reduce http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/2400/all en-US Best Money Tips: Ways to Reduce Vet Bills http://www.wisebread.com/best-money-tips-ways-to-reduce-vet-bills <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/best-money-tips-ways-to-reduce-vet-bills" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/pet-481457145.jpg" alt="cat" title="cat" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="141" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Welcome to Wise Bread's <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/topic/best-money-tips">Best Money Tips</a> Roundup! Today we found some amazing articles on reducing vet bills, living without a car, and haggling for a better price on everything.</p> <h2>Top 5 Articles</h2> <p><a href="http://www.stretcher.com/stories/13/13mar25e.cfm?slider">10 Ways to Reduce Vet Bills</a> &mdash; To reduce vet bills, shop smart for pet supplies and choose your vet wisely. [TheDollarStretcher.com]</p> <p><a href="http://livingonthecheap.com/live-without-car/">How to live without a car</a> &mdash; Learning about delivery options and utilizing car-sharing can help you live without a car. [Living on the Cheap]</p> <p><a href="http://www.moneyunder30.com/how-to-haggle-for-a-better-price">How to Haggle for a Better Price on Almost Everything</a> &mdash; When it comes to haggling, remember that you are doing nothing wrong when you ask for a better price on something. [Money Under 30]</p> <p><a href="http://www.narrowbridge.net/5-great-reasons-to-get-out-of-debt/">5 Great Reasons to Get Out of Debt</a> &mdash; No longer having to pay interest is just one great reason to get out of debt. [NarrowBridge Finance]</p> <p><a href="http://www.savvysugar.com/Free-Things-Do-San-Francisco-34438960">15 Free Things to Do in San Francisco</a> &mdash; Visiting Pier 39 is just one free thing you can do in San Francisco. [PopSugar Smart Living]</p> <h2>Other Essential Reading</h2> <p><a href="http://www.biblemoneymatters.com/how-to-curb-your-shopping-addiction-this-year/">How to Curb Your Shopping Addition This Year</a> &mdash; To curb your shopping addiction this year, identify your spending triggers. [Bible Money Matters]</p> <p><a href="http://retireby40.org/3-steps-spouse-on-board-goals/">3 Steps to Getting Your Spouse on Board with Your Goals</a> &mdash; Communicating with your spouse about your goals can help get him or her on board with your goals. [Retire By 40]</p> <p><a href="http://www.freemoneywisdom.com/studying-online-can-save-money/">How Studying Online Can Save You Money</a> &mdash; Studying at home will eliminate the cost of expensive gasoline! [Free Money Wisdom]</p> <p><a href="http://www.carefulcents.com/freelancers-avoid-huge-tax-bill/">3 Ways Self-Employed Freelancers Can Avoid a Huge Tax Bill</a> &mdash; Freelancers can avoid a huge tax bill by making quarterly tax payments. [Careful Cents]</p> <p><a href="http://parentingsquad.com/how-to-protect-your-family-from-poisons">How to Protect Your Family From Poisons</a> &mdash; Never refer to medicine as candy; this can confuse kids and turn medicine into a dangerous poison. [Parenting Squad]</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/ashley-jacobs">Ashley Jacobs</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/best-money-tips-ways-to-reduce-vet-bills">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/is-pet-health-insurance-worth-it">Is Pet Health Insurance Worth It?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/wise-bread-reloaded-watch-these-adorable-puppy-and-kitten-videos-and-learn-how-to-care-for-your-own">Wise Bread Reloaded: Watch These Adorable Puppy and Kitten Videos and Learn How to Care for Your Own, Frugally</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-pet-costs-you-dont-see-coming">5 Pet Costs You Don&#039;t See Coming</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-6-least-expensive-dog-breeds-to-own">The 6 Least Expensive Dog Breeds to Own</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-to-lower-water-heater-costs">7 Ways To Lower Water Heater Costs</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Frugal Living animals best money tips bills cat dog pets reduce vet Tue, 01 Apr 2014 09:00:29 +0000 Ashley Jacobs 1133952 at http://www.wisebread.com Best Money Tips: Ways to Reduce Your Water Bill http://www.wisebread.com/best-money-tips-ways-to-reduce-your-water-bill <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/best-money-tips-ways-to-reduce-your-water-bill" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/water-1616900-small.jpg" alt="water" title="water" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="167" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Welcome to Wise Bread's <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/topic/best-money-tips">Best Money Tips</a> Roundup! Today we found some stellar articles on reducing your water bill, cutting wedding costs when you are the guest, and keys to success.</p> <h2>Top 5 Articles</h2> <p><a href="http://canadianfinanceblog.com/10-ways-to-reduce-your-water-bill/">10 Ways to Reduce Your Water Bill</a> &mdash; Lower your water bill by replacing your toilet with a low flow model or watering your lawn early in the morning. [Canadian Finance Blog]</p> <p><a href="http://www.savvysugar.com/How-Save-Money-Attending-Wedding-28509685">How to Cut Wedding Costs When You're the Guest</a> &mdash; Splitting the cost of the gift with someone else can help you save on wedding expenses when you are a guest. [PopSugar Smart Living]</p> <p><a href="http://www.lifehack.org/articles/productivity/10-highly-successful-people-share-keys-success-everyone.html">10 Highly Successful People Share Their Keys To Success With Every One Of Us</a> &mdash; If you want to be successful, don't fear change and be creative. [Stepcase Lifehack]</p> <p><a href="http://www.dumblittleman.com/2014/03/how-to-make-quick-decisions-for-your.html">How To Make Quick Decisions For Your Life</a> &mdash; To make quick decisions for your life, overcome your fears and determine criteria. [Dumb Little Man]</p> <p><a href="http://asklizweston.com/are-you-ready-2/">Are you ready?