stocks http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/2959/all en-US Don't Be Fooled by an Investment's Rate of Return http://www.wisebread.com/dont-be-fooled-by-an-investments-rate-of-return <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/dont-be-fooled-by-an-investments-rate-of-return" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/investor_compares_quotes_from_newspaper_and_tablet.jpg" alt="Investor compares quotes from newspaper and tablet" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>When you invest, you are looking for return. You want your money to grow over time, preferably at a rate that will allow you to achieve your financial goals.</p> <p>An investment's rate of return can be a deceptive thing, however. The amount of money that an investment has made in the past isn't a guarantee of future returns. Moreover, these returns by themselves don't tell you a whole lot about what you are investing in.</p> <p>Learning how to analyze an investment's returns &mdash; and understanding its limitations &mdash; will help you on the path to financial freedom. Just remember these key facts about an investment's return when examining it.</p> <h2>Short time frames don't tell you much</h2> <p>&quot;Hey, this mutual fund went up 29 percent last year! Woo hoo!&quot; That's great, but what did it do the year before? And the year before that? How has it performed over the last decade? Looking at the rate of return for a single year is not particularly useful, as any investment can have a hot 12 months. To get a sense of how an investment may perform in the future, it helps to have a long record of performance to examine. Fortunately, most brokerages and financial websites have comprehensive information on historical returns, so you're not simply looking at the performance of the last year.</p> <h2>It offers no information on the type of investment</h2> <p>It's great if an investment has a solid rate of return, but that should not be the only consideration when looking to buy shares. If you are buying a stock, you need to ask yourself key questions aside from just looking at performance. What industry does the company operate in? How big is the company? Does it operate internationally? If you're talking about a mutual fund, what is the investment mix? Answering these questions will help you understand whether you already own similar investments, and whether it makes sense to add them to your portfolio.</p> <h2>It's almost useless without context</h2> <p>Let's say you come across a mutual fund that earned a 9 percent return last year. You might think that is pretty good, right? Well, it doesn't look so good when you consider the S&amp;P 500 returned 11.96 percent. Information on returns is only meaningful when it is paired with information about the broader stock market, comparable investments, and specific indexes. A small cap ETF, for example, should be examined alongside the Russell 2000 index. A mutual fund focused on technology should be compared to prominent technology indexes. Fortunately, most brokerage firms and financial websites do provide this, so it's important to analyze market returns using that context.</p> <h2>It does not always factor in all costs</h2> <p>If you purchase a mutual fund or ETF, a certain portion of your investment is taken in expenses and fees. While mutual fund returns are usually reported net of expenses, not every cost is included in this calculation. Many funds have sales charges and commissions (also known as loads) that you pay when buying and selling. Your brokerage firm may also charge a commission to execute the trade. This can reduce your overall return. The good news is that there are many good no-load mutual funds out there, and many can be traded without a commission, depending on the broker.</p> <p>One more caveat regarding costs. Capital gains taxes will also reduce your balance when you sell. Be sure to factor in these costs when examining an investment's rate of return.</p> <h2>It does not offer detail on volatility</h2> <p>Let's say you have a stock that rose in value from $50 to $90 in five years. The annualized return on that stock is 16 percent. But that does not tell you whether the stock's performance has been consistent or wildly up and down.</p> <p>For example, during that five-year period, that stock may have risen 20 percent, then dropped 25 percent, then risen 44 percent, dropped 10 percent, and finally rose 53 percent. That's pretty volatile, and may be outside the comfort zone of many investors even though the overall return is good. To get a better picture of the investment's performance, you need to look at the returns from each individual year, but even that offers no insight into price swings within any given year.</p> <h2>It can't answer the question &quot;Why?&quot;</h2> <p>An investment's rate of return may be the crucial piece of information you need to know before investing, but there's a lot that it doesn't tell you. Perhaps most importantly, it does not offer any insight into <em>why </em>an investment's price moved up or doing during a certain period.</p> <p>Investment values go up and down for a variety of reasons, not all of them related to company performance. Perhaps a retailer saw its shares fall sharply during one quarter due to a series of natural disasters. Perhaps another company saw shares rise dramatically because of hype over its Super Bowl commercial. Returns on investment are crucial to know, but if you are an investor, it's important to do your own homework to understand why a price went up or down. Doing so will help you better understand how an investment may perform in the future.</p> <h2>It gives you no information on fundamentals</h2> <p>An investment's historical rate of return can give you insight into how it might perform in the future. But the company's actual financial performance may be even more important. It's not enough to just examine an investment's return. You should also look at company balance sheets, analyze earnings reports, and look at things like cash flow, debt, and price-to-earnings ratio. This will help you understand whether an investment's price is justified. Examples abound of companies that saw share prices skyrocket based on speculation although earnings weren't there to support it.