hybrid cars http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/26/all en-US 7 Ways My Clunker Is Smarter Than a Hybrid http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-my-clunker-is-smarter-than-a-hybrid <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/7-ways-my-clunker-is-smarter-than-a-hybrid" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/clunkers.jpg" alt="Clunkers" title="Clunkers" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="146" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>I&rsquo;ve always been slightly amazed how the new car market is so readily embraced. I know it takes all those new car buyers to allow us used-car shoppers the luxury of so much inventory. I just want to stay in the ranks of the latter, not the former.</p> <p>Most people realize buying new often makes little financial sense, yet they justify it through a whole host of rationalizations. Even the federal government jumped on the bandwagon last year by suggesting we all needed to grind up our clunkers and buy new instead &mdash; for the sake of the national economy and the environment, no less. Was the result a whole fleet of new fuel-efficient cars on the road, or increased consumer debt and the loss of thousands of serviceable older vehicles? At the risk of sounding like I suffer from an acute case of sour-grapes, I&rsquo;d like to explore just seven ways in which my old clunker may be a smarter choice than even the newest hybrid. (See also: <a title="How to Cut Car Ownership Costs" href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-cut-car-ownership-costs">How to Cut Car Ownership Costs</a>)</p> <h3>1. Fuel Efficiency Isn&rsquo;t Always Green</h3> <p>By some estimates, more than 25% of a car&rsquo;s carbon dioxide emissions come from the manufacturing process (this can include design, testing, building, marketing and shipping). Since my used car has already gone through the manufacture and transport phase, it produces no new demand for automobiles and therefore, no additional environmental demand. Even though it only gets 22 miles per gallon on a good day, driving it responsibly arguably produces less pollution than purchasing new. If going green is truly driving (pun intended) your purchase, this consideration should give you pause.</p> <h3>2. Steep Depreciation</h3> <p>Though the jury is out on the long-term depreciation rates of hybrids, most new cars lose as much as 20% the minute you wave goodbye to the dealer. Where else can you lose $0.20 on every dollar with just a signature and a click of a belt buckle? If you aren&rsquo;t paying for the car outright, add finance charges to the mix and remember, all this delightful financial devastation is occurring to after-tax dollars &mdash; dollars that won&rsquo;t be around to invest. That&rsquo;s four major hits for every buck spent: one hit from the tax man (payroll tax and sales tax), one hit from depreciation, one hit from the finance company, and one last blow from the loss of earning power of each dollar tied up in your new purchase.</p> <h3>3. Premium Rates</h3> <p>Even if you&rsquo;re paying for <a title="Auto Insurance" href="http://www.wisebread.com/auto-insurance">comprehensive insurance</a> on a used car now, premiums go up for later-model automobiles. Hybrids are no exception; more complex engine systems and batteries mean higher repair costs and higher <a title="Auto Insurance Rates" href="http://www.wisebread.com/auto-insurance-rates">insurance rates</a>. Of course, full coverage is mandatory if you have a car loan &mdash; the bank wants to protect its investment. But used cars that are paid-off can be covered by liability insurance only (based upon comprehensive insurance costs vs. auto replacement cost calculations). Being able to control your insurance costs can make driving used even more fiscally prudent.</p> <h3>4. Higher Registration Costs</h3> <p>The fees and formulas vary from state to state, but typically, licensing and registration costs are directly related to the value of your car. Much like insurance, higher car values equal higher rates.</p> <h3>5. Higher Repair Costs and Repair Standards</h3> <p>If you&rsquo;ve ever bought a new car only to get a scratch or windshield chip a few weeks later, you know that newer cars compel us toward a higher standard of perfection. People are more likely to keep a new car as pristine as possible for as long as possible, and those little touch-ups and repairs tend to cost more too. My old Volvo has a <a title="How to Remove Car Dents Quickly and Cheaply" href="http://www.wisebread.com/remove-car-dents-quickly-and-cheaply">door ding</a>, some weird stain on the hood, and the plastic trim is bleaching out. Besides a compulsive cleaning and wax-job every few months to make it shine, I live with these road wounds happily.