aging parents http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/23443/all en-US How to Save for Retirement While Caring for Kids and Parents http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-save-for-retirement-while-caring-for-kids-and-parents <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-save-for-retirement-while-caring-for-kids-and-parents" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/three_generations_women_laughing_in_the_kitchen.jpg" alt="Three generations women laughing in the kitchen" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>As a member of the sandwich generation, you're not only raising your children, you're also caring for your aging parents. The financial burden, not to mention the daily responsibilities, can leave you struggling to invest in your own financial future. Here are some ways you can still save for your retirement while caring for those who depend on you. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-money-strategies-for-the-sandwich-generation?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Money Strategies for the Sandwich Generation</a>)</p> <h2>1. Make your financial future a priority</h2> <p>Your financial future matters as much as the current responsibilities you have. Consider the stress you experience as you try to navigate life while being a parent and caring for your own aging parents. Do you want to repeat the cycle of stress by failing to plan for your retirement? No, of course you don't. However, by letting guilt and the needs of the moment dictate your financial choices, you may end up in that place. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-financial-steps-to-take-when-your-aging-parents-move-in?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Financial Steps to Take When Your Aging Parents Move In</a>)</p> <p>When you're juggling medical bills and child care costs, retirement may seem far away and unimportant. It isn't. You deserve to have your financial needs met in the future as much as your children and parents deserve to have good care now.</p> <h2>2. Take advantage of employer programs</h2> <p>If your employer offers any sort of matching contribution to your 401(k), take full advantage of that opportunity.</p> <p>As you're able, increase the amount of money you're putting into your 401(k) from each paycheck. Having it automatically deducted &mdash; which is how most employers handle contributions &mdash; will keep you from depending on these savings for your daily expenses. Your goal is to bring your savings amount to the point of maximum matching contributions from your employer. It's an easy win, as those matching contributions double your savings.</p> <h2>3. Take advantage of tax-free savings</h2> <p>If you don't have a 401(k), now is the time to set up a traditional IRA. It's another way to maximize your retirement savings, as a traditional IRA will generally allow you to defer taxes on the money you save until much later &mdash; when you start withdrawing it. Deferring taxes enables you to save more now, while you're living in the sandwich generation budget crunch.</p> <h2>4. Find and apply for available tax benefits</h2> <p>Some additional tax breaks exist for adult children who are providing full-time care for their aging parents. Talk to your CPA about the requirements for claiming your elderly parents as a dependent.</p> <p>Additionally, examine your options for claiming tax deductions for medical care and other dependent expenses such as transportation, food, and supplies. Not all costs will qualify for tax deductions, but those that do can save you a good chunk of money that can go straight into your retirement savings.</p> <h2>5. Liquidate the assets your parents no longer need</h2> <p>It can be difficult to work through big financial decisions with your aging parents, but doing so can help you both navigate the somewhat rough financial waters of elder care. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-things-youll-encounter-when-taking-over-a-loved-ones-finances?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Things You'll Encounter When Taking Over a Loved One's Finances</a>)</p> <p>Identify the assets that are used very little but require ongoing maintenance, such as a house that's not lived in, or a boat or car that sits unused. These unused assets are financial drains. Work together to come up with a plan for liquidating them. Then put the money gained from their sale into an account that pays for your parents' monthly expenses. This relieves the financial burden you're carrying so that less of your income is required for your parents, and more of your income can go to your retirement savings.</p> <h2>6. Reduce a big, ongoing expense</h2> <p>The goal here isn't to come up with a one-time win, but to find a monthly cost that eats up your income and find a way to reduce it. Then you'll take that difference and add it to your monthly savings.</p> <p>Make a list of your monthly expenses, rank them from most to least expensive, and start going down the list with your goal in mind. You can shop for better insurance rates and a cheaper cellphone plan. You can sell the expensive car you're still making payments on, buy a cheaper one outright, and put the amount you used to spend on a car payment directly into your savings. The key is to make sure that the amount you save goes into savings; don't let it get absorbed into your budget and spent on other things.</p> <h2>7. Take a money challenge</h2> <p>A <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-smart-money-challenges-you-can-totally-do?ref=internal" target="_blank">money challenge</a> is a fun but temporary way to reduce your costs and increase your savings by cutting an expense for a short amount of time. It's doable because it's temporary, which also makes it fun. You might not want to haggle over expenses or shop from thrift stores all the time; however, you can do it for a month or so and use what you save to add to your retirement.