</p> <h2>It tells you nothing about taxes</h2> <p>Let's say you invested $1,000 in a company stock and it earned an annual return of 9 percent a year over five years. That means you'll end up with $1,450 when you sell, right? Well, not exactly. Remember that unless you are investing in a tax-advantaged account such as a Roth IRA, the government takes its share when you sell. Assuming that you'll be taxed at the long-term capital gains rate of 15 percent, suddenly, that 9 percent annual return became something closer to 7 percent. Keep this in mind when trying to calculate how much money you'll actually walk away with.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/tim-lemke">Tim Lemke</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dont-be-fooled-by-an-investments-rate-of-return">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-3-rules-every-mediocre-investor-must-know">The 3 Rules Every Mediocre Investor Must Know</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-investing-tips-you-wish-you-could-tell-your-younger-self">11 Investing Tips You Wish You Could Tell Your Younger Self</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-simple-ways-to-conquer-your-fear-of-investing">4 Simple Ways to Conquer Your Fear of Investing</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-the-risk-averse-can-get-into-the-stock-market">How the Risk Averse Can Get Into the Stock Market</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-foolproof-ways-to-protect-your-money-from-inflation">4 Foolproof Ways to Protect Your Money From Inflation</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Investment balance sheet bonds fees mutual funds rate of return returns roi s&p 500 stock market stocks volatility Fri, 08 Dec 2017 10:00:07 +0000 Tim Lemke 2068609 at http://www.wisebread.com 4 Simple Ways to Conquer Your Fear of Investing http://www.wisebread.com/4-simple-ways-to-conquer-your-fear-of-investing <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/4-simple-ways-to-conquer-your-fear-of-investing" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/businessman_cowering_on_blue_blackboard_background.jpg" alt="Businessman cowering on blue blackboard background" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>If you're nervous about investing in the stock market, you're not alone. Stock ownership in the U.S. is down, and a recent poll indicates that frightening memories of the last bear market may be to blame.</p> <p>According to a Gallup survey, just 54 percent of U.S. adults own stocks, including those owned through mutual funds that people invest in via their 401(k) or other retirement accounts. That's down from 62 percent who owned stocks before the last bear market. During that devastating downturn, which began at the end of 2007 and ran through early 2009, the market fell by more than 50 percent. In part, Gallup blames the decline in stock ownership on that painful, fearful time.</p> <p>&quot;It appears the financial crisis and recession may have fundamentally changed some Americans' views of stocks as an investment,&quot; the company stated on its website. &quot;The collapse in stock values in 2008 and 2009 seems to have left a greater impression on these people than the ongoing bull market that has followed it, as well as research showing the strong historical performance of stocks as a long-term investment.&quot;</p> <p>If that sounds like you, here are some suggestions for overcoming your concerns. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-over-these-5-scary-things-about-investing?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Get Over These 5 Scary Things About Investing</a>)</p> <h2>1. Develop a healthy fear of not investing</h2> <p>If it's safety you're after, there are few safer places to put your money than a bank. Because deposits are insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, you could put up to $250,000 in a bank account and rest easy knowing that if the bank went out of business, the federal government would make sure you got your money back.</p> <p>While a bank account can be a good place to keep some savings for emergencies, right now many banks are paying just .01 percent interest, making them a horrible place to pursue long-term goals like retirement.</p> <p>For example, let's say you're 30 years old and deposit $10,000 at .01 percent interest. In 40 years, your $10,000 will have turned into &mdash; wait for it &mdash; $10,040. That's right. After 40 years, you will have made just $40 on your 10 grand. And once you factor inflation into the mix, the buying power of your $10,000 will have taken a big step backward.</p> <p>Let's say you earn 7 percent interest instead. In 40 years, your $10,000 will have turned into $150,000. And 7 percent is a very conservative assumption since the stock market's long-term average annual return has been 10 percent.</p> <p>So, instead of being fearful about investing, it is more logical to be fearful about not investing.</p> <h2>2. Learn a little market history</h2> <p>Many of the mistakes investors make are due to their emotions. If the market falls, some people get scared and pull money out of the market, usually to their detriment. A little knowledge of market history can help you stay the course.</p> <p>The longer you keep money in the market, the more likely you are to make money. When Morningstar analyzed the stock market's performance during each one-, five- and 15-year period from 1926 to 2016, it found that 74 percent of the one-year periods showed positive returns, 86 percent of the five-year periods generated gains, and 100 percent of the 15-year periods were up. In other words, based on 90 years of history, if you stay in the market for at least 15 years, it's a virtual certainty that you will make money.