</p> <h3>6. The Phenomenon of &ldquo;Incestuous Affirmation&rdquo;</h3> <p>This is really just a fancy term for keeping up with the Joneses. It suggests that any major new purchase sets in motion a whole slew of buying activity within a close network of people (friends, coworkers, family, etc.) by affirming the behavior of one member. This ripple effect is felt from the least capable of affording new to the most capable and creates a slight uptick in unspoken standards within the group.</p> <h3>7. New Peripheral Expenses</h3> <p>From add-ons to upgrades, new cars increase standards and raise monetary output. Of course your baby needs premium gas, a hand-buffing each week, and a GPS system. And what about that monthly fee for satellite radio now that first year of free service has expired?</p> <p>Now, many of these same principles can be applied to any purchase where there&rsquo;s a reasonable choice between new and used. But our nation has such a love affair with the automobile and such a cultural acceptance of the resulting debt that it begs a bit of special exploration. What are the new economic realities that make buying new less attractive? Are we really in the same position our parents were when they traded up every few years? How do car companies entice us with nickels before the purchase only to damn us with dollars afterward?</p> <p>Granted, none of the points above explore the amazing safety advancements that some new cars feature. I would never put a price personal safety or begrudge a car purchase with this as the primary motivator. But with such a wide range of later model used cars available, it doesn&rsquo;t have to be an either/or proposition. All else being equal, each blemish and bump on my used car is masked by the dollar signs I see behind them &mdash; the dollars I save by keeping it in good working order and running smart for as long as possible.</p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-guestpost-blurb"> <div class="field-label">Guest Post Blurb:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>This is a guest post by Kentin Waits. Kentin has worked in web marketing for 13 years and run his own eBay business for 10. In 2009 he published two articles for Backwoods Home Magazine and is currently working on a page-a-day desk calendar on the topic of financial empowerment.</p> </div> </div> </div> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/kentin-waits">Kentin Waits</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-my-clunker-is-smarter-than-a-hybrid">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/better-cars-are-not-the-answer">Better cars are not the answer</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/would-you-drive-one-of-the-10-smallest-cars-ever-made">Would You Drive One of the 10 Smallest Cars Ever Made?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/seven-tips-for-buying-a-second-hand-car-and-walking-away-happy">Seven Tips For Buying a Second Hand Car and Walking Away Happy</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/frugal-transport-bicycling">Frugal Transport--bicycling</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/car-sharing-why-own-when-you-can-just-share">Car Sharing: Why Own When You Can Just Share?</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Cars and Transportation Green Living buying cars clunkers hybrid cars Mon, 03 May 2010 14:00:04 +0000 Kentin Waits 59683 at http://www.wisebread.com Honda Hybrids http://www.wisebread.com/honda-hybrids <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/honda-hybrids" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/LovingCars.jpg" alt="" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="176" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>For those of you who have toyed with the idea of buying a hybrid but were discouraged by the price, you are not alone. In fact, despite the growing concern for the environment, not to mention the skyrocketing price of gas, hybrid cars still only represent a small percentage of global car sales, and a major reason for this is the cost. </p> <p>Hybrids are considered the wave of the future because they not only reduce emissions, addressing the issue of climate change, but they get great gas mileage, an important consideration with the current price of oil. It should be noted that hybrids can also improve the power of the engine, which compromises any advantages in fuel efficiency and emissions. Whatever the application, however, the technology makes the cars more expensive.</p> <p>Because of this, they are the vehicle of choice for only a small niche of people who can afford them, and they currently enjoy a special status amongst the image conscious celebrity-set. For most average consumers, however, they are not an option.</p> <p>That may soon change.