networking http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/2800/all en-US 4 Ways Coworking Spaces Are Worth It http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-coworking-spaces-are-worth-it <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/4-ways-coworking-spaces-are-worth-it" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/000066179939.jpg" alt="" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Shared office spaces, aka coworking spaces, are currently revolutionizing the classic workday. A plethora of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/coworking-spaces-the-office-alternative">coworking spaces</a> have sprouted up in urban centers since the start of the global economic crisis in 2007-2012. You may have heard of them: WeWork, Regus, LiquidSpace; all are shared office spaces that claim to foster the enrichment of freelancers, start-ups, remote teams, and SMBs (small and midsize businesses). And they're not only growing in popularity because they're more affordable than traditional office space, but also because of the multitude of services and perks they offer, like free Wi-Fi, game rooms, networking events, courses, and more.</p> <p>According to a 2015 <a href="http://officeslicecoworking.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/GCUC-2015-Coworking-by-the-Numbers.compressed-1.pdf">(GCUC) - Emergent Research Coworking Survey</a> by Office Nomads in Seattle, Washington, coworking spaces had a direct impact on the emotional health and personal success of employees. Here's what a coworking space can do for you.</p> <h2>Boost of Confidence And Well-Being</h2> <p>An overwhelming number of survey respondents reported a boost of confidence and emotional well-being.</p> <ul> <li>89% reported they were happier</li> <li>83% reported they were less lonely</li> <li>78% reported that co-working helped keep them &quot;sane&quot;</li> </ul> <h2>Professional and Social Networking Opportunities</h2> <p>The benefits of coworking spaces can include a support group and reach beyond professional networks and can have a positive impact on its members' social lives.</p> <ul> <li>87% report they met other members for social reasons<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>54% met other members for social reasons after work and on weekends<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>33% met other members for social reasons during work hours<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>82% said coworking had expanded their professional networks<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>67% reported they attended events at their coworking space occasionally (45%), or often (21%); while only 4% said they never attend events</li> </ul> <h2>Creative Environment and Increased Productivity</h2> <p>Working in close proximity to others who are entrepreneurial-minded will likely increase your workflow and could help secure new job opportunities.</p> <ul> <li>84% said they were more engaged and motivated when coworking<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>67% said coworking improved their professional success</li> </ul> <ul> <li>69% said they felt more successful since joining a coworking space</li> </ul> <ul> <li>64% of the respondents said their coworking networking was a very important (26%) or a moderately important source of work (38%)</li> </ul> <h2>Personal Growth Opportunities</h2> <p>Coworking aims to foster growth. Many feature enrichment opportunities that include guest speakers, business courses, discounts on professional associations, and other services.</p> <ul> <li>69% reported they learned new skills</li> </ul> <ul> <li>68% reported they improved their existing skill set</li> </ul> <ul> <li>80% said they turn to other coworking members for help, guidance, or to find or source work</li> </ul> <p>You'll also be happy to know that packages are suitable to any budget. Virtual plans that include a business address, mail handling, and virtual assistant start around $45 per month. One-person designated desk space goes for about $350 per month. Customized solutions can be designed for SMBs with one to 100 employees. Additional benefits of shared space include: front door directory listings, front desk receptionist to meet and greet visitors, conference rooms, full kitchens and, best of all; flexible lease terms.</p> <p><em>Have you tried a coworking space? Share your experience below!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/qiana-chavaia">Qiana Chavaia</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-coworking-spaces-are-worth-it">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-bad-habits-that-are-ruining-your-career">6 Bad Habits That Are Ruining Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/25-career-changes-you-can-make-today">25 Career Changes You Can Make Today</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-10-best-networking-tips-for-people-under-40">The 10 Best Networking Tips for People Under 40</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-times-you-should-speak-up-at-work">10 Times You Should Speak Up at Work</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-career-advice-sites-you-should-know-about">15 Career Advice Sites You Should Know About</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building coworking space networking Office shared office space Tue, 08 Dec 2015 10:00:39 +0000 Qiana Chavaia 1618562 at http://www.wisebread.com 10 Social Blunders to Stop Making by 30 http://www.wisebread.com/10-social-blunders-to-stop-making-by-30 <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/10-social-blunders-to-stop-making-by-30" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_scratching_head_000037863184.jpg" alt="Woman learning social blunders to stop making by 30" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>There are things we get away with in our 20s &mdash; like dancing on bar tops and bingeing on 4:00 a.m. pizza (or maybe that was just me) &mdash; that just aren't acceptable in our 30s. What are they? Take a look at these 10 social <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-life-mistakes-you-need-to-stop-making-by-30">mistakes to stop making by age 30</a>. Leave some of your own suggestions in the comments below!</p> <h2>1. Engaging in Petty Arguments With Friends and Family</h2> <p>Bottom line &mdash; you're grown, and under no circumstance should you engage in petty arguments with your friends or family. You're better than that. Stay above that fray, and don't let negativity drag you down. If need be, eliminate people who aren't bringing out the best in you.</p> <h2>2. Dating (and Sleeping With) Tons of People</h2> <p>While exploring relationships, dating, and hooking up frequently in your 20s is acceptable (and necessary, in my opinion, as long as it's done safely), it's not a good look in your 30s. That's not to say that you have to be settled down &mdash; that's your prerogative &mdash; but you should at least be <em>slowed</em> down, lest you want to earn a reputation that's hard to live down and quite unbecoming of a person your age.</p> <p>Slowly back away from the Tinder and nobody will get hurt.</p> <h2>3. Making Bad Impulse Decisions</h2> <p>Remember those baller weekends when you'd go out with your buddies, drop a few Benjies on booze and other nighttime fun, and wake up 12 hours later just in time to rinse and repeat? Yeeeah. Those days are over, pal. But not just because at age 30 you should be more mature and less apt to engage in such activities. Rather, because when you're in your 30s, you've established a professional and hopefully successful life. You've got much more to lose by making stupid decisions.</p> <h2>4. Publishing Detrimental Posts to Social Media</h2> <p>I know you've heard this one before &mdash; how under no circumstances you should be posting drunk pics or publishing offensive posts to social media &mdash; yet so many people still do it, much to their future selves' dismay. This kind of social media activity isn't just immature &mdash; it can make you look unstable, and subsequently unhireable, if you're not careful.</p> <p>Jobvite recently conducted a study and found that 93% percent of recruiters <a href="http://www.brazencareerist.com/blog/2014/11/17/use-social-media-impress-employers-land-job/">check the social media profiles</a> of prospective hires. It goes without saying that employees should be careful what they post to their social networks &mdash; especially when it comes to photos and comments that could serve as a red flag to potential employers.</p> <h2>5. Letting Your Parents Pay for Dinner</h2> <p>Mom and Dad picked up the tab for 18 years, bought your groceries and took you to dinner frequently during college, and likely gave a helping hand here and there a few years post-college too. Now it's time to give thanks &mdash; with your wallet.</p> <h2>6. Being Systematically Rude and Ill-Mannered</h2> <p>It's not hard being nice or polite, yet a decent portion of the population can't seem to master those skills. Stay ahead of the class by saying please and thank you, holding the door open for strangers, showing up to parties with a gift for the host, sending a note of thanks for a gift you've received, and otherwise greeting people with a smile to acknowledge that they exist. Because it's, like, literally the least we can do.</p> <h2>7. Living at Home With Mom and Dad</h2> <p>Okay, so you needed a little more time out of college to get on your feet. That's acceptable. What's not acceptable is living in your parents' house in your 30s. That's not a result of circumstance, like when you couldn't find a job because you didn't have enough experience. It's a result of laziness at this age, and if you were my kid you'd be homeless.</p> <h2>8. Asking Someone You Just Met to Keep Repeating Their Name</h2> <p>Admittedly this is something I need to teach myself. Even when I've asked the person their name twice, it's still hard for me to remember. Consider me a work in progress.</p> <p>One tactic I try to use is saying the person's name out loud several times to drill it into my brain. Works most of the time. When I don't have a glass of wine in my hand.</p> <h2>9. Forgetting to Follow-Up</h2> <p>An extension of adopting a generally polite and mannered demeanor, extending your appreciation post-event is important. More than anything else, it shows that you care and that you're considerate, and in many circumstances that will make you a standout.</p> <h2>10. Submitting to Peer Pressure and Pack Mentality</h2> <p>Given our carefree and often reckless attitudes in our 20s, it's easy to give into peer pressure &mdash; especially if you're trying to fit into a certain group &mdash; and subscribe to a pack mentality, which for many of us was established in high school and college as a result of athletics and other extracurriculars. But in your 30s, you really ought to be your own person, free thinking and independent. It doesn't mean you have to abandon your friends altogether, but you certainly shouldn't be reliant on them so much socially that you can't do anything without them.</p> <p>&quot;Starting in early childhood and continuing throughout the lifespan, we, as humans, are almost programmed to look to others for an identity or at least some ideas on how to interact with and function in the world,&quot; says<a href="http://blogs.psychcentral.com/caregivers"> child and adolescent therapist</a> Támara Hill. &quot;Sadly, many 20-somethings struggle with identity and often look to other youths for 'inspiration' on how to be.&quot;</p> <p>Studies show, however, that by the time we adults reach age 30, we should have developed some idea of who we are, how we want to present ourselves to the world, and what goals we would like to achieve.</p> <p>&quot;Research suggests that the adult brain reaches full development by the age of 25,&quot; Hill continues. &quot;It is more likely that by age 25, young adults are more capable of approaching the world from a more adult perspective. Our prefrontal cortex &mdash; the area of the brain that controls impulses, decision making, personality, planning, and a host of other significant skills and characteristics &mdash; is more fully developed by age 25. By 30, adults should be more capable of separating from the 'pack' and creating their own identity and life goals.&quot;</p> <p><em>What other social mistakes do we need to stop making by age 30?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/mikey-rox">Mikey Rox</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-social-blunders-to-stop-making-by-30">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-to-stop-doing-on-social-media-by-30">10 Things to Stop Doing on Social Media by 30</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-things-successful-30-somethings-do">9 Things Successful 30-Somethings Do</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-money-goals-all-30-somethings-should-have">10 Money Goals All 30-Somethings Should Have</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-life-mistakes-you-need-to-stop-making-by-30">5 Life Mistakes You Need to Stop Making by 30</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dont-go-to-college-to-learn">Don&#039;t Go to College to Learn</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Life Hacks 30 year olds 30-somethings millennials networking peer pressure professionalism social media social skills Wed, 30 Sep 2015 17:00:43 +0000 Mikey Rox 1570365 at http://www.wisebread.com 7 Things You Should Never Do on LinkedIn http://www.wisebread.com/7-things-you-should-never-do-on-linkedin <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/7-things-you-should-never-do-on-linkedin" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/linkedin_000038175350.jpg" alt="Learning things you should never do on LinkedIn" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>How dialed in is your LinkedIn profile? As the world's most successful social business network (at last count, the site had 380 million members across more than 200 countries and territories), LinkedIn has become synonymous with online career-building. And with such a mind-boggling reach, it's worth making sure you're not <em>locked out</em>. Here are seven things you should never do on LinkedIn.