</a> &mdash; Remember that you can't just set it and forget it when it comes to emergency supplies. Schedule checkups for your supplies at least once a year. [Ask Liz Weston]</p> <h2>Other Essential Reading</h2> <p><a href="http://lifehacker.com/what-should-i-do-if-i-break-my-phone-1547229129">What Should I Do If I Break My Phone?</a> &mdash; If you break your phone, trade it in or sell it. [Lifehacker]</p> <p><a href="http://timemanagementninja.com/2014/03/10-wrong-ways-your-company-is-measuring-productivity/">10 Wrong Ways Your Company is Measuring Productivity</a> &mdash; Does your company measure productivity by the number of hours you work? If so, they are measuring wrong. [Time Management Ninja]</p> <p><a href="http://howsmarriedlife.net/behind-bills/">What to Do If You Are Behind on Your Bills</a> &mdash; It is important to make a workable budget if you are behind on your bills. [How's Married Life?]</p> <p><a href="http://www.marcandangel.com/2014/03/12/8-things-you-should-never-give-up-for-a-relationship/">8 Things You Should Never Give Up For A Relationship</a> &mdash; Don't give up your joy or your inner peace for a relationship. [Marc and Angel Hack Life]</p> <p><a href="http://parentingsquad.com/14-household-responsibilities-you-can-and-should-hand-over-to-your-kids">14 Household Responsibilities You Can (and Should) Hand Over to Your Kids</a> &mdash; Hand over the chore of dusting and picking up toys to your kids. [Parenting Squad]</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/ashley-jacobs">Ashley Jacobs</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/best-money-tips-ways-to-reduce-your-water-bill">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-ways-to-reuse-common-household-items">10 Ways to Reuse Common Household Items</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-surprising-ways-a-houseplant-can-save-you-money">6 Surprising Ways a Houseplant Can Save You Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/25-things-to-throw-out-today">25 Things to Throw Out Today</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-really-easy-ways-to-unclog-drains">10 Really Easy Ways to Unclog Drains</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-best-kitchen-dish-towels">The 5 Best Kitchen Dish Towels</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Home best money tips Bill reduce water bill Thu, 20 Mar 2014 10:08:59 +0000 Ashley Jacobs 1132003 at http://www.wisebread.com 10 Ways to Reuse Common Household Items http://www.wisebread.com/10-ways-to-reuse-common-household-items <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/10-ways-to-reuse-common-household-items" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/egg_carton_seeds.jpg" alt="Seedlings in egg carton" title="Seedlings in egg carton" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="167" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>If you&rsquo;re anything like me, you&rsquo;re throwing out too much with the trash. Even though I recycle, I often think that I could surely be doing more to cut down on waste. With a little creative thinking, I&rsquo;ve come up with a list of 10 household items I could be saving rather than tossing out. Here they are, along with some of the ways they can be reused. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/garbage-into-gold-great-ways-to-recycle-old-containers">Garbage Into Gold: Great Ways to Recycle Old Containers</a>)</p> <h2>Dish Soap Bottles</h2> <p>Use an old, thoroughly cleaned dish soap bottle (or any squeeze bottle) to dole out a perfect amount of pancake batter onto a hot griddle. You can also use a squeeze bottle as a convenient way to fill an iron with water or water out-of-the-way plants.</p> <h2>Egg Cartons</h2> <p>Used egg cartons (preferably well-cleaned Styrofoam ones) are excellent for freezing individual portions of all kinds of things &mdash; cookie dough batter, meatballs, homemade herb-butter patties. You could also use the cartons as convenient Jell-O molds for fun treats. They're also a great way to start seedlings for your garden. And if you have enough, use the cartons to store golf balls or organize change, which is especially convenient for garage and bake sales.</p> <h2>Floor Tiles</h2> <p>Make a beautiful piece of mosaic art. Gather up unused remnant tiles (or ask for some from your local home-improvement store), break carefully into pieces in a cloth bag, and arrange in a pattern on any solid surface. Adhere with floor-tile adhesive, and use a putty knife to push grout into the cracks after the adhesive dries. Wipe excess grout away with a damp cloth before it sets. You can also make a mosaic table or use large tiles to <a href="http://www.hgtv.com/home-improvement/kitchen-makeover-pt-4-breakfast-nook-tile-mosaic-tabletop/index.html">make an old tabletop new</a>. Smaller tiles can be used for trivets.</p> <h2>Old Socks</h2> <p>Use the lone socks that the sock gnome left behind to keep small toys organized or to keep odds and ends like screws and paper clips in one convenient location. You could also put old socks over your shoes when doing something messy (like painting), or when your shoes are a wreck but you need to run inside for a minute. Feel free to hand them out to maintenance men and repairmen who tromp through your house, too. Try using others as dog or cat toys &mdash; put a tennis ball in one for the dog, or catnip in the cat&rsquo;s, and sew closed. (See also: <a title="DIY pet toys" href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-diy-dog-toys-you-can-make-for-pennies">10 DIY Dob Toys You Can Make for Pennies</a>)</p> <h2>Old T-Shirts</h2> <p>When your husband&rsquo;s fraternity T-shirts have more holes in them than the family colander, it&rsquo;s time to retire the man-jersey. Pay homage to his favorite tees by sewing them into a pillow (for the man-cave), or just throw them into the dog&rsquo;s crate. Better yet, use those babies for cleaning rags or to wrap breakables when moving. Your husband will appreciate his old shirts being given new life. Maybe.