</p> <p>Honda Motor Corporation, one of the largest car manufacturers in the world and a leader in fuel efficient technology, has unveiled it’s plan to introduce a <a href="http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20080521/bs_nm/honda_dc" target="_blank">low-cost hybrid</a> by 2009. If they can pull it off, they hope to make the hybrid a more mainstream car that will be more appealing to the general public, with the ultimate goal of achieving greater sales and broader appeal than their current incarnation.</p> <p>This, of course, is making Detroit nervous, and may signal a need for American car makers to start making greener and more fuel efficient vehicles, something they could afford to ignore in the past because hybrid cars weren’t worth their attention (due to such a small market share) while gas-guzzling SUVs have such high profit margins.</p> <p>Honda, meanwhile, has had to confront a growing need to compete with Toyota, which has not only grown to be the world’s largest automaker, but makes the car that has become synonymous with the hybrid movement, the Prius. Honda is therefore faced with the seemingly insurmountable task of challenging Toyota’s dominance in the market.</p> <p>Concurrently, Toyota is racing to lower production costs on the Prius, as well, which would hopefully result in a lower cost to the consumer. All eyes are on a potentially favorable car buyers market in 2009. </p> <p>In the meantime, with even adamant global warming naysayers warming up (no pun intended) to the possibilities of an ecological disaster on the horizon, maybe it’s time that we got over our need to drive huge SUVs and start moderating our fuel consumption. </p> <p>Then again, as gas prices hovering around $4.00 and with no ceiling in sight, we may have little choice in the matter.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/fred-lee">Fred Lee</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/honda-hybrids">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-my-clunker-is-smarter-than-a-hybrid">7 Ways My Clunker Is Smarter Than a Hybrid</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/better-cars-are-not-the-answer">Better cars are not the answer</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/17-things-car-salesmen-dont-want-you-to-know">17 Things Car Salesmen Don&#039;t Want You to Know</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/remove-car-dents-quickly-and-cheaply">Remove Car Dents Quickly and Cheaply</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/repair-the-car-or-spend-the-cash">Repair the Car or Spend the Cash?</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Cars and Transportation fuel efficient hybrid cars low emissions Thu, 22 May 2008 16:21:55 +0000 Fred Lee 2117 at http://www.wisebread.com Better cars are not the answer http://www.wisebread.com/better-cars-are-not-the-answer <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/better-cars-are-not-the-answer" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/cars-in-apartment-lot.jpg" alt="Cars in apartment lot" title="Cars in apartment lot" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="81" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Wise Bread is an optimistic place. There are some people who can't see the congruence between optimism and frugality. I'm talking about the sort of people who point to our progress from <a href="http://www.deldot.gov/static/projects/archaeology/wynn_wilson_lewis/intersite_inter_arch.shtml">360 square foot houses</a> to <a href="http://www.nahb.org/publication_details.aspx?publicationID=2028">2400 square foot houses</a> and say that, if your vision of the future doesn't have us all in 16,000 square foot houses pretty soon now, it's a pessimistic one. This article, though, isn't about houses. It's about cars.</p> <p>Posted as part of <a href="http://blogactionday.org/">blog action day</a>.</p> <p>Why do we care about cars? Because they use energy. Energy which, for the past hundred years has been fantastically cheap, but which over the next hundred years will become much, much more expensive. Energy use which has always produced pollution, but which we can see ever more clearly is a threat not only to our way of life, but our very lives.</p> <h2>Do cars matter?</h2> <p>In the United States, 28.5% of our energy consumption goes for transportation, and most of that (about two-thirds) goes to move people from where they are to where they want to be--mostly in cars and so-called light trucks (a legal category of vehicle designed for light cargo hauling but used for personal transportation because of unwise tax and regulatory policies). (Data from the U.S. Department of Energy <a href="http://cta.ornl.gov/data/index.shtml">Transportation Energy Data Book</a>.)</p> <p>Hand-in-hand with its fraction of energy consumption, transportation contributes a comparable share to carbon emissions as well (33%, according to the U.S. <a href="http://www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/1605/ggrpt/carbon.html">Energy Information Administration</a>).</p> <p>So, transportation is a big deal, and personal transportation (i.e. cars and things we use like cars) is the biggest chunk of transportation.