networking http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/2800/all en-US 11 Ways a Professional Association Can Boost Your Career http://www.wisebread.com/11-ways-a-professional-association-can-boost-your-career <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/11-ways-a-professional-association-can-boost-your-career" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/group_of_business_people_in_the_office_building_lobby.jpg" alt="Group of business people in the office building lobby" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>You got the degree and landed the job. Maybe, though, your career seems stalled. Are you looking for a way to move up the corporate ladder, or out of a rut? If so, maybe it's time you joined a professional association.</p> <p>What's the best thing about a professional association? <em>Networking.</em> And it's not stand-around-at-a-cocktail-party, trying-to-make-small-talk networking. Belonging to a professional association is like having an instant group of friends, with at least one similar interest: You all work in the same field.</p> <p>So, what some other reasons should you join a professional association?</p> <h2>1. It's easy to find one</h2> <p>Either Google it (i.e., &quot;pharmacist professional associations&quot;), or use this handy <a href="https://www.careeronestop.org/businesscenter/professionalassociations/find-professional-associations.aspx" target="_blank">professional association finder</a> developed by the U.S. Department of Labor. A quick search will bring you results for organizations in your career field.</p> <h2>2. You can give back to your community</h2> <p>Especially appealing to millennials, an age group that wants their work to have meaning, are opportunities for giving back. Many professional associations have subgroups that pride themselves on charitable and community-building efforts.</p> <p>You might find yourself speaking at an elementary school, helping with a trash pickup day, or fundraising for a good cause. My niece, an optometrist, participates in a professional association that raises funds for guide dogs for the blind. If your association doesn't already do good works, maybe you're the leader they need to start something.</p> <h2>3. It'll help beef up your resume</h2> <p>The more you can show a recruiter or interviewer that you're connected to your career, the better. Listing a professional association demonstrates your passion and drive, as well as your involvement in the field. Recruiters love data, and seeing something like, &quot;Co-chaired auction that raised $5,000 for guide dog program&quot; will definitely stand out. Similarly, you can use leadership roles in a professional association (&quot;Treasurer, 2017&ndash;2018: Converted organization's record-keeping to QuickBooks&quot;) to illustrate your skills.</p> <p>If your resume and cover letter skills need work, many associations also have a &quot;career resources&quot; page on their website for tips on formatting resumes and writing effective cover letters.</p> <h2>4. You'll boost your own technology skills</h2> <p>I was overwhelmed by social media until I began attending meetings of my local social media professional association. It helped me learn about the different platforms and what works best for me.</p> <p>Millennials are the generation that has most embraced technology. If that's your age group, you may find that a professional association is a place to use those technology skills and keep learning new ones.</p> <h2>5. You'll make friends</h2> <p>Remember, you already have one thing in common with people who belong to your profession's association: You work in the same field. There may be others with whom you have common interests, and you may be able to build a social support group within your new circle. I found I enjoyed a walking group with members of my professional association, and am currently interested in another group that does healthy cooking potlucks. It's a great way to bring a fun, personal element into your professional life.</p> <h2>6. They can help you find a new, or better, job</h2> <p>I work in human resources, and regularly receive emails from the Society for Human Resource Management listing job opportunities. That is the same case with most other professional associations. Many of them have job boards or announcements where companies seeking new hires can list openings. You might even come across some positions that aren't being listed elsewhere.</p> <h2>7. Educational opportunities</h2> <p>Need continuing education credits, or just need to learn how to do something new? Check with your association. If they don't offer it themselves, they may able to direct you to a source that does. Discounts may also be available, which brings us to the next point.</p> <h2>8. Discounts</h2> <p>Looking for travel, health care, or educational discounts? Your association may have some available. In addition, you'll often find discounts on websites or tools pertinent to your career field. For example, the Society of Professional Journalists offers members a 20 percent discount on a subscription to the AP Stylebook.</p> <h2>9. You'll find great material for work</h2> <p>Yes, you'll be inundated with material to read, but don't just ignore those newsletters and notices. I squirrel away the daily emails and read them in batches; the magazines I take home and peruse in my leisure. That stuff can come in handy.</p> <p>For instance, when my CEO recently said he thought our hiring process took too long, I could quote HR Magazine (April, 2017) in saying 28 days is the typical period of time between someone applying for a job and being hired ... but also that I'd look into ways we could shorten our process. In a competitive workplace, your association's reading and events will keep you ahead of the pack. Plus, let's face it &mdash; you'll sound more knowledgeable.</p> <h2>10. You can find, or be, a mentor</h2> <p>I found having a mentor to be extremely helpful in my career. Someone with vast experience in your field can give sound advice and help you stay motivated. Alternatively,<em> you</em> may be that experienced person for someone else, and it might be very rewarding for you to help a newbie. It can be a great thing to have a source outside of your own office to ask for advice.</p> <h2>11. Be active in your association</h2> <p>Sure, you can pay for the membership and do nothing, but that won't help your career much. Even if you're shy, taking on a small, manageable role in the association will help your career.</p> <p>Still on the fence? Explore your professional association's website, talk to someone who belongs about benefits, or attend a class or meeting. Once you actually get your feet wet, you may be much more eager to dive in.</p> <h2>A few things to consider</h2> <p>While professional associations can be a great boon to your career, they also have a few downsides. The first being cost: Joining a professional association often comes with a membership fee, and these can be pricey. However, if you are required to join by your employer, or pitch the idea of joining to them, they may foot the bill for you. Another potential expense to consider are meetings, which are often held at restaurants or cafes.</p> <p>Professional associations can also feel a little overwhelming at times, between the social media feeds, the association's newsletter, their calendar of events, and all the LinkedIn connections. For some organizations, there can be a deluge of information to read.</p> <p>Career-wise, however, the pros of joining a professional association outweigh the cons. If you can find and afford to join one, it can be a wonderful way to advance your professional standing.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/marla-walters">Marla Walters</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-ways-a-professional-association-can-boost-your-career">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-8"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-ways-freelancers-and-telecommuters-can-make-friends-and-network">11 Ways Freelancers and Telecommuters Can Make Friends and Network</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/25-career-changes-you-can-make-today">25 Career Changes You Can Make Today</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dont-go-to-college-to-learn">Don&#039;t Go to College to Learn</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-someone-to-accept-your-linkedin-invitation">How to Get Someone to Accept Your LinkedIn Invitation</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-simple-networking-tricks">15 Simple Networking Tricks</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building clubs connections discounts events learning making friends networking organizations professional associations skills Tue, 06 Jun 2017 08:30:16 +0000 Marla Walters 1959134 at http://www.wisebread.com 11 Ways College Grads Can Get Ahead in the Job Hunt http://www.wisebread.com/11-ways-college-grads-can-get-ahead-in-the-job-hunt <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/11-ways-college-grads-can-get-ahead-in-the-job-hunt" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-476073295.jpg" alt="College grad learning how to get ahead on the job hunt" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="141" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>It's a dog-eat-dog post-college world out there for new grads. It was when I graduated in 2003, and I hear the same grumblings today from next-gens looking for work.</p> <p>While I can't promise that any of my advice will get you hired, I can ensure that it'll at least help you get your professional endeavors off on the right foot. As such, consider these ways to get ahead in the job hunt.</p> <h2>1. Explore entrepreneurship while you're still in school</h2> <p>Entrepreneurship isn't for everyone, but I do recommend it to everyone. I started my first business while I was still in college, which eventually evolved into a successful media business. That has, in turn, provided me with the financial and recreational freedom to pursue other interests and revenue streams.</p> <p>More than that, though, trying to become your own boss at a young(ish) age, even if you don't quite know what you're doing yet, will never be considered a failure. At the very least, you'll gain skills than can help you in future prospects, learn how to interact with customers, and make connections networking with other professionals. This will give you a major edge over your contemporaries.</p> <h2>2. Volunteer to enhance work ethic and build references</h2> <p>Volunteering, especially right after college, looks great on a resume because it lets an employer know that you're committed to a cause. It's not just about listing the noble charities to which you've given your time, but rather how you turned these opportunities into in-the-field, ethic-building ventures. The experience will undoubtedly help you make contacts and build references who will sing your praises when called upon. Of course, seeing the world, meeting and helping people, and gaining a sense of purpose and self are pretty cool, too.</p> <h2>3. Pursue internships to gain industry experience</h2> <p>I held two internships at a time in college because I knew I wanted to work in media, specifically journalism. Unfortunately for me, I fell in love with a college that didn't offer a journalism major, and that meant I had to make up the difference &mdash; big time.</p> <p>One of my internships was writing news for an ABC-affiliated AM news-radio station, while the other was writing about music for a local magazine. Each of these internships provided me with vastly different skills, but they both prepared me for applying to my first paid writing positions. I went into those jobs better prepared, perhaps, than other candidates.</p> <p>Alexis Chateau, founder and managing partner of her own eponymous public relations firm, credits internship for her success. In addition to the internship, she suggests taking on spec assignments for free to show potential employers what you've got.</p> <p>&quot;College students should take on pro-bono work, to build their portfolio, if they work in an area that requires it,&quot; she says. &quot;An impressive portfolio can open up almost any door in business.&quot;</p> <p>I can personally vouch for this tactic. When I started my journalism career, I wrote many articles for free just to get published. When I had enough clips that showed that I was a capable and cognizant writer, editors responded in kind by hiring me for work.</p> <h2>4. Connect with prospective companies online</h2> <p>If there are particular companies at which you're interested in working, follow them online so you can get a better idea of what they're all about. When you go into an interview with something smart and relevant to say about the company, you won't go unnoticed by the interviewer.</p> <p>&quot;These days, smart companies are using their social media to have a dialogue with the public, and this dialogue is a great way for people to figure out a company's core values, their mission, and the language they use in order to connect with them, and present yourself as an ideal candidate,&quot; explains Carlota Zimmerman, a New York-based career coach and success strategist.</p> <p>Zimmerman suggests also liking the company's Facebook page, as someone through the grapevine may notice and reach out. It may not be that easy, but any potential connection is a valuable connection.</p> <h2>5. Clean up your social media</h2> <p>This is the digital age, when everyone and their mother has a social media presence. Chances are, if you're fresh out of college, you've got a few things floating around your Facebook or Instagram account that may not paint the prettiest picture of you to an employer. And believe me, your prospective employers will be looking.</p> <p>Before you even send out your resume, do a deep clean of all of your social media accounts. Scrub embarrassing posts, delete or untag yourself from unflattering photos, and double check your privacy settings. Then, view your profile publicly to see what information is still accessible. A tedious process? Yes, but so is unemployment. