meat and produce. Even if you live in an area where stores don't accept coupons, most stores have weekly sales. If something you can buy in bulk to use later is sold out, be sure and ask for a rain check. In exchange for letting Vons Grocery track my purchases, as a member of VonsClub I get discounts and personalized sales on produce year around. Just like shopping in season, I match my recipes to my purchases, rather than shopping for specific ingredients to match a recipe. I use the recipe calculator at Epicurious to match recipes to the ingredients I have on hand.</p> <h2>12. Hunt or Forage</h2> <p>Even if guns scare you and you can't see yourself ever becoming a proficient archer, you can still hunt and gather like your paleo ancestors.</p> <p>I grew up in the Pacific Northwest and learned how to forage for chanterelle mushrooms as a kid. It was a super-fun kid activity because it is, after all, the foodie version of a treasure hunt. To prevent poisoning, I recommend going on a <a href="http://www.lamushrooms.org/LAMS-forays.html">guided hunt</a> with an experienced mushroom hunter first before setting out on your own.</p> <p>Every March I enjoy weeding my garden because that is when I harvest all the lamb's quarters, nettles, cresses, and dandelions for salad greens. It is so satisfying to eat the enemy.</p> <h2>13. Glean</h2> <p>Every year I post a want ad on my local Freecycle group asking for surplus backyard produce. And every year I receive, at minimum, 2000 pounds of free, organic, fruit. It's human nature to hate food waste, so people are thrilled to have me take their fruit off their hands. Some communities, like Los Angeles, have food laws that make any fruit growing in parks or hanging over public land (like the sidewalk or the street) fair game for urban foragers.</p> <p>Frankly, I always like to ask before I pick, because generally the owner of the tree will give me more from their &quot;private&quot; stock. I always hit up real estate agents for leads on free fruit. Fallen fruit attracts vermin, which is something that no potential home buyer wants to see while at an open house tour. Real estate agents will call me when they want a tree picked clean.</p> <h2>14. Eat Less, Drink More</h2> <p>Americans are so bad at staying hydrated, that often times we <a href="http://dcp.psc.gov/ccbulletin/articles/fitforduty_050607.htm">mistake thirst for hunger</a>. Are you feeling hungry between meals? Try drinking a glass of water instead of eating a snack. If you still feel hungry ten minutes later, have that snack. I am surprised by how much less I eat, when I drink 10 glasses of water a day.</p> <h2>15. Buy In-Season Produce</h2> <p>Buying in-season produce not only saves money but also the environment. Out of season produce is often grown thousands of miles away and shipping adds a heavy carbon footprint to food that shouldn't be environmentally taxing. Also, the longer the interval between picking and eating, the more the <a href="http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/05/27/really-the-claim-fresh-produce-has-more-nutrients-than-canned/">produce degrades nutritionally</a>.</p> <h2>16. Buy Canned or Frozen Produce</h2> <p>Studies show that canned and frozen fruits and vegetables have the <a href="http://ucce.ucdavis.edu/files/datastore/234-779.pdf">same nutritional value</a> as fresh produce (providing they are free of added salt and sugar). So if it is less expensive to purchase frozen or canned produce in your area, this is a good way to stretch your grocery budget.</p> <h2>17. Conventionally Grown Produce is Still Better Than None</h2> <p>If you live in an area where organic food is difficult to procure, or expensive, don't throw in the towel on eating healthy. Eating factory farm-to-table is still a healthier option than eating packaged food. Having an all-or-nothing attitude makes every new habit into an odious chore.</p> <p>Also note that organic certification is incredibly expensive, so there are thousands of small-scale food producers across the nation growing chemical-free and non-GMO food who cannot afford the official stamp of approval. For example, I procure the majority of my organic produce that I turn into jam and pickles from backyard orchardists and gardeners who use no pesticides. Ironically, as a treatment-free, urban beekeeper, my bees are exposed to a lower pesticide load in the city than bees that pollinate commercial agriculture! However, none of my food product can be sold in the &quot;organic&quot; part of my local farmers market because I lack certification.</p> <h2>18. Eat More Eggs</h2> <p>One of my clients who I cook for has Ankylosing Spondylitis, an autoimmune disease that causes chronic pain and inflammation. He gets pain relief from an extreme starch-free diet. Although he eats more than two dozen eggs per week, his bad cholesterol levels have dropped since he went on a no-starch diet. He attributes this to the fact that he's eating more vegetables and lean meats than ever before. This is anecdotal, but it's worth testing for others who are looking for a less expensive protein source. Please note that organic eggs from free-range chickens have almost three times the amount of omega-3 and twice the amount of vitamin E as eggs from conventionally kept chickens.</p> <h2>19. Eat More Carbs</h2> <p>I know. I said the C-word. But any diet should focus on nutrition, and not make you pathological about food. There are many people who forgo grains but eat starchy root vegetables who still get the same positive effects on their health. Use common sense. Substituting bacon and steak for bananas and brown rice in your diet and thinking this is solid nutrition is crazy.</p> <h2>20. Be a Part-Time Paleo</h2> <p>I am a weekend carnivore. I eat vegetarian five days per week and reserve meat consumption for dinners out with friends or special occasions. This saves me a huge amount of money on groceries and is much better for the planet. Better eating once a week is better than never. It takes most people time to build up a pantry stocked with high quality food. It might take you a year of careful shopping to build up your budget and pantry, so if you can't go 100% paleo right now, cut yourself some slack.</p> <p><em>Are you eating a paleo diet? What do you do to save on groceries? Please share with your fellow readers in the comments section. </em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/max-wong">Max Wong</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/20-ways-to-eat-paleo-for-super-cheap">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-stay-on-budget-while-eating-paleo">How to Stay on Budget While Eating Paleo</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/fresh-fruits-and-vegetables-by-the-month">Fresh Fruits and Vegetables, By the Month</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-smoothie-bowls-you-want-right-now">11 Smoothie Bowls You Want Right Now</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/20-surprisingly-delicious-squash-recipes">20 Surprisingly Delicious Squash Recipes</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/31-delicious-ways-to-enjoy-your-summer-veggies">31 Delicious Ways to Enjoy Your Summer Veggies</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Food and Drink fruits groceries healthy meat paleo paleolithic diet vegetables Wed, 19 Aug 2015 21:00:27 +0000 Max Wong 1524599 at http://www.wisebread.com 7 Deliciously Affordable Meats You'll Love Grilling http://www.wisebread.com/7-deliciously-affordable-meats-youll-love-grilling <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/7-deliciously-affordable-meats-youll-love-grilling" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/friends_eating_hotdogs_000046408406.jpg" alt="Friends eating deliciously affordable meats for grilling" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Everyone loves a good cook-out in the summertime, but hosting a gathering that's centered around the consumption of lots of grilled meat can get expensive, and fast. Before you buy packs of steaks and resign yourself to peanut butter and jellies the rest of the week, consider the following affordable meats that <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-grilled-veggie-dishes-that-hold-their-own-with-meat">taste so great grilled</a>, you won't miss those pricey steaks one bit.</p> <h2>1. Chicken Thighs and Drumsticks</h2> <p>It just so happens that one of the cheapest meats to grill is also one of the best. Chicken breasts tend to dry out before they're cooked through, and can be tough and flavorless. Considerably cheaper bone-in, skin-on <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-chicken-leg-and-thigh-recipes-from-around-the-world">thighs and drumsticks</a> are better at retaining their moisture and cooking evenly on the grill. On sale, they can run for less than a dollar a pound at the supermarket, making them a real cost-saver. Chicken thighs can be flavored just about any way you can think of, and taste great with a <a href="http://www.primalpalate.com/paleo-recipe/aromatic-grilled-chicken-thighs/">simple spice rub</a>. Drumsticks are equally diverse, and a simple coating of <a href="http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/grilled-lemon-oregano-chicken-drumsticks-354311">fresh lemon and herbs</a> is all you need for a delicious main dish.</p> <h2>2. Ground Beef</h2> <p>If you're buying beef for your cook-out, then things don't get much cheaper than ground chuck. Luckily, that's the prime ingredient for burgers, and who (minus vegetarians) doesn't love burgers? Make your <a href="http://www.food.com/recipe/the-perfect-burger-92021">perfect patties</a> by adding egg for moisture and cohesion, and season them well for great flavor. Get <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-delicious-and-easy-new-ways-to-top-your-burgers">creative with your toppings</a>, and take your burgers from plain to gourmet with very little extra cost.</p> <h2>3. Pork Shoulder/Boston Butt Pork Roast</h2> <p>This cut of meat might not sound like much, but it's what is commonly turned into pulled pork. The cut can cost under $2 a pound, and will feed a very happy crowd. You can make succulent <a href="http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/smoked-pork-shoulder-recipe.html">pulled pork</a> at home if you don't mind a little prep and some lazy, all-day cooking. Start your shoulder the night before with a rub, and cook it low and slow with some hickory chips. Serve it with buns and coleslaw, and you'll have your friends and family swooning.</p> <h2>4. Chicken Wings</h2> <p>The price of chicken wings often hovers at around $2 a pound, easily beating out any beef prices. Wings are also amazingly delicious grilled, and can be flavored in countless ways. Try them <a href="http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/emeril-lagasse/emeril-lagasses-grilled-vietnamese-style-chicken-wings-recipe.html">Vietnamese-style</a> with ginger and fish sauce, or classic <a href="http://www.onceuponachef.com/2014/05/grilled-chicken-wings-with-seasoned-buffalo-sauce.html">buffalo wings</a>. No matter what flavor you choose, wings make a great summer appetizer or even main dish.</p> <h2>5. Whole Turkey</h2> <p>Turkey doesn't have to be relegated to Thanksgiving. Enjoy a juicy, smoky, and flavorful <a href="http://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/grill-roasted-turkey">grilled turkey</a> at your next cookout, and easily feed big a group. Turkey is often under $1.50 a pound, and tends to be cheaper outside of the holiday season. It's surprisingly easy to cook, just needing a turn every hour and a rest under aluminum foil after cooking. Make sure you monitor the internal temperature with a thermometer &mdash; that way you won't end up with a health risk or a dry, sad bird.</p> <h2>6. Beef Back Ribs</h2> <p>Pork ribs aren't the cheapest cut of meat out there, but <a href="http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/grilled-beef-ribs-with-sweet-and-sticky-barbecue-sauce-103627">beef back ribs</a> are typically one of the cheapest pieces of beef you can buy. You may not get quite as much meat per pound as some other items on this list, seeing as each rack has a number of bones in it, but it's still a great deal for beef. Plus, everyone loves sharing ribs and getting sticky barbecue sauce all over the place. For tender meat, cook your ribs on the stove with aromatics before grilling them. Give them a generous slather of homemade sauce, and enjoy.