</p> <h2>Paper Towel Rolls</h2> <p>Keep your plastic bags contained by stuffing them in an empty paper towel roll. And while you&rsquo;re at it, keep extension cords untangled by rolling them up and putting them through a paper towel roll. You can also organize hair bands and hair clips, roll your linens around paper towel rolls to keep them crease-free, or make boot trees so your over-the-knee boots won&rsquo;t get unsightly creases in them after spending the summer slouched over in the back of your closet.</p> <h2>Plastic Shopping Bags</h2> <p>You already know how to keep plastic shopping bags contained in an empty paper towel roll. Now put the bags to use by lining bathroom waste cans with them. If you collect enough, plastic bags make excellent packing material in place of those awful packing peanuts. They&rsquo;re also great for keeping flour and sugar from spilling all over your pantry shelves.</p> <h2>Shoe Boxes</h2> <p>Being a small-time shoe diva myself, I&rsquo;ve collected more than my fair share of empty shoe <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/30-uses-for-the-humble-cardboard-box">boxes</a> over the years. I put the boxes to good use by making them into storage bins for my closet &mdash; rather than spend a fortune on matching boxes, I&rsquo;ve wrapped them all in similar wrapping paper and printed off labels for easy identification. I also use empty shoe boxes as dresser-drawer organizers. You might also want to use your empty shoe boxes for, well, shoe storage. Take pictures of your inventory and tape them to the outside of the boxes to quickly spot the pair you&rsquo;re looking for in the closet.</p> <h2>Shower Curtains</h2> <p>I know this is a surprise, but I have somehow accumulated a number of old shower curtains over the years. I plan on using some as tablecloths for an outdoor gathering, while others I&rsquo;ll use as drop cloths the next time I paint the walls. Another will be reused as a windshield cover to prevent frost build-up. Simply cut the shower curtain to the size of your windshield and hem in magnets to keep the cover in place. The magnets should stick to your car's metal windshield frame (see this <a href="http://www.improvementscatalog.com/home/improvements/792929252-magnetic-windshield-cover-set-of-2.html">windshield cover</a> for an idea of how it should work). (See also: <a title="remove frost on windshields" href="http://www.wisebread.com/3-cheap-and-easy-formulas-for-homemade-windshield-de-icer-plus-bonus-tips">3 Cheap and Easy Formulas for Homemade Windshield De-Icer</a>)</p> <h2>Wine Corks</h2> <p>Don&rsquo;t just toss all the wine corks you&rsquo;ve accumulated over the years! Make a floating keychain to keep track of your keys the next time you set sail, or use another to safely store knives in a drawer. Use some to make a <a href="http://frugalliving.about.com/od/craftsgifts/ht/Cork_Wreath.htm">stylish wreath</a> for your front door. You could also make an actual <a href="http://www.marthastewart.com/article/wine-cork-board">cork board</a> to hold messages and important pieces of paper. (See also: <a title="reuse wine corks" href="http://www.wisebread.com/25-things-to-do-with-used-corks-including-making-money-with-them">25 Things to Do with Used Corks</a>)</p> <p><em>What about you? Are there any household items that you reuse in a creative way, or do you have another use for one of these items? Share your thoughts in the comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/janey-osterlind">Janey Osterlind</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-ways-to-reuse-common-household-items">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/save-money-by-rekindling-the-art-of-reusing-your-stuff">Save Money by Rekindling the Art of Reusing your Stuff</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/17-cheap-and-awesome-reusable-replacements-for-disposable-products">17 Cheap and Awesome Reusable Replacements for Disposable Products</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/20-household-uses-for-pantyhose">20 Household Uses for Pantyhose</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-cheap-and-easy-homemade-mosquito-repellents">4 Cheap and Easy Homemade Mosquito Repellents</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-things-in-your-kitchen-that-get-rid-of-bad-smells-naturally">6 Things in Your Kitchen That Get Rid of Bad Smells Naturally</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Green Living Home cheap storage kitchen hacks reduce reuse Thu, 14 Apr 2011 10:00:22 +0000 Janey Osterlind 523714 at http://www.wisebread.com Preparing for a Recession http://www.wisebread.com/preparing-for-a-recession <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/preparing-for-a-recession" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/piggy-bank-5306352-small.jpg" alt="piggy bank" title="piggy bank" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="167" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>I don't know if a recession is coming. Nobody does. We may dodge the bullet for a while. On the other hand, the economy may already be in recession. You don't need to know the future, though, to make some wise moves.</p> <p>Recessions hit everybody differently, so we'll take a look at how things tend to play out for people in different situations. First, though, it helps to understand what a recession is. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-recession-glossary-1">The Recession Glossary</a>)</p> <h2>What Happens in a Recession</h2> <p>A recession is a reduction in the total amount of business done in the economy.