</p> <h2>8. Invest in a hobby that makes money</h2> <p>Taking on yet another responsibility may seem impossible. However, prioritizing your own interests &mdash; in this case, one that can make you some money &mdash; is a good idea. You need time to dedicate to your own interests in this time of intense caregiving. If you put time into developing a <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-awesome-money-making-hobbies?ref=internal" target="_blank">hobby that has income potential</a>, you'll be able to add to your retirement fund.</p> <p>If finding the time is an issue (and of course it is!), don't be shy about asking family members and friends to pitch in on child care and parent care. You may handle most of the responsibility for your aging parents, but you don't have to do everything yourself. Set up a schedule so that adult siblings, cousins, and community members take on caregiving for a day or afternoon out of the week. Use that time to work on your side hustle, and funnel the money you make from it straight into your retirement savings.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fhow-to-save-for-retirement-while-caring-for-kids-and-parents&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FHow%2520to%2520Save%2520for%2520Retirement%2520While%2520Caring%2520for%2520Kids%2520and%2520Parents.jpg&amp;description=How%20to%20Save%20for%20Retirement%20While%20Caring%20for%20Kids%20and%20Parents"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/How%20to%20Save%20for%20Retirement%20While%20Caring%20for%20Kids%20and%20Parents.jpg" alt="How to Save for Retirement While Caring for Kids and Parents" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/annie-mueller">Annie Mueller</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-save-for-retirement-while-caring-for-kids-and-parents">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-help-your-parents-retire">How to Help Your Parents Retire</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-age-milestones-that-impact-your-retirement">6 Age Milestones That Impact Your Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-your-daily-latte-wont-sink-your-retirement-savings">Why Your Daily Latte Won&#039;t Sink Your Retirement Savings</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-you-can-cut-costs-right-before-you-retire-0">6 Ways You Can Cut Costs Right Before You Retire</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/half-of-americans-are-wrong-about-their-retirement-savings">Half of Americans Are Wrong About Their Retirement Savings</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Family Retirement aging parents caregiving cutting costs extra income IRA raising kids sandwich generation saving money taxes Thu, 14 Sep 2017 08:31:09 +0000 Annie Mueller 2019188 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Things You'll Encounter When Taking Over a Loved One's Finances http://www.wisebread.com/6-things-youll-encounter-when-taking-over-a-loved-ones-finances <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-things-youll-encounter-when-taking-over-a-loved-ones-finances" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/i've_always_been_able_to_count_on_her.jpg" alt="taking over an older relative&#039;s finances" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Your parents took care of you for much of your life. It's not a comfortable moment when you realize that they need <em>you</em> to help care for <em>them</em>.</p> <p>Ideally, when it's time to take the financial wheel for aging parents or other loved ones, you've already done some advanced planning. If not, the process may be more onerous. Here's what you need to know.</p> <h2>1. It's relatively easy if the person's assets are in a revocable trust</h2> <p>A decade ago, I received a letter from an elderly cousin informing me that she'd met with a lawyer to set up a revocable living trust, and that she wanted to name me the successor trustee. At the time, this was mumbo jumbo to me. But a couple of years ago, when my relative's health robbed her of the ability to conduct her own affairs, I was very grateful for her foresight.</p> <p>Because my name was already on her accounts as successor trustee, it was relatively easy to have the banks promote me to &quot;trustee,&quot; which gave me the legal power to manage nearly all her finances. All I needed to do was to provide the banks with a copy of the trust and a signed statement of incapacitation from her physician. Then I was able to set up online banking with my own passwords, giving me the power to pay her bills, deposit her checks, and renew her certificates of deposit as needed.</p> <p>Having this trust also made settling her estate easier when my relative eventually passed away.</p> <h2>2. A financial power of attorney is helpful, too</h2> <p>Having your assets transferred to a trust is a long process. In most cases, a durable financial power of attorney is almost as helpful, and creating one is much quicker and easier. The person who may need your future help simply fills out a few pages of paperwork and signs it in front of a notary. Their bank may have the necessary forms on hand.</p> <p>This power may be set up to kick in only if the account holder has become incapacitated, or can be for anytime use; for example, if your mother wants you to handle finances for her while she travels overseas once a year. It gives you the power to sign checks and tax returns, collect and deposit Social Security checks, sell real estate &mdash; pretty much everything. The main difference between the revocable trust and the power of attorney, in my experience, is that a power of attorney ends when the person dies, while a revocable trust continues after death.</p> <p>Even if you already have a revocable living trust, it's good to also get a financial power of attorney, for several reasons. First, not everyone recognizes a living trust, but pretty much every bank employee is familiar with a POA. Second, your loved one may have forgotten to put some assets into a living trust, in which case the POA can be a backup means for you to handle those assets. Third, there are a few powers, like signing tax returns, that trustees don't have.</p> <h2>3. It can be hard to talk to Social Security on their behalf</h2> <p>Once I took over my relative's finances, I noticed that her Social Security payments seemed low for the number of years she had worked. I wanted to talk with the Social Security Administration about whether she was getting everything she was due, so I took my POA and trust documents to a local service center, took a number, and waited for my turn at the window.