</p> <h2>1. Confuse It With Facebook</h2> <p>The distinctions are obvious to most, but some lump all social media tools together in a bucket marked &quot;anything goes.&quot; Don't be one of these people.</p> <p>LinkedIn connections, messages, and posts should be reserved for building your professional network, joining groups of people who share your interests, expanding your career skills and knowledge, and learning about new work opportunities. Don't use it for a casual social interaction, posting office party selfies, or anything else that might turn a potential employer off.</p> <h2>2. Send a Standard Connection Request</h2> <p>If you're interested enough to make a connection on LinkedIn, take a moment to do it with a personal message. Remember, be professional and polite. If you've met, remind the person of your affiliation; if not, briefly explain your interest in connecting.</p> <h2>3. Pick the Wrong Pic</h2> <p>A great photo is an important way to <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/get-your-linkedin-profile-noticed-with-a-few-attention-grabbing-tweaks">get your LinkedIn profile noticed</a>. But skip the one that includes your husband, your kids, your friends, or the family pet. Also, make sure the photo is clear, professional, and relatively recent (no vintage glamour shots, please).</p> <h2>4. Write Wrong</h2> <p>LinkedIn is a continuous online snapshot of who you are professionally. And just as there's an art to <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-write-a-resume-12-steps-to-your-next-job">writing a great resume</a>, there's an art to crafting great content on LinkedIn. Even though it's a social media site, grammatical errors on LinkedIn can immediately cast you in bad light. Proofread every word you write; even quick status updates and link introductions should be polished and perfect.</p> <h2>5. Solicit Recommendations</h2> <p>Soliciting recommendations from previous employers and co-workers is tricky. First of all, never overwhelm new connections with a recommendation request right away. Second, don't spam your entire network with requests. Be tactical and tactful; only reach out to those with whom you have (or have had) a strong professional relationship. And keep in mind, people are more likely to respond to requests that are simple and easy. Explain the specific skill sets you're hoping to emphasize on LinkedIn and then politely request a recommendation &mdash; once and only once.</p> <h2>6. Ignore Your Privacy Settings</h2> <p>Privacy on a professional networking site is an essential feature for obvious reasons. If you're currently employed, but actively looking for your next opportunity, you'll naturally want to maintain a certain level of discretion. If you're engaged in a job search, customize your privacy settings so your boss can't see what you're up to. You can find LinkedIn's privacy options by scrolling over the small version of your profile photo in the upper right hand of the homepage. Navigate to &quot;Privacy &amp; Settings&quot; and make the necessary adjustments.</p> <h2>7. Be Passive</h2> <p>Active users make LinkedIn a vibrant community and a valuable tool. Be part of it by updating your status a couple of times each week. Updates on promotions and professional pursuits or links to events keep things fresh and gives potential employers a reason to reach out to you. Joining groups, sharing articles, and growing your network are other important ways to show you're more than just a lurker.</p> <p>Today, learning to use social media effectively is a big part of professional <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/networking-basics-for-regular-people">networking basics</a>. With some time, attention, and discipline, LinkedIn can become a powerful career-building tool&hellip; just as long as you don't post those glamour shots.</p> <p><em>Have you found a job through a LinkedIn connection? What tips do you have for other LinkedIn users?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/kentin-waits">Kentin Waits</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-things-you-should-never-do-on-linkedin">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-someone-to-accept-your-linkedin-invitation">How to Get Someone to Accept Your LinkedIn Invitation</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/13-ways-to-use-social-media-in-business">13 Ways to Use Social Media in Business</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-online-tools-to-help-you-land-a-job">5 Online Tools to Help You Land a Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/30-minutes-to-a-linkedin-profile-that-gets-you-hired">30 Minutes to a LinkedIn Profile That Gets You Hired</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-crucial-job-searching-steps-most-people-skip">6 Crucial Job Searching Steps Most People Skip</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building business connections Internet LinkedIn networking resumes social media Mon, 28 Sep 2015 09:00:32 +0000 Kentin Waits 1568938 at http://www.wisebread.com 9 Skills That Will Be Obsolete Soon http://www.wisebread.com/9-skills-that-will-be-obsolete-soon <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/9-skills-that-will-be-obsolete-soon" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/women_reading_map_000020985087.jpg" alt="Women using skill that will soon become obsolete" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>As technology evolves, certain careers are replaced with new ones. For instance, children used to be employed as pinsetters in bowling alleys; the automated pin-setting machine made that job vanish pretty quickly. Before alarm clocks, &quot;knocker uppers&quot; would walk the streets tapping on windows to get people out of bed. And at night, lamplighters would walk around igniting gas-fueled street lamps.</p> <p>But beyond jobs, certain <em>skills</em> also get replaced as technology moves ever forward. So what are some modern skills that will <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-life-skills-that-are-now-completely-obsolete">soon be rendered obsolete</a>? Here are nine that are quickly becoming extinct.</p> <h2>1. A Sense of Direction</h2> <p>Two words &mdash; Google Maps. You may be able to navigate around your city like a cab driver around the streets of London, but who cares? With the maps app on your phone, you can get to anywhere you want. There are no wrong turns, no dead ends, and no traffic delays. Everything is synced up to GPS, and you can be a complete newbie to the town or city you're in, and still get where you're going like you've lived there for 50 years. This is great news for people like me, who continue to get lost on the way to work.</p> <h2>2. Parallel Parking</h2> <p>Some people are really good at it. Most of us are okay. Some are terrible. You may be one of those people that brags about your parallel parking skills, but soon you'll be impressing no one. Many higher-end vehicles already come with park assist, but as technology gets less expensive, it migrates to other cars, and is currently available as an option on the Toyota Prius and the Ford Focus. Yes&hellip; the Ford Focus. Give it a few years, and every car will be a perfect parallel parker. And driving itself, when that gets replaced by driverless cars, could also become a skill of the past.</p> <h2>3. Flirting</h2> <p>Really!? Well, perhaps not entirely. There will always be the need to do the dance, using body language, eye contact, all of that. But these days, online dating apps like Tinder, OK Cupid, Plenty Of Fish, and many more, are taking a lot of the hard work out of meeting people in bars and clubs. After all, why risk the rejection when you have a guaranteed date waiting? And not only that, but a date you know a whole lot about, including likes, dislikes, pets, and anything else you want to look up. There are guidebooks out there telling guys how to pick up women, and they are starting to lose their appeal. Quickly.</p> <h2>4. Cursive Writing</h2> <p>Although it is still being taught in schools, cursive writing is rarely used outside of the classroom. Think about it&hellip; when was the last time you wrote anything in cursive? In fact, when was the last time you wrote anything by hand, other than a quick shopping list or note letting someone know you'd be back in 10 minutes? Technology has eliminated the need for cursive writing; we use a keyboard for almost everything, and not just reports, emails, and other documents. From online diaries and blogs, to notepads on smartphones and tablets, keyboards are making cursive go the way of the dodo.</p> <h2>5. Mental Arithmetic</h2> <p>So, this is not discounting the work of mathematicians and scientists; those skills will always be needed by society. However, for most of us, the ability to do calculations in our heads is quickly becoming a task we'd much rather do on our phones. We have this computer on us almost everywhere we go, so why bother crunching the numbers ourselves when a calculator app can do it in half the time, and with certainty? Lazy it may be, but we always take the path of least resistance.</p> <h2>6. Memorization</h2> <p>As with mental arithmetic, having a great memory (which is a learnable skill, by the way) is also becoming obsolete thanks to smartphones. It is very rare to be with a bunch of friends and have that &quot;Oh&hellip; what was the name of that actor who was in that movie?&quot; kinda question get answered with a chorus of &quot;Hang on, I know this one.&quot; Instead, we pull it up on IMDB. The same goes for anything that requires looking into the archives of our minds, from phone numbers and addresses, to recipes and birthdays. It's all available to us at the touch of a button.</p> <h2>7. Spelling</h2> <p>Pretty soon, the only use for being an excellent speller will be to win a spelling bee. It doesn't matter if you cannot spell even the simplest words, your phones and computers have spell checking built into almost everything you use. It's not just in Microsoft Word, but emails, messaging apps, and even design programs. Just look for the little red wavy line, and voila, click to correct. You may be able to spell floccinaucinihilipilification after seven pints of foaming ale, but it's not going to be a skill you need in everyday life.</p> <h2>8. Physical Networking</h2> <p>Remember the days when you had to attend functions, meeting people in your field in order to increase your circle of business colleagues? Well, these days you can do it all over the Internet. Sites like LinkedIn, Monster, Indeed and many others are making it very easy to reach out and find new jobs, or careers. And if you need to hire a professional, you've got millions of people just a click away. There will always be company functions, but that handshake, smile, and charm won't be needed anymore. You can do it all while you're sitting at your desk, or at home while you're watching the game.</p> <h2>9. Filing Hard Copies</h2> <p>There was a real art to filing information, and if you were good at it, you made your own life (and that of your employer) much easier. These days, it can almost all be done on a computer, using filing software that does all the hard work for you. Yes, you may be required to keep hard files on occasion, but even that is being replaced by digital copies. Pretty soon, filing cabinets will be in a museum right next to buggy whips and PDAs.</p> <p><em>What common skills do you see becoming obsolete soon?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-skills-that-will-be-obsolete-soon">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-14"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-back-to-school-iphone-apps">10 Back-to-School iPhone Apps</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-modern-life-skills-everyone-should-master">15 Modern Life Skills Everyone Should Master</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/these-5-apps-can-fix-your-finances">These 5 Apps Can Fix Your Finances</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-apps-for-the-tech-challenged-traveler">7 Apps for the Tech-Challenged Traveler</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-to-save-on-smartphone-costs-while-traveling">8 Ways to Save on Smartphone Costs While Traveling</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Lifestyle Productivity Technology apps Dating maps math networking obsolete skills parallel parking Wed, 12 Aug 2015 11:00:18 +0000 Paul Michael 1515687 at http://www.wisebread.com The 10 Best Networking Tips for People Under 40 http://www.wisebread.com/the-10-best-networking-tips-for-people-under-40 <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/the-10-best-networking-tips-for-people-under-40" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_shaking_hands_000019330601.jpg" alt="Woman learning best networking tips for pros under 40" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>If you want to get ahead in this world, you have to network. Networking helps build confidence, connects you with like-minded professionals, and, if all goes well, networking can help improve your business's bottom line. But are you doing the best you can do as a mover and shaker? Take a look at these <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-great-ways-to-network-that-dont-feel-sleazy">networking tips</a> for pros under age 40 and then add some of your own in the comments below.