</p> <h2>Better cars?</h2> <p>A lot of people look at that and say, &quot;Ah ha! What we need are much better cars! Cars that use less fuel, and cars that use different fuels--renewable fuels!&quot; Those people are wrong. What we need--and what we're going to have whether we like it or not--is much less driving.</p> <p>Of course, we will get better cars. Cars will become more efficient and there'll be new fuels and new technologies--hybrid, hydrogen, and plug-in electric cars; cars burning ethanol, bio-diesel, coal-to-liquid, and other even more exotic fuels. But none of that will preserve our car-driving way of life. There are many reasons. Two big ones are:</p> <ol> <li>We can't solve the climate change problems with a few little--or even big--tweaks to the way we run our cars. It's going to take <a href="http://environment.newscientist.com/article/dn12775-zero-emissions-needed-to-avert-dangerous-warming.html">major changes</a>.</li> <li>The energy needed to run around in your own car is going to get too expensive. The total world quantity of crude oil produced has been flat for about three years, despite record high prices. If these prices can't draw more fuel out of the ground, farms, and laboratories.... Well, then we'll get higher prices.</li> </ol> <p>Cars could be made a lot more efficient, simply by making them smaller and lighter. That'll happen automatically, once energy gets a lot more expensive. The average car got <a href="http://www.bts.gov/publications/national_transportation_statistics/html/table_04_23.html">22.4 mpg in 2004</a> (the average light truck considerably less). Among cars currently being sold in the U.S. fuel efficiency tops out at about <a href="http://www.edmunds.com/reviews/list/top10/119083/article.html">60 mpg</a>. Much better is possible--we'll see 120 mpg in the short term, as gasoline prices continue to rise. Making the shift as higher and higher prices force it, though is a slow, painful way to change, with the bulk of the pain falling on poor people, because the higher prices hit them first, and because they don't have the capital to invest in fuel-efficient cars.</p> <p>Because there are so many things that will help--new car technology and new fuel technology--and so many good ideas and bits of good news being reported--we see a perverse result: People to look at the long list and imagine that surely one (or a few) of these ideas will pan out, and that our car culture will go on in the future much the same as it has in the past. The ideas <em>will</em> pan out (or many of them will), but it won't be enough to preserve our car-driving way of life. The climate change problems are too pressing and the energy supplies are no longer growing--which means that prices will have to rise to balance the still-growing demand.</p> <h2>What then?</h2> <p>We face a world with less driving.</p> <p>If we accept that soon enough, there's a lot we can do--restore the failing railroad infrastructure, for one thing. Quit wasting money on airports and widening roads and putting up multi-level parking structures. Those aren't things that an individual can have much impact on (although at a local level it's possible, and worth trying).</p> <p>As an individual, start arranging your life so you don't have to drive so much. Walk more. Bicycle more. Take the bus more. If you live too far from work, think about moving, or changing jobs, or both.</p> <p>In the short term, also do all the things other articles on saving fuel recommend: Make sure your tire pressure is right. Combine trips. Drive conservatively. If you need a new car, buy a fuel efficient one. But none of that's going to be enough.</p> <p>Soon--sooner than you think, unless you've been paying attention to the oil production figures--you're going to have to drive less. Plan for that. Arrange your life now, so that driving less won't be a burden.</p> <p>The sooner you do it, the better off you'll be. It will give you more time to work out the kinks in your personal strategy for driving less. Also, it's frugal to drive less and it's incredibly frugal to live car-free. The money you're no longer spending to buy, fuel, <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/auto-insurance">insure</a>, and maintain a car can give you a huge boost to your standard of living and your savings.</p> <h2>Why so optimistic?</h2> <p>This may not sound like an optimistic vision of the future. It is, though.</p> <p>I look at the future and see cars becoming less common and less important. They'll become smaller and more fuel-efficient as well, but the dominate trend will be fewer of them on the road making fewer trips.