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-easy-ways-to-clean-up-your-image-on-social-media?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Easy Ways to Clean Up Your Image on Social Media</a>)</p> <h2>6. Tap into your personal network for professional tips</h2> <p>Nearly every single adult you know is a professional with years of experience in their field. Some of them have had the same jobs forever, and some of them have changed careers frequently. No matter the case, these folks can be helpful not only in the advice they can provide, but they may also be able to point you in the right direction of employment.</p> <p>Kristine Thorndyke, who landed a full-time gig in Los Angeles before she graduated, offers advice on how to apply this principle within your own college community.</p> <p>&quot;Join a club or school committee based around a particular skill or interest you intend on pursuing in the future,&quot; she says. &quot;For example, if you are a business major, see if there are any groups or committees that meet up or, oftentimes, a designated business fraternity. These kinds of groups usually have access to professionals in the field you intend on pursuing and can help coordinate meet and greets with these professionals or alumni.&quot;</p> <h2>7. Take advantage of your school's career services resources</h2> <p>When I was looking for a job in Manhattan, I was willing to take all the help I could get. Enter Career Services at my alma mater. These centers provides free resources that not only help students write proper resumes, but also facilitate conversations between alumni and new grads based on field of interest, skill level, and more. My own Career Services connected me with the right people so I could start putting out feelers and getting a handle on what my options were.</p> <p>&quot;Reach out to alumni from your school and ask them out for a coffee to 'pick their brain,'&quot; Thorndyke suggests. &quot;Oftentimes, this alumni has connections or ties to companies that are hiring and will be impressed that you were driven enough to meet and learn more about the kind of work they do and their insight and/or suggestions for you.&quot;</p> <h2>8. Practice how to give a good interview from start to finish</h2> <p>Interviewing for a job is an art form. There are a million things that go into giving a great one, from how you dress to your follow-up thank-yous. As with everything else, of course, practice makes perfect &mdash; and you have ample time to hone your skills since, ya know, you're currently unemployed. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-answer-23-of-the-most-common-interview-questions?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Answer 23 of the Most Common Interview Questions</a>)</p> <p>Thorndyke advises, &quot;Interview with a professional career counselor. It's the best way to figure out how to most effectively convey your thoughts and accomplishments before the big interview. Oftentimes, it's difficult to get any honest feedback from HR or interviewers about notes on your qualifications or interviewing ability from a gig you were declined an offer from.&quot;</p> <p>An interview counselor can point out where you need to improve before the rejections become a trend.</p> <h2>9. Learn how to write a resume that will get you noticed</h2> <p>First, let's start with the number one thing you shouldn't do with your resume: Do not send the same one to every job prospect, regardless of industry or field. Your resume should be specifically tailored to the job you're seeking. If that means changing it 57 times a week to make sure it's relevant to each prospect, that's what you need to do. Secondly, it needs to stand out. There are lots of ways you can do that, but the highest on the list is providing details about past accomplishments opposed to generic lines like, &quot;Provided marketing assistance to the director of sales.&quot; (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-resume-mistakes-that-will-hurt-your-job-search?ref=seealso" target="_blank">10 Resume Mistakes That Will Hurt Your Job Search</a>)</p> <p>You know what HR people do when they read resumes full of bland descriptors? They slam dunk it into the circular file and move on to the next one.</p> <h2>10. Put your GPA on your resume</h2> <p>Maybe I've been out of college for too long, but I don't remember including my GPA on my resume &mdash; or anybody ever suggesting I do so. But Chris Kolmar, co-founder of Zappia.com, makes a good point about adopting the practice, at least for the first couple years after graduation.</p> <p>His logic?</p> <p>&quot;Any good hiring manager will ask for it because it's a decent predictor of success right of out college,&quot; he says.</p> <p>Not gospel, but it certainly won't hurt.</p> <h2>11. Start your job hunt months before graduation</h2> <p>Looking for a job well before you graduate doesn't always work, but getting a head start never hurts.</p> <p>&quot;I secured a job in public relations three days before graduation because of this,&quot; explains Alyssa Pallotti, an account supervisor at Montner Tech PR in Connecticut. &quot;I began applying, participating in phone interviews, and meeting potential employers in person as early as the beginning of my final semester. This allowed me to tweak my resume, cover letters, and interview style based on feedback from those companies. Therefore, my overall presentation and nerves were refined by the time I was actually eligible to take on a position.&quot;</p> <p>Yes, job hunting takes work &mdash; and that can be an overwhelming prospect when you're still dealing with school &mdash; but don't put this off. It could potentially save you months of job-hunt headaches.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/mikey-rox">Mikey Rox</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-ways-college-grads-can-get-ahead-in-the-job-hunt">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-7"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-keep-your-job-search-a-secret">How to Keep Your Job Search a Secret</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-things-you-should-never-include-in-your-cover-letter">7 Things You Should Never Include in Your Cover Letter</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-proper-ways-to-discuss-salary-in-a-job-interview">The Proper Ways to Discuss Salary in a Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-tax-deductions-job-hunters-can-t-afford-to-overlook">6 Tax Deductions Job-Hunters Can’t Afford to Overlook</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/job-search-tips-that-will-get-you-a-job-in-2012">Job Search Tips That Will Get You a Job in 2012</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Job Hunting advice career college grads internships interviewing looking for work networking new grads resumes tips Mon, 24 Apr 2017 08:30:13 +0000 Mikey Rox 1931722 at http://www.wisebread.com 7 Easy Ways to Clean Up Your Image on Social Media http://www.wisebread.com/7-easy-ways-to-clean-up-your-image-on-social-media <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/7-easy-ways-to-clean-up-your-image-on-social-media" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-515677550.jpg" alt="Woman learning easy ways to clean up her image on social media" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="142" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Cleaning up your social media account can improve your overall image and pay off big time. That's because more people are checking social media accounts now than ever before. In fact, according to the job search website CareerBuilder, 60 percent of employers admit to researching potential candidates through their social media profiles. As a safe bet, you should expect potential employers, college admissions offices, romantic partners, and even in-laws to Google your name and check your accounts. Here's how to clean up your internet presence in a pinch. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-to-stop-doing-on-social-media-by-30?ref=seealso" target="_blank">10 Things to Stop Doing on Social Media by 30</a>)</p> <h2>1. Check all accounts</h2> <p>Make sure that you hit all the important social media channels when you're cleaning up your online profile. You'll want to focus on your social media pages across the board, including Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Google+. Don't neglect one just because you don't think you have a lot of followers or haven't been on it for years.</p> <h2>2. View it publicly</h2> <p>Sign out of your social media accounts or login and &quot;view your profile as public&quot; to see what strangers can see. Sometimes your privacy settings aren't what you thought. Imagine a potential employer is visiting your social media page. Are you happy with the image you've created? Delete things that you're not comfortable with the world seeing.</p> <h2>3. Upload recent photos</h2> <p>You can improve your job prospects by making a good first impression right away. Post a recent photo of yourself and make sure your best self is highlighted. A professional looking headshot is best. If you can't afford to hire a photographer, have a friend take some shots in good lighting.</p> <h2>4. Showcase your talents</h2> <p>Update your LinkedIn profile with recent projects to showcase your talents, as well as information on your interests and skills. Add keywords to your profile so that it is more likely to show up in searches.</p> <h2>5. Get a domain</h2> <p>Consider getting your own domain and using it as a portfolio. Here, you can showcase your recent projects, skills, and links for further information on your work. Add this link to all of your social media pages. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-surprising-ways-a-personal-website-can-improve-your-life?ref=seealso" target="_blank">8 Surprising Ways a Personal Website Can Improve Your Life</a>)</p> <p>Having a social media presence and your own domain allows you to control what people see when they search for you online.</p> <h2>6. When in doubt, delete, delete, delete!</h2> <p>You'll want to clear away anything that interferes with the image you're trying to present. Consider erasing provocative photographs, controversial statements, and any posts that negatively refer to previous employers. Consider taking the time to go back several years. Some companies have interns whose job it is to go through candidates' social media pages and they're instructed to dig deep.</p> <h2>7. File a complaint when necessary</h2> <p>If there is embarrassing content that someone else has posted of you that you can't remove yourself, you may want to politely ask them to remove it. If there are items on your Facebook page that you can't remove yourself, you may want to contact Facebook Support or even <a href="https://support.google.com/legal/answer/3110420?visit_id=1-636250326555842646-111694048&amp;rd=2" target="_blank">submit a legal complaint to Google</a> in extreme cases.</p> <h2>Going forward</h2> <p>Just follow the general rule that if you don't feel comfortable with everyone at the office seeing what you're up to, don't include it on your social media accounts.</p> <p>Consider setting up different groups for your friends and followers, so that you can limit some of your activity to only the people you trust. Sometimes it's unavoidable to add a coworker or boss to your social media account, but you can limit your posts to specific groups of followers and friends.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/andrea-cannon">Andrea Cannon</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-easy-ways-to-clean-up-your-image-on-social-media">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/flashback-friday-34-smart-ways-to-improve-your-social-media-presence">Flashback Friday: 34 Smart Ways to Improve Your Social Media Presence</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-use-snapchat-in-your-job-search">How to Use Snapchat in Your Job Search</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/your-web-presence-will-soon-be-more-valuable-than-your-credit-rating">Your Web Presence Will Soon Be More Valuable Than Your Credit Rating</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-social-blunders-to-stop-making-by-30">10 Social Blunders to Stop Making by 30</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-high-paying-jobs-that-didnt-exist-10-years-ago">9 High-Paying Jobs That Didn&#039;t Exist 10 Years Ago</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Life Hacks Technology dos and don'ts networking reputation social media social media etiquette social media tips Tue, 11 Apr 2017 08:30:14 +0000 Andrea Cannon 1925372 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Deal When You Hate Your New Job http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-deal-when-you-hate-your-new-job <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-deal-when-you-hate-your-new-job" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-529254969.jpg" alt="Man learning how to deal when he hates his new job" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>In 1994, I started a new job in an entirely new field. The gig seemed perfect: It was a step up financially, it was ripe with opportunity &hellip; and it was a complete disaster.</p> <p>Within days, I had a sinking feeling that my new dream job was actually a nightmare. But I was stuck. Without a clear plan, I stayed in that job for two years and hated nearly every minute of it. If your new job feels like a bad dream, here are seven things you can do.</p> <h2>1. Determine if it's the job or the transition</h2> <p>Starting a new job is a huge change, and one that can be very stressful. It's easy for that stress to be misinterpreted and misplaced. Ask yourself, &quot;Is it the job I hate, or is it the transition?&quot; Many times, once we settle into a new job, get acquainted with co-workers, and begin to understand the expectations, that &quot;nightmare job&quot; becomes just a job.