</p> <h2>7. Hot Dogs</h2> <p>You can't deny that sometimes a smoky, charred hot dog on a soft bun tastes great. They're especially good summertime grilling food, since they're easy to serve and a real crowd-pleaser. They're also one of the cheaper meat options out there, starting at little more than $1 a pound. Even if you're grilling some gourmet dogs, they're still a great deal per pound, and are all meat &mdash; no paying for bone you won't eat. Hot dogs are one of the easiest and quickest items to grill, and since they're so affordable, you can get creative with your toppings. Classic sauerkraut is always a hit, or try <a href="http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2013/07/hot-slaw-dogs-recipe.html">creamy coleslaw</a> and mustard.</p> <p><em>What's your favorite cheap meat for the grill?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/laurel-randolph">Laurel Randolph</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-deliciously-affordable-meats-youll-love-grilling">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-grilled-veggie-dishes-that-hold-their-own-with-meat">15 Grilled Veggie Dishes That Hold Their Own With Meat</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/13-delicious-early-summer-recipes-to-try-on-your-grill">13 Delicious Early Summer Recipes to Try on Your Grill</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/stop-dissing-spam">Stop dissing Spam!</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-instant-pot-recipes-that-will-save-you-money">12 Instant Pot Recipes That Will Save You Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-delicious-breakfast-dishes-for-your-grill">11 Delicious Breakfast Dishes for Your Grill</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Food and Drink cheap dinners Grilling meat recipes summer Wed, 01 Jul 2015 15:00:18 +0000 Laurel Randolph 1469492 at http://www.wisebread.com 7 Secret Cheap Steak Cuts You Should Be Asking For http://www.wisebread.com/7-secret-cheap-steak-cuts-you-should-be-asking-for <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/7-secret-cheap-steak-cuts-you-should-be-asking-for" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/steak_000051038948.jpg" alt="Cheap steak cuts you should ask for" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Summertime is steak time. That is, unless you can&rsquo;t afford a steak.</p> <p>Fortunately, you don&rsquo;t have to spend a fortune to get some <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/25-easy-ways-to-make-cheap-cuts-of-meat-taste-expensive">good quality beef</a>. While not all of the cheaper cuts grill up well all by themselves, most of them do with a bit of extra preparation, and the others taste great as part of a kebab or in other favorite dishes.</p> <p>Bon appetit!</p> <h2>1. Flat Iron Steak</h2> <p>The flat iron steak, or the <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2009/04/29/dining/29beef.html?pagewanted=all&amp;_r=0">chicken steak</a>, is seriously a hidden gem. It&rsquo;s got the tenderness of the much more expensive filet, but because no one has ever heard of it, it&rsquo;s a lot cheaper. Cook it exactly like you would cook your favorite tender cut of meat &mdash; usually on the grill or by pan frying it. (And if you&rsquo;ve never pan fried before, this <a href="http://allrecipes.com/recipe/perfect-flat-iron-steak/">steak recipe</a> would be a great place to start.)</p> <h2>2. Shoulder Steak</h2> <p>The shoulder steak, also called the <a href="http://www.esquire.com/food-drink/food/g604/cheap-steak-cuts/?slide=5">London Broil</a>, is what you need to get if you love it when the flavor of beef is almost overwhelming. Because this is a larger piece of meat, it can be roasted, though it is also tasty when you cook it on the grill. Then, slice it into thin pieces and you can feed the whole crowd. Or, you can <a href="http://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/3090-shoulder-steak-with-herbs">pan fry it</a>, and even <a href="http://www.food.com/recipe/barbecue-shoulder-steak-skillet-287868">add that barbeque flavor</a>.</p> <h2>3. Chuck Eye Steak</h2> <p>The chuck eye steak is kind of like a rib eye, for a good reason: It is the cut <a href="http://strongertogether.coop/food-lifestyle/cooking/meat-your-top-5-affordable-steak-cuts/">nearest the rib eye</a> on the animal. So while it costs significantly less, it retains many of the characteristics you love about the more expensive cut of meat. This is a very flexible hunk of meat: you can do anything from cooking it like a roast to grilling it. Just don&rsquo;t cook it all the way to well done! If you don&rsquo;t have access to a grill, <a href="http://www.sweettmakesthree.com/2013/10/chuck-eye-steak-recipe/">chuck eye can be pan fried</a>, too.</p> <h2>4. Flank Steak</h2> <p>Flank steak is tasty, but it&rsquo;s also tough. Luckily for us, there are ways to get around that. Braise it, grill it, or marinate it. Keep in mind, though, that marinating it won&rsquo;t make it tender. If you use a dry method of cooking, like grilling, be sure to use high heat, only keep it on the grill for a short time, and cut it against the grain. This looks like an <a href="http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/flank-steak-242598">amazing marinade</a> to use with that method!</p> <h2>5. Tip Sirloin</h2> <p>Tip sirloin (or sirloin tip) is another name for <a href="http://www.seriouseats.com/2012/05/the-best-inexpensive-steak-for-the-grill-part-4-flap-meat-sirloin-tip.html">flap meat</a> (which has got to be one of the most unfortunate names out there for a cut of steak!). If you cook it carefully, it has a fabulous steaky taste, is tender and juicy, and goes great with a bunch of different marinades. You can do pretty much anything you want with it: Make it into kebabs, braise it slowly, or <a href="http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2011/05/steakhouse-style-grilled-marinated-flank-stea.html">grill it</a> for that steakhouse taste.</p> <h2>6. Chuck Arm Steak</h2> <p>If you&rsquo;re looking for cheaper beef, look no farther than something labeled &ldquo;chuck.&rdquo; This particular cut can come out tough and fatty, but it&rsquo;s wonderful when cooked in a way that will keep it moist. This usually means that you <a href="http://everydaylife.globalpost.com/cook-arm-steak-31922.html">braise it</a>. Afterwards, you can pull it apart, slice it and serve, or use it in a soup or stew.</p> <h2>7. Brisket</h2> <p>A brisket is an incredibly tough cut of meat, which means it doesn&rsquo;t usually work well on a grill. But that makes it perfect for cooking slowly, and especially for true BBQ. If you have access to a smoker, that&rsquo;s the best way to go when cooking brisket. But you can <a href="http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/texas-oven-roasted-beef-brisket-recipe.html">oven roast</a> or <a href="http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/braised-beef-brisket-355532">braise brisket</a> as well. As long as the meat has time to get tender and gain flavor, there&rsquo;s no reason to buy a more expensive cut.</p> <h2>A Note on Tenderizing</h2> <p>You might have noticed that many of the cheaper cuts of meat don&rsquo;t always reach the same levels of tenderness that most of us like our beef to have. There&rsquo;s a way around that, though: kosher salt. <a href="http://steamykitchen.com/163-how-to-turn-cheap-choice-steaks-into-gucci-prime-steaks.html">Salt the steak</a> and then, for every inch of steak, let it sit for an hour. After that, rinse off any excess salt and cook it however you want. Basically, the salt helps the steak hold onto moisture in such a way that it actually becomes more tender, which is good by me!</p> <p><em>What is your favorite cheap, fabulous cut of meat? And the recipe you use the most? </em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/sarah-winfrey">Sarah Winfrey</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-secret-cheap-steak-cuts-you-should-be-asking-for">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-stay-on-budget-while-eating-paleo">How to Stay on Budget While Eating Paleo</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/one-pot-roast-a-week-of-cheap-and-delicious-lunches">One Pot Roast, A Week of Cheap and Delicious Lunches</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-is-gasoline-so-cheap-a-cost-comparison-of-40-common-household-liquids">Why is Gasoline So Cheap? A Cost Comparison of 40 Common Household Liquids</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/20-ways-to-eat-paleo-for-super-cheap">20 Ways to Eat Paleo for Super Cheap</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-deliciously-affordable-meats-youll-love-grilling">7 Deliciously Affordable Meats You&#039;ll Love Grilling</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Food and Drink beef cheap dinner groceries meat steak Wed, 24 Jun 2015 15:00:37 +0000 Sarah Winfrey 1462786 at http://www.wisebread.com 11 Delicious Bacon Recipes That Only Sound Expensive http://www.wisebread.com/11-delicious-bacon-recipes-that-only-sound-expensive <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/11-delicious-bacon-recipes-that-only-sound-expensive" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/fresh_bacon_000020809260.jpg" alt="Bacon recipes that only sound expensive" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Beloved bacon. We can't get enough of it, can we? The average American eats 18 pounds a year. It has been known to &quot;turn&quot; vegetarians. We love it for breakfast, lunch, or dinner; it even shows up now in jam, milkshakes, and cookies. Clearly, we're still obsessed. I know I am, and <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ug_iluxQ1IQ">this video</a> illustrates my feelings when I smell it cooking.</p> <p>Among its many qualities, <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/twenty-signs-that-you-were-raised-by-true-money-savers">bacon</a>:</p> <ul> <li>Frequently goes on sale</li> <li>Freezes well</li> <li>Is extremely versatile</li> <li>Is a &quot;meal-stretcher,&quot; meaning you don't need to use a lot of it for great flavor.</li> </ul> <p>Below are 11 bacon recipes that sound expensive or fancy, but are actually very down-to-earth and can be modified to fit your budget.</p> <h2>1. You Say Pancetta, I Say Bacon</h2> <p>Actually, HGTV's &quot;The Pioneer Woman&quot; said it for me. Although her recipe lists pancetta, she kindly agreed that you can substitute thinly-sliced bacon in her <a href="http://thepioneerwoman.com/cooking/2010/07/pasta-with-pancetta-and-leeks/">pasta with pancetta and leeks</a>. And I always have, and it's always great. Leeks are actually the most expensive part of this meal (I priced some yesterday; they were $5.79 per pound), so when I see them on sale, I grab them to make this dish.</p> <h2>2. Even People Who Say They Don't Like Brussels Sprouts...</h2> <p>...Like them when you add bacon. Watch for Brussels sprouts to go on sale, and you'll be ready to make a super-elegant meal. I made this side dish of <a href="http://www.foodiewithfamily.com/roasted-brussels-sprouts/">roasted Brussels sprouts</a> with grapes and walnuts a few years ago while trying out some potential Thanksgiving menus. It made the cut the on the first try, because it's just that delicious. The second time I made it, though, I had this thought: Bacon. My instincts were correct &mdash; bacon made it better. Fry three or four slices of bacon, and set aside to drain. Pour most of the bacon fat from the pan, leaving just a &quot;sheen.&quot; After removing the roasted sprouts from the oven, toss them into the bacon pan, roll everything around, and proceed to the last step of the recipe. Top with crumbled bacon.</p> <h2>3. Oui, Le Bacon et Merveilleux</h2> <p>Unable to find Reblochon cheese, I looked up substitutes for this <a href="http://www.saveur.com/article/recipes/tartiflette-french-bacon-potato-and-reblochon-casserole">tartiflette recipe</a>. Recommended were Brie, Camembert, and fontina. I used Camembert and thought it was delicious. In fact, it is hard to imagine that this bacon, onion, and cheese casserole could taste better had I been able to score the super-fancy cheese. The cheese, at $5.64, was the most expensive part, as I found my bacon and potatoes on sale. Paired with a tossed salad, this made a decadent meal.</p> <h2>4. Mom's Hot Spinach Salad With BACON</h2> <p>Mom loved salads that were also pretty, and this one has bacon so everyone is happy.