</p> <p>When conditions are right for a recession almost anything can set one off &mdash; anything that prompts businesses to decide to produce less, or prompts consumers to decide to buy less. High oil prices, for example, may lead consumers to cut back on food and clothing purchases so they can afford enough gasoline to get to their job. A credit squeeze may force businesses to scale back, because they can't borrow enough to buy all the raw materials they need to keep their factories running at full capacity.</p> <p>Once a recession gets started, it tends to spread. Every business that sells less also buys less &mdash; meaning their suppliers are doing less business. Pretty soon, all those businesses are laying off employees &mdash; meaning a bunch of would-be consumers no longer have any income, so they're buying less as well.</p> <h2>How It Affects You</h2> <p>A slowdown in business hits you directly if you own a business. It hits you one step removed if you work for a business (or want to) &mdash; jobs will be harder to find, raises will be smaller, layoffs will be more common.</p> <p>A lot of people don't work for a business. Some work for governments (federal, state, local). Others work for institutions, large and small: colleges, universities, hospitals, orchestras, art centers, food pantries, land trusts (any of which may be purely independent or government-sponsored to some extent). People who work for governments or institutions are a second step removed from the impact of a recession, but that doesn't make them immune. The decline in business activity always reduces tax receipts to governments, leading to cutbacks especially at the state and local level. A general decline in prosperity often reduces charitable donations, leading to cutbacks at private institutions. Again: fewer jobs, less secure jobs, smaller raises.</p> <p>There are also, of course, people who don't work in the money economy. Putting aside children and non-working spouses (who face the same circumstance as their family breadwinner), I divide these people into two groups &mdash; the ones who are actually out of the money economy (subsistence farmers, freegans, prisoners), and the ones who are are in the money economy but their income doesn't depend on the work they do (the wealthy, retirees, people on welfare).</p> <p>It's an important distinction, because people in the second category are depending on promises &mdash; the income from investments, pensions, social security, welfare, and the like &mdash; which are at best only as sound as the finances of whoever is paying the money. In a recession, that soundness is threatened.</p> <p>If you live on promises, remember that promises get broken &mdash; especially in a recession.</p> <h2>What to Do</h2> <p>So, what can you do to soften the blow if a recession hits?</p> <p><strong>Reduce Your Expenses</strong></p> <p>The first key, whether your income is tied to a business or not, is to <a href="/start-with-recurring-monthly-expenses">reduce fixed expenses</a>. High variable expenses can be tolerated, as long as there's an income stream to pay them. But high fixed expenses will wreck your finances very quickly if the income stream dries up. This means reducing debt and avoid new obligations (fitness center memberships, burglar alarm contracts, etc.). For businesses, it means postponing hiring (hire temps instead) and postponing raises (instead, offer bonuses conditioned on profits).</p> <p><strong>Increase Your Emergency Fund</strong></p> <p>The second key is to <a href="/figuring-the-size-of-your-emergency-fund">boost your emergency fund</a>. A temporary income shortfall doesn't need to become a financial catastrophe, as long as you have enough cash on hand to tide yourself over. Resist the temptation to rely on credit as your emergency fund. It can be tempting to figure that paying down revolving debt frees up part of your credit line for use in a future emergency, but that's not the same as an emergency fund. At any time, but <em>especially during a recession</em>, lenders can cut credit limits, refuse to extend further credit, or simply get out of the business entirely. Have an emergency fund that doesn't depend on someone making you a loan. (After all, the classic reason to tap an emergency fund is when you've just lost your job &mdash; which is exactly the time that a creditor would be especially likely to cut off your credit.)</p> <p><strong>Diversify Your Income</strong></p> <p>The third key is to <a href="/best-investment-yourself">diversify your income sources</a>. If your goal were maximum total income, diversity would probably be the wrong choice. There's almost certainly one income stream that would give you the highest total income if you put all your effort there. The problem is, that's not a stable strategy. A better choice, especially if a recession is in the offing, is to try to arrange several income streams, some of which don't depend too much on a thriving economy.</p> <p><strong>Reduce Your Dependence on Money</strong></p> <p>The fourth key is to <a href="/opting-out-of-the-money-economy">reduce your dependence on money economy</a>. This is the one sure way to protect your family from recession &mdash; provide for their needs without having to spend money. It seems unnatural in today's world for people to grow their own food and make their own clothes, but, to the extent that you can do so, you're in a position to just ignore the ups and downs in the economy. All the other options are just stop-gaps &mdash; they help you keep things together until the economy picks up again. This one actually solves the problem.</p> <h2>Same Strategies, Different Balance</h2> <p>Wise Bread readers will recognize these four strategies as the same core principles that we talk about all the time, so I'm not telling you to do something new. Rather, I'm suggesting that you <em>alter the balance</em>. The downside of all these strategies is that in good economic times they result in a lower standard of living than you could achieve if you followed more mainstream personal finance strategies. In bad economic times, though, these are the winning strategies.