</p> <h2>2. Focus on the good</h2> <p>OK, so you've determined that it's the job &mdash; not the transition itself &mdash; that's the nightmare. Now what? At the risk of sounding like a blind optimist, focus on the good. It can help you tolerate a job when there are no other options immediately available. What duties do you enjoy? Are there co-workers that make the day-to-day grind easier to manage? Is there a nearby coffee shop or park where you can unwind for a few minutes every afternoon? All of those things, even though small, are positives you can look forward to.</p> <h2>3. Retreat</h2> <p>Sometimes the smartest strategy is a hasty retreat. Contact the supervisor of your previous job and explain the circumstances &mdash; you made a career misstep and would like the opportunity to return to your old job. If you left on good terms, if the position is still open, and if you're willing to eat a little crow, this tactic just might work.</p> <h2>4. Set a deadline</h2> <p>Toiling away at a job you hate year after year can sap your motivation and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-that-job-you-hate-keeps-you-poor?ref=internal" target="_blank">keep you poor</a>. If you have a financial cushion, don't stay in a nightmare job one minute longer than necessary. Set a deadline for your departure and stick to it. In the meantime, <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-resume-mistakes-that-will-hurt-your-job-search?ref=internal" target="_blank">polish your resume</a>, <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/30-minutes-to-a-linkedin-profile-that-gets-you-hired?ref=internal" target="_blank">build a better LinkedIn profile</a>, and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-come-up-with-1000-in-the-next-30-days?ref=internal" target="_blank">save aggressively</a> so you can weather gaps in employment.</p> <h2>5. Work your network</h2> <p>There's a kernel of truth to the adage, &quot;It's not what you know, it's whom you know.&quot; If you need to find a new job quickly, tap into the power of your professional network. To avoid the deadly &quot;job hopper&quot; wrap, frame your situation carefully but honestly. Be ready to explain to potential employers why your new job is a bad fit, what you learned from the experience, and how you're applying those lessons in your current job search. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-10-best-networking-tips-for-people-under-40?ref=seealso" target="_blank">The 10 Best Networking Tips for People Under 40</a>)</p> <h2>6. Be willing to take a step backward</h2> <p>Even if going back to your old job is out of the question, be willing to take a temporary step backward. Though it may bruise your ego, a strategic step down the career ladder allows you to regroup, plan your next move, and build additional experience in a more positive environment.</p> <h2>7. Once you're back on track, purge it from your resume</h2> <p>Mistakes happen, but there's no need to document each one permanently on a resume. If your nightmare job was short-lived, don't include it in your work history. Instead, own the mistake on a personal level. Use it to learn more about yourself, improve how you research new career opportunities, and &mdash; perhaps most importantly &mdash; make sure all your future jobs are nightmare-free.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/kentin-waits">Kentin Waits</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-deal-when-you-hate-your-new-job">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-questions-you-should-always-ask-in-an-exit-interview">8 Questions You Should Always Ask in an Exit Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-fun-ways-to-leave-your-job">10 Fun Ways to Leave Your Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/they-offered-you-a-promotion-and-no-pay-raise-now-what">They Offered You a Promotion and No Pay Raise. Now What?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-you-must-do-before-you-quit-your-job">5 Things You Must Do Before You Quit Your Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-super-cool-ways-people-have-quit-their-jobs">6 Super-Cool Ways People Have Quit Their Jobs</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income bad job employment job offers networking new job quitting resumes Fri, 31 Mar 2017 08:30:31 +0000 Kentin Waits 1915859 at http://www.wisebread.com 11 Ways Freelancers and Telecommuters Can Make Friends and Network http://www.wisebread.com/11-ways-freelancers-and-telecommuters-can-make-friends-and-network <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/11-ways-freelancers-and-telecommuters-can-make-friends-and-network" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-528577668.jpg" alt="Freelancers learning how to make friends and telecommute" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="142" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Working from home can be a great thing. It allows you to work where you want, when you want, and has a number of other perks. However, it can be a bit lonely. Luckily, with the power of the Internet (and some motivation to get out and socialize), even those without an office water cooler to mill around can network and make new friends.</p> <h2>Networking Resources</h2> <p>Working off-site can take a toll on your professional network. To build your reputation, find mentors and collaborators, and connect with people in your industry, take advantage of some of the following networking resources. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-simple-networking-tricks?ref=seealso" target="_blank">15 Simple Networking Tricks</a>)</p> <h3>1. LinkedIn</h3> <p>LinkedIn is one of those most common, popular ways to build and maintain professional relationships. It makes it so easy to network online with other professionals in your field. You can also use LinkedIn to find networking events and opportunities in your area, or connect you with organizations you are interested in.</p> <h3>2. Shapr</h3> <p><a href="http://www.shapr.co/" target="_blank">Shapr</a> is an app that can connect you with like-minded people, allowing you to swipe left (pass) or right (interested) on your connections. You can set your favorite ways to meet, your passions and interests, and what you're looking for (collaborators, job opportunities, inspiration, potential investments, or new friends).</p> <h3>3. Work Your Existing Connections<strong> </strong></h3> <p>Ask friends, past and current co-workers, or even your employer for recommendations on local networking events or seminars. Most cities have their own organizations that specialize in these types of events for working professionals of all kinds. If you can't find any from asking around, try a Google search, LinkedIn, or social media.</p> <h3>4. Take Classes</h3> <p>Consider taking a night class. In addition to growing your skills or teaching you something brand-new, you might befriend some fellow classmates along the way. Even online classes can connect you with new people with similar interests or background in your field.</p> <h3>5. Volunteer</h3> <p>Research some local organizations that could use a hand, and offer your time. Not only will you be contributing to a worthy cause, but you'll also be gaining experience (which looks great on a resume), expanding on your skill set, and of course, meeting new people. Volunteering allows you to become part of a community, which is a great way to expand your network.</p> <h2>Friendship Resources</h2> <p>If you don't get out much, maybe you should start! In the meantime, your smartphone or computer can also be the perfect friendly matchmaker.</p> <h3>6. Bumble BFF</h3> <p><a href="https://bumble.com/en-us/about" target="_blank">Bumble</a> was originally a dating app, but has expanded to include a &quot;Bumble BFF&quot; feature. Instead of swiping left or right on potential dates, you'll do the same for potential friends. Once you're paired with a new friend, you have only 24 hours to start a chat, so procrastinators and fair-weather friends aren't welcome.</p> <h3>7. Atleto</h3> <p>If you're looking for a workout buddy, then <a href="http://www.atletosports.com/#what" target="_blank">Atleto</a> can help you find local sports activities and fellow fitness enthusiasts. The app can connect you with friends from your existing social media accounts, or you can find new friends in your area. This is a fun way to find an accountability buddy to help you reach your fitness goal.</p> <h3>8. Friender</h3> <p><a href="https://frienderapp.com/" target="_blank">Friender</a> allows you to swipe left or right on potential connections. You'll create a profile based on personal interests and activities you enjoy, and Friender will recommend a few folks with mutual interests. This app is only for making friends, however, so you won't have to waste time with people who are looking for more.</p> <h3>9. Meetup</h3> <p><a href="https://www.meetup.com/" target="_blank">Meetup</a> is an online organization with nearly 30 million members that hosts endless gatherings and social functions. You can meet people based on your occupation, personal interests (like hiking or cooking), location, and other factors that are important to you. Join a local club, take up a brand-new hobby, or explore somewhere new, all while making new like-minded friends along the way.</p> <h3>10. Social Media<strong> </strong></h3> <p>There can be more to interacting with your Facebook friends than a simple &quot;like&quot; or the occasional comment. Reach out to those friends and old co-workers through Facebook, Twitter, and/or Instagram. Invite them out for lunch or drinks, and simply catch up. It'll feel great to get out and sit with people face to face.</p> <h3>11. Get Out More</h3> <p>Once you are no longer in school or working from an office, it can be challenging to meet new people in person. The best thing to do is visit places where connections naturally occur. Maybe find a book club through your local library, or sign up for that fitness class or 5K you've been aspiring to run. Try a local arts or cooking class, or even take your kids on a playdate where you can mingle with fellow parents. There are countless ways to meet new people if you just get out there!</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/andrea-cannon">Andrea Cannon</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-ways-freelancers-and-telecommuters-can-make-friends-and-network">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-life-skills-every-freelancer-needs">8 Life Skills Every Freelancer Needs</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/22-websites-that-will-pay-you-to-write-for-them">22 Websites That Will Pay You to Write for Them</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-to-stay-productive-while-working-from-home">5 Ways to Stay Productive While Working From Home</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-ways-a-professional-association-can-boost-your-career">11 Ways a Professional Association Can Boost Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-skills-that-will-be-obsolete-soon">9 Skills That Will Be Obsolete Soon</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Lifestyle apps events freelance friends networking relationships social media telecommute work from home Wed, 22 Feb 2017 10:30:36 +0000 Andrea Cannon 1896807 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Use Snapchat in Your Job Search http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-use-snapchat-in-your-job-search <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-use-snapchat-in-your-job-search" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_55082910_MEDIUM.jpg" alt="using snapchat in your job search" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Graham Allgood, a college senior, dreamed of landing a social media internship at top agency <a href="http://www.businessinsider.com/graham-allgood-uses-snapchat-geofilter-for-internship-interview-2016-5">Horizon Media</a>. The problem was, so did every other college senior. Allgood knew he had to set himself apart, so he decided to skip the traditional resume and application and did something completely unexpected: he created an on-demand geofilter. This is a Snapchat design that features a custom location or special event, and Allgood scheduled a campaign to launch during the agency's working hours.</p> <p>That same day, Allgood received an invitation to interview, and within days, he had a job offer. His ingenuity and innovation cut through the competition and showed off his social media savvy, making him a great fit for the agency.</p> <h2>Snapchat and Job Searching</h2> <p>If you think Snapchat is something just for teens to swap selfies or make silly faces, you may be missing out on a powerful career development tool. While known for its use by millennials and teenagers, Snapchat is one of the fastest growing social media platforms with over&nbsp;<a href="http://www.adweek.com/socialtimes/snapchat-is-the-fastest-growing-social-network-infographic/624116">200 million</a> active users.</p> <p>Companies from HubSpot to General Electric are increasingly using the app to highlight their work, culture, and employees, and it can be an easy way to connect with prospective employers. From showcasing your portfolio to networking with professionals, Snapchat can be an asset in&nbsp;<a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-100k-jobs-you-can-do-online">your job search</a>. Here's how to take advantage of all Snapchat has to offer:</p> <h3>Highlight Your Achievements</h3> <p>Snapchat provides a unique opportunity to highlight your work in an engaging way visually. Share your expertise, exciting projects, and great results. Use the app as a platform to position yourself as an industry leader. For example, comment on the latest trends in your industry, create stories with Snapchat's features to show off your latest campaign, or show your team celebrating a significant milestone. It lets employers see not only your work, but your personality, teamwork, and social media savvy.