</p> <p>I view that change with great optimism. I see a future where communities are walkable--where housing, jobs, and shopping are close together. I see a future where people bicycle to work and to run errands. I see a future where light rail links bedroom communities with city centers and industrial centers, so that people who don't want to live in cities can still work in them and so that heavy industries that people don't want next door can still exist and still have workers. I see a future where high-speed rail links my town with the nearby cities--Chicago, Indianapolis, St. Louis.</p> <p>I'm optimistic, because that's the future where I want to live.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/philip-brewer">Philip Brewer</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/better-cars-are-not-the-answer">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/frugal-transport-bicycling">Frugal Transport--bicycling</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-my-clunker-is-smarter-than-a-hybrid">7 Ways My Clunker Is Smarter Than a Hybrid</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-good-life-on-less-energy-even-in-the-us">The good life on less energy--even in the US</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/would-you-drive-one-of-the-10-smallest-cars-ever-made">Would You Drive One of the 10 Smallest Cars Ever Made?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/bottled-water-bottled-hype-part-1">Bottled Water, Bottled Hype Part 1</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Cars and Transportation Green Living bicycling car hybrid cars Personal transportation transport Mon, 15 Oct 2007 13:53:46 +0000 Philip Brewer 1288 at http://www.wisebread.com Stay warm without burning a hole in your pocket http://www.wisebread.com/stay-warm-without-burning-a-hole-in-your-pocket <p><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/wisebread_imce/Hell_freezing_over.jpg" alt="Hell freezes over" width="179" height="86" align="right" />As the days get shorter and the wind colder, the heating bill has a way of creeping up. CNN Money offers <a href="http://money.cnn.com/2006/11/28/pf/heating_costs_savings/index.htm?postversion=2006112816"><strong>Six ways to shrink that heating bill</strong></a>. </p> <p>Here are home improvement tips to help you stay warm without being bundled up like an Eskimo all the time.</p> <ol> <li>Clean your furnace filter.</li> <li>Get a programmable thermostat.</li> <li>Take advantage of the sun.</li> <li>Turn down the hot water.</li> <li>Insulate and seal.</li> <li>Upgrade your windows.</li> </ol> <p>Maybe you can find some help from the <a href="/do-it-yourself-with-community-help">good folks at Curbly</a>.</p> <p>The really good news is that by doing these things, you get a double bonus. There are tax breaks when you spend on energy efficient products! Keep your home warm with a lower heating bill <em>and</em> get a break from Uncle Sam on the new windows. Nice.</p> <p>According to this <a href="http://www.ase.org/content/article/detail/2654">Alliance to Save Energy</a> document, you can <strong>get tax credits for buying energy efficient goodies</strong> like:</p> <ul> <li>Hybrid car or SUV: $650 to $3,150</li> <li>Central air conditioner or heat pump: $300</li> <li>Furnace or boiler: $150</li> <li>Windows: $200</li> <li>Insulation and sealing: $500 *</li> </ul> <p>(Note: there is a $500 max on home improvement. Read the rules and talk to your accountant to see how much you can save.)</p> <p>Be sure to scroll down to the <a href="http://www.ase.org/content/article/detail/2654#hybrid_vehicle">Hybrid car section</a>. Specific credit amounts are listed according to the car year and model. Check out how much your <a href="http://www.toyota.com/prius/">Prius</a> saved you. With gas stuck at expensive and earth-friendly tax breaks in the books, can you really afford to keep driving that gas-guzzling monster SUV? That&#39;s so 1997. </p> <p>(via <a href="http://chitownblues.blogspot.com/2006/11/6-ways-to-cut-heating-bills.html">Windy City Blues</a>)</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/greg-go">Greg Go</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/stay-warm-without-burning-a-hole-in-your-pocket">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-4"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-frugal-ways-to-keep-your-home-warm-this-winter">10 Frugal Ways to Keep Your Home Warm This Winter</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-easy-ways-to-lower-winter-energy-costs">7 Easy Ways to Lower Winter Energy Costs</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/hold-off-on-heating-with-these-10-warming-ways-0">Hold Off On Heating with These 10 Warming Ways</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-my-clunker-is-smarter-than-a-hybrid">7 Ways My Clunker Is Smarter Than a Hybrid</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/super-cheap-building-supplies-and-a-way-to-help-your-community">Super-Cheap Building Supplies and a Way to Help Your Community!</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Green Living heating home improvement hybrid cars taxes Mon, 04 Dec 2006 08:00:31 +0000 Greg Go 24 at http://www.wisebread.com