</p> <ul> <li>1 bag pre-washed spinach</li> <li>4 slices bacon</li> <li>4 hard-boiled eggs, sliced</li> <li>&frac12; red onion, thinly sliced</li> <li>&frac14; cup blue cheese, crumbled</li> <li>1 cup cherry tomatoes, halved</li> <li>1 &frac12; cups mushrooms, cleaned and thinly sliced</li> <li>1 cup croutons (optional)</li> </ul> <p>Dressing:</p> <ul> <li>&frac12; cup ketchup</li> <li>2 T olive oil</li> <li>&frac12; t salt</li> <li>2 t Worcestershire sauce</li> </ul> <p>In a large skillet with sides, fry bacon. Set aside to drain. When slightly cooled, crumble bacon. Drain pan, leaving most of the bacon fat. Reheat pan so that bacon fat is hot, and then turn it off. Immediately add the bag of spinach and toss the spinach just a little; it will quickly go limp in the hot fat. Add remaining ingredients, toss; add dressing; toss again. Serve immediately. Good with crusty bread. My dad liked this with a London Broil. That's good of course, but the salad is good on its own, too.</p> <h2>5. Don't Forget the Italians</h2> <p>Got pasta? <a href="http://damndelicious.net/2014/03/29/spaghetti-carbonara/">Spaghetti carbonara</a> sounds, and looks, a lot fancier than it is. In my area, a box of spaghetti noodles can be had, on sale, for less than a dollar. It also calls for a couple of eggs (also inexpensive), a little parsley, garlic, four slices of bacon, and Parmesan. To keep the cost of Parmesan down, I buy the big chunks at Costco and grate myself. I like to toss a cup of frozen peas in with the spaghetti, too, when it's boiling. It just adds more color and some veggies to my meal.</p> <h2>6. What's a Caprese?</h2> <p><a href="http://www.tasteofhome.com/recipes/caprese-chicken-with-bacon">Caprese chicken with bacon</a> is another recipe that sounds kind of swanky, but it's really very basic. Caprese refers to the style of Capri, an Italian island. This means, usually, combining tomatoes, basil, mozzarella, salt, and olive oil. Adding bacon takes this to, shall we say, another level. To make this entree for less, buy your chicken breasts in bulk, separate, and freeze to have on hand. This is a nice dinner-party entree with garlic bread and a tossed salad.</p> <h2>7. Party Puffs</h2> <p>Even without fancy pumpernickel party bread, you can still make these <a href="http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Bacon-Cheese-Puffs/Detail.aspx?evt19=1&amp;referringHubId=14741">bacon cheese puffs</a>. Heck, you can use Wonder Bread, and they will still be scarfed. Let's review the ingredients: bacon, bread, cheddar cheese, mayonnaise, green onions, and mustard. Sure, the darker bread looks sporty, but sprinkle those onions on top and you're in business.</p> <h2>8. Paris Sidewalk Cafe</h2> <p>Looking for a light supper idea? Try this <a href="http://www.marthastewart.com/315226/frisee-salad-with-warm-bacon-vinaigrette#Bacon%20Recipes%7C/275103/bacon-recipes/@center/854190/comfort-food-recipes%7C315226">frisee salad with warm bacon vinaigrette</a>. Keep costs down by substituting red leaf lettuce. I also like the suggestion to top with a fried egg; this makes the meal slightly more hearty.</p> <h2>9. Martha Stewart Would Be Upset</h2> <p>I'm sure Ms. Stewart would prefer you use Arborio rice in this <a href="http://www.marthastewart.com/336988/leek-bacon-and-pea-risotto#Bacon%20Recipes%7C/275103/bacon-recipes/@center/854190/comfort-food-recipes%7C336988">leek, bacon, and pea risotto</a>, but it can be pricey (see also, leeks, #1 above). I have made this recipe with whatever rice I have around &mdash; white, Hawaiian &quot;hapa,&quot; brown, sushi rice, whatever. In all honesty, by the time you add leeks, bacon, and put Parmesan on top, nobody cares. It tastes great.</p> <h2>10. Show Off at a Dinner Party</h2> <p>Here's a show-stopper: <a href="http://www.recipetineats.com/bacon-wrapped-pork-tenderloin/">bacon-wrapped pork tenderloin</a>. I just purchased, in bulk, the pork tenderloins at Costco, cut them into smaller sections, wrapped them, and put them into the freezer. By doing so, I figure each loin cost about $4. I plan to pair this with an apple-blue cheese salad and roasted red potatoes.</p> <h2>11. Even Ordinary Lentils Can Be Fancy</h2> <p>Although this recipe calls for green lentils, brown ones work fine. They can become mushy, but I think that is actually a plus, in a soup. Brown lentils are the cheapest of the three (brown, green, or French; red). When I told my husband we we having <a href="http://www.onceuponachef.com/2013/01/french-lentil-and-vegetable-soup-with-bacon.html">lentil soup</a>, he gave me one of those looks (you know the one &mdash; &quot;Ew, lentils?&quot;) but he's a gamer, so he ate it, and he loved it (hello, bacon).</p> <p>We know bacon isn't &quot;health food,&quot; but again, none of the recipes above use a ton of it. So go nuts!</p> <p><em>What are your favorite &quot;fancy-but-affordable&quot; recipes featuring bacon? Please share some in comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/marla-walters">Marla Walters</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-delicious-bacon-recipes-that-only-sound-expensive">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/stop-dissing-spam">Stop dissing Spam!</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-deliciously-affordable-meats-youll-love-grilling">7 Deliciously Affordable Meats You&#039;ll Love Grilling</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-best-money-saving-healthy-homemade-salad-dressings">5 Best Money-Saving, Healthy, Homemade Salad Dressings</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/when-good-food-goes-bad">When Good Food Goes Bad</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-meatless-dishes-for-meat-n-taters-lovers">8 Meatless Dishes for Meat-n-Taters Lovers</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Food and Drink bacon meat recipes Tue, 02 Jun 2015 21:00:09 +0000 Marla Walters 1437292 at http://www.wisebread.com Best Money Tips: Ways to Save on Meat http://www.wisebread.com/best-money-tips-ways-to-save-on-meat <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/best-money-tips-ways-to-save-on-meat" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_shopping_meat_000020784319.jpg" alt="Woman finding ways to save on meat" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Welcome to Wise Bread's <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/topic/best-money-tips">Best Money Tips</a> Roundup! Today we found some great articles on ways to save on meat, productive habits of the wealthy and successful, and budget-friendly ways to decorate your apartment.</p> <h2>Top 5 Articles</h2> <p><a href="http://www.moneytalksnews.com/7-ways-save-meat/">7 Ways to Save on Meat</a> &mdash; Watch out for added liquids used to enhance flavor (and price). The label will have words like &ldquo;enhanced with,&rdquo; &ldquo;flavored with&rdquo; or &ldquo;flavor solution.&rdquo; [Money Talks News]</p> <p><a href="http://www.lifehack.org/articles/money/15-daily-habits-wealthy-people.html">15 Daily Habits of Wealth People</a> &mdash; It may surprise you to know that many wealthy people live minimally and show gratitude. [Life Hack]</p> <p><a href="http://www.popsugar.com/smart-living/Apartment-Decorating-Budget-25572166">12 Inexpensive and Creative Ways to Decorate Your Apartment</a> &mdash; Frame calendar art to make your walls pop! [PopSugar Smart Living]</p> <p><a href="http://www.csmonitor.com/Business/Saving-Money/2015/0502/Seven-steps-to-achieving-your-2015-financial-goals">Seven steps to achieving your 2015 financial goals</a> &mdash; Take another look at your financial goals for the year. Do you need to reassess your money habits? [The Monitor]</p> <p><a href="http://blog.readyforzero.com/coffee-addicts-money-saving-tips/">A Coffee Addict&rsquo;s Money Saving Tips</a> &mdash; Pour leftover coffee into an ice tray and pop it in the freezer. Use the coffee cubes for iced coffee, or drop them into a too-hot cup to cool it down. [ReadyForZero]</p> <h2>Other Essential Reading</h2> <p><a href="http://moneypantry.com/under-5k-business-ideas/">50 Kick-Ass Businesses You Can Start for Under $5000</a> &mdash; If your cakes are delicious and you have a flair for decorating, you can make a business of creating personalized cakes for special occasions. [Money Pantry]</p> <p><a href="http://moneyning.com/credit-cards/what-type-of-payment-should-i-use-when-to-use-cash-credit-or-debit/">What Type of Payment Should I Use? When to Use Cash, Credit, or Debit</a> &mdash; Use cash at local mom and pop shops, yard sales, and when you're tipping. [MoneyNIng]</p> <p><a href="http://www.mydollarplan.com/creative-and-inexpensive-wedding-gift-ideas/">6 Creative and Inexpensive Wedding Gift Ideas</a> &mdash; Offer to gift something for their wedding. You can take care of invitations or centerpieces, and that'll be one item off the wedding couple's to-do list. [My Dollar Plan]</p> <p><a href="http://blog.quizzle.com/2015/05/3-laws-that-protect-you-and-your-credit-and-how-to-use-them">3 Laws That Protect You and Your Credit &ndash; And How to Use Them</a> &mdash; Read up on the Fair Credit Reporting Act &mdash; it's the cornerstone of all consumer credit protection.</p> <p><a href="http://parentingsquad.com/a-complete-checklist-for-evaluating-an-educational-app">A Complete Checklist for Evaluating an Educational App</a> &mdash; Use this checklist to help you figure out of an app is educational enough for your child. [Parenting Squad]</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/amy-lu">Amy Lu</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/best-money-tips-ways-to-save-on-meat">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-secret-cheap-steak-cuts-you-should-be-asking-for">7 Secret Cheap Steak Cuts You Should Be Asking For</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-stay-on-budget-while-eating-paleo">How to Stay on Budget While Eating Paleo</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/20-ways-to-eat-paleo-for-super-cheap">20 Ways to Eat Paleo for Super Cheap</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-best-5-credit-cards-for-groceries">The Best Credit Cards for Groceries</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/20-easy-ways-to-stretch-your-grocery-dollars">20 Easy Ways to Stretch Your Grocery Dollars</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Food and Drink best money tips groceries meat Mon, 11 May 2015 19:00:22 +0000 Amy Lu 1416524 at http://www.wisebread.com 8 Meatless Complete Proteins That Will Help You Lose Weight http://www.wisebread.com/8-meatless-complete-proteins-that-will-help-you-lose-weight <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/8-meatless-complete-proteins-that-will-help-you-lose-weight" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/soybeans-179961610-small.jpg" alt="soybeans" title="soybeans" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>When you see the word &quot;meat,&quot;what's the first thing that comes to your mind? If you're like many people, you'll probably answer with the word &quot;protein.&quot;</p> <p>You may already know that the protein in meat is &quot;<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Complete_protein">complete</a>,&quot; meaning that it contains all nine of the essential amino acids in adequate proportions necessary for our dietary needs.</p> <p>But did you know that there are other, meatless foods that contain complete protein as well? And that in addition, did you know that these might even help you lose weight? (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/35-slow-cooker-recipes-for-busy-or-lazy-vegetarians?ref=seealso">35 Slow Cooker Recipes for Busy Vegetarians</a>)</p> <p>Although meat has protein, it also tends to have zero fiber and lots of fat. For example, even <a href="http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/beef-products/6193/2">90 percent lean ground beef</a> has 10 grams of fat per 100 gram serving. And one <a href="http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/pork-products/10297/2">pork chop</a> has 4 grams of fat.</p> <p>These eight meatless complete proteins, conversely, are generally low fat and high fiber. So what are you waiting for? Check them out &mdash; along with some recommended starter recipes below &mdash; and start eating complete, meat-free, protein.</p> <h2>1. Chia Seeds</h2> <p>Native to central and southern Mexico and Guatemala, and known for their use in the popular Chia Pets back in the 1980's, <a href="http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/nut-and-seed-products/3061/2">chia seeds</a> pack 11 grams of fiber, and 4 grams of protein into just one ounce. Chia seeds have an Amino Acid Score of 115 (an Amino Acid Score of 100 or higher indicates a complete protein). And they make a mean <a href="http://www.wholefoodsmarket.com/recipe/chia-pudding">chia pudding</a>.