</p> <p>No dice. The staff there informed me that the SSA doesn't recognize POAs, and that the only way I'd be able to get any information about her account was to apply to have them appoint me as a representative payee. Representative payees are given the authority to receive the Social Security payments belonging to a relative, friend, or other loved one, and use the money on the beneficiary's behalf.</p> <p>Upon further examination, I decided my relative probably would not qualify for any further Social Security payments, so I didn't go through this rigmarole. If you need to manage a loved one's Social Security benefits, however, be aware that you'll need to apply for this designation.</p> <h2>4. If you need to sell investments, you may have some digging to do</h2> <p>If you sell stock on behalf of your loved one, that person may owe capital gains taxes. Figuring out how much they owe can be a real challenge if they've held the asset for many decades. My relative held some stocks in online brokerage accounts, which sounded like they would be easy to manage. Soon I realized that she'd transferred these stocks to the brokerage after holding them for years as stock certificates.</p> <p>Some of the companies had gone through mergers and takeovers since she'd first invested. She probably had the paperwork showing when they'd originally been purchased somewhere &mdash; but her home contained many, many boxes of papers and I didn't know where to find the stock purchase records.</p> <p>If your loved one is expected to live a long time and will need investments to be liquidated, you'll have to do the legwork to get at least your best estimate as to when stocks were purchased and at what price. But if the account owner is not likely to need those assets in their lifetime, I learned from a financial adviser it may be wise to just leave them be. Why? Because cost basis &mdash; the cost at which the IRS views you to have acquired the asset &mdash; is reset at death. If your loved one passes away, those stocks can be liquidated without worrying about what they originally cost.</p> <h2>5. You must prepare carefully for financing nursing home care</h2> <p>Before I began helping my loved one with her finances, I lived in a fantasy land where Medicaid or Medicare would pay for all U.S. citizens' nursing home care if needed. A meeting with an elder lawyer set me straight.</p> <p>Medicaid will indeed pay for nursing home expenses &mdash; but only after nearly every other asset belonging to your loved one is gone. Once admitted to a nursing home, unless they purchased <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/is-long-term-care-insurance-worth-it" target="_blank">long-term care insurance</a>, they'll be expected to pay market rates, which can be <a href="https://www.genworth.com/about-us/industry-expertise/cost-of-care.html" target="_blank">$3,600 to $7,600 a month</a> <em>or more</em>. Once their money and assets run out, <em>then</em> Medicaid takes over.</p> <p>There are ways to shield some assets from going to the nursing home, and it's wise for you and/or your loved one to consult a lawyer who specializes in Title XIX planning in your state. One surprising rule in most states is that the person needing care can't simply give all their money away and expect Medicaid to pay for the nursing home. In fact, if your mother gives you $10,000 a few years before going into a nursing home, and then runs out of money, you can actually be compelled to give back that $10,000 gift &mdash; and if you've already spent it, well, now you're $10,000 in debt.</p> <p>Only a qualified attorney can walk you through all the rules for your state, but in general, what I learned was that it's important to start keeping records. Track money spent and gifts given as early as possible to prevent the system from trying to take back money already given away or spent. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/a-simple-guide-to-planning-for-a-loved-ones-long-term-care?ref=seealso" target="_blank">A Simple Guide to Planning For a Loved One's Long-Term Care</a>)</p> <h2>6. Check recent statements carefully</h2> <p>Elderly or ailing people can be victimized by everything from outright scams to petty fees that they shouldn't have to pay. Once you have access to your loved one's accounts, look over the past year's worth of financial statements. When I did this, I found that my relative had been unwittingly signed up for some membership programs she never used, and was still being billed for a phone line that had been disconnected months before. I was able to get all these charges reversed with some persistent phone calls. On the same tack, be alert for any signs that your loved one has been the victim of identity theft or other fraud. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-to-do-when-you-suspect-a-scam?ref=seealso" target="_blank">What to Do When You Suspect a Scam</a>)</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/carrie-kirby">Carrie Kirby</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-things-youll-encounter-when-taking-over-a-loved-ones-finances">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-money-moves-to-make-before-you-remarry">8 Money Moves to Make Before You Remarry</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-is-power-of-attorney">What Is Power of Attorney?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dont-make-these-5-common-mistakes-when-writing-a-will">Don&#039;t Make These 5 Common Mistakes When Writing a Will</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/who-really-owns-your-digital-assets">Who Really Owns Your Digital Assets?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/are-you-putting-off-these-9-adult-money-moves">Are You Putting Off These 9 Adult Money Moves?