</p> <p>In good economic times, a business that refuses to use debt to grow will inevitably fall behind its more aggressive competitors. In bad economic times, the business that avoids debt will survive while the others will fail. For individuals, the calculation leans even more away from debt.</p> <p>On top of that, a recession provides many opportunities for someone with ready cash. When no one else is buying, someone with cash in hand can get some terrific bargains &mdash; enough to catch up with years' worth of &quot;lost opportunities&quot; for growth.</p> <p>We don't know for sure that bad economic times are coming, but the threats to the economy (housing collapse, credit crunch, spiking prices for oil and food) are as great as they've been in a long time, and the potential missed opportunities from an excess of caution are smaller than during a boom.</p> <p>Now is the time to go with these strategies &mdash; accepting the slower growth and lower standards of living that go along with them as a small price to pay for security and a reasonable shot at some big opportunities ahead.</p> <p>Remember, a recession is a time when promises get broken. Business fail, leaving both their debts and their employees unpaid. Tenants don't pay their rent. People who have always paid their bills on time suddenly can't. Sales fall through. Wherever your income comes from, it is at some risk. Arrange things so that you can face that risk.</p> <p><em>Update: The National Bureau of Economic Research, the group that makes the &quot;official&quot; call on the beginnings and ends of recessions, announced on </em><em>December 1st, 2008</em><em> that a recession began in the US in December 2007, the month this post was written.</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/philip-brewer">Philip Brewer</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/preparing-for-a-recession">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/living-within-your-means-isnt-nasty">Living within your means isn&#039;t nasty</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/stag-hyperinflation">Stag-hyperinflation?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/could-the-last-person-to-leave-america-please-turn-out-the-light">Could the last person to leave America please turn out the light.</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-live-with-inflation">How to live with inflation</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/peak-debt">Peak Debt</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance depression Economy emergency account how to prepare recession reduce Fri, 28 Dec 2007 17:14:06 +0000 Philip Brewer 1549 at http://www.wisebread.com Poem on opting out http://www.wisebread.com/poem-on-opting-out <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/poem-on-opting-out" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/sunflowers.jpg" alt="Sunflowers" title="Sunflowers" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="103" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>A while back I wrote a piece on <a href="/opting-out-of-the-money-economy">Opting out of the money economy</a>, a topic I&#39;ve long been interested in. </p> <p>Because of that long interest, the poem &quot;<a href="http://writersalmanac.publicradio.org/programs/2007/10/08/">Getting By</a>&quot; by Gary L. Lark caught my ear when it was on the most recent Writer&#39;s Almanac.</p> <blockquote><p> I started picking ferns, barking chittam<br /> and selling mushrooms; made spinners<br /> and tied trout flies; got used to getting by.</p> </blockquote> <p>It&#39;s a powerful piece. If, like me, you have a sneaking suspicion that it might be more fun to &quot;just get by&quot; than to spend the rest of your life working for the man, follow that link and savor the poem. (Maybe even buy the book: <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1599241706?ie=UTF8&amp;tag=wisbre08-20&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=1599241706"><cite>Men At the Gates</cite></a>.)</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/philip-brewer">Philip Brewer</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/poem-on-opting-out">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-4"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/opting-out-of-the-money-economy">Opting out of the money economy</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/fresh-fruits-and-vegetables-by-the-month">Fresh Fruits and Vegetables, By the Month</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/weird-things-you-didnt-know-about-valentines-day">Weird Things You Didn&#039;t Know About Valentine&#039;s Day</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-produce-workers-guide-to-choosing-fruits-and-vegetables">The Produce Worker&#039;s Guide to Choosing Fruits and Vegetables</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-ways-to-reuse-common-household-items">10 Ways to Reuse Common Household Items</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Extra Commentary eat local food production localize produce producing reduce Mon, 08 Oct 2007 18:21:50 +0000 Philip Brewer 1268 at http://www.wisebread.com Opting out of the money economy http://www.wisebread.com/opting-out-of-the-money-economy <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/opting-out-of-the-money-economy" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/boat-on-pond-with-mist.jpg" alt="Boat on pond with mist" title="Boat on Pond with Mist" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="188" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>It's a quirk of mine that I've always found the idea of opting out of the money economy to be interesting.</p> <p>I've got a bunch of books on the topic. Books like <em><a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0876639872?ie=UTF8&amp;tag=wisbre08-20&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=0876639872">Possum living: How to live well without a job and with almost no money</a></em> and <em><a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1894622375?ie=UTF8&amp;tag=wisbre08-20&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=1894622375">How to Survive Without a Salary: Learning How to Live the Conserver Lifestyle</a></em>.