</p> <h2>2. Soybeans</h2> <p>You've seen <a href="http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/legumes-and-legume-products/4376/2">soybeans</a> processed into tofu and soymilk, soybeans pack 10 grams of fiber and 29 grams of protein into a single cup. They also have an Amino Acid Score of 118, all of which you can drink with some beautiful homemade <a href="http://www.tinyurbankitchen.com/2012/02/homemade-soy-milk.html">soymilk</a>.</p> <h2>3. Quinoa</h2> <p><a href="http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/cereal-grains-and-pasta/10352/2">Quinoa</a> (pronounced <em>keen-wah</em>) originated in the Andean region of Peru, Bolivia, Ecuador, and Colombia, and is without a doubt &quot;the grain of the moment.&quot; One cup has 5 grams of fiber and 8 grams of protein, and while very versatile, this <a href="http://kidtestedfirefighterapproved.com/2012/04/12/citrus-black-bean-quinoa-salad/">citrus black bean quinoa salad</a> is a great place to start.</p> <h2>4. Amaranth</h2> <p>Once a staple food of the Aztecs, <a href="http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/cereal-grains-and-pasta/5676/2">amaranth</a> has an Amino Acid Score of 108, and makes a hearty <a href="http://www.glowkitchen.com/2014/01/amaranth-breakfast-cereal-2/">amaranth breakfast cereal</a>.</p> <h2>5. Spinach</h2> <p>Ten grams of protein and 7 grams of fiber was enough for Popeye, so what about you? And if you think <a href="http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/vegetables-and-vegetable-products/2626/2">spinach</a> is all about salads, you clearly need to try this <a href="http://simplegreensmoothies.com/Recipes/beginners-luck">simple green smoothie</a>.</p> <h2>6. Black-Eyed Peas</h2> <p><a href="http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/legumes-and-legume-products/4332/2">Black-eyed peas</a> are named for the black spots which looks like black eyes. They are traditionally eaten in the South, and on New Year's Day to bring good luck. One cup has 11 grams of fiber, and 13 grams of protein, and all of that goodness goes into these <a href="http://healthyslowcooking.com/2013/11/16/sloppy-black-eyed-peas/">sloppy black-eyed peas</a>.</p> <h2>7. Split Peas</h2> <p>Originally round when harvested, <a href="http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/legumes-and-legume-products/4354/2">split peas</a> are mechanically separated after they've been dried to encourage faster cooking. One cup has a whopping 16 grams of fiber, and 16 grams of protein, so demon-possessed girls aren't the only ones who should be enjoying <a href="http://cleangreensimple.com/2012/04/split-pea-soup/">split pea soup</a>.</p> <h2>8. Cauliflower</h2> <p>And finally: <a href="http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/vegetables-and-vegetable-products/2390/2">cauliflower</a> comes from the same species of vegetables that includes broccoli, brussels sprouts, cabbage, collard greens, and kale. Although most commonly known for its white color, cauliflower also comes in orange and purple varieties, and just one small head has 7 grams of fiber and 5 grams of protein. Try some <a href="http://www.wholefoodsmarket.com/recipe/roasted-cauliflower-steaks">Roasted Cauliflower Steak</a> and see how they stack up to those lesser, <em>actual</em> steaks.</p> <p><em>What's your favorite non-animal protein source? Please share a bite in comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/darren-wu">Darren Wu</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-meatless-complete-proteins-that-will-help-you-lose-weight">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/so-you-think-youre-a-carnivore">So, You Think You&#039;re a Carnivore?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/perfect-peanut-sauce">Perfect Peanut Sauce</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/25-frugal-items-for-your-organic-vegan-grocery-list">25 Frugal Items for Your Organic Vegan Grocery List</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/35-mouth-watering-lentil-recipes">35 Mouth Watering Lentil Recipes</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-stay-on-budget-while-eating-paleo">How to Stay on Budget While Eating Paleo</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Health and Beauty complete protein meat protein vegan vegetarian veggie protein Fri, 17 Oct 2014 13:00:03 +0000 Darren Wu 1236727 at http://www.wisebread.com 8 Reasons Why It's OK to Eat Meat http://www.wisebread.com/8-reasons-why-its-ok-to-eat-meat <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/8-reasons-why-its-ok-to-eat-meat" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/bbq-453441127.jpg" alt="barbecue" title="barbecue" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="167" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>These days, it seems like meat doesn't have many friends. Vegetarians hate it. Environmentalists rail against it. And your doctor has probably told you to avoid it.</p> <p>But it may be time to come to meat's defense. After all, there is considerable evidence to suggest that lean beef and other meats can be a meaningful part of a balanced diet.</p> <p>No one is suggesting you must eat an 18-ounce Porterhouse for every meal. But you may be surprised to find that meat can be very good for you in ways you never considered.</p> <p>Consider these great benefits of eating meat.</p> <h2>1. It's Packed With Protein</h2> <p>One six ounce steak has about 44 grams of protein, or nearly 90% of the daily recommended intake for an average middle-aged man. That's great for building strong muscles and repairing damaged tissues.</p> <h2>2. It's a Great Source of Iron</h2> <p>If you're feeling tired or lethargic, more meat may be what you need. Most meats, especially beef, have <a href="http://www.cdc.gov/nutrition/everyone/basics/vitamins/iron.html">high amounts of iron</a>, a mineral that helps ensure good oxygen content in the blood. According to the Centers for Disease Control, the iron in meat can be absorbed two to three times faster than the iron in plants. In fact, the CDC said eating meat can help the body more effectively absorb the iron we get from other foods.</p> <h2>3. It Has Lots of Other Vitamins, Too</h2> <p>Meat is also <a href="http://ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/beef">a great source of vitamin B12</a>, which is only available from animal products and helps release energy from food. It also contains helpful amounts of vitamin B6, zinc, selenium, phosphorous, and riboflavin, according to the US Department of Agriculture. People who avoid meat have to work extra hard to find these vitamins and minerals in other foods.</p> <h2>4. It Has Fat, but Not All of It's Bad</h2> <p>It's important to know that there are different kinds of fat, and some are more healthful than others. Saturated fat is generally not good for you, but monounsaturated fat &mdash; the kind found in olive oil &mdash; can help boost your HDL (good) cholesterol. And guess what? About <a href="http://www.beefnutrition.org/cmdocs/beefnutrition/fattyacidprofileofbeef.pdf">half of the fat content in beef</a> is monounsaturated. Beef also has a small amount of polyunsaturated fat, including the heart-helpful Omega-3 and Omega-6.</p> <h2>5. It Fills You Up and May Help You Lose Weight</h2> <p>In part because of that great protein, beef takes a while to digest. That's a good thing if you are looking to keep your appetite in check. Beef rates quite <a href="http://www.mendosa.com/satiety.htm">high on the Satiety Index</a>, which scores foods based on how long they can keep a person feeling full. Beef has a score of 176, meaning that it is 76% more satisfying than a similarly sized portion of white bread. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-foods-that-will-keep-you-satisfied-for-longer?ref=seealso">9 Foods That Will Keep You Satisfied Longer</a>)</p> <h2>6. Our Bodies Know What to Do With It</h2> <p>Many health-conscious people have adopted the &quot;Paleolithic&quot; diet, which essentially eliminates any food that we humans didn't eat in the early days of our evolution. The diet is based on the theory that humans haven't really changed much genetically in thousands of years, so it's best to stick with foods we commonly ate during our hunter-gatherer days. That means we're essentially left with meat, fish, eggs, vegetables, fruit, nuts, and seeds. Our bodies, in theory, know exactly how to digest and process these foods.</p> <h2>7. It May Be Good for the Environment</h2> <p>OK, there are many people who will surely disagree with this one. After all, a United Nations report estimated that livestock are responsible for as much as <a href="http://www.fao.org/ag/magazine/0612sp1.htm">18% of all greenhouse gases</a>. But there are some who argue that figure is actually lower, and that livestock can actually be helpful to the ecology when properly raised.</p> <p>In his book, &quot;<a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1603583246/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=1603583246&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=FZHLR4FWH3UWHF4S">Meat: A Benign Extravagance</a>,&quot; author Simon Fairlie writes that livestock <a href="http://www.permaculture.co.uk/articles/meat-eating-vs-vegetarian-or-vegan-diets">can play a role </a>in a well-balanced ecosystem.</p> <p>&quot;Livestock provide the biodiversity that trees on their own cannot provide,&quot; he writes. &quot;They are the best means we have of keeping wide areas clear and open to solar energy and wind energy. They harness biomass that would otherwise be inaccessible, and recycle waste that would otherwise be a disposal problem.&quot;</p> <h2>8. It's Great for Your Mental Health</h2> <p>I count grilling out on a summer evening among life's greatest pleasures. And there is at least one study that suggests <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21537054">cookouts can be beneficial to your psyche</a>. A study in Psychology Science said that many &quot;comfort foods&quot; &mdash; such as those found during a typical family cookout &mdash; can play a role in making people feel less lonely. Environmental psychologist Sally Augustin further theorizes that there is an additional <a href="http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/people-places-and-things/201105/benefits-barbeques">benefit to being outside</a>, and that the music played at barbecues can improve a person's mental outlook.</p> <p><em>What's your favorite reason to eat more meat? Please share in comments! </em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/tim-lemke">Tim Lemke</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-reasons-why-its-ok-to-eat-meat">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/book-review-in-defense-of-food">Book review: In Defense of Food</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-reasons-cold-pressed-juice-may-not-be-all-that">5 Reasons Cold-Pressed Juice May Not Be All That</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/so-you-think-youre-a-carnivore">So, You Think You&#039;re a Carnivore?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-stay-on-budget-while-eating-paleo">How to Stay on Budget While Eating Paleo</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-new-face-of-poverty-is-fat">The new face of poverty is fat</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Food and Drink Health and Beauty dieting Food meat nutrition psychology Mon, 05 May 2014 09:00:15 +0000 Tim Lemke 1137747 at http://www.wisebread.com 25 Easy Ways to Make Cheap Cuts of Meat Taste Expensive http://www.wisebread.com/25-easy-ways-to-make-cheap-cuts-of-meat-taste-expensive <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/25-easy-ways-to-make-cheap-cuts-of-meat-taste-expensive" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/meat-175945290.jpg" alt="meat" title="meat" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="167" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>As one of the big-ticket items on your grocery list, meat can eat up a big portion of your budget if you're not careful. While many of us would love to dine on filet mignon and prime rib regularly, reality requires us to be a little more frugal with our protein. Fortunately many less-expensive cuts of meat can taste deliciously gourmet if prepared in the right way. Read on to find out how to cook these wallet-friendly cuts. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/cheap-ways-to-add-big-flavor-to-your-food?ref=seealso">Cheap Ways to Add Big Flavor</a>)</p> <h2>Beef Chuck</h2> <p>Beef chuck is an economical cut that comes from the shoulder of the steer. It can be cut into chunks for stew, ground into ground beef, or braised whole. Beef chuck is the perfect stew meat &mdash; it is full of connective tissue that softens and makes the meat tender and flavorful. The key with this tough cut is to cook it slowly.