</p> <h2>1. Muster up the Confidence to Go it Alone</h2> <p>There's always safety in numbers of course, but one of the big problems with going to a networking event with a friend or coworker is that you'll tend to stick together instead of branching off on your own, thereby limiting your exposure to other networkers. Instead, think of networking like those times when your teacher told you to partner up with someone you didn't know so well. There was a reason behind that &mdash; so you wouldn't dilly-dally with your BFF, and instead give you a chance to make a new friend. Networking is just like that, but all grown-up. And since you're an adult, be an adult about it &mdash; try going to the networking event alone and see what happens.</p> <p>&quot;Some of the most beneficial and lasting networking I've done has tended to share one common theme: I've been on my own at the conference or event,&quot; says Jaime Netzer, content editor of <a href="https://www.thezebra.com/">The Zebra</a>. &quot;So often, I'll get introductions via coworkers, or head to industry-type events with friends. But if you can push yourself to go alone &mdash; and can handle those first few moments of feeling awkward and trying to figure out what to do with your hands &mdash; you'll find that they're totally worth it.&quot;</p> <h2>2. Pay Attention to the Younger Generation</h2> <p>I daresay that early on I was a victim to thinking very narrowly and only wanting to make contacts with people who were already in high places &mdash; while completely disregarding those who were on their way but not quite there yet. It's a common networking faux pas that will not only limit your professional potential, but could also make you come off like a jerk.</p> <p>Dani Pascarella, 27-year-old founder and CEO of millennial personal finance and career site<a href="http://www.invibed.com"> Invibed</a>, reminds us to show some love to the little people.</p> <p>&quot;Invite new analysts to coffee and give them advice. Help college students get their foot in the door at your company. Be a mentor. Do whatever you can to help others,&quot; she says. &quot;Most people ignore younger talent and focus on networking with really senior people. But I can't tell you how many of the people I helped early in their careers that went on to be wildly successful. And those people were always willing to help me any way they could because I helped them early on, when most others were ignoring them.&quot;</p> <h2>3. Don't Be Afraid to Ask for a Meeting</h2> <p>Do you want a meeting with an influencer, someone with whom you think it would be beneficial (hopefully mutually) to be connected? Make the first move. As my mother always told me, the worst thing they can say is &quot;no,&quot; but you won't know until you ask.</p> <p>&quot;Don't ever be afraid to ask someone to meet you for a coffee &mdash; I don't care how important you think they are,&quot; Pascarella says. &quot;If you don't ask, you'll never get the opportunity. If you ask, at least you have a shot. And don't take things personally if they say 'no.' There are three types of people in the world of networking: people who love it, people who don't, and people who only participate if there's something in it for them. Each person's attitude towards networking plays a much larger role in whether they agree to meet with you than anything you could have said or done.&quot;</p> <p>On the flip side, Ryan Modesto, managing partner at investment research firm 5i Research, suggests accepting any and all invitations from other professionals to meet. Because, well, you don't like to be told &quot;no,&quot; do you? Neither do they.</p> <p>&quot;You never know where a contact/connection may lead, so if you have a chance to do a coffee with someone more established, take it,&quot; he says. &quot;Even if they can't help you directly, they may be able to pass you on to someone else who can help. This includes family, friends, friends of friends, etc.&quot;</p> <h2>4. Just Don't Ask for the Other Person's Help Too Soon</h2> <p>At this point you've got several meetings set up and you're excited. SO many opportunities on the horizon. While you might be chomping at the bit to turn these connections into something more substantial &mdash; like a profit &mdash; don't jump the gun. Nobody, in business or otherwise, likes to feel used. Let the relationship develop deeper and organically take its course. Push too soon and you could start to earn a reputation that will only work against you.</p> <p>&quot;Networking is not about you; it's about finding out about the other person, perhaps even uncovering what you can do for them,&quot; motivational speaker Barry Maher says. &quot;It's about building some sort of relationship &mdash; even if it's a quick and very short-term relationship &mdash; before trying to find out what they might be able to do for you. Without that relationship, you're not networking; you're cold calling, and there's no more reason for that person to help you than any other stranger they might come across on the street.&quot;</p> <h2>5. Remember to Share, Not Sell</h2> <p>This sort of goes hand-in-hand with not asking for your new contact's help too soon, so remember that this relationship you're building is supposed to be one of mutual benefit. Avoid allowing it to teeter too far to your side by keeping a focus on sharing aspects of your career opposed to selling them. There's a difference &mdash; one of them is genuine; the other isn't.</p> <p>&quot;For anyone networking, I suggest not being too pushy. Share; don't sell,&quot; says media relations and social media specialist Christina Nicholson. We all have our personal reasons for networking, but we cannot focus on those reasons entirely. Don't act like a stereotypical used car salesman. Instead, be professional, but personal too.&quot;</p> <h2>6. Try Your Hand at &quot;Sweatworking&quot;</h2> <p>Personally, I've been on social sports teams for nearly a decade &mdash; kickball, dodgeball, bowling, trivia, and more &mdash; and I highly recommend these activities to help build your contact base. But keep in mind that the main focus is not professional networking &mdash; unless it's a business team, of course &mdash; so don't make it such. Rest assured, however, that over the weeks of play you'll inevitably talk about what you do as a career and sometimes there's a synergy that comes out of it.</p> <p>Career and life coach Jenn DeWall agrees.</p> <p>&quot;Take networking from the bar to the outdoors or a gym,&quot; she says. &quot;By doing a physical activity or shared experience you can help create more meaningful relationships. The shared experience can also break the ice helping conversations smooth more easily, which can build confidence for both extroverts and introverts. For Millennials, this is especially effective as it reduces perceived too pushy or formal networking atmospheres that they feel they are not able to truly be themselves or authentic..&quot;</p> <h2>7. Wear an Article of Clothing That's Memorable</h2> <p>Another one of my favorite &mdash; and very easy &mdash; networking tactics is to wear clothing that makes an impression. (A good impression, of course. Don't show up looking like a clown, please.) When done well, your standout article of clothing is an icebreaker and a confidence booster simultaneously.</p> <p>Jenna Elkins is a media relations coordinator for TechnologyAdvice, and she's familiar with this strategy.</p> <p>&quot;Don't over do it by wearing something bright head-to-toe,&quot; she says, &quot;but instead wear something small like bright shoes or a unique scarf. This is a great way for people to notice you and start small talk by mentioning your article of clothing.&quot;</p> <p>While Jenna's advice applies to women, career expert Allan Ageman didn't forget about all you dapper gents out there.</p> <p>&quot;It can be difficult to keep track of all the people you meet at a networking event, and as important as it is for you to remember you new acquaintances, it's equally important that they remember you,&quot; he says. &quot;Wear something identifiable but still professional, such as a brightly colored blouse or polka dot bow tie.&quot;</p> <h2>8. Sit Near the Bar if You Lack the Confidence to Approach Others</h2> <p>This advice to stake a claim near the bar doesn't mean that you should start throwing back cold ones like it's Super Bowl Sunday. Order one drink, stand there, and <em>sip</em> on it. This tactic is to help those of you who aren't outwardly confident enough to approach strangers by taking a passive approach to networking and letting the conversation come to you.</p> <p>Elkins explains how this works more in depth.</p> <p>&quot;Generally, if someone wants to be excused from the person they are networking with, many times the bar is a place many people head to when wanting to switch it up a bit,&quot; she says. &quot;One way to strike up a conversation with the networkers who visit the bar is by simply introducing yourself. Most of the time people spend a few minutes waiting for their drink, so this is a great time to make small talk that could turn into a longer conversation. Just don't stay at the bar for too long &mdash; you don't want to give people the wrong impression.&quot;</p> <h2>9. Try Pre-Networking to Break Down a Few Barriers</h2> <p>Another tactic that can help ease the awkwardness of approaching and meeting strangers at an event is to establish contact beforehand. Social media gives you all the tools to do this in order to make the actual event more comfortable &mdash; and give you an edge up on other networkers.</p> <p>&quot;Still not feeling confident?&quot; Ageman asks. &quot;Check out the Facebook group or online event page to see who else will be attending. Try looking them up on LinkedIn and connecting with them prior to the event. Having a short conversation with people beforehand can make you feel more confident at the event.&quot;</p> <h2>10. Always, Always, Always Follow Up</h2> <p>And finally, let's not forget our post-networking manners. If you've met someone &mdash; doesn't matter who they are or what they do &mdash; it's wise to follow up afterward with a quick &quot;Nice to meet you!&quot;' memo via email. You'll solidify your status as a consummate professional via this practice, and the recipients will remember you more than most of the other dozen or so people with whom they may have chatted the day before. One chat near the bar does not a business relationship make. You have to cultivate the relationship, and a message about what a pleasure it was to meet a person is the perfect way to continue.</p> <p><em>Do you have other networking tactics for pros under age 40 that you'd like to recommend? Let us know in the comments below.</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/mikey-rox">Mikey Rox</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-10-best-networking-tips-for-people-under-40">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/25-career-changes-you-can-make-today">25 Career Changes You Can Make Today</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-career-advice-sites-you-should-know-about">15 Career Advice Sites You Should Know About</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/13-ways-to-use-social-media-in-business">13 Ways to Use Social Media in Business</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-bad-networking-habits-that-will-kill-your-job-prospects">15 Bad Networking Habits That Will Kill Your Job Prospects</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/friends-for-work-life-and-everything-in-between">Having Fun at Work, Life, and Everything In-Between</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building contacts making connections networking new people professionals Fri, 24 Jul 2015 11:00:11 +0000 Mikey Rox 1495080 at http://www.wisebread.com 10 Times at Work You're Just Wasting Effort http://www.wisebread.com/10-times-at-work-youre-just-wasting-effort <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/10-times-at-work-youre-just-wasting-effort" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/businessman-working-late-Dollarphotoclub_44503005.jpg" alt="businessman working late" title="businessman working late" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Americans work hard. Very hard. About 1,800 hours a year, no guarantee of vacation time hard. And some of that, unfortunately, is just spinning the wheels. Here are 10 times when we're simply wasting effort at work.</p> <h2>1. Working Very Late or Coming in Super Early</h2> <p>When I first started working in the advertising industry, several of the old guards told me &quot;Be the first one in, and the last one to leave.