</p> <h3>Instead of a Resume, Tell a Story</h3> <p>If you are in a creative industry, like advertising or event planning, posting your resume as a story can be an excellent way to stand out from the competition. Video clips and pictures that recap your experience, accomplishments, and growth emphasize your capabilities and potential for a new position. While a Snapchat resume may not work in fields like law or accounting, a social media-based resume can resonate in fields that focus on out-of-the-box thinking and ingenuity.</p> <h3>Network With Employers</h3> <p>With employers like&nbsp;<a href="http://www.reuters.com/article/goldman-sachs-snapchat-idUSL1N11O1T920150918/">Goldman Sachs</a> posting regularly on Snapchat, it can be a great way to learn about a company, find out about their culture, and connect with their staff. They often post breaking news, milestones, and other achievements, which can give you great talking points in a cover letter or interview. You can interact with them as well, but do it strategically when you have something of value to contribute to the discussion.</p> <p><a href="http://www.bizjournals.com/louisville/blog/2015/05/taco-bell-uses-snapchat-to-advertise-internships.html">Taco Bell</a> is a great example of a company using Snapchat to advertise job opportunities and recruiting for internships.</p> <h2>Career Development</h2> <p>Some of the biggest leaders in business use Snapchat to offer tips, advice, and tutorials on industry trends. Follow key leaders in your field to learn about building your executive presence, how to increase engagement or how to improve your productivity.</p> <p>While Snapchat is most well known as an app for funny pictures and video clips, if used strategically, you can use it as a powerful platform to supercharge your job search.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/kat-tretina">Kat Tretina</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-use-snapchat-in-your-job-search">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-7"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-youre-sabotaging-your-job-hunt">7 Ways You&#039;re Sabotaging Your Job Hunt</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-easy-ways-to-clean-up-your-image-on-social-media">7 Easy Ways to Clean Up Your Image on Social Media</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/jumpstart-your-job-search-with-instagram">Jumpstart Your Job Search With Instagram</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/heres-how-one-social-media-micro-star-gets-lots-of-free-stuff">How I Scored Tons of Free Stuff By Building a Small Social Media Audience</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/flashback-friday-34-smart-ways-to-improve-your-social-media-presence">Flashback Friday: 34 Smart Ways to Improve Your Social Media Presence</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Job Hunting Technology job search networking resume selfie snapchat social media social network Wed, 14 Sep 2016 10:00:13 +0000 Kat Tretina 1792128 at http://www.wisebread.com Could Happy Hour Help You Better Manage Debt? http://www.wisebread.com/could-happy-hour-help-you-better-manage-debt <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/could-happy-hour-help-you-better-manage-debt" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/friends_drinking_together_73973511.jpg" alt="Friends learning if happy hour can help them manage debt" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Millennial-focused lender <a href="https://sofi.com/wisebread">SoFi</a> offers its members a long list of crazy perks. Should traditional lenders &mdash; and borrowers &mdash; take note?</p> <p>First off, it's important to understand that social hour is in SoFi's DNA. After all, the alternative lender's name is shorthand for &quot;social finance.&quot;</p> <p>Next, consider the company's short history. Upon launching in 2011 as a start-up student loan lender for Stanford grads, SoFi has massively grown in popularity. Ditching the Stanford niche, SoFi now accepts borrowers from a much larger, but still exclusive, list of accredited colleges. Of course, SoFi's member's-only vibe is not for nothing.</p> <h2>SoFi's Secret Social Formula</h2> <p>In curating a group of educated borrowers with vetted incomes and credit scores, SoFi's 150,000 members actually have quite a bit in common with one another socially. SoFi knows this and capitalizes on it. The lender's series of free <a href="http://money.cnn.com/2016/07/18/pf/sofi-student-loan-refinancing/index.html?iid=SF_River">happy hours, cooking classes, and brewery tours</a> are highly attended and often booked solid by members. And that's because if you are a SoFi member, chances are pretty good that you'll get along, or at least find common ground, with other SoFi members. While attending a SoFi social event, you might even strike up a beautiful new friendship &mdash; or score a date. (You guessed it: There's a SoFi matchmaking app in the making.)</p> <p>Now, think about the last time you visited a traditional, brick-and-mortar bank. Would you want to dine under the stars with the folks you encountered in there? No, probably not.</p> <p>Of course, SoFi's social events calendar has more to offer than fancy cocktails. Piggybacking off Millennials' comfort and familiarity with social networking, SoFi taps into borrowers' alumni networks, connecting them to investors from the same alma mater. It's sort of like banking meets LinkedIn. SoFi makes borrowing personal, which is why not only its happy hours, but also its opportunities for career advising, networking, and entrepreneurial support are so well-received by members. For the most part, SoFi borrowers are young, responsible, and successful. And those are exactly the type of people the typical SoFi borrower wants to share company with and take advice from.</p> <h2>A Revolution in Banking?</h2> <p>That's all well and good, but why should traditional banks take interest?</p> <p>Well, for one thing, SoFi isn't playing social events chair solely for the fun of it. By engaging members in fun and beneficial activities, SoFi is boosting members' camaraderie amongst each other. This also boosts members' feelings of connectedness and loyalty to the SoFi brand. And that loyalty directly translates into cash. The more connected and loyal a SoFi member feels toward SoFi itself and other SoFi members, the greater the odds that the member will fulfill his or her financial duty to pay loans back in a timely manner.</p> <p>Turns out it's true: SoFi borrowers tend to pay off their loans quickly, and in many cases they are pre-paying more than the monthly minimum. And it makes sense: We're much more likely to pay back our friends than we are to make good on our debts to a giant corporation without a face. All of the career coaching and networking that SoFi provides is also a help to the company's bottom line. It's in SoFi's best interest that its membership is well-employed. And this is where traditional banks might want to take a lesson.</p> <p>Indeed, Goldman Sachs already has taken a lesson. The 147-year-old investment bank is preparing to launch its own online peer-to-peer lending platform. While a few traditional banks, such as JP Morgan Chase, have announced partnerships with peer-to-peer lenders, Goldman is the first bank to attempt to <a href="http://www.lendacademy.com/goldman-sachs-is-entering-p2p-lending-first-bank-to-launch-a-platform/">build its own online lending platform</a> from the ground up. It's an indication that even the biggest of banks knows that the future of lending is mobile and more personal.</p> <p>But only time will tell if banks will begin launching happy hour clubs.&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Would you drop your stodgy bank for a younger, hipper lender?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/brittany-lyte">Brittany Lyte</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/could-happy-hour-help-you-better-manage-debt">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-financial-differences-between-millennials-and-the-next-generation">7 Financial Differences Between Millennials and the Next Generation</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-unique-ways-millennials-are-dealing-with-student-loan-debt">7 Unique Ways Millennials Are Dealing With Student Loan Debt</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-money-moves-to-make-before-moving-out-on-your-own">5 Money Moves to Make Before Moving Out on Your Own</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/3-smart-ways-young-millionaires-manage-their-money">3 Smart Ways Young Millionaires Manage Their Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-millennials-have-changed-money-so-far">6 Ways Millennials Have Changed Money (So Far)</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance events happy hour millennials networking online lenders peer to peer social sofi Tue, 23 Aug 2016 10:30:17 +0000 Brittany Lyte 1775944 at http://www.wisebread.com 4 Ways Coworking Spaces Are Worth It http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-coworking-spaces-are-worth-it <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/4-ways-coworking-spaces-are-worth-it" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/000066179939.jpg" alt="" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Shared office spaces, aka coworking spaces, are currently revolutionizing the classic workday. A plethora of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/coworking-spaces-the-office-alternative">coworking spaces</a> have sprouted up in urban centers since the start of the global economic crisis in 2007-2012. You may have heard of them: WeWork, Regus, LiquidSpace; all are shared office spaces that claim to foster the enrichment of freelancers, start-ups, remote teams, and SMBs (small and midsize businesses). And they're not only growing in popularity because they're more affordable than traditional office space, but also because of the multitude of services and perks they offer, like free Wi-Fi, game rooms, networking events, courses, and more.</p> <p>According to a 2015 <a href="http://officeslicecoworking.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/GCUC-2015-Coworking-by-the-Numbers.compressed-1.pdf">(GCUC) - Emergent Research Coworking Survey</a> by Office Nomads in Seattle, Washington, coworking spaces had a direct impact on the emotional health and personal success of employees. Here's what a coworking space can do for you.</p> <h2>Boost of Confidence And Well-Being</h2> <p>An overwhelming number of survey respondents reported a boost of confidence and emotional well-being.</p> <ul> <li>89% reported they were happier</li> <li>83% reported they were less lonely</li> <li>78% reported that co-working helped keep them &quot;sane&quot;</li> </ul> <h2>Professional and Social Networking Opportunities</h2> <p>The benefits of coworking spaces can include a support group and reach beyond professional networks and can have a positive impact on its members' social lives.</p> <ul> <li>87% report they met other members for social reasons<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>54% met other members for social reasons after work and on weekends<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>33% met other members for social reasons during work hours<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>82% said coworking had expanded their professional networks<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>67% reported they attended events at their coworking space occasionally (45%), or often (21%); while only 4% said they never attend events</li> </ul> <h2>Creative Environment and Increased Productivity</h2> <p>Working in close proximity to others who are entrepreneurial-minded will likely increase your workflow and could help secure new job opportunities.</p> <ul> <li>84% said they were more engaged and motivated when coworking<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>67% said coworking improved their professional success</li> </ul> <ul> <li>69% said they felt more successful since joining a coworking space</li> </ul> <ul> <li>64% of the respondents said their coworking networking was a very important (26%) or a moderately important source of work (38%)</li> </ul> <h2>Personal Growth Opportunities</h2> <p>Coworking aims to foster growth. Many feature enrichment opportunities that include guest speakers, business courses, discounts on professional associations, and other services.</p> <ul> <li>69% reported they learned new skills</li> </ul> <ul> <li>68% reported they improved their existing skill set</li> </ul> <ul> <li>80% said they turn to other coworking members for help, guidance, or to find or source work</li> </ul> <p>You'll also be happy to know that packages are suitable to any budget. Virtual plans that include a business address, mail handling, and virtual assistant start around $45 per month. One-person designated desk space goes for about $350 per month. Customized solutions can be designed for SMBs with one to 100 employees. Additional benefits of shared space include: front door directory listings, front desk receptionist to meet and greet visitors, conference rooms, full kitchens and, best of all; flexible lease terms.</p> <p><em>Have you tried a coworking space? Share your experience below!