</p> <p>It's mostly the idea that I find appealing. When I look at the details&mdash;the hard trade-offs involved&mdash;I find that I come up short of wanting to live that way. But there's a lot to learn from these people, their books, and their lifestyle.</p> <!--break--><!--break--><h2>Alternative Economies</h2> <p>The money economy is the default in the western world, but it's hardly the only economy out there.</p> <h3>Bartering</h3> <p>Bartering predates money and has never gone completely out of style. It has resurgences now and then, especially during times of inflation and deflation.</p> <p>In a severe inflation the money becomes worthless, forcing people into a barter economy, but even in a more modest inflation barter becomes attractive&mdash;when prices are changing quickly, it's a lot of extra work just to stay informed about what's a fair price. Inflation also produces phantom profits with the attendant taxes due. As far as the IRS is concerned the taxes are still due even if the transaction is by barter, but the barterers are in a much better position to avoid the phantom parts of their profits.</p> <p>In times of deflation the money has value, it's just that most people don't have any. Again, people fall back on barter as a way to get what they need when they can't just go to the store and buy it.</p> <h3>The gift economy</h3> <p>In the gift economy, instead of exchanging money for goods and services, people just give one another what they need and help one another out.</p> <p>To someone used to the money economy it sounds preposterous, but in fact almost everyone has experienced a gift economy&mdash;their family. Parents give their children what they need to survive. Many families are an almost pure gift economy, with every member of the household contributing to the extent that they can&mdash;doing chores and helping out in other ways. Other families begin to monetize that sort of work, but most of them do so as a way to teach younger members about how the money economy works and not because each family member is trying to maximize the economic value of his labor.</p> <p>Outside the family the gift economy becomes less common, but it still exists in various restricted forms. The classic &quot;barn raising&quot; is a gift economy thing&mdash;everybody helps their neighbors out. There's an expectation of general reciprocity to the community as a whole, but no expectation of specific reciprocity to the people who showed up to help. In the more modern context, lots of young people rely on the gift economy for help when they need to move.</p> <p>The gift economy works well when resources are abundant so that everyone can contribute without seriously depriving themselves. They also work best when everyone knows everyone else and a reputation as being generous or stingy can make a difference in how people view you.</p> <p>Open-source software is often viewed as a gift economy, as is the <a href="/frugal-causes-creative-commons">creative commons</a>.</p> <h3>Self-sufficiency</h3> <p>If you can produce everything you need, you can opt out of all the economies. Virtually no one is in this situation today, but just a couple hundred years ago it was common for frontier families to be largely self-sufficient: through a mixture of gardening, hunting, fishing, and gathering they produced their own food. They made their house out of local materials. They spun fiber into yarn and wove their own fabric for clothing. They might need to go to the money economy to get specialty items like spinning wheels or cast iron pots, but with a modest amount of capital in the form of such items, they could be self-sufficient (albeit at a fairly low standard of living).</p> <h3>Others</h3> <p>There are plenty of other economic forms. The <strong>command economy</strong>, where some central authority tells everyone what to produce and how to produce it. (Corporations and armies tend to be command economies internally. Some have mock-market economic structures internally, but even when they go through the motions the command structure is lurking in the background.) In the <strong>feudal economy</strong>, strong tradition dictated who made what and who got it.</p> <h2>Opting Out in the Modern World</h2> <p>Opting out of the money economy really comes down to a few strategies that are simple to describe however hard they may be to actually do.</p> <h3>Reduce and reuse</h3> <p>If you can get by without something, or you can repurpose something you've already got, then you don't need to buy it.</p> <h3>Localize</h3> <p>If you get something from a giant corporation, then you're pretty much stuck paying for it with money. The more of your needs you can satisfy locally, the better your chance of satisfying them in other ways. Your neighbors are much more likely to engage in barter. Your neighbors are much more likely to share the bounty of their garden. Your neighbors are much more likely to let you borrow (or have) things they aren't using.</p> <h3>Produce</h3> <p>Anything you can make yourself, you don't need to buy. Garden. Learn a craft. If you can make things that are useful or beautiful, you can give them away or use them for barter.</p> <p>It's worth noting the similarity between these strategies and those for greener living: reduce, reuse, recycle. Producing locally can be either low-impact or not, depending on what you do, but at least it's up to you and not up to some corporation whose impact on the environment is a dark secret.</p> <h3>Avoid debt</h3> <p>There are a few things that absolutely trap you in the money economy; things like debt, taxes, and utilities. They make completely opting out impossible, but they can be managed.