</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance aging parents estate planning long term care nursing home care power of attorney representative payee revocable trusts social security take care of loved ones Tue, 30 May 2017 08:30:13 +0000 Carrie Kirby 1955479 at http://www.wisebread.com 5 Money Strategies for the Sandwich Generation http://www.wisebread.com/5-money-strategies-for-the-sandwich-generation <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-money-strategies-for-the-sandwich-generation" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-77931648.jpg" alt="Sandwich generation learning smart money strategies" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Generation X is commonly called the sandwich generation for two reasons. First, they are sandwiched between the Millennials and the Baby Boomers, both groups that seem to hog media coverage &mdash; and marketing budgets. More importantly, many Gen Xers face the modern problem of caring for their elderly parents while still also caring for their own children. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-the-sandwich-generation-can-get-ahead?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Ways the Sandwich Generation Can Get Ahead</a>)</p> <p>Being in the sandwich generation can be stressful and financially draining. Here are five strategies to stay financially afloat if you're caring for others.</p> <h2>1. Talk Openly About Finances</h2> <p>Whether your elderly parents live with you or not, it is important to know where they stand financially. For families that didn't grow up talking about money, this might feel awkward. However, it is important for you to be prepared to assume financial responsibility if anything were to happen.</p> <p>Of course, it is best to have this talk with a certified financial planner and estate attorney, as well. There are a lot of financial matters to discuss.</p> <ul> <li>Who has <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-is-power-of-attorney" target="_blank">power of attorney</a>?<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Where will the funds for your parents' care come from?<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Should your parents be receiving veterans' benefits or Medicaid assistance?<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Do your parents have any investments, and are they making the best rate of return on them?<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Do your parents have <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/is-long-term-care-insurance-worth-it" target="_blank">long-term care insurance</a> or enough retirement savings to cover care costs?</li> </ul> <h2>2. Utilize Special Savings Accounts</h2> <p>Money will be tight when you are caring for your parents and children at the same time, but don't neglect saving accounts. Contribute as much as you can to your retirement account and even look into a 529 plan for future college costs.</p> <p>Many employers offer flexible spending accounts (FSAs), which allow you to contribute up to $2,500 into a health account and dependent care account. If both you and your spouse are employed, then you might both be eligible to contribute $2,500, for a combined $5,000. This money can be used for your own medical costs, your kids' medical costs and care needs, and your elderly parents' medical and care needs, if they are declared as your dependents.</p> <p>An elderly parent can be financially taxing, but don't let that cause you to avoid saving for your retirement or your child's college. You don't want to be stuck in a financial black hole once your elderly loved one is gone.</p> <h2>3. Get Tax Benefits</h2> <p>If you do declare a parent as a dependent, make sure you get all of the possible tax benefits. Talk with a tax specialist about getting special deductions for medical home improvements, medical expenses, and care expenses.</p> <h2>4. Prioritize the Budget</h2> <p>Take a look at your budget and see what can be cut or put on hold. You might have to move to a more affordable area or forgo family vacations for a few years. Being in the sandwich generation will take sacrifice, but if you can survive this time without incurring debt, then you will stay financially afloat.</p> <p>If you need extra money, try to sell unwanted or unneeded items. Every little bit helps. If either your child or parent is capable of earning some money with a part-time position, this can help too. A teenager can get a job and take over their cellphone or car payments, and your parent can help contribute to the grocery budget. Even if this only adds up to an extra $100 a month, it can still create a little bit of breathing room.</p> <h2>5. Ask Other Family Members for Help</h2> <p>An aging parent shouldn't fall on the shoulders of just one person. Siblings and other able family members should help financially and physically. Have a serious talk with your other siblings and family members about contributing. If they cannot contribute financially, then they should be able to watch or care for an elderly parent at least a few hours a month to give you a break.</p> <p>Don't try to balance the weight of aging parents and children alone. Start by talking with a financial adviser, who can help put your finances in order and point you to free resources. It can also help to seek advice from peers who have gone through or are going through the same situation.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/ashley-eneriz">Ashley Eneriz</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-money-strategies-for-the-sandwich-generation">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-the-sandwich-generation-can-get-ahead">6 Ways the Sandwich Generation Can Get Ahead</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-save-for-retirement-while-caring-for-kids-and-parents">How to Save for Retirement While Caring for Kids and Parents</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-simple-acts-of-self-care-for-the-sandwich-generation">9 Simple Acts of Self-Care for the Sandwich Generation</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-tax-mistakes-new-parents-make">4 Tax Mistakes New Parents Make</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/heres-how-your-taxes-will-change-after-you-have-a-kid">Here&#039;s How Your Taxes Will Change After You Have a Kid</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Family aging parents baby boomers children dependents generation x household millennials money advice sandwich generation Mon, 13 Feb 2017 11:00:07 +0000 Ashley Eneriz 1884961 at http://www.wisebread.com