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/qiana-chavaia">Qiana Chavaia</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-coworking-spaces-are-worth-it">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-simple-networking-tricks">15 Simple Networking Tricks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-10-best-networking-tips-for-people-under-40">The 10 Best Networking Tips for People Under 40</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-tips-for-better-workplace-body-language">7 Tips for Better Workplace Body Language</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/25-career-changes-you-can-make-today">25 Career Changes You Can Make Today</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-ways-a-professional-association-can-boost-your-career">11 Ways a Professional Association Can Boost Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building coworking space networking Office shared office space Tue, 08 Dec 2015 10:00:39 +0000 Qiana Chavaia 1618562 at http://www.wisebread.com 10 Social Blunders to Stop Making by 30 http://www.wisebread.com/10-social-blunders-to-stop-making-by-30 <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/10-social-blunders-to-stop-making-by-30" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_scratching_head_000037863184.jpg" alt="Woman learning social blunders to stop making by 30" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>There are things we get away with in our 20s &mdash; like dancing on bar tops and bingeing on 4:00 a.m. pizza (or maybe that was just me) &mdash; that just aren't acceptable in our 30s. What are they? Take a look at these 10 social <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-life-mistakes-you-need-to-stop-making-by-30">mistakes to stop making by age 30</a>. Leave some of your own suggestions in the comments below!</p> <h2>1. Engaging in Petty Arguments With Friends and Family</h2> <p>Bottom line &mdash; you're grown, and under no circumstance should you engage in petty arguments with your friends or family. You're better than that. Stay above that fray, and don't let negativity drag you down. If need be, eliminate people who aren't bringing out the best in you.</p> <h2>2. Dating (and Sleeping With) Tons of People</h2> <p>While exploring relationships, dating, and hooking up frequently in your 20s is acceptable (and necessary, in my opinion, as long as it's done safely), it's not a good look in your 30s. That's not to say that you have to be settled down &mdash; that's your prerogative &mdash; but you should at least be <em>slowed</em> down, lest you want to earn a reputation that's hard to live down and quite unbecoming of a person your age.</p> <p>Slowly back away from the Tinder and nobody will get hurt.</p> <h2>3. Making Bad Impulse Decisions</h2> <p>Remember those baller weekends when you'd go out with your buddies, drop a few Benjies on booze and other nighttime fun, and wake up 12 hours later just in time to rinse and repeat? Yeeeah. Those days are over, pal. But not just because at age 30 you should be more mature and less apt to engage in such activities. Rather, because when you're in your 30s, you've established a professional and hopefully successful life. You've got much more to lose by making stupid decisions.</p> <h2>4. Publishing Detrimental Posts to Social Media</h2> <p>I know you've heard this one before &mdash; how under no circumstances you should be posting drunk pics or publishing offensive posts to social media &mdash; yet so many people still do it, much to their future selves' dismay. This kind of social media activity isn't just immature &mdash; it can make you look unstable, and subsequently unhireable, if you're not careful.</p> <p>Jobvite recently conducted a study and found that 93% percent of recruiters <a href="http://www.brazencareerist.com/blog/2014/11/17/use-social-media-impress-employers-land-job/">check the social media profiles</a> of prospective hires. It goes without saying that employees should be careful what they post to their social networks &mdash; especially when it comes to photos and comments that could serve as a red flag to potential employers.</p> <h2>5. Letting Your Parents Pay for Dinner</h2> <p>Mom and Dad picked up the tab for 18 years, bought your groceries and took you to dinner frequently during college, and likely gave a helping hand here and there a few years post-college too. Now it's time to give thanks &mdash; with your wallet.</p> <h2>6. Being Systematically Rude and Ill-Mannered</h2> <p>It's not hard being nice or polite, yet a decent portion of the population can't seem to master those skills. Stay ahead of the class by saying please and thank you, holding the door open for strangers, showing up to parties with a gift for the host, sending a note of thanks for a gift you've received, and otherwise greeting people with a smile to acknowledge that they exist. Because it's, like, literally the least we can do.</p> <h2>7. Living at Home With Mom and Dad</h2> <p>Okay, so you needed a little more time out of college to get on your feet. That's acceptable. What's not acceptable is living in your parents' house in your 30s. That's not a result of circumstance, like when you couldn't find a job because you didn't have enough experience. It's a result of laziness at this age, and if you were my kid you'd be homeless.</p> <h2>8. Asking Someone You Just Met to Keep Repeating Their Name</h2> <p>Admittedly this is something I need to teach myself. Even when I've asked the person their name twice, it's still hard for me to remember. Consider me a work in progress.</p> <p>One tactic I try to use is saying the person's name out loud several times to drill it into my brain. Works most of the time. When I don't have a glass of wine in my hand.</p> <h2>9. Forgetting to Follow-Up</h2> <p>An extension of adopting a generally polite and mannered demeanor, extending your appreciation post-event is important. More than anything else, it shows that you care and that you're considerate, and in many circumstances that will make you a standout.</p> <h2>10. Submitting to Peer Pressure and Pack Mentality</h2> <p>Given our carefree and often reckless attitudes in our 20s, it's easy to give into peer pressure &mdash; especially if you're trying to fit into a certain group &mdash; and subscribe to a pack mentality, which for many of us was established in high school and college as a result of athletics and other extracurriculars. But in your 30s, you really ought to be your own person, free thinking and independent. It doesn't mean you have to abandon your friends altogether, but you certainly shouldn't be reliant on them so much socially that you can't do anything without them.</p> <p>&quot;Starting in early childhood and continuing throughout the lifespan, we, as humans, are almost programmed to look to others for an identity or at least some ideas on how to interact with and function in the world,&quot; says<a href="http://blogs.psychcentral.com/caregivers"> child and adolescent therapist</a> Támara Hill. &quot;Sadly, many 20-somethings struggle with identity and often look to other youths for 'inspiration' on how to be.&quot;</p> <p>Studies show, however, that by the time we adults reach age 30, we should have developed some idea of who we are, how we want to present ourselves to the world, and what goals we would like to achieve.</p> <p>&quot;Research suggests that the adult brain reaches full development by the age of 25,&quot; Hill continues. &quot;It is more likely that by age 25, young adults are more capable of approaching the world from a more adult perspective. Our prefrontal cortex &mdash; the area of the brain that controls impulses, decision making, personality, planning, and a host of other significant skills and characteristics &mdash; is more fully developed by age 25. By 30, adults should be more capable of separating from the 'pack' and creating their own identity and life goals.&quot;</p> <p><em>What other social mistakes do we need to stop making by age 30?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/mikey-rox">Mikey Rox</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-social-blunders-to-stop-making-by-30">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-easy-ways-to-clean-up-your-image-on-social-media">7 Easy Ways to Clean Up Your Image on Social Media</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-to-stop-doing-on-social-media-by-30">10 Things to Stop Doing on Social Media by 30</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-things-successful-30-somethings-do">9 Things Successful 30-Somethings Do</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-money-goals-all-30-somethings-should-have">10 Money Goals All 30-Somethings Should Have</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-high-end-electronics-with-one-simple-question">How to Get High-End Electronics with One Simple Question</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Life Hacks 30 year olds 30-somethings millennials networking peer pressure professionalism social media social skills Wed, 30 Sep 2015 17:00:43 +0000 Mikey Rox 1570365 at http://www.wisebread.com 7 Things You Should Never Do on LinkedIn http://www.wisebread.com/7-things-you-should-never-do-on-linkedin <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/7-things-you-should-never-do-on-linkedin" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/linkedin_000038175350.jpg" alt="Learning things you should never do on LinkedIn" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>How dialed in is your LinkedIn profile? As the world's most successful social business network (at last count, the site had 380 million members across more than 200 countries and territories), LinkedIn has become synonymous with online career-building. And with such a mind-boggling reach, it's worth making sure you're not <em>locked out</em>. Here are seven things you should never do on LinkedIn.</p> <h2>1. Confuse It With Facebook</h2> <p>The distinctions are obvious to most, but some lump all social media tools together in a bucket marked &quot;anything goes.&quot; Don't be one of these people.</p> <p>LinkedIn connections, messages, and posts should be reserved for building your professional network, joining groups of people who share your interests, expanding your career skills and knowledge, and learning about new work opportunities. Don't use it for a casual social interaction, posting office party selfies, or anything else that might turn a potential employer off.</p> <h2>2. Send a Standard Connection Request</h2> <p>If you're interested enough to make a connection on LinkedIn, take a moment to do it with a personal message. Remember, be professional and polite. If you've met, remind the person of your affiliation; if not, briefly explain your interest in connecting.</p> <h2>3. Pick the Wrong Pic</h2> <p>A great photo is an important way to <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/get-your-linkedin-profile-noticed-with-a-few-attention-grabbing-tweaks">get your LinkedIn profile noticed</a>. But skip the one that includes your husband, your kids, your friends, or the family pet. Also, make sure the photo is clear, professional, and relatively recent (no vintage glamour shots, please).</p> <h2>4. Write Wrong</h2> <p>LinkedIn is a continuous online snapshot of who you are professionally. And just as there's an art to <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-write-a-resume-12-steps-to-your-next-job">writing a great resume</a>, there's an art to crafting great content on LinkedIn. Even though it's a social media site, grammatical errors on LinkedIn can immediately cast you in bad light. Proofread every word you write; even quick status updates and link introductions should be polished and perfect.</p> <h2>5. Solicit Recommendations</h2> <p>Soliciting recommendations from previous employers and co-workers is tricky. First of all, never overwhelm new connections with a recommendation request right away. Second, don't spam your entire network with requests. Be tactical and tactful; only reach out to those with whom you have (or have had) a strong professional relationship. And keep in mind, people are more likely to respond to requests that are simple and easy. Explain the specific skill sets you're hoping to emphasize on LinkedIn and then politely request a recommendation &mdash; once and only once.</p> <h2>6. Ignore Your Privacy Settings</h2> <p>Privacy on a professional networking site is an essential feature for obvious reasons. If you're currently employed, but actively looking for your next opportunity, you'll naturally want to maintain a certain level of discretion. If you're engaged in a job search, customize your privacy settings so your boss can't see what you're up to. You can find LinkedIn's privacy options by scrolling over the small version of your profile photo in the upper right hand of the homepage. Navigate to &quot;Privacy &amp; Settings&quot; and make the necessary adjustments.</p> <h2>7. Be Passive</h2> <p>Active users make LinkedIn a vibrant community and a valuable tool. Be part of it by updating your status a couple of times each week. Updates on promotions and professional pursuits or links to events keep things fresh and gives potential employers a reason to reach out to you. Joining groups, sharing articles, and growing your network are other important ways to show you're more than just a lurker.</p> <p>Today, learning to use social media effectively is a big part of professional <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/networking-basics-for-regular-people">networking basics</a>. With some time, attention, and discipline, LinkedIn can become a powerful career-building tool&hellip; just as long as you don't post those glamour shots.</p> <p><em>Have you found a job through a LinkedIn connection? What tips do you have for other LinkedIn users?