&quot; There's something to be said for that, especially in the days when you are young and hungry and looking for that first promotion. But those guys also added an addendum later on, and I never forgot it &mdash; &quot;Just make sure people notice the effort.&quot; If you're getting in at 6:00 a.m., and the next person doesn't arrive until 8:30 a.m., how much of that two and a half hours was necessary? If you stay two hours past the last person, who will know? If you have to do it to get some work done, fair enough. If you do it all the time to show your loyalty and work ethic, it's wasted effort.</p> <h2>2. Having Drawn Out E-mail/Text Conversations</h2> <p>It's astonishing that so many people in workplaces across America can go a whole day without actually physically talking to someone. It's all about e-mail, instant messaging, texting, and social media. The problem with all of those is that tone and mannerisms are lost. It can take many e-mail conversations to get across something that a simple five-minute phone call or face-to-face meeting could have cleared up. If the first few e-mails are not getting things done, pick up the phone or walk a few minutes to that person's office.</p> <h2>3. Setting Specific Meeting Durations</h2> <p>We have 15, 30, 45, and 60-minute meetings. Usually, it's the latter. There's some chitchat, a little passing of time until everyone gathers, and then there is that &quot;Hey, we still have 10 minutes, how's your dog doing?&quot; time. This is wasting time and effort for all involved. Get the meeting started, quickly, and get to the point. Rule out jokes and nonsense, and if the 30-minute meeting is over in 11 minutes and 32 seconds, end it and get on with your day. Remember, there are no one-hour meetings. There are at least two people in attendance, and every person in the company loses an hour. Make that time count.</p> <h2>4. Having Meetings Without Key People</h2> <p>Everyone in your company, be it a massive multinational corporation or a local business, knows who the right people are. They're the decision makers, the knowledgeable workers, or the people with the latest intelligence. If you are organizing a meeting without including these people, you are going to have to have another meeting. Yes, it's not always possible to include them, but if that means you're going to spend 45 minutes talking in circles, you should reconsider. Make these meetings smaller, or bring other action items to them. There is little point in spending an hour in a meeting only to have a puppet tell you they'll get back to you.</p> <h2>5. Working With Unclear Directives</h2> <p>When you begin a project, know exactly what it is that you are being asked to do. If you are in any doubt at all, you are about to begin hours, or days, of wasted effort. Unclear directives and fuzzy strategies lead to meetings that have people scratching their heads and asking for additional work. If the person asking for the work does not specifically know what they want, try and send them back to the drawing board to get more information. It isn't always easy, especially if that person is the boss, but if you point out that you will be wasting time and money without those facts, you should be fine.</p> <h2>6. Overwriting</h2> <p>There is a quote that many of you know. &quot;I have already made this paper too long, for which I must crave pardon, not having now time to make it shorter.&quot; That came from Benjamin Franklin in 1750, to the Royal Society of London. Basically, he apologized for the length of the letter, and if he had time, he'd have made it shorter. This is lost on many today. Some feel that quantity is better than quality. After all, who looks like they have spent more time on a report: someone who hands in a 10-page document, or a three-page document? But people have little time to read those 10 pages. It's wasted effort to keep bloviating about a subject for page after page. People won't read it. Cut it down.</p> <h2>7. Hiding the Truth From the Masses</h2> <p>Whether you are a small automotive chain in Colorado, or a massive company spanning the world, people will gossip. You do not want to add fuel to that fire by taking a lot of time and effort hiding things. The truth will eventually come out, and that wasted effort will result in a lot of gossiping and ill feeling. Be honest &mdash; it will save you in the long run.</p> <h2>8. Networking With the Powerless</h2> <p>We all know that a certain amount of our job revolves around dealing with other people. Whether they're in the same company or a different one, we have to find time to grease the wheels and make connections. However, be careful how much time you spend with people who really cannot do anything for you or your company. It may seem ruthless, but wining and dining the wrong people can be a complete waste of time and lead to some awkward silences. These people may tell you they have power, but it's easy to probe and find this out. Look at a company org chart, find out who has the bosses ear. You'll soon know the truth.</p> <h2>9. Working When You're Sick or Tired</h2> <p>It seems as though Americans don't like taking sick days when they're actually sick. Coming in to the office when you are a physical wreck may make you look like a glowing employee, but it's a waste of time and effort. You are not at your best. You are not thinking clearly. You are probably infecting other people. And, most likely, you'll be off the next day. The extra effort of driving in, trying to do your job, and driving home will take it out of you. And the work you did will most likely have to be redone. Don't waste that effort on being a golden employee.</p> <h2>10. Taking the Initiative Without Doing Your Research</h2> <p>Eager beavers are great employees&hellip; unless they dive into projects without first learning about a few basic facts. Recently, I heard of someone who spent five months developing a new app in his spare time, only to discover the company was scrapping the entire project. That guy would have saved a lot of time and heartache if he had simply done a little digging to see if the project had legs. So, do yourself a favor. By all means, take the initiative. But do not spend all that time without first knowing if that will be effort that could be rewarded, or wasted.</p> <p><em>What causes you to waste time and effort at work? Share your frustration in comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-times-at-work-youre-just-wasting-effort">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-make-your-sluggish-workday-go-a-lot-faster">How to Make Your Sluggish Workday Go (a Lot) Faster</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-reasons-your-coworkers-think-youre-a-slacker">6 Reasons Your Coworkers Think You&#039;re a Slacker</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-pearls-of-career-wisdom-from-brian-tracy">6 Pearls of Career Wisdom From Brian Tracy</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/find-work-worth-doing">Find work worth doing</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-signs-youre-working-for-an-impossible-boss">7 Signs You&#039;re Working for an Impossible Boss</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income meetings networking time sink time wasters work workday Mon, 02 Feb 2015 10:00:13 +0000 Paul Michael 1284261 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Ways It Pays to Be Friendly With Your Neighbors http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-it-pays-to-be-friendly-with-your-neighbors <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-ways-it-pays-to-be-friendly-with-your-neighbors" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/neighbors-E000352-small.jpg" alt="neighbors " title="neighbors" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Our communities just don't have the same bonds they used to. Think about it: Of all the people you've lived next door to, how many of their names do you know? (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-deal-with-a-rude-neighbor?ref=seealso">How to Deal With a Rude Neighbor</a>)</p> <p>This is a problem, given the tangible, material benefits of having neighbors you know better than, say, the receptionist at your dentist's office. Don't believe it? Then check out these six ways it pays to be friendly with your neighbors.</p> <h2>1. Splitting Chores</h2> <p>Some chores impact more than just one house in a neighborhood. For example, if you share a common driveway, you can all pitch in when it comes to repaving it. It's not just about communal chores, though. Doing small favors can encourage a mini sharing economy. Help your neighbor plant a garden, he helps you change the transmission on your car. Start saving a mint based on the things that you couldn't do yourself, but can do with a spare set of hands.</p> <h2>2. Sharing the Cost of Big Equipment</h2> <p>Just like there are some chores that are impossible alone, so are there pieces of big equipment one person might not want to buy, but a neighborhood can go in on together. Think of things like wood chippers, cherry pickers, or power washers. Particularly if you're not going to be using them a lot, the price can be cost prohibitive. However, once you start splitting the cost three or four ways, the investment starts making a lot more sense.</p> <h2>3. Splitting Entertainment Costs</h2> <p>Especially for the sports fan, the ability to split entertainment costs can be a big deal. Maybe you don't want to shell out for the next UFC fight, WWE pay-per-view, or a season of NFL game day on your own. However, with the help of a neighbor or two you can make the cost of an expensive paid cable event no more than a couple of lattes. What's more, you might also be able to get package deals on vacations if you all coordinate your time away from home. Once you get there you don't have to be joined at the hip, though hey &mdash; if you guys are close, why not?</p> <h2>4. Learning New Skills</h2> <p>Chances are good that you have skills your neighbor wants and vice versa. So why not go about trading those talents? Not only can you learn them without paying any money, you can also save money over the long run by applying the skills you learn. Maybe it's auto repair. Maybe it's bread baking. Maybe it's interior painting. Whatever it is, when you learn how to do things for yourself, you don't have to pay someone else to do it for you.</p> <h2>5. Tolerating Your Big Bash</h2> <p>Having a party? Making any amount of racket? Get ready for a noise complaint and the charges that come along with it. Making friends with your neighbors not only makes them a little more tolerant of things like watering your garden on the day that you're not supposed to, but it also makes them more likely to talk to you directly about the problem rather than going straight through more official channels. No one wants angry neighbors, but if you're going to have them they can be angry in the neighborly way or the expensive way.</p> <h2>6. Networking</h2> <p>Networking is more important than ever. Looking for the best plumber in town? Your neighbor might be a friend. Trying to find a marriage counselor? Maybe your neighbors recently got through a rough patch with the help of a family therapist. Is your nephew looking for his first job in publishing? Talk to your neighbors and see if they know anyone who can help. Knowing more people is always helpful, starting with the people who live just down the street.</p> <p><em>Are you neighborly with your neighbors? How has it paid off for you?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/nicholas-pell">Nicholas Pell</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-it-pays-to-be-friendly-with-your-neighbors">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/25-reasons-why-its-good-to-know-your-neighbors">25 Reasons Why It&#039;s Good to Know Your Neighbors</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-dont-people-share-more">Why don&#039;t people share more?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/cooking-for-beginners-10-recipes-for-kitchen-newbies">Cooking for Beginners: 10 Recipes for Kitchen Newbies</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/20-awesome-uses-for-milk-crates">20 Awesome Uses for Milk Crates</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-best-10-items-to-borrow">The Best 10 Items to Borrow</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Home Lifestyle neighbors networking real estate sharing sharing economy Fri, 24 Oct 2014 17:00:05 +0000 Nicholas Pell 1241737 at http://www.wisebread.com Masters of Small Talk Never Do These 10 Things — Do You? http://www.wisebread.com/masters-of-small-talk-never-do-these-10-things-do-you <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/masters-of-small-talk-never-do-these-10-things-do-you" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/business-group-talking-160613541-small.jpg" alt="business people talking" title="business people talking" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Have you been in the situation of needing to make conversation with people you did not know well? Weddings, cocktail parties, and business conferences can be anxiety-provoking if you don't know how to make small talk. Although you may dread it, though, small talk can be a great thing. Chatting can make simple exchanges more pleasant; it can also start the beginning of a great conversation or even friendship. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-fun-practically-free-ways-to-make-new-friends?ref=seealso">10 Fun, Practically Free Ways to Make New Friends</a>)</p> <p>It is estimated that between 7% and 13% of humans suffer from <a href="http://www.anxietybc.com/resources/social.php">social anxiety</a>. What is there to talk about? What should you never bring up? What subjects are safe? Well to start, below are 10 things that small-talk masters know never to do.</p> <h2>1. They Don't Assume They Are Alone in Their Anxiety</h2> <p>It may seem like everyone in the room knows each other, but that's unlikely. I guarantee there are other people there who are as anxious as you are about social situations. Take a deep breath, square your shoulders, and smile. Take a moment to survey the situation and see if maybe there is somebody there that you do know. If not, no need for panic. It's just an event, and it will pass.</p> <p>My trick is to anticipate the worst and let the dread &quot;in;'&quot; nearly all the time, I end up enjoying myself.</p> <h2>2. They Never Forget to Introduce Themselves</h2> <p>Even if I do know someone at an event or party, I do not depend on them to introduce me to others. They may have forgotten my name, or how they know me, or whatever. Don't barge in on people in deep conversations, but if you see an opening, simply walk up and say, &quot;Hi! I'm Jane Smith&quot; and extend your hand for a handshake. If there are other people in the group, repeat the process.</p> <p>How to remember names? Repeat the name (&quot;Hi, Tom, it's really nice to meet you.&quot;). You might try a little trick to remember the name, like a song, or a nursery rhyme, that makes a word association for you. Once introductions are made, people will usually ask where you work, or how you know the bride or groom, or birthday person, or where you're from. The ball is then rolling.</p> <h2>3. They Never Forget to Introduce Someone Else</h2> <p>My friend Sylvia, a seasoned networker, makes the best introductions. They usually go something like this: &quot;Everyone, I would like you to meet John Smith. John has this awesome travel website and he is my travel guru! He also makes the world's best homemade bread.&quot; In her introduction, she gives people clues about things to ask John. She has also given him several compliments, which strengthens his self-confidence and make him smile.</p> <h2>4. They Never Have Bad Body Language</h2> <p>People are receptive to good body language. Take note of your posture, first of all. Are you slumping? Stand up straight. What are you doing with your hands? Do not cross your arms &mdash; that is defensive posture. Holding your hands together in front of you, or behind your back, are both &quot;open&quot; gestures. It may help you to have a drink to hold, if you are nervous. Try not to hold it in the hand you shake with, though, or you'll be shaking hands with a cold hand. Make eye contact, but don't stare. Engage. Smile. Listen. The world is full of talkers, but a good listener is hard to find. Nod your head, and ask the occasional question. Don't keep checking your cell phone. If you get a call, excuse yourself politely and take it.</p> <h2>5. They Never Discuss Religion</h2> <p>This was one of my mom's rules, and will serve you well. While it can be a very interesting subject, it is not a &quot;safe&quot; one in that you might easily offend someone you do not know well.</p> <h2>6. They Almost Never Discuss Politics</h2> <p>Another &quot;mom&quot; rule, and a harder one to avoid. But do, because this topic gets heated, quickly. This rule can go out the window if you are at a political fundraiser, because you are likely on the same page the other people, of course. Just tread carefully.</p> <h2>7. They Never Forget How to Use Openers</h2> <p>People who are good at small talk, I have noticed, are really good at asking questions, or &quot;openers.&quot; Use the information you glean from your first question to ask more questions.For instance, &quot;So when you went to Portland, did you go to Jake's Seafood?&quot; Or, &quot;What a beautiful scarf! Where did you buy it?&quot;</p> <p>Hopefully, the person you are conversing with will in turn ask you questions, which will keep the small talk going. Sometimes, the person you are trying to chat up is really reticent. Here is a trick: &quot;So before this event, what did you do, today?&quot; There is almost always some usable material in that response.</p> <h2>8. They Don't Forget to Expand the Circle</h2> <p>So, if a few moments ago, you were the &quot;odd man out,&quot; be aware of people who may be hovering and want to join in, too. Make eye contact, extend your arm for a handshake, and introduce yourself (and the others, if you can remember their names). After introductions, you may need to backtrack (&quot;We were just talking about where the best breweries are in this town&quot;) and give the newbie a chance to get involved. They will be grateful to you for your help.</p> <p>Also, in the world of small talk, It's bad form to stay and talk shop with one person the whole time. If someone is monopolizing you, it is perfectly fine to say something like, &quot;Well, Ben, my wife will shoot me if I don't get over there and visit with her great-aunt for a while. Good to see you.&quot;</p> <h2>9. They Don't Go Into Small Talk Unprepared</h2> <p>Unless you are having pretty dramatic weather, I wouldn't lead with that. For a conference or company event, do some homework and have some relevant topics ready to bring up. Movies, television shows, current events, or hobbies are usually safe and interesting for cocktail parties. Ask for activity or restaurant recommendations, if you are from out of town. Read the local paper, watch the local news. Just gather up a few possible subjects for your arsenal.</p> <h2>10. They Don't Make a Poor Exit</h2> <p>This is easier to do if you are in a little group, when you simply say, &quot;Excuse me, I need to go say hello to my regional VP.&quot; Or, &quot;Hey, I am going to go get a fresh cocktail.&quot; If it is just you and another person, when there is a graceful lull in the conversation, something like, &quot;John, it has been great talking to you and I enjoyed meeting you. I hope we can stay in touch.&quot; Shake hands again, and go. If you are in a business setting, you might give one of your cards.</p> <p><em>So, tell us: How do you handle small talk?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/marla-walters">Marla Walters</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/masters-of-small-talk-never-do-these-10-things-do-you">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-things-people-with-good-phone-skills-never-do">9 Things People With Good Phone Skills Never Do</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-things-people-with-good-communication-skills-never-do">12 Things People With Good Communication Skills Never Do</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-rules-of-etiquette-everyone-should-know-and-follow">10 Rules of Etiquette Everyone Should Know (and Follow!)</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-small-gestures-that-go-a-long-way-at-work">10 Small Gestures That Go a Long Way at Work</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-reasons-alone-time-is-good-for-your-soul">9 Reasons Alone Time Is Good For Your Soul</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> General Tips Personal Development conversation etiquette networking Wed, 15 Oct 2014 21:00:06 +0000 Marla Walters 1235111 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Simple Ways to Make a Fantastic First Impression http://www.wisebread.com/6-simple-ways-to-make-a-fantastic-first-impression <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-simple-ways-to-make-a-fantastic-first-impression" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/handshake-166474013-small.jpg" alt="handshake" title="handshake" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="167" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Warmer weather means more socializing, and more socializing means more opportunities to meet new people. As a guy on the shy side, I've never relished social situations where there are dozens of new people to meet, and, thus, dozens of first impressions to manage. To most of my friends though, my discomfort would probably come as a surprise. That's because over the years and with just a few simple strategies, I've honed my skills at meeting new people and making a (mostly) fantastic first impression. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-great-ways-to-network-that-dont-feel-sleazy?ref=seealso">5 Great Ways to Network That Don't Feel Sleazy</a>)</p> <p>Here are my top six tips to impress with first impressions.</p> <h2>1. Get a Grip</h2> <p>No matter how perfect the attire, how coiffed the hair, or how articulate the speech, a limp and non-committal handshake is all your new acquaintance will remember. Socially or in business, when you first meet a person &mdash; as you're going through those initial introductions and niceties &mdash; anticipate the handshake. Be prepared and return it with commitment and confidence, while maintaining eye contact.</p> <h2>2. Be Cling-Free</h2> <p>If new social situations make you uneasy, it's tempting to cling to one or two friendly faces you know. As safe as it feels, avoid this tactic. Making a fantastic first impression means picking up the conversation after a friend has introduced you, mingling, and embracing the awkwardness of meeting new people with humor and a sense of adventure. You don't have to work a room like a silver-tongued politician; heck, you don't necessarily even have to be a gifted conversationalist. But what wins every time &mdash; what leaves a good impression &mdash; is effort. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/spice-up-the-conversation-by-skipping-what-do-you-do?ref=seealso">Spice Up the Conversation by Skipping &quot;What Do You Do?&quot;</a>)</p> <h2>3. Come Bearing Gifts</h2> <p>A sure-fire way to make a great first impression is to arrive with a thoughtful gift in hand. Even the smallest token (a bottle of wine, some good chocolate, a small bouquet of flowers) creates immediate social credit and communicates volumes about who you are. But choose the occasion carefully. According to EmilyPost.com, <a href="http://www.emilypost.com/social-life/hosts-and-guests/772-should-i-bring-a-hostess-gift">occasions for host or hostess gifts</a> include casual dinner parties, weekend visits, or parties where there's a guest of honor. If you're the &quot;plus-one&quot; or the newest face at any of these types of events, a small token of appreciation sets the stage for a making a great first impression.</p> <h2>4. Master Non-Verbal Cues</h2> <p>While some common <a href="http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/beyond-words/201109/is-nonverbal-communication-numbers-game">body language statistics</a> are often overstated or applied too generally, we can all agree that important parts of communication happen verbally and non-verbally. Maintaining good posture, eye contact, and pleasant facial expressions are the big three components of body language to be aware of if you're trying to make a positive first impression.</p> <p>Without getting into the minutiae about how to stand, hold your arms, or point your feet, just remember this: Try to keep your physical communication consistent with your verbal communication. Acknowledge the power your body has to reinforce or detract from what you're saying and perhaps more importantly &mdash; the power it has to speak on your behalf when you're silent.</p> <h2>5. Be Curious and Open-Minded</h2> <p>Engaging with new people takes a healthy dose of curiosity and open-mindedness. Try not to let differences in religion, politics, lifestyle, or career choices prevent you from expanding your social horizons or making new professional connections. If it helps you feel more comfortable, look for the common ground that can fuel good conversation. Asking questions, divulging a bit about ourselves, and not letting distractions derail the flow of conversation are the keys to getting noticed in the right way.</p> <p>Of course, we don't always mesh with every new person we meet, and sometimes it's obvious in the first five seconds that a new acquaintance will never be anything more. But making a good first impression often takes a bit of a creative role playing. If you can't muster any genuine interest, fake it and consider a bit of well-intentioned acting a social skill-building activity.</p> <h2>6. Buzz (Off!)</h2> <p>Sadly, in our modern, hyper-connected world, this doesn't go without saying. When you're meeting new people, it helps to prevent interruptions by silencing cell phones and other electronics. Constantly checking who's calling or texting is an efficient way to stifle a conversation or alienate yourself from a crowd by implying you'd like be somewhere else <em>with</em> someone else. Even if others are doing it, avoid the reflexive phone glance if you want to make a good first impression. Wait to check your phone discreetly outside or in the bathroom if all the beeps and buzzes leave you feeling simply Pavlovian.</p> <p>While it may be true that we never get a second chance to make a first impression, we do get many opportunities to perfect our skills with different people and in different settings. Part art and part science, making a fantastic first impression might take a bit of practice. A misstep or <em>faux pas</em> here or there isn't the end of the world &mdash; it's just a lesson to remember for next time.