</p> <p>Taxes, at least in the US, are not much of a problem. If you're not in the money economy (i.e. you're earning little or no money), then you won't owe any income taxes and will owe little or nothing in payroll taxes. If you own land, there's no avoiding property taxes.</p> <p>Avoiding utilities completely can be tough, but living &quot;off the grid&quot; is possible for some people in some situations. Even when that's not possible, the use of utilities can be kept to a minimum, and most utilities are regulated in ways that make basic services available at a fair price for people with low incomes (which people outside the money economy usually are).</p> <p>Debt is the killer that forces you into the money economy. You really can't opt out while you're in debt, which is just another reason why debt should be avoided.</p> <h2>Opting out for the short term</h2> <p>It used to be quite common for people to opt out of the money economy temporarily.</p> <p>In the days before student loans were ubiquitous, a new college grad might well have nothing but a new diploma and the clothes on his or her back--but had enormous flexibility. Many authors and artists were able to start their careers by living in the gift economy&mdash;sleeping on a friend's couch or staying at someone's vacation home for a few months in the off-season, making do with whatever clothes and tools they already had. That level of generosity was pretty easy to come by, at least for long enough to produce, for example, a first novel.</p> <p>Now that all but the wealthy graduate with student loans, very few new grads have the choice of trying to make it on their art. (A friend who'll let you live in their RV from Halloween until Arbor Day is a lot more common than one who'll make your student loan payments for six months.) They have no choice but to enter the money economy long enough to pay off their debt. By the time that's done, they usually have spouses, kids, a work history that would lose substantial value if they put it aside for a year or two. They're trapped in the money economy.</p> <p>It makes me mad every time I think about the great art and literature that our student loan system has cost our society.</p> <h2>Opting out for the long term</h2> <p>Now we finally come back to those books that I mentioned at the beginning. If opting out of the money economy appeals to you, track down those books and others like them.</p> <p>Opting out for the short term is pretty easy, if you have no debt and you already own the basic goods of a functioning household. Opting out for the long term is much harder. It's not what I want to do, and it's probably not the right choice for most people. But bits and pieces of the strategies that work for opting out of the money economy can make it much easier to live well on small budget.</p> <p>If you know you can get by with little or no money, then you have the flexibility to follow your own path, to take risks, to refuse to knuckle under to people who don't have your interests at heart. That's why it has always fascinated me.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/philip-brewer">Philip Brewer</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/opting-out-of-the-money-economy">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-5"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/poem-on-opting-out">Poem on opting out</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dissecting-gift-guilt-when-does-receiving-a-gift-make-you-feel-bad">Dissecting &quot;Gift Guilt&quot; - When Does Receiving a Gift Make You Feel Bad?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/3-simple-ways-to-split-bills-with-your-spouse">3 Simple Ways to Split Bills With Your Spouse</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/3-ways-good-sleep-makes-you-wealthier">3 Ways Good Sleep Makes You Wealthier</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-go-from-two-incomes-to-one">How to Go From Two Incomes to One</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance Lifestyle eat local food production. producing localize produce reduce Fri, 03 Aug 2007 11:27:11 +0000 Philip Brewer 944 at http://www.wisebread.com Life Without Toiletpaper - Bum Deal? http://www.wisebread.com/life-without-toiletpaper-bum-deal <p><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/wisebread_imce/toiletpaper.jpg" alt=" " width="180" height="200" /></p> <p>How far would you go to save the world?</p> <p>Upon reading the <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2007/03/22/garden/22impact.html?pagewanted=1&amp;_r=2">New York Times article</a> about the Beaven-Conlin household in Manhattan, I started to get a little queasy. The article delves a bit into the lives of a couple and their young daughter, yuppies who live affluent lives in New York City. They&#39;ve taken the idea behind <a href="http://sfcompact.blogspot.com/">The Compact</a>, and then taken it a LOT farther. They are trying to live for one year with absolute minimal impact on the environment.</p> <p>Their toddler wears organic cotton diapers. The family eats all organic food, grown within a 250-mile radius of the city. They bake their own bread, take the stairs instead of the elevator, and don&#39;t buy much outside of groceries.</p> <p>That sounds responsible, right? Then it gets better. They don&#39;t use toilet paper (the details of how they avoid this are not pretty, and no, they did not have the good sense to invest in a bidet). They compost INSIDE their apartment. They use no spices but have made an exception for salt, which they apparently think of as an indulgence in baking rather than something that <a href="http://www.fda.gov/fdac/features/1997/797_salt.html">humans need in order to survive</a>.</p> <p>I think that the idea behind what the Beaven-Conlin family is trying is wonderful. And even though we all agree that we should use less, buy less, and pollute less, how many of us really <strong>do much of anything to accomplish this</strong>? </p> <p class="blockquote">The dishwasher is off, along with the microwave, the coffee machine and the food processor. Planes, trains, automobiles and that elevator are out, but the family is still doing laundry in the washing machines in the basement of the building. And they have not had the heart to take away the vacuum from their cleaning lady, who comes weekly (this week they took away her paper towels).