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/kentin-waits">Kentin Waits</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-things-you-should-never-do-on-linkedin">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/13-ways-to-use-social-media-in-business">13 Ways to Use Social Media in Business</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-someone-to-accept-your-linkedin-invitation">How to Get Someone to Accept Your LinkedIn Invitation</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/flashback-friday-34-smart-ways-to-improve-your-social-media-presence">Flashback Friday: 34 Smart Ways to Improve Your Social Media Presence</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-ways-freelancers-and-telecommuters-can-make-friends-and-network">11 Ways Freelancers and Telecommuters Can Make Friends and Network</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-online-tools-to-help-you-land-a-job">5 Online Tools to Help You Land a Job</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building business connections Internet LinkedIn networking resumes social media Mon, 28 Sep 2015 09:00:32 +0000 Kentin Waits 1568938 at http://www.wisebread.com 9 Skills That Will Be Obsolete Soon http://www.wisebread.com/9-skills-that-will-be-obsolete-soon <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/9-skills-that-will-be-obsolete-soon" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/women_reading_map_000020985087.jpg" alt="Women using skill that will soon become obsolete" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>As technology evolves, certain careers are replaced with new ones. For instance, children used to be employed as pinsetters in bowling alleys; the automated pin-setting machine made that job vanish pretty quickly. Before alarm clocks, &quot;knocker uppers&quot; would walk the streets tapping on windows to get people out of bed. And at night, lamplighters would walk around igniting gas-fueled street lamps.</p> <p>But beyond jobs, certain <em>skills</em> also get replaced as technology moves ever forward. So what are some modern skills that will <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-life-skills-that-are-now-completely-obsolete">soon be rendered obsolete</a>? Here are nine that are quickly becoming extinct.</p> <h2>1. A Sense of Direction</h2> <p>Two words &mdash; Google Maps. You may be able to navigate around your city like a cab driver around the streets of London, but who cares? With the maps app on your phone, you can get to anywhere you want. There are no wrong turns, no dead ends, and no traffic delays. Everything is synced up to GPS, and you can be a complete newbie to the town or city you're in, and still get where you're going like you've lived there for 50 years. This is great news for people like me, who continue to get lost on the way to work.</p> <h2>2. Parallel Parking</h2> <p>Some people are really good at it. Most of us are okay. Some are terrible. You may be one of those people that brags about your parallel parking skills, but soon you'll be impressing no one. Many higher-end vehicles already come with park assist, but as technology gets less expensive, it migrates to other cars, and is currently available as an option on the Toyota Prius and the Ford Focus. Yes&hellip; the Ford Focus. Give it a few years, and every car will be a perfect parallel parker. And driving itself, when that gets replaced by driverless cars, could also become a skill of the past.</p> <h2>3. Flirting</h2> <p>Really!? Well, perhaps not entirely. There will always be the need to do the dance, using body language, eye contact, all of that. But these days, online dating apps like Tinder, OK Cupid, Plenty Of Fish, and many more, are taking a lot of the hard work out of meeting people in bars and clubs. After all, why risk the rejection when you have a guaranteed date waiting? And not only that, but a date you know a whole lot about, including likes, dislikes, pets, and anything else you want to look up. There are guidebooks out there telling guys how to pick up women, and they are starting to lose their appeal. Quickly.</p> <h2>4. Cursive Writing</h2> <p>Although it is still being taught in schools, cursive writing is rarely used outside of the classroom. Think about it&hellip; when was the last time you wrote anything in cursive? In fact, when was the last time you wrote anything by hand, other than a quick shopping list or note letting someone know you'd be back in 10 minutes? Technology has eliminated the need for cursive writing; we use a keyboard for almost everything, and not just reports, emails, and other documents. From online diaries and blogs, to notepads on smartphones and tablets, keyboards are making cursive go the way of the dodo.</p> <h2>5. Mental Arithmetic</h2> <p>So, this is not discounting the work of mathematicians and scientists; those skills will always be needed by society. However, for most of us, the ability to do calculations in our heads is quickly becoming a task we'd much rather do on our phones. We have this computer on us almost everywhere we go, so why bother crunching the numbers ourselves when a calculator app can do it in half the time, and with certainty? Lazy it may be, but we always take the path of least resistance.</p> <h2>6. Memorization</h2> <p>As with mental arithmetic, having a great memory (which is a learnable skill, by the way) is also becoming obsolete thanks to smartphones. It is very rare to be with a bunch of friends and have that &quot;Oh&hellip; what was the name of that actor who was in that movie?&quot; kinda question get answered with a chorus of &quot;Hang on, I know this one.&quot; Instead, we pull it up on IMDB. The same goes for anything that requires looking into the archives of our minds, from phone numbers and addresses, to recipes and birthdays. It's all available to us at the touch of a button.</p> <h2>7. Spelling</h2> <p>Pretty soon, the only use for being an excellent speller will be to win a spelling bee. It doesn't matter if you cannot spell even the simplest words, your phones and computers have spell checking built into almost everything you use. It's not just in Microsoft Word, but emails, messaging apps, and even design programs. Just look for the little red wavy line, and voila, click to correct. You may be able to spell floccinaucinihilipilification after seven pints of foaming ale, but it's not going to be a skill you need in everyday life.</p> <h2>8. Physical Networking</h2> <p>Remember the days when you had to attend functions, meeting people in your field in order to increase your circle of business colleagues? Well, these days you can do it all over the Internet. Sites like LinkedIn, Monster, Indeed and many others are making it very easy to reach out and find new jobs, or careers. And if you need to hire a professional, you've got millions of people just a click away. There will always be company functions, but that handshake, smile, and charm won't be needed anymore. You can do it all while you're sitting at your desk, or at home while you're watching the game.</p> <h2>9. Filing Hard Copies</h2> <p>There was a real art to filing information, and if you were good at it, you made your own life (and that of your employer) much easier. These days, it can almost all be done on a computer, using filing software that does all the hard work for you. Yes, you may be required to keep hard files on occasion, but even that is being replaced by digital copies. Pretty soon, filing cabinets will be in a museum right next to buggy whips and PDAs.</p> <p><em>What common skills do you see becoming obsolete soon?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-skills-that-will-be-obsolete-soon">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/these-5-apps-can-fix-your-finances">These 5 Apps Can Fix Your Finances</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-back-to-school-iphone-apps">10 Back-to-School iPhone Apps</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-ways-freelancers-and-telecommuters-can-make-friends-and-network">11 Ways Freelancers and Telecommuters Can Make Friends and Network</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-modern-life-skills-everyone-should-master">15 Modern Life Skills Everyone Should Master</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-11-best-parking-apps-for-your-city">The 11 Best Parking Apps for Your City</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Lifestyle Productivity Technology apps Dating maps math networking obsolete skills parallel parking Wed, 12 Aug 2015 11:00:18 +0000 Paul Michael 1515687 at http://www.wisebread.com The 10 Best Networking Tips for People Under 40 http://www.wisebread.com/the-10-best-networking-tips-for-people-under-40 <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/the-10-best-networking-tips-for-people-under-40" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_shaking_hands_000019330601.jpg" alt="Woman learning best networking tips for pros under 40" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>If you want to get ahead in this world, you have to network. Networking helps build confidence, connects you with like-minded professionals, and, if all goes well, networking can help improve your business's bottom line. But are you doing the best you can do as a mover and shaker? Take a look at these <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-great-ways-to-network-that-dont-feel-sleazy">networking tips</a> for pros under age 40 and then add some of your own in the comments below.</p> <h2>1. Muster up the Confidence to Go it Alone</h2> <p>There's always safety in numbers of course, but one of the big problems with going to a networking event with a friend or coworker is that you'll tend to stick together instead of branching off on your own, thereby limiting your exposure to other networkers. Instead, think of networking like those times when your teacher told you to partner up with someone you didn't know so well. There was a reason behind that &mdash; so you wouldn't dilly-dally with your BFF, and instead give you a chance to make a new friend. Networking is just like that, but all grown-up. And since you're an adult, be an adult about it &mdash; try going to the networking event alone and see what happens.</p> <p>&quot;Some of the most beneficial and lasting networking I've done has tended to share one common theme: I've been on my own at the conference or event,&quot; says Jaime Netzer, content editor of <a href="https://www.thezebra.com/">The Zebra</a>. &quot;So often, I'll get introductions via coworkers, or head to industry-type events with friends. But if you can push yourself to go alone &mdash; and can handle those first few moments of feeling awkward and trying to figure out what to do with your hands &mdash; you'll find that they're totally worth it.&quot;</p> <h2>2. Pay Attention to the Younger Generation</h2> <p>I daresay that early on I was a victim to thinking very narrowly and only wanting to make contacts with people who were already in high places &mdash; while completely disregarding those who were on their way but not quite there yet. It's a common networking faux pas that will not only limit your professional potential, but could also make you come off like a jerk.</p> <p>Dani Pascarella, 27-year-old founder and CEO of millennial personal finance and career site<a href="http://www.invibed.com"> Invibed</a>, reminds us to show some love to the little people.</p> <p>&quot;Invite new analysts to coffee and give them advice. Help college students get their foot in the door at your company. Be a mentor. Do whatever you can to help others,&quot; she says. &quot;Most people ignore younger talent and focus on networking with really senior people. But I can't tell you how many of the people I helped early in their careers that went on to be wildly successful. And those people were always willing to help me any way they could because I helped them early on, when most others were ignoring them.&quot;</p> <h2>3. Don't Be Afraid to Ask for a Meeting</h2> <p>Do you want a meeting with an influencer, someone with whom you think it would be beneficial (hopefully mutually) to be connected? Make the first move. As my mother always told me, the worst thing they can say is &quot;no,&quot; but you won't know until you ask.</p> <p>&quot;Don't ever be afraid to ask someone to meet you for a coffee &mdash; I don't care how important you think they are,&quot; Pascarella says. &quot;If you don't ask, you'll never get the opportunity. If you ask, at least you have a shot. And don't take things personally if they say 'no.' There are three types of people in the world of networking: people who love it, people who don't, and people who only participate if there's something in it for them. Each person's attitude towards networking plays a much larger role in whether they agree to meet with you than anything you could have said or done.&quot;</p> <p>On the flip side, Ryan Modesto, managing partner at investment research firm 5i Research, suggests accepting any and all invitations from other professionals to meet. Because, well, you don't like to be told &quot;no,&quot; do you? Neither do they.</p> <p>&quot;You never know where a contact/connection may lead, so if you have a chance to do a coffee with someone more established, take it,&quot; he says. &quot;Even if they can't help you directly, they may be able to pass you on to someone else who can help. This includes family, friends, friends of friends, etc.&quot;</p> <h2>4. Just Don't Ask for the Other Person's Help Too Soon</h2> <p>At this point you've got several meetings set up and you're excited. SO many opportunities on the horizon. While you might be chomping at the bit to turn these connections into something more substantial &mdash; like a profit &mdash; don't jump the gun. Nobody, in business or otherwise, likes to feel used. Let the relationship develop deeper and organically take its course. Push too soon and you could start to earn a reputation that will only work against you.</p> <p>&quot;Networking is not about you; it's about finding out about the other person, perhaps even uncovering what you can do for them,&quot; motivational speaker Barry Maher says. &quot;It's about building some sort of relationship &mdash; even if it's a quick and very short-term relationship &mdash; before trying to find out what they might be able to do for you. Without that relationship, you're not networking; you're cold calling, and there's no more reason for that person to help you than any other stranger they might come across on the street.&quot;</p> <h2>5. Remember to Share, Not Sell</h2> <p>This sort of goes hand-in-hand with not asking for your new contact's help too soon, so remember that this relationship you're building is supposed to be one of mutual benefit. Avoid allowing it to teeter too far to your side by keeping a focus on sharing aspects of your career opposed to selling them. There's a difference &mdash; one of them is genuine; the other isn't.