</p> <p><em>How do you make a good first impression? What's the most common mistake you see others do that sabotage a positive first impression? Make a good impression here by sharing in comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/kentin-waits">Kentin Waits</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-simple-ways-to-make-a-fantastic-first-impression">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-4"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-networking-mistakes-you-shouldnt-make">10 Networking Mistakes You Shouldn&#039;t Make</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-ways-even-shy-people-can-fake-confidence-and-get-ahead">10 Ways Even Shy People Can Fake Confidence and Get Ahead</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/masters-of-small-talk-never-do-these-10-things-do-you">Masters of Small Talk Never Do These 10 Things — Do You?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-great-ways-to-network-that-dont-feel-sleazy">5 Great Ways to Network That Don&#039;t Feel Sleazy</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-simple-networking-tricks">15 Simple Networking Tricks</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Development first impressions meeting people networking Tue, 10 Jun 2014 13:00:50 +0000 Kentin Waits 1142123 at http://www.wisebread.com 5 Great Ways to Network That Don't Feel Sleazy http://www.wisebread.com/5-great-ways-to-network-that-dont-feel-sleazy <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-great-ways-to-network-that-dont-feel-sleazy" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/talk-3826524-small.jpg" alt="talking" title="talking" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="167" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>While some seasoned professionals can market and network in a natural way, too many can come off as pick-up artists. Whether they are pitching a new health shake multi-level-marketing plan, their child's Girl Scout cookies, or their new tech startup, when someone you encounter has you in their sights to close a business deal, it can feel very, very uncomfortable. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-networking-mistakes-you-shouldnt-make?ref=seealso">Networking Mistakes to Avoid</a>)</p> <p>So what if you're not a natural networker? Most business experts agree that your body language, tone, and ability to put your contact at ease are more important than the where and when of networking. With that in mind, here are some of the best strategies to getting a foot in the door of opportunity with people you see every day.</p> <h2>1. Make the Wait Great</h2> <p>There are so many instances of &quot;hurry up and wait&quot; in today's society, that it may feel like you spend more time in line or in a chair waiting for your turn than actually getting anything done.</p> <p>Since places like airports, physicians' waiting rooms, and bus stops are meccas of professionals who are just like you (trying to get things done), there is an instant emotional connection that can become a genuine starting point for conversation. While tact is key (you would never want to approach someone who appears bereaved at an airport or in very poor health at the Doc's office), someone who is willing to make eye contact and ask you about your profession is giving you permission to at least make small talk. Use your brief chat to exchange a business card, if there isn't time for anything else. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-simple-networking-tricks?ref=seealso">Simple Networking Tricks</a>)</p> <h2>2. Network Around the Kids</h2> <p>I have met more like-minded professionals in the bleachers of my kids' sporting events than any high-dollar business conference I've attended. The team atmosphere and a sense of &quot;belonging&quot; to a group of people that you may never have bonded with otherwise also brings out opportunities to market. Whether you're paired up with another mom for snack duty or you happen to overhear a frank discussion during overtime, it's generally OK to follow-up with questions about business if they are brief and not overbearing. Close any shop talk convos with compliments or questions about the other's son or daughter, however. It is all about the kids, after all. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/your-31-hidden-networks-that-can-help-you-land-jobs?ref=seealso">Hidden Networks to Help You Land Jobs</a>)</p> <h2>3. Share Your Skills</h2> <p>Do you blog, paint, write, or repair? Are people always asking &quot;how do you do that&quot;? Offering a skills class or workshop to the public is a legitimate way to meet others with similar interests, establish yourself as an expert in your trade, and possibly get some media exposure. Coupon bloggers are known for their initiative in holding &quot;savings workshops&quot; in their local churches and schools &mdash; sometimes for free. The result of these gratis offerings have resulted in book deals, consulting gigs, and a lifetime of goodwill that all the direct postcard mailers in the world can't generate.</p> <h2>4. Request a Referral</h2> <p>I am always amazed whenever I meet with a small business owner who tells me that they have hit a wall with getting new clients, and they admit that they rarely ask for referrals. The simple phrase, &quot;I'd be delighted if you'd let your friends know about my services,&quot; is a golden key to bigger and better things, and it costs nothing to say. Referrals lend themselves to some of the easiest networking of all; you and the new lead have at least one friend in common. Use your shared experiences as a jumping off point for discussing business in a way that's neither harsh nor out of place. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-bad-networking-habits-that-will-kill-your-job-prospects?ref=seealso">Bad Networking Habits</a>)</p> <h2>5. Ask Your Fellow Alumni</h2> <p>I hadn't talked to a friend of mine from school in over 20 years. That didn't stop me from sending a LinkedIn message asking permission to refer a business associate to him for a sales pitch. He was happy to help, and it led to some great trips down memory lane. If I wanted to do some business with someone who starred in the 4th grade play with me or shared a marching band awards victory, I would find it easy to do. People whom you've created childhood experiences with are a special class of contacts that you can continue to check in with, no matter how much time has passed. (This is reserved for people who you were on good terms with, however. I wouldn't recommend networking with ex-prom dates or the class bully unless you've worked things out in the meantime.)</p> <p>I have made some of the best business contacts in the most ordinary places. The key isn't to think of some untapped market to sell your wares; it is to maximize the time with those you know and meet to be respectful of their busy lives and offer them something of value. Even if they aren't a good fit for what you have to offer, they should walk away feeling like they are better off from having talked with you.</p> <p><em>Where do you network? Why not try some networking in comments below? </em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/linsey-knerl">Linsey Knerl</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-great-ways-to-network-that-dont-feel-sleazy">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-simple-networking-tricks">15 Simple Networking Tricks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/networking-basics-for-regular-people">Networking Basics for Regular People</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/are-you-in-the-wrong-career-heres-how-to-tell">Are You in the Wrong Career? Here&#039;s How to Tell</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-bad-networking-habits-that-will-kill-your-job-prospects">15 Bad Networking Habits That Will Kill Your Job Prospects</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/13-great-reasons-to-quit-your-job">13 Great Reasons to Quit Your Job</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Personal Development job search networking referrals Thu, 17 Apr 2014 08:24:14 +0000 Linsey Knerl 1135773 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Things You Can Do to Help an Unemployed Friend Find a Job http://www.wisebread.com/6-things-you-can-do-to-help-an-unemployed-friend-find-a-job <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-things-you-can-do-to-help-an-unemployed-friend-find-a-job" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/friends-5318794-small.jpg" alt="friends" title="friends" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="167" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>While the nation's economy is improving from the depths of despair we experienced in 2008 &ndash; 2009, finding a job is still a challenge for a large number of people. Currently, I have a few friends who are looking for new jobs, some unemployed, some underemployed, and others who want to trade in their current jobs for new ones. These recent experiences have prompted me to consider how I can be the best resource and friend possible during their searches. Here's what I've been up to. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/should-you-talk-to-friends-about-money?ref=seealso">Should You Talk to Friends About Money?</a>)</p> <h2>1. Offer Up Your Contacts</h2> <p>A few of my friends are interested in transitioning in both directions between for-profit and non-profit organizations. I've worked on both sides of the aisle throughout my career, and I've found a great deal of satisfaction and some difficulties in both. Whenever a friend tells me he or she needs a new job, whether by circumstance or choice, the first thing I do is offer to connect them with people I know who can be helpful to them in their search, especially if they are looking to change industries. I spend a lot of time and effort cultivating my network, and it's a tremendous gift to connect like-minded people who can help one another along their career paths. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/your-31-hidden-networks-that-can-help-you-land-jobs?ref=seealso">Hidden Networks That Can Help You Land a Job</a>)</p> <h2>2. Ask Them What They Really Want to Do</h2> <p>Before I make those connections I mentioned above, I ask each of my friends what they really want to do with their careers going forward. These future plans can simply be the next step on their path or a long-term goal. To be most helpful to them on their journeys, I need to know where they want to go. As Lewis Carroll so brilliantly and insightfully wrote in Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, &quot;If you don't know where you're going, any road'll take you there.&quot; We need to have some kind of destination in mind before we set out on a new road.</p> <h2>3. Review the Resume</h2> <p>Just as a map can show us where we've been and the way ahead, a resume succinctly explains our work history and our future ambitions. I always keep mine up-to-date as I add new experiences, although you may find that many of your friends don't have this practice. People are sometimes reluctant to ask for help on their resumes because they are afraid to toot their own horns. Offer your eagle eyes and help a friend brush up a resume so that they shine like the bright stars that they are. Be honest and supportive, encouraging friends to focus on the skills they acquired in each professional experience as well as their achievements and results. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-words-you-need-to-delete-from-your-resume-right-now?ref=seealso">12 Words to Delete From Your Resume</a>)</p> <h2>4. Suggest Groups to Find New Connections</h2> <p>Some people don't realize just how many resources they have in their job search. Many alumni organizations, even if we've graduated a while ago, offer fantastic services to connect to other alums and discover job listings. Professional organizations, LinkedIn groups, and Meetups are other rich pools of opportunities to connect with and learn from others who share our interests and goals.</p> <h2>5. Remind Them to Set Goals and Review Them Regularly</h2> <p>The job search can feel like a grind, especially when it's not going as well as we'd like it to go. We easily lose our way and forget all that we're doing to help ourselves.</p> <p>I encourage my job searching friends to keep track of every person they speak to, every resume and cover letter they submit, and every company that piques their interest. Note the dates and content of the conversation or job listing, and create next steps for each. It's helpful to encourage friends on the hunt for a job to set daily, weekly, and monthly goals and then track their progress. One of the most disorienting parts of the job search is that it feels so overwhelming and often lacks structure. With a plan in hand, we can stay motivated and persistent, two attributes we need to lock down a new job. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-ways-to-maintain-motivation-when-the-going-gets-tough?ref=seealso">9 Ways to Maintain Motivation</a>)</p> <h2>6. Give Them a Break</h2> <p>Looking for a new job is a stressful experience. Friends need our support in their search, and they also need ways to take their minds off of it every once in a while. Have them over for dinner at your place, catch a movie together, or take a walk or run through the park. The job search is a full-time job in and of itself, and just as we need a break from work to be at our best on the job, we also need a break from the job search so that we put our best foot forward with potential new employers. Sometimes our friends will want to vent about the process, and sometimes they'll want to talk about something completely unrelated. Give them that space and an empathic ear.</p> <p>They say it takes a village to raise a child. It also takes a village to grow a career, and it takes several villages to get through a job search. When a friend is looking for a new role, that's a time when we can really step up and show our care and concern. It's sure to be appreciated and reciprocated.</p> <p><em>How have you helped friends find new jobs? Let us know in comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/christa-avampato">Christa Avampato</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-things-you-can-do-to-help-an-unemployed-friend-find-a-job">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/master-these-15-interview-questions">Master These 15 Interview Questions</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-bad-networking-habits-that-will-kill-your-job-prospects">15 Bad Networking Habits That Will Kill Your Job Prospects</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/your-31-hidden-networks-that-can-help-you-land-jobs">Your 31 Hidden Networks That Can Help You Land Jobs</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/51-uses-for-coca-cola-the-ultimate-list">51 Uses for Coca-Cola – the Ultimate List</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-signs-your-company-is-going-under">10 Signs Your Company Is Going Under</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Life Hacks General Tips Job Hunting friendship job search networking Thu, 27 Mar 2014 09:36:18 +0000 Christa Avampato 1133027 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Get Someone to Accept Your LinkedIn Invitation http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-someone-to-accept-your-linkedin-invitation <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-get-someone-to-accept-your-linkedin-invitation" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/email-5145617-small.jpg" alt="email" title="email" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="141" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Once the domain of corporate types, <a href="http://linkedin.com">LinkedIn</a> is a must-have social network for everyone today no matter what career you have. The social network has done an incredible job curating interesting career-related content from top influencers, listing job opportunities, and giving people a path to connect with others on a professional level. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-simple-networking-tricks?ref=seealso">Simple Networking Tricks</a>)</p> <p>When you want to connect with someone on LinkedIn, it's important to remember a few key points so that the other person accepts your invitation to connect without hesitation, even if they don't know you well.</p> <h2>1. Make It Personal</h2> <p>There's a person behind that LinkedIn profile so make the message you put in the invitation personal. LinkedIn pre-fills every invitation with a generic message such as &quot;Hi. I'd like to connect with you on LinkedIn.&quot; While there's nothing wrong with that message, it could give the person the impression that you didn't care enough to personalize the note. That may lead them to ignore the invitation. Add a short simple message to the invitation that makes it clear why you want to connect. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-bad-networking-habits-that-will-kill-your-job-prospects?ref=seealso">15 Bad Networking Habits</a>)</p> <h2>2. Give Them Context</h2> <p>Do you have a connection in common? Did you meet at an event? Do you have a common interest, employer, or experience? In your invitation, provide some type of professional context that helps the person understand who you are.</p> <h2>3. Express Interest in Their Work</h2> <p>Everyone likes to talk about what they do. Let the people you invite to join your network know that you care about their work. A tasteful, authentic compliment about their recent work can go a long way toward opening up the lines of communication. For example, I am a great admirer of one of the top writers for the Associated Press. I reached out to him to tell him how much I liked a recent piece he wrote, and we've had a series of friendly LinkedIn conversations ever since we connected. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/youre-doing-it-wrong-moron-5-tips-for-giving-better-compliments?ref=seealso">How to Give Better Compliments</a>)</p> <h2>4. Offer to Help Them</h2> <p>Everyone has something to offer. Do you see a way that you could be helpful to this contact you want to make? Offer up your support for something that matters to him or her. Because I'm a writer with a number of outlets, I often offer to write about someone whom I admire. It's amazing what that kind of offer can do to open doors.</p> <h2>5. Keep Your Profile Current</h2> <p>This may sound like a no-brainer, but you'd be surprised how many times I get invitations from people who haven't filled in one bit of their own profiles. Take the time to use the platform to explain who you are, your experience, and your interests. When someone gets an invitation from you, they will likely visit your profile before deciding to accept or ignore your invitation. Think of your profile as a first professional impression you are giving someone. Sometimes, a first impression is the only chance you get on LinkedIn, so make sure you put your best foot forward. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/get-your-linkedin-profile-noticed-with-a-few-attention-grabbing-tweaks?ref=seealso">Get Your LinkedIn Profile Noticed</a>)</p> <p>Remember that in addition to connecting to a person, you also become a secondary connection to everyone in his or her network. Circles intersect and overlap in fantastic ways, and those circles can open doors that you may not even know exist. As with all other social networks, the more heart, effort, and energy you put into it, the more you'll receive in return. If you'd like to connect with me, look me up at <a href="http://linkedin.com/in/christaavampato">Christa Avampato</a>. Happy connecting!</p> <p><em>Have you scored a particularly valuable connection on LinkedIn? How'd you do it?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/christa-avampato">Christa Avampato</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-someone-to-accept-your-linkedin-invitation">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-5"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/13-ways-to-use-social-media-in-business">13 Ways to Use Social Media in Business</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-things-you-should-never-do-on-linkedin">7 Things You Should Never Do on LinkedIn</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-bad-habits-that-are-ruining-your-career">6 Bad Habits That Are Ruining Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-to-stop-doing-on-social-media-by-30">10 Things to Stop Doing on Social Media by 30</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/30-minutes-to-a-linkedin-profile-that-gets-you-hired">30 Minutes to a LinkedIn Profile That Gets You Hired</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building connections LinkedIn networking social media Wed, 19 Mar 2014 09:36:15 +0000 Christa Avampato 1130832 at http://www.wisebread.com 15 Bad Networking Habits That Will Kill Your Job Prospects http://www.wisebread.com/15-bad-networking-habits-that-will-kill-your-job-prospects <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/15-bad-networking-habits-that-will-kill-your-job-prospects" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/business-3449479-small.jpg" alt="blindfolded business people" title="blindfolded business people" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="167" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>For those facing the competitive arena of the job market you likely know that networking with other people in your peer group and beyond could be the ideal way to get your foot in the next door with a job opening. Networking has helped many <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/small-business/how-to-network-sincerely-and-effectively">land great jobs</a>. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-simple-networking-tricks?ref=seealso">15 Simple Networking Tricks</a>)</p> <p>However helpful networking can be to your job-finding success, it can also kill any prospects you have on a potential job, especially if you are doing it wrong. Here are 15 job prospect-killing moves you may be guilty of in your search for a new job.</p> <h2>1. Networking With Your Current Boss's Allies</h2> <p>Many people make the mistake of not researching with whom they are speaking. If you talk down your current boss to an acquaintance of his or hers, you likely not only kill any chance of getting a new job, you may be putting your current job at risk.</p> <h2>2. Projecting Poor Body Language</h2> <p>When <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/smart-ways-to-start-and-end-networking-conversations">meeting a potential job contact</a> in person, it is important that you maintain a professional presence no matter the location in which you are meeting. Make sure to make eye contact, offer a firm handshake, and watch your non-verbal actions. If you have a tendency to smirk or roll your eyes, your contact may dismiss you before even finding out about your experience. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/you-are-what-you-do-16-ways-to-improve-your-body-language?ref=seealso">16 Ways to Improve Your Body Language</a>)</p> <h2>3. Using Terrible Grammar</h2> <p>If you are meeting a networking contact via email, you better make sure your writing skills are up to snuff. Use complete sentences, and don't speak in Internet slang better reserved for texting your friends. Keep profane words out of the conversation and double-check for typos prior to hitting send. If meeting in person, enunciate your words and speak concisely and clearly without slang words.</p> <h2>4. Being a Wallflower</h2> <p>If you are in an environment that is all about networking and making connections but choose to cling to the edge of the room instead of mingling, you likely are ruining a possible good first impression. It may be better to skip these events altogether than give off a bad vibe.</p> <h2>5. Having Poor Manners</h2> <p>Whether online or off, manners are still required. A simple &quot;please&quot; and a &quot;thank you&quot; will get you far. Never interrupt conversations already in progress just to get in a handshake. Lack of manners or basic courtesies are a turn off to many people looking to recruit new talent. Those who consider you to be rude are likely not going to refer you to their own contacts. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-rules-of-etiquette-everyone-should-know-and-follow?ref=seealso">Etiquette Rules You Should Follow</a>)</p> <h2>6. Missing Contact Info</h2> <p>If you are providing others with your business card or other contact information, make sure the details are correct. Someone may be more than interested in giving you a shot at a job but will easily become frustrated when they can't get in touch with you because your phone number has been disconnected or your email account is no longer active.</p> <h2>7. Delaying a Response</h2> <p>If you tend to procrastinate on new interview requests or other job inquiries, you may be showing your true colors to a potential employer. If you have successfully networked with other contacts who in turn contact you for a job, make sure to follow up on emails or phone calls. If you fail to get back in touch within 24 hours, you may be perceived as unreliable.</p> <h2>8. Network Spamming</h2> <p>If you have been lucky enough to get the contact information of people with an &quot;in,&quot; use it wisely. Make the initial contact and wait for a reply. If no reply comes within a week's time do one follow up contact. Avoid becoming a harassing presence in the other person's life with repeated phone calls, emails, or contacts on social media.</p> <h2>9. Missing Appointments</h2> <p>If you have the opportunity to meet with a networking connection, be sure to show up and show up on time. If someone takes the time to hear you out about job opportunities, have the decency to be respectful of their time. Otherwise you will be viewed as irresponsible and not reliable. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-always-be-on-time?ref=seealso">How to Always Be on Time</a>)</p> <h2>10. Telling Lies</h2> <p>While it can be difficult to toot one's own horn to another person in a position of power, some people find it all too easy to hype up their experience by just plain lying. Be truthful about your skills and experience even if you aren't speaking to a hiring authority. No one will want to recommend a known liar to their employer or other acquaintance. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-tell-if-someone-is-lying-other-than-the-long-nose?ref=seealso">How to Tell If Someone Is Lying</a>)</p> <h2>11. Making Inappropriate Confessions</h2> <p>In the process of making small talk with a networking connection, make sure you are aware of what you are saying and how it can impact your job prospects. For instance, if you freely admit to having a house full of stolen office supplies, your connection may find a reason to step away from you quickly.</p> <h2>12. Complaining</h2> <p>While communicating with your potential networking contact, always keep things positive. If you are perceived as a negative person because you constantly complain and rarely seem satisfied with anything, you may be the last person an employer wants in the office. Save your rants for your close friends that are totally unrelated to your job.</p> <h2>13. Burning Your Bridges</h2> <p>If you have had a successful interaction with a <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/your-31-hidden-networks-that-can-help-you-land-jobs">networking connection</a> only to discover things didn't work out in your favor, don't burn the bridges you have established out of spite. While this particular job may not be a win for you, the networking contact may be instrumental in the near-future. Don't bad-mouth your allies or be rude because things didn't work in your favor.</p> <h2>14. Offering Too Much Information</h2> <p>There are people that have a bad habit of talking entirely too much for their own good when nervous. When networking with a potential employer practice a few breathing exercises and watch what you say. Telling your potential boss too much information about your personal life can put you at a serious disadvantage.</p> <h2>15. Not Cooling Your Emotions</h2> <p>If you have been without a job for some time or just plain dislike the job you currently have, it can be easy to feel overwhelmed and generally emotional about a new job prospect. If you lose control of your emotions during your networking contact, you may be seen as unstable. Don't cry, yell, or in any other way have a meltdown in front of someone who may be interested in hiring you.</p> <p><em>Anything I've missed? What networking mistakes have you made or have you seen others make?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/tisha-tolar">Tisha Tolar</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-bad-networking-habits-that-will-kill-your-job-prospects">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-words-to-never-use-in-a-job-interview">10 Words to Never Use in a Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-signs-your-company-is-going-under">10 Signs Your Company Is Going Under</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/flashback-friday-the-65-best-career-tips-weve-ever-shared">Flashback Friday: The 65 Best Career Tips We&#039;ve Ever Shared</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-that-job-you-hate-keeps-you-poor">6 Ways That Job You Hate Keeps You Poor</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-you-can-do-right-now-to-become-more-hirable">10 Things You Can Do Right Now to Become More Hirable</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Job Hunting job search networking networking mistakes Fri, 21 Feb 2014 10:48:36 +0000 Tisha Tolar 1125261 at http://www.wisebread.com Best Money Tips: Don'ts for Online Networking http://www.wisebread.com/best-money-tips-donts-for-online-networking <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/best-money-tips-donts-for-online-networking" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/network-4677821-small.jpg" alt="networking" title="networking" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="167" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Welcome to Wise Bread's <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/topic/best-money-tips">Best Money Tips</a> Roundup! Today we found some great articles on don'ts for online networking, retirement savings in your 40s, and ways to earn passive income.</p> <h2>Top 5 Articles</h2> <p><a href="http://www.savvysugar.com/Things-You-Shouldnt-Do-LinkedIn-17965792">Be a LinkedIn Whiz: 5 Don'ts For Online Networking</a> &mdash; When networking on LinkedIn, don't reach out to someone without reading their profile first. [PopSugar Smart Living]</p> <p><a href="http://www.narrowbridge.net/start-retirement-savings-in-your-40s/">How to Start Retirement Savings in Your 40s</a> &mdash; To start saving for retirement in your 40s, avoid risk by diversifying your investments. [NarrowBridge Finance]</p> <p><a href="http://www.moolanomy.com/3504/10-surefire-ways-to-earn-passive-income-sconnell/">10 Surefire Ways to Earn Passive Income</a> &mdash; Earn passive income by building websites or writing a book. [Moolanomy]</p> <p><a href="http://timemanagementninja.com/2013/06/7-ways-your-time-management-is-putting-you-at-risk/">7 Ways Your Time Management Is Putting You At Risk</a> &mdash; If your time management skills are lacking, your relationships and money may be suffering. [Time Management Ninja]</p> <p><a href="http://financialhighway.com/15-behavioral-interview-questions-and-answers/">15 Behavioral Interview Questions and Answers</a> &mdash; When asked about an obstacle you overcame during an interview, demonstrate how your positive attributes and skills related to the position you are applying for helped you solve the problem. [Financial Highway]</p> <h2>Other Essential Reading</h2> <p><a href="http://retireby40.org/2013/06/why-start-investing-young/">Why you need to start investing when you're young</a> &mdash; It is important to start investing when you are young due to the power of compound interest. [Retire By 40]</p> <p><a href="http://www.dumblittleman.com/2013/06/say-goodbye-to-fast-food-and-master.html">Healthy Living: Say Goodbye to Fast Food and Master the Cooking Habit in 3 Simple, Stress-Free Steps</a> &mdash; Master cooking on a regular basis by planning and grocery shopping once per week. [Dumb Little Man]</p> <p><a href="http://lifehacker.com/everything-you-didnt-know-you-could-do-with-google-voi-512727229">Everything You Didn't Know You Could Do With Google's Voice Commands</a> &mdash; Did you know Google Voice Commands can look up a flight status or area codes? [Lifehacker]</p> <p><a href="http://parentingsquad.com/father-s-day-gifts-the-whole-family-can-help-give">Father's Day Gifts the Whole Family Can Help Give</a> &mdash; This Father's Day, get your dad tickets to a sporting event or make him breakfast in bed. [Parenting Squad]</p> <p><a href="http://www.marcandangel.com/2013/06/09/9-warning-signs-youre-in-bad-company/">9 Warning Signs You're in Bad Company</a> &mdash; You may be in bad company if you feel the negativity of the people you hang out with is rubbing off on you. [Marc and Angel Hack Life]</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/ashley-jacobs">Ashley Jacobs</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/best-money-tips-donts-for-online-networking">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-4"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-crucial-job-searching-steps-most-people-skip">6 Crucial Job Searching Steps Most People Skip</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-things-you-should-never-do-on-linkedin">7 Things You Should Never Do on LinkedIn</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/tips-for-joining-an-excellent-startup-company">Tips for Joining an Excellent Startup Company</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-times-at-work-youre-just-wasting-effort">10 Times at Work You&#039;re Just Wasting Effort</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/tips-for-finding-legitimate-work-at-home-opportunities">Tips for Finding Legitimate Work at Home Opportunities</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income best money tips LinkedIn networking online online networking Thu, 13 Jun 2013 10:00:33 +0000 Ashley Jacobs 978123 at http://www.wisebread.com 10 Networking Mistakes You Shouldn't Make http://www.wisebread.com/10-networking-mistakes-you-shouldnt-make <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/10-networking-mistakes-you-shouldnt-make" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/business-network-5145622-small.jpg" alt="networking" title="networking" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="167" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Networking makes landing a job, starting a business, and just about everything else in life a little bit easier &mdash; provided you network well. If you connect with people in such a way that you irritate them or show a poor side of yourself, your networking efforts can actually hurt you. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/networking-basics-for-regular-people" target="_blank">Networking Basics for Regular People</a>)</p> <p>It's crucial to avoid networking mistakes as much as possible. The list below is not exhaustive &mdash; there will always be a new way to trip up out there &mdash; but if you can at least avoid these mistakes, you'll be well on your way to improving your networking efforts.</p> <h2>1. Connecting With the Wrong People</h2> <p>Just because <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/effective-networking-in-a-one-horse-town" target="_blank">someone is available</a> doesn't mean they can help with the particular project you're working on. Asking a freelancer, for instance, with help landing a full-time job is just going to confuse that freelancer &mdash; she's just not going to be as familiar with the question as a hiring manager.</p> <h2>2. Networking in a Rush</h2> <p>Some people wait until they desperately need help to network. That approach can lead to some serious desperation, which shows. If your contacts know that you need them much more than they need you, they'll be turned off.</p> <h2>3. Failing to Follow Up</h2> <p>If you connect with someone, you're going to need to keep in touch to actually build a relationship. Going to a networking event and collecting a deck of business cards isn't enough to get you a connection who you can ask for a favor.</p> <h2>4. Being Unprofessional</h2> <p>Networking may not be all about finding a job, but that doesn't mean that you shouldn't be professional about the process. Even little details, like an email address that tries too hard to be cute, can be off-putting.</p> <h2>5. Forcing a Connection Through Multiple Contacts</h2> <p>This particular mistake happens more frequently online. In an attempt to network, a person will send multiple tweets or comment on multiple blog posts very quickly, almost like she's trying to create a connection through quantity of communications.</p> <h2>6. Spamming Your Contacts</h2> <p>Once a connection is established, you effectively have permission to communicate further. But you don't have permission to spam your contacts with updates, email newsletters, requests to fund your Kickstarter, <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/network-marketing-parties-opportunity-or-emotional-blackmail" target="_blank">or anything else</a>. You need to send personalized communications if you want people to pay attention.</p> <h2>7. Making It All About You</h2> <p>There has to be some give (as well as some take) in networking so that your connections will continue to want to help you in the long run.</p> <h2>8. Monopolizing a New Connection's Time</h2> <p>Particularly at networking events, there's a temptation to talk to someone for as long as possible &mdash; to really cement the new relationship &mdash; but doing so frustrates everyone else in the room. And it might not just be people in the room you're irritating. Everyone you meet has a life outside of the place you meet them.</p> <h2>9. Failing to Return the Favor</h2> <p>If a connection does you a favor, there's an expectation that you'll try to <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-being-nice-at-work-can-payoff" target="_blank">help him out down the road</a>. You may not always be able to follow up perfectly, but intentionally blowing off a connection's request is rude.</p> <h2>10. Lying</h2> <p>You would think that people would know better than to lie. Don't lie to a new connection about what you can do or who you know. Your new contact will discover your lie, and sooner than you think.</p> <p><em>Any networking mistakes I've overlooked? Please share them in comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/thursday-bram">Thursday Bram</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-networking-mistakes-you-shouldnt-make">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-bad-networking-habits-that-will-kill-your-job-prospects">15 Bad Networking Habits That Will Kill Your Job Prospects</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-crucial-job-searching-steps-most-people-skip">6 Crucial Job Searching Steps Most People Skip</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/job-search-tips-that-will-get-you-a-job-in-2012">Job Search Tips That Will Get You a Job in 2012</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/book-review-the-twitter-job-search-guide">Book Review: The Twitter Job Search Guide</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-quit-your-job">How to Quit Your Job</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Job Hunting meeting people networking networking mistakes Wed, 12 Jun 2013 10:24:33 +0000 Thursday Bram 977970 at http://www.wisebread.com