</p> <p>Putting time on your side is also the key to surviving a significant market downturn. According to Morningstar, someone with $100,000 invested in the stock market at the beginning of 2007 would have lost nearly half that amount by early 2009. Brutal, right? However, if they had stayed invested, by January 2017 their portfolio would have been worth nearly twice its value on January 2007. Despite that horrible downturn, their average annual return over those 10 years would have been nearly 7 percent. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-the-risk-averse-can-get-into-the-stock-market?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How the Risk Averse Can Get Into the Stock Market</a>)</p> <h2>3. Start small</h2> <p>If you have a chunk of money to invest but just can't work up the courage to hit &quot;buy,&quot; consider investing a little at a time through dollar-cost averaging. The idea is very simple. Just take the total amount (let's say $12,000), divide by the number of months you plan to invest (let's use 12), and invest that amount at the same time every month ($1,000 per month).</p> <p>If the market has a good month, your money will buy fewer shares. If the market has a bad month, your money will buy more. You never have to worry about getting the timing just right. By spreading your investments over a year a more, you minimize the risk of losing a lot of money through an immediate downturn. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/is-dollar-cost-averaging-the-right-strategy-for-you?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Is Dollar Cost Averaging the Right Strategy for You?</a>)</p> <h2>4. Keep it simple</h2> <p>Investment terminology can be confusing. Diversification. Asset allocation. What does it all mean? You can put these helpful concepts to work without qualifying for a job on Wall Street by investing in a super simple target-date fund.</p> <p>Because they are mutual funds, target-date funds are inherently diversified &mdash; that is, the money you invest is spread out among multiple stocks, bonds, or other investments. And they take care of asset allocation decisions for you. That means they are designed with an appropriate mix of stocks and bonds for someone your age. They even automatically adjust that mix as you get older, tilting their stock/bond allocation more toward bonds to make your portfolio appropriately more conservative as you near your intended retirement date.</p> <p>It's understandable that the last bear market may have dampened your enthusiasm for the stock market. However, the market continues to offer most people their best opportunity for building wealth. The steps described above should help you wade back into the investment waters without fear.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F4-simple-ways-to-conquer-your-fear-of-investing&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F4%2520Simple%2520Ways%2520to%2520Conquer%2520Your%2520Fear%2520of%2520Investing.jpg&amp;description=4%20Simple%20Ways%20to%20Conquer%20Your%20Fear%20of%20Investing"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/4%20Simple%20Ways%20to%20Conquer%20Your%20Fear%20of%20Investing.jpg" alt="4 Simple Ways to Conquer Your Fear of Investing" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/matt-bell">Matt Bell</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-simple-ways-to-conquer-your-fear-of-investing">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dont-be-fooled-by-an-investments-rate-of-return">Don&#039;t Be Fooled by an Investment&#039;s Rate of Return</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-the-risk-averse-can-get-into-the-stock-market">How the Risk Averse Can Get Into the Stock Market</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-reasons-to-invest-in-stocks-past-age-50">7 Reasons to Invest in Stocks Past Age 50</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-3-rules-every-mediocre-investor-must-know">The 3 Rules Every Mediocre Investor Must Know</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-types-of-investors-which-one-are-you">8 Types of Investors — Which One Are You?</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Investment allocation bonds dollar cost averaging fears losing money not investing risk stock market stocks target date funds Wed, 06 Dec 2017 09:30:11 +0000 Matt Bell 2066563 at http://www.wisebread.com 7 Roadblocks to Retirement (And How to Clear Them) http://www.wisebread.com/7-roadblocks-to-retirement-and-how-to-clear-them <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/7-roadblocks-to-retirement-and-how-to-clear-them" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/sticky_note_on_notice_board.jpg" alt="Sticky note on notice board" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>How often do you dream about retirement? It's nice to think about the day when you can stop answering to a boss, and instead spend your time relaxing, traveling, and enjoying life to the fullest. Well, if you want that dream to become a reality, you may need to make some significant life changes <em>now</em>. If you're guilty of the following things, you could end up working well past your planned retirement age. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-much-should-you-have-saved-for-retirement-by-30-40-50?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How Much Should You Have Saved for Retirement by 30? 40? 50?</a>)</p> <h2>1. You simply aren't putting enough money away</h2> <p>Most people vastly underestimate the amount they need to stash away for their golden years. The problem comes from the fact that many financial planners will tell you to put between 10 and 15 percent of your income toward retirement. However, that assumes you started saving in your 20s.</p> <p>If you are now 40, and only started putting money away 10 years ago, you need a higher savings rate in order to make up for those missing years. In fact, you would have to put around 25 percent of your salary away each month and work until you're 70 in order to make up for the shortfall. And as always, compound interest is the real key to saving. By missing out on those years in your 20s, you will have significantly impacted your future nest egg. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-start-saving-for-retirement-at-40?