</p> <h3>1. Boeuf Bourguignon</h3> <p>One of my favorite &quot;gourmet&quot; ways to prepare beef chuck is to make Julia Child's famous <a href="http://www.food.com/recipe/boeuf-bourguignon-a-la-julia-child-148007">Boeuf Bourguignon</a>, a slowly cooked, hearty stew that is perfect for a company dinner.</p> <h3>2. Beef Stroganoff</h3> <p><a href="http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/tyler-florence/beef-stroganoff-over-buttered-noodles-recipe.html">Beef stroganoff</a> is a Russian stew with sour cream and fresh herbs that make it creamy and a perfect topping for buttery egg noodles. Try switching the parsley in this recipe with fresh dill &mdash; it's addictive!</p> <h3>3. Beef Chuck Pot Roast</h3> <p><a href="http://thepioneerwoman.com/cooking/2011/09/2008_the_year_of_the_pot_roast/">Pot roast</a> is a traditional one-pot meal that works just as well for a family dinner as for a dinner party. And with the affordable prices of a beef chuck roast, you could potentially have one every Sunday. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/one-pot-roast-a-week-of-cheap-and-delicious-lunches?ref=seealso">A Week of Lunches From One Pot Roast</a>)</p> <h3>4. Shredded BBQ Beef</h3> <p>If you love smoked BBQ brisket, but don't want to bother with slow-smoking, try using beef chuck in a braise instead in this <a href="http://www.simplyrecipes.com/recipes/braised_bbq_beef_sandwich/">BBQ beef recipe</a>. Braising means you can easily cook the beef on the stovetop. Just shred and serve on a soft bun.</p> <p><img width="605" height="303" alt="" src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u784/meat-465447255-ggnoads.jpg" /></p> <h2>Beef Shanks</h2> <p>Cross-cut beef shanks come from the leg of the steer. They are one of the most overlooked cuts of meat, and as a result tend to be very budget-friendly, even the grass-fed organic versions! The inclusion of bone and marrow makes for an intensely rich stew, as well as lots of healthy nutrients. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-nutrients-you-need-more-of?ref=seealso">You Need More of These Nutrients</a>)</p> <h3>5. Osso Buco</h3> <p><a href="http://www.thecavegirldish.com/2011/06/beef-shank-osso-buco-style-alla-giada.html">Osso buco</a>, an Italian stew, is typically made with veal shanks, which tend to be expensive. But you can make osso buco with inexpensive beef shanks for a fraction of the price &mdash; although the flavor of the beef won't be as delicate as the veal, your wallet will appreciate the difference!</p> <h3>6. Beef Shanks Braised in Red Wine</h3> <p>This budget-friendly recipe for <a href="http://www.thekitchn.com/slow-cooker-rec-160583">beef shanks slowly braised in red wine</a> (&quot;Two-Buck Chuck&quot; does the trick) makes meltingly tender chunks of flavorful beef, and it's easy to cook in the slow cooker. After the beef is cooked, the braising liquid is reduced to make a silky sauce. Serve it over polenta for a cultured company meal.</p> <h3>7. Beef Shanks and Cabbage Stew</h3> <p>This slow-cooker recipe for <a href="http://nomnompaleo.com/post/2565593206/slow-cooker-grass-fed-beef-shanks-cabbage-stew">beef shanks with cabbage</a> is one of my favorite easy one-pot meals. Hint: After you've finished eating the stew, save any leftover braising liquid and freeze it in an ice-cube tray. Throw the intensely flavorful stock cubes into stir-fries, chili, or anything that needs a shot of beefy flavor. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-freeze-foods-that-dont-freeze-well?ref=seealso">Surprising Foods You Can Freeze</a>)</p> <h2>Skirt Steak</h2> <p>Skirt steak is one of the more commonly found affordable steaks at the supermarket and is often sliced thinly for fajitas or stir-fries. You can of course use it as such (use high heat and don't overcook it), but blast it briefly on high heat on the grill, and you've got a flavorful steak that's much more affordable than rib-eye or filet.</p> <h3>8. Grilled Skirt Steak With Chimichurri</h3> <p>Because skirt steak is so thin, cook it for only a couple minutes on each side to avoid overcooking. This <a href="http://www.foodandwine.com/recipes/mark-bittmans-grilled-skirt-steak-with-chimichurri-sauce">Argentine-style skirt steak</a> is served with aromatic chimichurri sauce.</p> <h3>9. Soy Marinated Skirt Steak</h3> <p>Skirt steak also takes well to marinating in a <a href="http://allrecipes.com/recipe/marinated-flank-steak/">soy-based sauce</a> &mdash; let it sit for several hours to allow the flavors to penetrate. Then grill it over high heat.</p> <p><img width="605" height="303" alt="" src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u784/meat-146914150-ggnoads.jpg" /></p> <h2>Hanger Steak</h2> <p>Craving steak on a budget? Hanger steak is popular in French cuisine but is much more affordable than better-known steaks like tenderloin or ribeye. It's a large piece of steak that can be tough if overcooked and is best seared or broiled to medium-rare. Be sure to slice it thinly against the grain. Unfortunately, hanger steak can be hard to find &mdash; there are only two steaks per animal &mdash; so if you find a store that stocks it, grab it when you can.</p> <h3>10. Garlic and Herb-Marinated Hanger Steak</h3> <p>According to <a href="http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2012/05/grilled-garlic-and-herb-marinated-hanger-steak.html">J. Kenji Lopez-Alt of Serious Eats</a>, hanger steak's loose texture makes it perfect for marinating. Here, he marinates the steak for at least two hours in a flavorful mix of garlic and herbs before searing it on the grill. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-cheap-and-delicious-marinades?ref=seealso">Cheap and Delicious Marinades</a>)</p> <h3>11. Beer-Marinated Hanger Steak</h3> <p>I love the flavor of a <a href="http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/pan-grilled-beer-marinated-hanger-steak-236873">beer-marinated steak</a>, and with a full day of marinating, this hanger steak is sure to soak up the flavor.</p> <h2>Rump Roast</h2> <p>Rump roast (or its cousins top round, bottom round, and eye of round roasts) comes from the muscled hindquarters of the steer and is thus quite tough. However, it's perfect for braising and for roast beef where the slow cooking tenderizes this lean cut.</p> <h3>12. Roast Beef</h3> <p>This simple recipe for <a href="http://www.simplyrecipes.com/recipes/roast_beef/">roast beef</a> is perfect for serving a crowd relatively cheaply while still impressing your guests. It also makes a great family meal. It uses a tough cut &mdash; the rump roast &mdash; and cooks it slowly for 2 to 3 hours. Be sure to use a thermometer to keep an eye on the doneness.</p> <h3>13. Rump Roast Au Jus</h3> <p>An easy way to cook a rump roast low and slow is in the slow-cooker. Just put it in the slow cooker in the morning and <a href="http://allrecipes.com/recipe/rump-roast-au-jus/">a delicious roast is ready</a> when you get home from work. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-best-slow-cookers?ref=seealso">Best Slow Cookers</a>)</p> <p><img width="605" height="303" alt="" src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u784/meat-465794577-ggnoads.jpg" /></p> <h2>Pork Shoulder</h2> <p>Pork shoulder is one of the most budget-friendly meat options I've come across. A medium bone-in shoulder roast can feed a family of four for $10. It takes tremendously well to slow-cooking and shredding, making it a set-and-forget kind of meal.</p> <h3>14. Pulled Pork</h3> <p>Roast a Boston butt low and slow in the oven with plenty of seasonings for delicious <a href="http://www.kevinandamanda.com/recipes/dinner/perfect-pulled-pork-slow-roasted-seasoned-savory.html">pulled pork</a>. Warning: You will need to leave your oven on for several hours (13 hours for the 8-pound roast in the recipe), so plan to do it on a rainy weekend when you'll be around.</p> <h3>15. Cilantro Shredded Pork</h3> <p>One of my favorite ways to cook a pork shoulder is to dump it in a slow cooker with onions, a cup of salsa verde, a handful of chopped cilantro, a generous sprinkle of cumin and garlic powder, and salt and pepper. Set it on low for 8 hours or on high for 6. A few hours later you've got deliciously tender pork that can be shredded for tacos, eaten on top of a bowl of rice and beans, or added to a salad. I love using this pork for a taco bar where guests can assemble tacos themselves.</p> <h3>16. Carnitas</h3> <p>Mexican <a href="http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/melissa-darabian/pork-carnitas-recipe.html">pork carnitas </a>might seem like a restaurant meal, but they're surprisingly easy and affordable to cook at home. Cook the pork in a slow cooker all day and when you're ready for dinner, fry the shredded pork until it develops a savory crust.</p> <p><img width="605" height="303" alt="" src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u784/meat-177412099-ggnoads.jpg" /></p> <h2>Pork Shank</h2> <p>In general, Americans seem to prefer boneless meat (ribs and wings are the exception to the rule). I've found that bone-in cuts tend to be much cheaper. Pork shanks are one example of an unpopular cut that can be flavorful and tender in a long braise.</p> <h3>17. Braised Pork Shanks</h3> <p>This recipe for <a href="http://www.foodandwine.com/recipes/braised-pork-shanks">braised pork shanks</a>, cooked low and slow, makes for meltingly tender pork and a flavorful pork gravy. Don't let the liquid boil or it will toughen the meat.</p> <h2>Top Loin</h2> <p>Top loin makes a good roast and is cheaper than tenderloin. Using a meat thermometer is key to getting tender, juicy meat. Cook the loin too long and it'll end up tough and chewy.</p> <h3>18. Rosemary Roasted Pork Loin</h3> <p>This simple recipe for <a href="http://allrecipes.com/recipe/roasted-pork-loin/">roasted pork loin</a> makes a flavorful roast that can serve six or more people. Make a gravy with the sauce and serve it with risotto or fingerling potatoes for an elegant meal. Again, using a meat thermometer is essential.</p> <h2>Pork Chops</h2> <p>Pork chops are an affordable and lean meat that are sometimes known as &quot;the other white meat&quot; (in comparison to chicken breast). Unfortunately they can often be tough and dry. Cut from the lean loin, pork chops can overcook quickly. For a tender and flavorful pork chop, sear the outside of the meat briefly before turning the heat down and cooking it gently the rest of the way.</p> <h3>19. Tender and Juicy Pork Chops</h3> <p>This oven-roasted <a href="http://www.thekitchn.com/how-to-cook-perfect-pork-chops-in-the-oven-cooking-lessons-from-the-kitchn-194257">pork chop recipe</a> isn't so much a recipe as it is a method for cooking tender and juicy pork chops every time. You'll never go back!</p> <h3>20. Pork Chops With Mushroom Gravy</h3> <p>My neighbor swears by this recipe for <a href="http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Grandmas-Pork-Chops-in-Mushroom-Gravy">pork chops with mushroom gravy</a> &mdash; the pork chops end up tender while the rich, sherry-laced mushroom sauce makes this dish extra special.</p> <p><img width="605" height="303" alt="" src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u784/meat-463329139-ggnoads.jpg" /></p> <h2>Chicken Legs and Thighs</h2> <p>Chicken is in general one of the more affordable meats. Unfortunately the high demand for skinless, boneless, chicken breast has driven up the price. My personal opinion is that while the breast may be meaty, it lacks flavor and tends to be dry. Thankfully, the thighs, legs, and wings, are much more affordable, easier to cook well, and are much more flavorful!</p> <p>I've already covered chicken legs and thighs in depth in a previous article &mdash; <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-chicken-leg-and-thigh-recipes-from-around-the-world">15 Chicken Leg and Thigh Recipes From Around the World</a> &mdash; but here are a few of my favorite go-to recipes.</p> <h3>21. Cracklin' Chicken</h3> <p>Use skin-on, bone-in chicken thighs to make this crispy, <a href="http://nomnompaleo.com/post/74180911762/cracklin-chicken#more">cracklin' chicken</a> recipe with just a few readily-available ingredients. The skin crisps up into a delicious crust while the thigh meat stays juicy and tender.</p> <h3>22. Thai Basil Chicken Stir-Fry</h3> <p>I make this easy <a href="http://www.marthastewart.com/334306/chicken-and-basil-stir-fry">Thai basil chicken</a> stir-fry for a quick weeknight dinner quite often. While this recipe calls for breast meat, I find that boneless, skinless, chicken thighs work even better, as you can't overcook them.