</p> <p>I consider myself an environmentalist, but I just ate a sandwich out of a styrofoam container and then threw it away, because you can&#39;t recycle styrofoam in Seattle and I got tired of hauling bags of it to my parents&#39; place across the mountains for recycling. </p> <p>I drive 20 miles to work, because my job is located quite far from the job that I had when I bought my home (telecommuting is not an option with this firm, and taking the bus would take me close to 2.5 hours each way). If there is anyone who eats food grown farther from where they live, I don&#39;t know who it could be. I have a ridiculous appetite for tropical fruit and exotic spices.</p> <p>In the NY Times article, Colin Beaven states that the experiment that his family is trying is &quot;also very urban. It’s a critical twist in the old wilderness adage: Leave only footprints, take only photographs. But how do you translate that into Manhattan?&quot;</p> <p>Well, I&#39;d argue that that&#39;s easier in Manhattan than a lot of other places. Because Manhattan is rife with foodies, you can find farmers markets open year-round. You can buy organic milk in reusable glass bottles. There aren&#39;t many places in the five boroughs that you can&#39;t walk or bike to. I used to live in Brooklyn and work in Chelsea, and I would walk from dinner with friends in Midtown back home. It took a while (and wasn&#39;t always voluntary; sometimes I&#39;d run out of money and not be able to get subway fair), but it was very doable. Come to think of it, I never went to Staten Island, so maybe you can&#39;t get there by bike or on foot.</p> <p>People who live outside of large metropolitan areas with stellar public transportation (you know, normal people who can&#39;t afford huge apartments, or even studios, in swanky downtown areas) don&#39;t have the luxury of riding their Razor scooters to work. Not only would that be impossible, but they&#39;d probably get their butts kicked by their work buddies. Hell, my neighbors are very swishy, and I think they&#39;d probably call me a sissy if I broke out a Razor scooter and started scooting around Seattle.</p> <p>Now, the No Impact Family is not saying that everyone else has to live like this, and they are obviously trying it as an experiment. I think these kinds of revolutionary try-it-and-see experiments are brilliant, and I certainly applaud their efforts, even if I think the lifestyle might be too extreme for many of us (I am NOT making my own vinegar, thank you).</p> <p>Also, I think some of the moves are a little odd. For instance, <em>Ms. Conlin takes her lunch to work every day in a mason jar</em>. </p> <p>A mason jar. </p> <p>What&#39;s wrong with Tupperware? Yes, it&#39;s plastic, but it&#39;s not like you throw it out. A mason jar is heavy and awkward and breakable. I love using mason jars for preserves and pickles, but it&#39;s not up there on my list of potential lunchboxes. Why stop at a mason jar? Why not just put your lunch in a soapstone box that you carved yourself and tie it up in leather than you tanned out of from Central Park squirrel hides? Think of the shoulder muscles you&#39;d develop!</p> <p>Also, she gave up coffee. Well, that&#39;s just plain sick. I mean, if you don&#39;t want to go to Starbucks or even an independent coffeshop every day, that&#39;s fine. But there&#39;s nothing wrong with a French press. It&#39;s French! The French love suffering (or is that Russians?), so it totally fits in with the lifestyle.</p> <p>There was a telling little bit of the story that got me thinking, though:</p> <p class="blockquote">Ms. Conlin... did describe, in loving detail, a serious shopping binge that predated No Impact and made the whole thing doable, she said. “It was my last hurrah,” she explained. It included two pairs of calf-high Chloe boots (one of which was paid for, she said, with her mother’s bingo winnings) and added up to two weeks’ salary, after taxes and her 401(k) contribution. </p> <p>What? You know, maybe these people really need to try this. I don&#39;t know how much Conlin makes at Business Week, because she could be an intern, but I&#39;m guessing from her apartment location and her good taste in boots that that was pretty much a $3000 shopping spree. That&#39;s a guess, yes, but still. Two weeks salary? Doesn&#39;t something like that sort of defeat the purpose of no impact living?</p> <p>Perhaps I&#39;m being too touchy on the subject because I realize that if I used one-tenth of the discipline that this family is showing, I could make a major impact on my life, but by golly, I hate the stairs. </p> <p>And bidets are really, really pricey. </p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/andrea-karim">Andrea Karim</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/life-without-toiletpaper-bum-deal">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-ways-the-government-pays-you-to-live-green">11 Ways the Government Pays You to Live Green</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/only-celebrate-a-few-select-birthdays">Only Celebrate A Few Select Birthdays</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/47-simple-ways-to-waste-money">47 Simple Ways To Waste Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/opting-out-of-the-money-economy">Opting out of the money economy</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-end-of-the-energizer-bunny-six-products-that-dont-need-batteries">The end of the Energizer bunny: SIX products that don&#039;t need batteries.</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Lifestyle An Incovenient Truth compost environment no impact reduce reuse recycle The Compact toilet paper Walden waste Thu, 22 Mar 2007 19:53:53 +0000 Andrea Karim 384 at http://www.wisebread.com