</p> <p>&quot;For anyone networking, I suggest not being too pushy. Share; don't sell,&quot; says media relations and social media specialist Christina Nicholson. We all have our personal reasons for networking, but we cannot focus on those reasons entirely. Don't act like a stereotypical used car salesman. Instead, be professional, but personal too.&quot;</p> <h2>6. Try Your Hand at &quot;Sweatworking&quot;</h2> <p>Personally, I've been on social sports teams for nearly a decade &mdash; kickball, dodgeball, bowling, trivia, and more &mdash; and I highly recommend these activities to help build your contact base. But keep in mind that the main focus is not professional networking &mdash; unless it's a business team, of course &mdash; so don't make it such. Rest assured, however, that over the weeks of play you'll inevitably talk about what you do as a career and sometimes there's a synergy that comes out of it.</p> <p>Career and life coach Jenn DeWall agrees.</p> <p>&quot;Take networking from the bar to the outdoors or a gym,&quot; she says. &quot;By doing a physical activity or shared experience you can help create more meaningful relationships. The shared experience can also break the ice helping conversations smooth more easily, which can build confidence for both extroverts and introverts. For Millennials, this is especially effective as it reduces perceived too pushy or formal networking atmospheres that they feel they are not able to truly be themselves or authentic..&quot;</p> <h2>7. Wear an Article of Clothing That's Memorable</h2> <p>Another one of my favorite &mdash; and very easy &mdash; networking tactics is to wear clothing that makes an impression. (A good impression, of course. Don't show up looking like a clown, please.) When done well, your standout article of clothing is an icebreaker and a confidence booster simultaneously.</p> <p>Jenna Elkins is a media relations coordinator for TechnologyAdvice, and she's familiar with this strategy.</p> <p>&quot;Don't over do it by wearing something bright head-to-toe,&quot; she says, &quot;but instead wear something small like bright shoes or a unique scarf. This is a great way for people to notice you and start small talk by mentioning your article of clothing.&quot;</p> <p>While Jenna's advice applies to women, career expert Allan Ageman didn't forget about all you dapper gents out there.</p> <p>&quot;It can be difficult to keep track of all the people you meet at a networking event, and as important as it is for you to remember you new acquaintances, it's equally important that they remember you,&quot; he says. &quot;Wear something identifiable but still professional, such as a brightly colored blouse or polka dot bow tie.&quot;</p> <h2>8. Sit Near the Bar if You Lack the Confidence to Approach Others</h2> <p>This advice to stake a claim near the bar doesn't mean that you should start throwing back cold ones like it's Super Bowl Sunday. Order one drink, stand there, and <em>sip</em> on it. This tactic is to help those of you who aren't outwardly confident enough to approach strangers by taking a passive approach to networking and letting the conversation come to you.</p> <p>Elkins explains how this works more in depth.</p> <p>&quot;Generally, if someone wants to be excused from the person they are networking with, many times the bar is a place many people head to when wanting to switch it up a bit,&quot; she says. &quot;One way to strike up a conversation with the networkers who visit the bar is by simply introducing yourself. Most of the time people spend a few minutes waiting for their drink, so this is a great time to make small talk that could turn into a longer conversation. Just don't stay at the bar for too long &mdash; you don't want to give people the wrong impression.&quot;</p> <h2>9. Try Pre-Networking to Break Down a Few Barriers</h2> <p>Another tactic that can help ease the awkwardness of approaching and meeting strangers at an event is to establish contact beforehand. Social media gives you all the tools to do this in order to make the actual event more comfortable &mdash; and give you an edge up on other networkers.</p> <p>&quot;Still not feeling confident?&quot; Ageman asks. &quot;Check out the Facebook group or online event page to see who else will be attending. Try looking them up on LinkedIn and connecting with them prior to the event. Having a short conversation with people beforehand can make you feel more confident at the event.&quot;</p> <h2>10. Always, Always, Always Follow Up</h2> <p>And finally, let's not forget our post-networking manners. If you've met someone &mdash; doesn't matter who they are or what they do &mdash; it's wise to follow up afterward with a quick &quot;Nice to meet you!&quot;' memo via email. You'll solidify your status as a consummate professional via this practice, and the recipients will remember you more than most of the other dozen or so people with whom they may have chatted the day before. One chat near the bar does not a business relationship make. You have to cultivate the relationship, and a message about what a pleasure it was to meet a person is the perfect way to continue.</p> <p><em>Do you have other networking tactics for pros under age 40 that you'd like to recommend? Let us know in the comments below.</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/mikey-rox">Mikey Rox</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-10-best-networking-tips-for-people-under-40">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-simple-networking-tricks">15 Simple Networking Tricks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/25-career-changes-you-can-make-today">25 Career Changes You Can Make Today</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-ways-a-professional-association-can-boost-your-career">11 Ways a Professional Association Can Boost Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-bad-networking-habits-that-will-kill-your-job-prospects">15 Bad Networking Habits That Will Kill Your Job Prospects</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-career-advice-sites-you-should-know-about">15 Career Advice Sites You Should Know About</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building contacts making connections networking new people professionals Fri, 24 Jul 2015 11:00:11 +0000 Mikey Rox 1495080 at http://www.wisebread.com 10 Times at Work You're Just Wasting Effort http://www.wisebread.com/10-times-at-work-youre-just-wasting-effort <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/10-times-at-work-youre-just-wasting-effort" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/businessman-working-late-Dollarphotoclub_44503005.jpg" alt="businessman working late" title="businessman working late" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Americans work hard. Very hard. About 1,800 hours a year, no guarantee of vacation time hard. And some of that, unfortunately, is just spinning the wheels. Here are 10 times when we're simply wasting effort at work.</p> <h2>1. Working Very Late or Coming in Super Early</h2> <p>When I first started working in the advertising industry, several of the old guards told me &quot;Be the first one in, and the last one to leave.&quot; There's something to be said for that, especially in the days when you are young and hungry and looking for that first promotion. But those guys also added an addendum later on, and I never forgot it &mdash; &quot;Just make sure people notice the effort.&quot; If you're getting in at 6:00 a.m., and the next person doesn't arrive until 8:30 a.m., how much of that two and a half hours was necessary? If you stay two hours past the last person, who will know? If you have to do it to get some work done, fair enough. If you do it all the time to show your loyalty and work ethic, it's wasted effort.</p> <h2>2. Having Drawn Out E-mail/Text Conversations</h2> <p>It's astonishing that so many people in workplaces across America can go a whole day without actually physically talking to someone. It's all about e-mail, instant messaging, texting, and social media. The problem with all of those is that tone and mannerisms are lost. It can take many e-mail conversations to get across something that a simple five-minute phone call or face-to-face meeting could have cleared up. If the first few e-mails are not getting things done, pick up the phone or walk a few minutes to that person's office.</p> <h2>3. Setting Specific Meeting Durations</h2> <p>We have 15, 30, 45, and 60-minute meetings. Usually, it's the latter. There's some chitchat, a little passing of time until everyone gathers, and then there is that &quot;Hey, we still have 10 minutes, how's your dog doing?&quot; time. This is wasting time and effort for all involved. Get the meeting started, quickly, and get to the point. Rule out jokes and nonsense, and if the 30-minute meeting is over in 11 minutes and 32 seconds, end it and get on with your day. Remember, there are no one-hour meetings. There are at least two people in attendance, and every person in the company loses an hour. Make that time count.</p> <h2>4. Having Meetings Without Key People</h2> <p>Everyone in your company, be it a massive multinational corporation or a local business, knows who the right people are. They're the decision makers, the knowledgeable workers, or the people with the latest intelligence. If you are organizing a meeting without including these people, you are going to have to have another meeting. Yes, it's not always possible to include them, but if that means you're going to spend 45 minutes talking in circles, you should reconsider. Make these meetings smaller, or bring other action items to them. There is little point in spending an hour in a meeting only to have a puppet tell you they'll get back to you.</p> <h2>5. Working With Unclear Directives</h2> <p>When you begin a project, know exactly what it is that you are being asked to do. If you are in any doubt at all, you are about to begin hours, or days, of wasted effort. Unclear directives and fuzzy strategies lead to meetings that have people scratching their heads and asking for additional work. If the person asking for the work does not specifically know what they want, try and send them back to the drawing board to get more information. It isn't always easy, especially if that person is the boss, but if you point out that you will be wasting time and money without those facts, you should be fine.</p> <h2>6. Overwriting</h2> <p>There is a quote that many of you know. &quot;I have already made this paper too long, for which I must crave pardon, not having now time to make it shorter.&quot; That came from Benjamin Franklin in 1750, to the Royal Society of London. Basically, he apologized for the length of the letter, and if he had time, he'd have made it shorter. This is lost on many today. Some feel that quantity is better than quality. After all, who looks like they have spent more time on a report: someone who hands in a 10-page document, or a three-page document? But people have little time to read those 10 pages. It's wasted effort to keep bloviating about a subject for page after page. People won't read it. Cut it down.</p> <h2>7. Hiding the Truth From the Masses</h2> <p>Whether you are a small automotive chain in Colorado, or a massive company spanning the world, people will gossip. You do not want to add fuel to that fire by taking a lot of time and effort hiding things. The truth will eventually come out, and that wasted effort will result in a lot of gossiping and ill feeling. Be honest &mdash; it will save you in the long run.</p> <h2>8. Networking With the Powerless</h2> <p>We all know that a certain amount of our job revolves around dealing with other people. Whether they're in the same company or a different one, we have to find time to grease the wheels and make connections. However, be careful how much time you spend with people who really cannot do anything for you or your company. It may seem ruthless, but wining and dining the wrong people can be a complete waste of time and lead to some awkward silences. These people may tell you they have power, but it's easy to probe and find this out. Look at a company org chart, find out who has the bosses ear. You'll soon know the truth.</p> <h2>9. Working When You're Sick or Tired</h2> <p>It seems as though Americans don't like taking sick days when they're actually sick. Coming in to the office when you are a physical wreck may make you look like a glowing employee, but it's a waste of time and effort. You are not at your best. You are not thinking clearly. You are probably infecting other people. And, most likely, you'll be off the next day. The extra effort of driving in, trying to do your job, and driving home will take it out of you. And the work you did will most likely have to be redone. Don't waste that effort on being a golden employee.</p> <h2>10. Taking the Initiative Without Doing Your Research</h2> <p>Eager beavers are great employees&hellip; unless they dive into projects without first learning about a few basic facts. Recently, I heard of someone who spent five months developing a new app in his spare time, only to discover the company was scrapping the entire project. That guy would have saved a lot of time and heartache if he had simply done a little digging to see if the project had legs. So, do yourself a favor. By all means, take the initiative. But do not spend all that time without first knowing if that will be effort that could be rewarded, or wasted.</p> <p><em>What causes you to waste time and effort at work? Share your frustration in comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-times-at-work-youre-just-wasting-effort">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-to-deal-when-you-work-with-someone-you-hate">8 Ways to Deal When You Work With Someone You Hate</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-signs-youre-working-for-an-impossible-boss">7 Signs You&#039;re Working for an Impossible Boss</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-times-you-should-never-feel-guilty-at-work">8 Times You Should Never Feel Guilty at Work</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/jumpstart-your-job-search-with-instagram">Jumpstart Your Job Search With Instagram</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/you-got-a-raise-now-what">You Got a Raise! Now What?