</p> <h2>Whole Chicken</h2> <p>Pound-for-pound, a whole chicken is cheaper than cut-up parts like breasts or thighs. In addition, you can use the leftover bones to make chicken broth or stock. Don't be intimidated by cooking a whole chicken &mdash; it's easy to do with these foolproof methods. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/get-a-weeks-worth-of-dinners-out-of-one-chicken?ref=seealso">One Week of Dinners From One Chicken</a>)</p> <h3>23. Slow-Cooker Chicken and Gravy</h3> <p>Put a <a href="http://nomnompaleo.com/post/4807547385/slow-cooker-roast-chicken-and-gravy">whole chicken</a> breast-side down into a slow cooker with herbs and aromatics. Six hours later, you've got a perfectly tender whole chicken ready to eat. Simply puree the remaining vegetables and juices to make a savory gravy to eat with the chicken.</p> <h3>24. Hainanese Chicken</h3> <p>With this method for cooking <a href="http://www.steamykitchen.com/5068-hainanese-chicken-rice.html">Hainanese chicken</a>, you slowly simmer a chicken in a large pot of water with aromatics like ginger and scallions. The poached chicken meat turns out meltingly tender, and you then use the broth to cook rice to go along with it. Way to use the whole bird!</p> <h3>25. Simple Roast Chicken</h3> <p>You can't get much more gourmet than a recipe by famous chef Thomas Keller. Yet this recipe for <a href="http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/My-Favorite-Simple-Roast-Chicken-231348">roast chicken</a> is simple enough for anyone to master.</p> <p><em>What is your favorite budget cut of meat? How do you prepare it?</em></p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <p>&nbsp;</p> <div align="center"><a href="//www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F25-easy-ways-to-make-cheap-cuts-of-meat-taste-expensive&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F25%20Easy%20Ways%20to%20Make%20Cheap%20Cuts%20of%20Meat%20Taste%20Expensive_0.jpg&amp;description=25%20Easy%20Ways%20to%20Make%20Cheap%20Cuts%20of%20Meat%20Taste%20Expensive" data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-config="above" data-pin-color="red" data-pin-height="28"><img src="//assets.pinterest.com/images/pidgets/pinit_fg_en_rect_red_28.png" alt="" /></a> </p> <!-- Please call pinit.js only once per page --><!-- Please call pinit.js only once per page --><script type="text/javascript" async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <div align="center">&nbsp;</div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/25%20Easy%20Ways%20to%20Make%20Cheap%20Cuts%20of%20Meat%20Taste%20Expensive_0.jpg" alt="25 Easy Ways to Make Cheap Cuts of Meat Taste Expensive" width="250" height="374" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/camilla-cheung">Camilla Cheung</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/25-easy-ways-to-make-cheap-cuts-of-meat-taste-expensive">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/make-pizza-night-fun-again-with-these-30-pizza-sauce-alternatives">Make Pizza Night Fun Again With These 30 Pizza Sauce Alternatives</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/25-ways-to-use-frozen-mixed-vegetables">25 Ways to Use Frozen Mixed Vegetables</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-delicious-ways-to-prepare-a-humble-head-of-cabbage">15 Delicious Ways to Prepare a Humble Head of Cabbage</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/50-ways-to-use-canned-salmon">50 Ways to Use Canned Salmon</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-delicious-ways-to-use-canned-corn">15 Delicious Ways to Use Canned Corn</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Food and Drink cheap meat cheap meat recipes cheap recipes meat Mon, 24 Feb 2014 11:37:11 +0000 Camilla Cheung 1126819 at http://www.wisebread.com Food Safety Reminder: Rinsing the Bird Is Bad for Your Health http://www.wisebread.com/food-safety-reminder-rinsing-the-bird-is-bad-for-your-health <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/food-safety-reminder-rinsing-the-bird-is-bad-for-your-health" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/chicken-5312161-small.jpg" alt="chicken" title="chicken" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="248" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Jennifer Quinlan, a food safety scientist at Drexel University, and the media production folks at New Mexico State University have produced a series of informative, and weirdly entertaining, <a href="http://www.drexel.edu/dontwashyourchicken/Videos-Photo-novellas/Overview/">videos and print ads that remind us to <em>stop </em>rinsing</a> chicken before cooking.</p> <p><iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/192C-iKRgFg?rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <p>Contrary to what most of us believe, rinsing before cooking does not remove harmful bacteria or reduce the risk of food borne illness, and in fact may increase the risk by spreading bacteria throughout sink and kitchen. The only safe way to eliminate harmful bacteria is to kill it with fire&nbsp;&mdash; by cooking the meat to a minimum safe temperature (<a href="http://www.foodsafety.gov/keep/charts/mintemp.html">165F for poultry</a>).</p> <p>Not rinsing before cooking is not new food safety advice &mdash; it's been the consensus among scientists for the past several years. Quinlan was inspired to launch this public awareness effort after focus groups revealed that as many as 90% of Americans still rinse before cooking.&nbsp;As NPR points out, even the venerable <a href="http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2013/08/23/213578553/julia-child-was-wrong-don-t-wash-your-raw-chicken-folks">Julia Child had it wrong</a>. Rinsing the bird first is a hard habit to break.</p> <p>What's true for poultry is <a href="http://www.fsis.usda.gov/wps/wcm/connect/2ceaa425-0488-4e86-a397-e2d9c470fc4a/Washing_Food.pdf?MOD=AJPERES">also true for pork, beef, lamb, and veal products</a>. Don't rinse before you cook any of those, either. But do remember to always wash your hands thoroughly after handling any meat products and before handling anything else.</p> <p><em>Do you still rinse first?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/lars-peterson">Lars Peterson</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/food-safety-reminder-rinsing-the-bird-is-bad-for-your-health">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/25-tasty-ways-to-use-chicken-stock">25 Tasty Ways to Use Chicken Stock</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/a-dinner-party-for-6-feed-em-for-under-20">A Dinner Party for 6: Feed &#039;Em for Under $20</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-chicken-leg-and-thigh-recipes-from-around-the-world">15 Chicken Leg and Thigh Recipes From Around the World</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/25-easy-ways-to-make-cheap-cuts-of-meat-taste-expensive">25 Easy Ways to Make Cheap Cuts of Meat Taste Expensive</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/low-carb-less-carbon-in-your-meals">Low-Carb: Less Carbon in Your Meals?</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Food and Drink chicken food safety meat Fri, 23 Aug 2013 20:41:14 +0000 Lars Peterson 981494 at http://www.wisebread.com So, You Think You're a Carnivore? http://www.wisebread.com/so-you-think-youre-a-carnivore <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/so-you-think-youre-a-carnivore" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/lion.jpg" alt="" title="Hm, you look so tasty..." class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="187" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Purely from a taste standpoint, very few things are as tasty to my tongue as  tender Steak Diane with a nice glass of cabernet. But because I try to minimize my consumption of meat, I occasionally have to explain my near-vegetarian diet preferences to a dining companion. This is usually the point at which said friend or date will feel the need to verify that they, in fact, <em><strong>will be consuming meat</strong></em>. The testimony to their preference of carnivorous indulgences is usually accompanied by some sort of grunt or chest thump - sometimes self-consciously and with a hint of guilt, and sometimes provocatively, with a combative edge. </p> <p>The funny thing about most people I meet who behave this way is that while they&#39;ll happily tear into a fillet mignon with bare hands and a smattering of A-1 sauce, the thought of eating <a href="http://whatscookingamerica.net/History/RockyMtnOyster.htm">breaded-and-fried calf testicles</a> with garlic aioli makes them turn a little green around the gills. </p> <p>Frankly, I&#39;m of the opinion that if you can&#39;t dig into a big bowl of <a href="http://www.mexican-barbecue-recipes.com/menudo-recipes.html#Menudo_Sonora">menudo</a>, then <strong>you&#39;re not a carnivore</strong>: you&#39;re a <em>musculutarian.</em> Yeah, I said it. If you&#39;re a <strong>real</strong> carnivore, you don&#39;t pick and choose the bits of the animal that you find the most acceptable; you have to go for the whole hog. None of this prissy &quot;Oh, well, I really only like the <em>white</em> meat&quot; or &quot;I only eat the shoulder&quot;. Nah, that ain&#39;t right. In for the penny, in for the pound, as it were. </p> <p>If you are going to contribute to the death of countless animals through your consumption of their flesh (and hey, that&#39;s your right), you should at least try to eat as <strong>much</strong> of the animal as you possibly can. Waste not, and all that. It&#39;s not so much self-righteous as it is old-fashioned; you know, in the olden days, they found a use for every part of the pig except the squeal.</p> <p>This philosophy extends beyond merely being adventurous (or guilt-ridden); pig&#39;s feet are cheap AND delicious. Tripe has an amazing texture and absorbs spicy sauces like you wouldn&#39;t believe. Liver is so versatile (and nutritious) that you can add bits of it nearly everywhere. <a href="http://www.erik-rasmussen.com/blog/2007/03/26/spanish-cow-tongue-recipe/">Tongue</a> is exquisitely tasty if cooked correctly.</p> <p>Just because you&#39;ve never enjoyed chicken feet before doesn&#39;t meant that you can&#39;t start now. There are some dishes that your average American or Canadian might balk at that are actually quite good, and if you do have the opportunity to try them out, be it while traveling abroad, dining with someone with less conventional tastes, or upon seeing just how affordable chicken hearts really are at your local supermarket, well... give it a shot for the following reasons:</p> <ol> <li><strong>Bragging rights</strong>. If nothing else, your less adventurous friends will think you&#39;re a stud for eating sheep&#39;s eyeballs at an Afghani restaurant.</li> <li><strong>Hey, you eat sausage, right</strong>? Do you know what they put in sausage? You think you&#39;re too good for pig&#39;s lips or something?</li> <li>Every self-respecting meat-eater should be brave enough to <strong>accept responsibility</strong> for the pain that their eating habits cause. I&#39;m not saying this with a judgmental tone - I&#39;m being as earnest as I can be. We all need to be aware of the impact that our lifestyles have on others. Recognizing that <em>there is more to a living animal than a delectable tenderloin</em> is a part of this process. When you dig into a heaping dish of haggis, you are recognizing the the animal that gave its life for your meal is made up of more than chops. Either that, or you are really, really drunk. Or both.</li> </ol> <p>Here are some things I&#39;ve tasted over the past few years that I have found to be utterly delectable, AND cheap:</p> <p><strong>Gizzards.</strong> There used to be a stand at the Public Market in Seattle that sold little bags of deep-fried gizzards, and my visiting family members would devour them like they were going out of style. It turns out that they were, because I can&#39;t find the guy who used to sell them, but if you ever get a chance to try them anywhere else, I highly recommend them. In fact, I&#39;ve taken to fighting my dad for the turkey gizzard every Thanksgiving. You can easily fix them yourself if you have a deep fryer or a deep enough pan and a good deal of vegetable oil. When fresh, they really are a treat.</p> <p><strong>Tripe (cow&#39;s stomach lining).</strong> Tripe is the man ingredient in menudo, which I simply adore, and it&#39;s also a common ingredient in <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hot_pot">Chinese hotpot</a>, which I love to enjoy with big groups of friends for special occasions. Also referred to as &quot;honeycomb&quot;, tripe has a unique texture that reminds me of a thinly-sliced calamari; a little chewy and very satisfying. Pig tripe is also quite good, but of a vastly different texture.</p> <p><strong>Blood.</strong> I&#39;ve had a couple of variations of this, but my favorite is a Korean version known as soon dae. Soon dae is a sausage that is made of blood and vermicelli noodles or rice, rather like Irish black pudding (which is a really good hangover food). Soon dae is served with some slight-spiced dipping salt, and sometimes sliced liver. It is incredibly delicious. The first time I ate it, I had no idea it was made of blood, and there&#39;s nothing in the taste of cooked blood that is similar to the taste of, say, the blood that comes out of your finger when you cut it.</p> <p><strong>Liver.</strong> When done right, liver can be a thing of beauty. My grandmother used to stuff piroshki with it, and it was so rich that I never really got accustomed to the taste in large quantities. However, I have found joy in sauces, such as a <a href="http://fxcuisine.com/default.asp?language=2&amp;Display=150&amp;resolution=high">good bolognese</a>, that have had liver added to them. </p> <p><strong>Glands.</strong> Be they testes, the thymus gland, or the pancreas, animal glands have an interesting texture that always makes me think of a slightly fluffy wonton. I&#39;ve found them to be fairly affordable in some fancier restaurants, at least, compared to the lobster.</p> <p><strong>Feet.</strong> Cow feet can be used in a variety of recipes. Calf&#39;s foot is used to make really delicious <a href="http://www.stratsplace.com/rogov/israel/joys_jewish_kit.htm">savory gelatins</a>. Pig&#39;s feet, when braised in soy sauce and star anise, are incredibly tender. Chicken legs and feet are one of my favorite Chinese dishes, but I&#39;ve never attempted to make them at home. My grandmother also used to make <a href="http://www.recipezaar.com/154189">headcheese</a> (also known as souse meat, a sort of gelatin made with chunks of meat and eaten with vinegar), something that was very popular in her village in the Ukraine before the Nazi take-over. I believe that she used a combination of chicken meat and calf&#39;s foot, because she had learned how to make the kosher version. I used to hate it as a kid, but now that I&#39;m old, I can see the appeal. </p> <p><strong>Bones.</strong> Every frugal kitchen knows the value of some good soup bones. If you get the right kind of bone, you can always let the dogs enjoy the remainder, but don&#39;t forget the <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2007/10/31/dining/311mrex.html">marrow</a>. If the idea of eating roasted marrow with bread is too much for you, you can always make that fillet mignon <a href="http://www.theworldwidegourmet.com/recipes/beef-tenderloin-with-fleurie-wine-and-marrow/">with marrow</a>. Fancy schmancy, eh?</p> <p><strong>Fish skin.</strong> It took me a very long time to appreciate the taste of fried salmon skin, but now that I&#39;ve been turned onto it, I can&#39;t get enough. Whenever I make salmon, which is rarely, I like to remove the skin and broil it until it&#39;s brown and incredibly crispy, then eat it over rice with chopped green onions and grated ginger.</p> <p><strong>Fish belly.</strong> The fish belly is the fattiest part of most fish, and thus, the most mouthwateringly melty and delicious. It&#39;s often removed by fishmongers and used in other deli dishes or discarded altogether. If you are lucky enough to find sashimi-quality salmon belly, I recommend indulging. Fish cheeks are also extremely delicious, if you can find them. </p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/andrea-karim">Andrea Karim</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/so-you-think-youre-a-carnivore">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/perfect-peanut-sauce">Perfect Peanut Sauce</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-stay-on-budget-while-eating-paleo">How to Stay on Budget While Eating Paleo</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-new-face-of-poverty-is-fat">The new face of poverty is fat</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/peanut-butter-the-poor-man-s-protein">Peanut Butter: The Poor Man’s Protein</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/healthy-frugal-eating">Healthy, frugal eating</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Food and Drink Health and Beauty carnivore diet Food Health meat omnivore's dilemma vegan vegetarian Mon, 11 Aug 2008 19:05:11 +0000 Andrea Karim 2313 at http://www.wisebread.com Low-Carb: Less Carbon in Your Meals? http://www.wisebread.com/low-carb-less-carbon-in-your-meals <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/low-carb-less-carbon-in-your-meals" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/semitruck.jpg" alt="" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="188" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>These days, it’s pretty much accepted practice to have a high carbon diet — the tomatoes in your salad may have ridden on a truck for days to get to you and the fish you’re grilling tonight may have caught a trans-Pacific flight to get to your table. We’re talking some pretty high carbon emissions just to make a meal.</p> <p>Environmentally-speaking, some low-carb — carbon, that is — is good for your diet and, considering the cost of food that has to be trucked into your area is rising, it might do your wallet some good as well. </p> <p>Most grocery stores don’t label locally-produced foods very clearly, but there are a couple of clear starting points for removing some carbon from your diet. Beef and dairy are ranked as the foods with the highest associated carbon emissions — although the fault doesn’t entirely lie with the transport. Cows, the source of both, are notorious sources of carbon emissions. As any farm kid can tell you, they produce methane — and lots of it! A reduction in the numbers of cows would go a long way towards reducing carbon emissions. Consider reducing the amount of beef and cheese you consume — consider poultry as an alternative, even if you can’t get it locally. </p> <p>Locally-grown produce is often suggested as a way to cut grocery bills and a local farmer’s market does offer a lot of good options. But, for most of us, they aren’t really a year round option. If you’ve got the time to spare, you might consider canning some local fruits and veggies — but honestly, most of us probably won’t. In that case, it’s worthwhile considering those canned varieties available at the grocery store. The occasional piece of fresh fruit isn’t going to ruin the environment, but out-of-season produce requires plenty of energy (and the associated emissions) to either grow or ship in from warmer climates. Long lasting canned goods are a better deal.</p> <p>One kind of food makes for the absolutely worst carbon emissions, though: the kind that gets thrown away. Not only is the energy used to get food to the consumer wasted, but then the food decomposes as well. Planning out meals ahead of time and reducing waste as much as possible is one of the clearest techniques most of us can use to lower our carbon footprint. And, we get the added benefit of saving money when we don’t buy food we won’t use.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/thursday-bram">Thursday Bram</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/low-carb-less-carbon-in-your-meals">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-4"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-cost-of-meat-too-high-to-pay">The Cost of Meat—Too High To Pay</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-cost-of-meat-the-personal-health-argument">The Cost of Meat—The Personal Health Argument</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/are-farmers-markets-frugal-or-a-luxury">Are Farmer&#039;s Markets Frugal or a Luxury?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/25-easy-ways-to-make-cheap-cuts-of-meat-taste-expensive">25 Easy Ways to Make Cheap Cuts of Meat Taste Expensive</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-produce-workers-guide-to-choosing-fruits-and-vegetables">The Produce Worker&#039;s Guide to Choosing Fruits and Vegetables</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Food and Drink carbon emission dairy meat produce Thu, 22 May 2008 18:44:01 +0000 Thursday Bram 2118 at http://www.wisebread.com Stop dissing Spam! http://www.wisebread.com/stop-dissing-spam <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/stop-dissing-spam" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/899415086_654b2378b9.jpg" alt="Sir Spam" title="Sir Spam" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="188" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p class="MsoNormal">Is it me, or are most people a bunch of Spam snobs? I admit it’s not filet mignon or a piece of finely seared Ahi Tuna, but come on people! It’s not that bad. In fact, I love it, and a lot of my friends and family do, too. It’s a great friend to the frugal chef, and if I can do anything today, it’s to convince Spam skeptics to change their ways (vegetarians excepted…maybe). </p> <p class="MsoNormal">Two of my fondest memories are of Spam. One goes way back to childhood. We grew up very poor at times, especially when my dad was unemployed for two years. Fried Spam with mashed potato was a highlight of my week. I loved slicing it into small, even squares and layering on big, creamy globs of mash.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">I never thought I’d find an equal Spam moment, but a few years ago it happened. I went on vacation to Guam, where my wife and her folks are from. And Spam is a big deal there. Christmas morning we went to a great little place called Shirley’s for breakfast and I ordered a big ol’ plate of fried rice, Portuguese sausage, eggs and Spam. It was fantastic. I asked for a plate of extra Spam and was thoroughly content before we’d opened any presents</p> <p class="MsoNormal">For those of you who think Spam is mystery meat, let me point out that it’s really no different than your average hot dog or slice of bologna. In fact, it&#39;s a little better quality than that. Here are the ingredients, and it’s a small list…</p> <ul> <li class="MsoNormal">Chopped pork shoulder meat with ham meat added. </li> <li class="MsoNormal">Salt (for binding, flavor, and firmness) </li> <li class="MsoNormal">Water (to help in mixing) </li> <li class="MsoNormal">Sugar (for flavor) </li> <li class="MsoNormal">Sodium Nitrite (for color and as a preservative)</li> </ul> <p class="MsoNormal">That’s pretty much it. Now consider that a hot dog is made up of Mechanically Separated Meat (another way of saying all the tiny bits of meat and fat stuck to the bones) and Spam seems like a piece of Prime Rib.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">Spam is also nice and cheap, around $2.20 per can at my supermarket (and even cheaper when you buy in bulk). A can of Spam will feed 2-4 people depending on the side dish, and is seriously tasty. Stop raising your eyebrows...it is. It’s way superior to fried bologna in my humble opinion.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">Ah, but what else can you do with it? Well, there are dozens of cookbooks out there devoted to Spam, but my favorite two come from the home of the humble meat, Hawaii. You can find them both on Amazon for a silly price.