</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income meetings networking time sink time wasters work workday Mon, 02 Feb 2015 10:00:13 +0000 Paul Michael 1284261 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Ways It Pays to Be Friendly With Your Neighbors http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-it-pays-to-be-friendly-with-your-neighbors <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-ways-it-pays-to-be-friendly-with-your-neighbors" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/neighbors-E000352-small.jpg" alt="neighbors " title="neighbors" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Our communities just don't have the same bonds they used to. Think about it: Of all the people you've lived next door to, how many of their names do you know? (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-deal-with-a-rude-neighbor?ref=seealso">How to Deal With a Rude Neighbor</a>)</p> <p>This is a problem, given the tangible, material benefits of having neighbors you know better than, say, the receptionist at your dentist's office. Don't believe it? Then check out these six ways it pays to be friendly with your neighbors.</p> <h2>1. Splitting Chores</h2> <p>Some chores impact more than just one house in a neighborhood. For example, if you share a common driveway, you can all pitch in when it comes to repaving it. It's not just about communal chores, though. Doing small favors can encourage a mini sharing economy. Help your neighbor plant a garden, he helps you change the transmission on your car. Start saving a mint based on the things that you couldn't do yourself, but can do with a spare set of hands.</p> <h2>2. Sharing the Cost of Big Equipment</h2> <p>Just like there are some chores that are impossible alone, so are there pieces of big equipment one person might not want to buy, but a neighborhood can go in on together. Think of things like wood chippers, cherry pickers, or power washers. Particularly if you're not going to be using them a lot, the price can be cost prohibitive. However, once you start splitting the cost three or four ways, the investment starts making a lot more sense.</p> <h2>3. Splitting Entertainment Costs</h2> <p>Especially for the sports fan, the ability to split entertainment costs can be a big deal. Maybe you don't want to shell out for the next UFC fight, WWE pay-per-view, or a season of NFL game day on your own. However, with the help of a neighbor or two you can make the cost of an expensive paid cable event no more than a couple of lattes. What's more, you might also be able to get package deals on vacations if you all coordinate your time away from home. Once you get there you don't have to be joined at the hip, though hey &mdash; if you guys are close, why not?</p> <h2>4. Learning New Skills</h2> <p>Chances are good that you have skills your neighbor wants and vice versa. So why not go about trading those talents? Not only can you learn them without paying any money, you can also save money over the long run by applying the skills you learn. Maybe it's auto repair. Maybe it's bread baking. Maybe it's interior painting. Whatever it is, when you learn how to do things for yourself, you don't have to pay someone else to do it for you.</p> <h2>5. Tolerating Your Big Bash</h2> <p>Having a party? Making any amount of racket? Get ready for a noise complaint and the charges that come along with it. Making friends with your neighbors not only makes them a little more tolerant of things like watering your garden on the day that you're not supposed to, but it also makes them more likely to talk to you directly about the problem rather than going straight through more official channels. No one wants angry neighbors, but if you're going to have them they can be angry in the neighborly way or the expensive way.</p> <h2>6. Networking</h2> <p>Networking is more important than ever. Looking for the best plumber in town? Your neighbor might be a friend. Trying to find a marriage counselor? Maybe your neighbors recently got through a rough patch with the help of a family therapist. Is your nephew looking for his first job in publishing? Talk to your neighbors and see if they know anyone who can help. Knowing more people is always helpful, starting with the people who live just down the street.</p> <p><em>Are you neighborly with your neighbors? How has it paid off for you?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/nicholas-pell">Nicholas Pell</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-it-pays-to-be-friendly-with-your-neighbors">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/25-reasons-why-its-good-to-know-your-neighbors">25 Reasons Why It&#039;s Good to Know Your Neighbors</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-dont-people-share-more">Why don&#039;t people share more?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/cooking-for-beginners-10-recipes-for-kitchen-newbies">Cooking for Beginners: 10 Recipes for Kitchen Newbies</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/beginners-guide-to-finding-your-interior-design-style">Beginner&#039;s Guide to Finding Your Interior Design Style</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-best-10-items-to-borrow">The Best 10 Items to Borrow</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Home Lifestyle neighbors networking real estate sharing sharing economy Fri, 24 Oct 2014 17:00:05 +0000 Nicholas Pell 1241737 at http://www.wisebread.com Masters of Small Talk Never Do These 10 Things — Do You? http://www.wisebread.com/masters-of-small-talk-never-do-these-10-things-do-you <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/masters-of-small-talk-never-do-these-10-things-do-you" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/business-group-talking-160613541-small.jpg" alt="business people talking" title="business people talking" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Have you been in the situation of needing to make conversation with people you did not know well? Weddings, cocktail parties, and business conferences can be anxiety-provoking if you don't know how to make small talk. Although you may dread it, though, small talk can be a great thing. Chatting can make simple exchanges more pleasant; it can also start the beginning of a great conversation or even friendship. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-fun-practically-free-ways-to-make-new-friends?ref=seealso">10 Fun, Practically Free Ways to Make New Friends</a>)</p> <p>It is estimated that between 7% and 13% of humans suffer from <a href="http://www.anxietybc.com/resources/social.php">social anxiety</a>. What is there to talk about? What should you never bring up? What subjects are safe? Well to start, below are 10 things that small-talk masters know never to do.</p> <h2>1. They Don't Assume They Are Alone in Their Anxiety</h2> <p>It may seem like everyone in the room knows each other, but that's unlikely. I guarantee there are other people there who are as anxious as you are about social situations. Take a deep breath, square your shoulders, and smile. Take a moment to survey the situation and see if maybe there is somebody there that you do know. If not, no need for panic. It's just an event, and it will pass.</p> <p>My trick is to anticipate the worst and let the dread &quot;in;'&quot; nearly all the time, I end up enjoying myself.</p> <h2>2. They Never Forget to Introduce Themselves</h2> <p>Even if I do know someone at an event or party, I do not depend on them to introduce me to others. They may have forgotten my name, or how they know me, or whatever. Don't barge in on people in deep conversations, but if you see an opening, simply walk up and say, &quot;Hi! I'm Jane Smith&quot; and extend your hand for a handshake. If there are other people in the group, repeat the process.</p> <p>How to remember names? Repeat the name (&quot;Hi, Tom, it's really nice to meet you.&quot;). You might try a little trick to remember the name, like a song, or a nursery rhyme, that makes a word association for you. Once introductions are made, people will usually ask where you work, or how you know the bride or groom, or birthday person, or where you're from. The ball is then rolling.</p> <h2>3. They Never Forget to Introduce Someone Else</h2> <p>My friend Sylvia, a seasoned networker, makes the best introductions. They usually go something like this: &quot;Everyone, I would like you to meet John Smith. John has this awesome travel website and he is my travel guru! He also makes the world's best homemade bread.&quot; In her introduction, she gives people clues about things to ask John. She has also given him several compliments, which strengthens his self-confidence and make him smile.</p> <h2>4. They Never Have Bad Body Language</h2> <p>People are receptive to good body language. Take note of your posture, first of all. Are you slumping? Stand up straight. What are you doing with your hands? Do not cross your arms &mdash; that is defensive posture. Holding your hands together in front of you, or behind your back, are both &quot;open&quot; gestures. It may help you to have a drink to hold, if you are nervous. Try not to hold it in the hand you shake with, though, or you'll be shaking hands with a cold hand. Make eye contact, but don't stare. Engage. Smile. Listen. The world is full of talkers, but a good listener is hard to find. Nod your head, and ask the occasional question. Don't keep checking your cell phone. If you get a call, excuse yourself politely and take it.</p> <h2>5. They Never Discuss Religion</h2> <p>This was one of my mom's rules, and will serve you well. While it can be a very interesting subject, it is not a &quot;safe&quot; one in that you might easily offend someone you do not know well.</p> <h2>6. They Almost Never Discuss Politics</h2> <p>Another &quot;mom&quot; rule, and a harder one to avoid. But do, because this topic gets heated, quickly. This rule can go out the window if you are at a political fundraiser, because you are likely on the same page the other people, of course. Just tread carefully.</p> <h2>7. They Never Forget How to Use Openers</h2> <p>People who are good at small talk, I have noticed, are really good at asking questions, or &quot;openers.&quot; Use the information you glean from your first question to ask more questions.For instance, &quot;So when you went to Portland, did you go to Jake's Seafood?&quot; Or, &quot;What a beautiful scarf! Where did you buy it?&quot;</p> <p>Hopefully, the person you are conversing with will in turn ask you questions, which will keep the small talk going. Sometimes, the person you are trying to chat up is really reticent. Here is a trick: &quot;So before this event, what did you do, today?&quot; There is almost always some usable material in that response.</p> <h2>8. They Don't Forget to Expand the Circle</h2> <p>So, if a few moments ago, you were the &quot;odd man out,&quot; be aware of people who may be hovering and want to join in, too. Make eye contact, extend your arm for a handshake, and introduce yourself (and the others, if you can remember their names). After introductions, you may need to backtrack (&quot;We were just talking about where the best breweries are in this town&quot;) and give the newbie a chance to get involved. They will be grateful to you for your help.</p> <p>Also, in the world of small talk, It's bad form to stay and talk shop with one person the whole time. If someone is monopolizing you, it is perfectly fine to say something like, &quot;Well, Ben, my wife will shoot me if I don't get over there and visit with her great-aunt for a while. Good to see you.&quot;</p> <h2>9. They Don't Go Into Small Talk Unprepared</h2> <p>Unless you are having pretty dramatic weather, I wouldn't lead with that. For a conference or company event, do some homework and have some relevant topics ready to bring up. Movies, television shows, current events, or hobbies are usually safe and interesting for cocktail parties. Ask for activity or restaurant recommendations, if you are from out of town. Read the local paper, watch the local news. Just gather up a few possible subjects for your arsenal.</p> <h2>10. They Don't Make a Poor Exit</h2> <p>This is easier to do if you are in a little group, when you simply say, &quot;Excuse me, I need to go say hello to my regional VP.&quot; Or, &quot;Hey, I am going to go get a fresh cocktail.&quot; If it is just you and another person, when there is a graceful lull in the conversation, something like, &quot;John, it has been great talking to you and I enjoyed meeting you. I hope we can stay in touch.&quot; Shake hands again, and go. If you are in a business setting, you might give one of your cards.</p> <p><em>So, tell us: How do you handle small talk?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/marla-walters">Marla Walters</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/masters-of-small-talk-never-do-these-10-things-do-you">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-4"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-things-people-with-good-phone-skills-never-do">9 Things People With Good Phone Skills Never Do</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-things-people-with-good-communication-skills-never-do">12 Things People With Good Communication Skills Never Do</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-rules-of-etiquette-everyone-should-know-and-follow">10 Rules of Etiquette Everyone Should Know (and Follow!)</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-to-say-no-to-friends-and-family">5 Ways to Say &quot;No&quot; to Friends and Family</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/25-ways-to-feel-better-fast">25 Ways to Feel Better Fast</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> General Tips Personal Development conversation etiquette networking Wed, 15 Oct 2014 21:00:06 +0000 Marla Walters 1235111 at http://www.wisebread.com