</p> <p><img src="http://healthcarehacks.com/files/fruganomics/u17/41RQSP1XWBL__SL500_AA240__0.jpg" alt="Spam2" title="Spam2" width="240" height="155" /> <br /><a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0935848495?ie=UTF8&amp;tag=wisebread07-20&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=0935848495">Hawaii&#39;s Spam Cookbook</a><img src="http://www.assoc-amazon.com/e/ir?t=wisebread07-20&amp;l=as2&amp;o=1&amp;a=0935848495" width="1" height="1" /><br /> </p> <p><img src="http://healthcarehacks.com/files/fruganomics/u17/51Y8221197L__SL500_AA240__0.jpg" alt="Spam3" title="Spam3" width="240" height="156" /><br /><a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1573061352?ie=UTF8&amp;tag=wisebread07-20&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=1573061352">Hawaii&#39;s 2nd Spam Cookbook</a><img src="http://www.assoc-amazon.com/e/ir?t=wisebread07-20&amp;l=as2&amp;o=1&amp;a=1573061352" width="1" height="1" /> </p> <p><a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1573061352?ie=UTF8&amp;tag=wisebread07-20&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=1573061352"></a></p> <p class="MsoNormal">I’ve included some great Spam recipes below (including the simple and delicious Spam Musubi) but before we get to those, a few Spam facts:</p> <ul> <li class="MsoNormal">SPAM is sold in over 99% of U.S. grocery stores. </li> <li class="MsoNormal">Over 60 million people <strong>in the U.S. alone</strong> eat SPAM. </li> <li class="MsoNormal">Over 141 million cans of SPAM are sold worldwide each year. </li> <li class="MsoNormal">By World War II, Hormel had sold twenty thousand tons of Spam. Then, during the wartime meat rationing, Spam got popular... </li> <li class="MsoNormal">If all the cans of Spam ever eaten were put end-to-end, they would circle the globe at least ten times. </li> <li class="MsoNormal">In the U.S. alone, 3.8 cans of Spam &quot;are consumed every second&quot;(assuming SPAM is eaten 24 hours a day, 365.25 days a year). </li> <li class="MsoNormal">Residents of Hawaii eat an average of four cans of SPAM per person per year, more than in any other place on Earth. Seems like a low number to me. </li> <li class="MsoNormal">By 1959, a billion cans of SPAM had been sold. The two billion mark was hit in 1970, followed by three billion in 1980, four billion in 1986, and five billion in 1993. </li> <li class="MsoNormal">In Korea, SPAM is sold in stylish presentation gift boxes of nine cans each. SPAM stolen from army PXs can be found on the Korean black market. And there are Korean imitations called Lo-Spam, Dak, Plumrose, and Tulip, to ensure that no one need go without. </li> <li class="MsoNormal">Nikita Krushchev once credited SPAM with the survival of the WWII Russian army. &#39;&#39;Without SPAM, we wouldn&#39;t have been able to feed our army,&#39;&#39; he said. </li> <li class="MsoNormal">The SPAM luncheon meat trademark is registered in 93 countries. </li> <li class="MsoNormal">SPAM is made in two U.S. locations - Austin, Minnesota, and Fremont, Nebraska - and seven other countries: England, Australia, Denmark, Philippines, Japan, Taiwan, and South Korea. </li> <li class="MsoNormal">In 1989, the U.S. armed forces bought 3.3 million pounds of SPAM. </li> </ul> <p class="MsoNormal">Now, if 99% of all U.S. grocery stores carry Spam, and yet everyone I talk to won’t touch the stuff, I’m led to three conclusions; first, grocery stores are involved in some major conspiracy with Hormel; second, there’s a lot of Spam being eaten by a tiny minority of people; third, people do eat Spam and just don’t like to admit it.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">But hey, who am I to throw aspersions out there? I’ll leave you with some of my favorite Spam recipes, they’re all really simple and take no time. Please, give Spam a chance (as John Lennon almost said).</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><img src="http://healthcarehacks.com/files/fruganomics/u17/17556.jpg" alt="musubi" title="musubi" width="250" height="250" /> </p> <p class="MsoPlainText"><span><strong>Spam Musubi</strong></span></p> <ul> <li><span>2 cups uncooked short-grain white rice</span></li> <li><span>2 cups water</span></li> <li><span>6 tablespoons rice vinegar</span></li> <li><span>1/4 cup soy sauce</span></li> <li><span>1/4 cup oyster sauce</span></li> <li><span>1/2 cup white sugar</span></li> <li><span>1 (12 ounce) container fully cooked Spam</span></li> <li><span>5 sheets sushi nori (dry seaweed)</span></li> <li><span>2 tablespoons vegetable oil</span></li> </ul> <p class="MsoPlainText"><span>1. Soak uncooked rice for 4 hours; drain and rinse. </span></p> <p class="MsoPlainText"><span>2. In a saucepan bring 2 cups water to a boil. Add rice and stir. Reduce heat, cover, and simmer for 20 minutes. Stir in rice vinegar, and set aside to cool. </span></p> <p class="MsoPlainText"><span>3. In a separate bowl, stir together soy sauce, oyster sauce, and sugar until sugar is completely dissolved. Slice Spam lengthwise into 10 slices, or to desired thickness, and marinate in sauce for 5 minutes. </span></p> <p><span>4. In a large skillet, heat oil over medium high heat. Cook slices for 2 minutes per side, or until lightly browned. Cut nori sheets in half and lay on a flat work surface. Place a rice press in the center of the sheet, and press rice tightly inside. Top with a slice of Spam and remove press. Wrap nori around rice mold, sealing edges with a small amount of water. (Rice may also be formed by hand in the shape of the meat slices, 1 inch thick.) Musubi may be served warm or chilled.</span></p> <p class="MsoPlainText"><span><strong>SPAM Fried Rice</strong></span></p> <ul> <li><span>2 cups leftover rice </span></li> <li><span>1-1/2 cups SPAM, cut into small pieces </span></li> <li><span>1 egg </span></li> <li><span>1 tablespoon soy sauce </span></li> <li><span>3 green onions, thinly sliced </span></li> <li><span>Sesame Oil</span> </li> </ul> <p class="MsoPlainText"><span> </span></p> <p class="MsoPlainText"><span>1: Heat a small amount of sesame oil into a skillet and brown spam pieces on all sides. </span></p> <p class="MsoPlainText"><span>2: Mix in the rice. </span></p> <p class="MsoPlainText"><span>3: Mix the egg with the soy sauce and stir into the hot rice and spam. </span></p> <p class="MsoPlainText"><span>4: Stir gently until the egg is cooked. </span></p> <p class="MsoPlainText"><span>5: Sprinkle green onions on top and serve.</span></p> <p class="MsoPlainText">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoPlainText"><img src="http://healthcarehacks.com/files/fruganomics/u17/44891.jpg" alt="wwii" title="wwii" width="250" height="250" /> </p> <p class="MsoPlainText"><span><strong>WWII Spam &amp; Egg Sandwich</strong></span></p> <ul> <li><span>1 tablespoon butter</span></li> <li><span>2 tablespoons finely chopped onion</span></li> <li><span>1 slice fully cooked Spam</span></li> <li><span>1 egg, beaten</span></li> <li><span>2 slices bread</span></li> <li><span>1 slice American cheese </span></li> <li><span>1 slice tomato (optional)</span></li> </ul> <p class="MsoPlainText"><span>1. Melt butter in a small skillet over medium-high heat. Sauté the onion in butter until soft. Mash up the slice of Spam with a fork, and add it to the skillet. Cook for 2 or 3 minutes, until browned. Pour the egg into the skillet so that it covers all of the meat and onion. Cook until firm, then flip to brown the other side. </span></p> <p class="MsoPlainText"><span>2. Place the egg and meat onto one slice of the bread and top with cheese and tomato if desired. Place the other piece of bread on top. Bread can also be toasted first. </span></p> <p class="MsoPlainText">&nbsp;</p> <p class="MsoPlainText"><img src="http://healthcarehacks.com/files/fruganomics/u17/1630.jpg" alt="bake" title="bake" width="250" height="250" /> </p> <p class="MsoPlainText"><strong><span>Spam &amp; Cheese Bake</span></strong></p> <ul> <li><span>1 (12 ounce) container fully cooked Spam, chopped</span></li> <li><span>2 eggs, beaten</span></li> <li><span>20 soda crackers, crushed</span></li> <li><span>2 cups milk</span></li> <li><span>1 cup shredded Cheddar cheese, divided</span></li> </ul> <p class="MsoPlainText"><span>1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). </span></p> <p class="MsoPlainText"><span>2. In a 9x13 inch baking dish combine the meat, eggs, cracker crumbs, milk and 3/4 cup of the cheese. Mix well. Sprinkle remaining 1/4 cup cheese on top. </span></p> <p class="MsoPlainText"><span>3. Bake uncovered in the preheated oven for 1 hour. Let cool and serve. </span></p> <p class="MsoPlainText"><span> </span></p> <p><em>This post is dedicated to my wife, her family and all the other great people who made me feel so welcome on Guam. Thank you all.  </em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/stop-dissing-spam">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-5"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-deliciously-affordable-meats-youll-love-grilling">7 Deliciously Affordable Meats You&#039;ll Love Grilling</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-best-money-saving-healthy-homemade-salad-dressings">5 Best Money-Saving, Healthy, Homemade Salad Dressings</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-delicious-raw-recipes-to-try-this-summer">11 Delicious Raw Recipes to Try This Summer</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/one-pot-roast-a-week-of-cheap-and-delicious-lunches">One Pot Roast, A Week of Cheap and Delicious Lunches</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-delicious-dishes-you-can-make-with-a-can-of-tomato-soup">11 Delicious Dishes You Can Make With a Can of Tomato Soup</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Frugal Living Food and Drink cheap ham meat pork recipes spam Thu, 24 Apr 2008 15:35:49 +0000 Paul Michael 2038 at http://www.wisebread.com I'll take a slice of lemon with fecal bacteria please. http://www.wisebread.com/ill-take-a-slice-of-lemon-with-fecal-bacteria-please <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/ill-take-a-slice-of-lemon-with-fecal-bacteria-please" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/461525292_1344fb943e.jpg" alt="Bad Lemon" title="Bad Lemon" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="187" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>I’ve never thought twice about the humble lemon slice. I’m sure most of you haven’t either. And as I’m partial to a slice of lemon in my water or iced tea, for added flavor, I usually request it at restaurants. After seeing this video, I think I’d be safer asking for slice of raw chicken in my drink. </p> <p>A study brought to light by <a href="http://healthinspections.com/">healthinspections.com</a> reveals that those innocent lemon slices you get in restaurants are loaded with bacteria, fecal matter and all sorts of other nasties. </p> <blockquote><p><em>&quot;It was like they had dipped it in raw meat or something; it was gross!” exclaimed Anne LaGrange, a microbiologist who tested several lemons from various restaurants and was shocked at the results. &quot;The very first sample that we took was loaded with fecal bacteria.&quot;</em> </p> </blockquote> <p>Here&#39;s the <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Dmcfcd9v24">full video</a> : </p> <p><object classid="clsid:D27CDB6E-AE6D-11cf-96B8-444553540000" codebase="http://download.macromedia.com/pub/shockwave/cabs/flash/swflash.cab#version=6,0,29,0" width="425" height="355"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/3Dmcfcd9v24&amp;rel=1" /><param name="quality" value="high" /><param name="menu" value="false" /><param name="wmode" value="" /><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/3Dmcfcd9v24&amp;rel=1" wmode="" quality="high" menu="false" pluginspage="http://www.macromedia.com/go/getflashplayer" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="425" height="355"></embed></object></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>In fact, from the 21 restaurant samples they tested, a staggering 77% of the wedges, 3 out of 4 (not 2 out of 3 as pointed out by an eagle-eyed reader), contained disease-causing bacteria. Yuck.</p> <p>Why is this happening? In simple terms, a mix of poor hygiene and cross-contamination. Restaurant workers should use tongs or gloves when they slice and serve the wedges, but they usually don’t. And often, the only explanation for the amount of bacteria found is that the lemons are being sliced using a knife and/or cutting board that was used for preparing raw meat. </p> <p>So, by all means add a slice of lemon at home. But now, when you’re out and about you may want to skip the lemons. This is definitely one of those cases where you can’t quite make lemonade out of the lemons life serves you.</p> <p><em>Thanks go to Skip Koebbeman for bringing this one to my attention. </em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/ill-take-a-slice-of-lemon-with-fecal-bacteria-please">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-secrets-restaurants-dont-want-you-to-know">6 Secrets Restaurants Don&#039;t Want You to Know</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/avoid-these-fast-food-items-say-fast-food-employees">“Avoid These Fast Food Items,” Say Fast Food Employees</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/do-you-agree-with-the-new-standards-of-restaurant-tipping">Do You Agree With the New Standards of Restaurant Tipping?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-protein-water-scam-kellogs-special-k2o-can-do-anything">The Protein Water Scam: Kellog&#039;s Special K2O Can Do Anything!</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/25-easy-ways-to-make-cheap-cuts-of-meat-taste-expensive">25 Easy Ways to Make Cheap Cuts of Meat Taste Expensive</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Consumer Affairs Food and Drink bacteria hygiene lemons meat raw restaurants Wed, 20 Feb 2008 18:14:19 +0000 Paul Michael 1822 at http://www.wisebread.com