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Start Saving for Retirement at 40+</a>)</p> <h2>2. You aren't taking advantage of your employer's 401(k) match</h2> <p>Simply put, any kind of match that your employer gives you is free money, and it would be silly not to take advantage of every cent. The average match out there is 3 percent of your pay, although companies can vary greatly on what they offer. This means that if you only put in 2 percent of your salary, you are leaving 0.7 percent of your income on the table. It may not seem like a lot, but that can really add up over time.</p> <p>If your company offers you 50 percent on the dollar for up to 6 percent of your pay, you should be putting 6 percent away. If it's a dollar amount match, say $2,500 per year, make sure you put in at least that amount. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-dumb-401k-mistakes-smart-people-make?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Dumb 401(k) Mistakes Smart People Make</a>)</p> <h2>3. Your plan is not aggressive enough</h2> <p>Most 401(k) plans have something called a &quot;target date&quot; that is used to figure out what your retirement portfolio will look like. If you have 30 years to go until retirement, you will almost certainly want at least a moderately aggressive portfolio. This will be comprised primarily of stocks, which offer higher gains, but are more volatile and can lose their value quickly. However, the stock market will always recover over time, and if you have that time to spare, this is the plan you should use.</p> <p>If you have less time to go until retirement, your portfolio will have way less stocks in it, opting instead for a larger percentage of bonds. These are much safer, but they don't have the ability to make as much money as stocks. If you came into the retirement savings habit late, you should talk to a professional about how to organize your portfolio. You simply may not have enough time to make money with a conservative plan, but could also risk losing money with a more aggressive one. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/start-planning-now-for-when-your-target-date-fund-ends?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Start Planning Now for When Your Target-Date Fund Ends</a>)</p> <h2>4. You're spending too much of your disposable income</h2> <p>A coffee here. A magazine there. Eating out every week. These small expenditures really add up, and instead of saving the money you'll need to survive after you stop working, these frivolous buys are burning holes in your pocket.</p> <p>Yes, life's little luxuries are important for your morale and self-esteem from time to time, but get a handle on those expenses and budget accordingly. You may find that you're spending $40 a month just on coffee. That's $480 a year. Let's say you plan on retiring in 30 years, and you stop getting that morning coffee for one year. A good rate of return on retirement investments is about 8 percent. Thirty years down the road, that $480 will become almost $5,000. If you cut your daily coffee out entirely, it will add over $63,500 to your retirement fund in a 30 year period. Now think about it: Is that &quot;luxury&quot; really worth it? (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-effortless-ways-to-prevent-budget-busting-impulse-buys?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Effortless Ways to Prevent Budget-Busting Impulse Buys</a>)</p> <h2>5. Social Security benefits alone will not be enough</h2> <p>It seems unfair that we pay into the system all our working lives, and when it comes time to retire, we get very little back. But, that is simply the result of a population that is living longer, yet retiring at the same age of 65. There just isn't enough money in Social Security to totally support you unless you have almost everything completely bought and paid for by the time you retire, and even then, it will be tough going.</p> <p>Right now, benefits for retired workers average around $1,374 per month, or just over $16,400 annually. When you consider that the federal poverty line is currently $12,060 for a one-person household, that's a little too close for comfort.</p> <p>While it's possible to survive on that, barely, you have to ask yourself: Do you really want to spend the last 20+ years of your life scraping to make ends meet? (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-smart-ways-to-boost-your-social-security-payout-before-retirement?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Smart Ways to Boost Your Social Security Payout Before Retirement</a>)</p> <h2>6. You're using your home like a cash machine</h2> <p>It's so tempting to dig into the equity in our homes, especially when the housing market is strong and interest rates are so low. But, every time you refinance your home to take out money, and start another 30-year mortgage, you are seriously impacting the quality of your retirement.</p> <p>Ideally, by the time you retire, you'll want that home to be paid for; no mortgage left, only taxes and maintenance. But if you are 40 years old and just did a 30-year refinance to take out some cash, you've ensured you'll be paying that mortgage until you hit 70. Not only that, but every time you do a cash-out refi, you're spending money on fees.</p> <p>If you must refinance, consider doing a 10 or 15-year fixed rate term instead. Get that mortgage paid off quickly. You'll also pay thousands less in interest over the life of the loan. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/3-times-a-refinance-is-the-wrong-move?ref=seealso" target="_blank">3 Times a Refinance Is the Wrong Move</a>)</p> <h2>7. You're not aiming to become a millionaire</h2> <p>When people start tucking away money for retirement, they don't really consider the lump sum they are going to need when they eventually stop working. And ask any average Joe if they will be a millionaire one day, and they will laugh at you and say something like, &quot;Yeah, right!&quot;</p> <p>But, everyone should be doing what they can to become a millionaire in retirement. While it may not be possible to hit that figure exactly, you should still aim as high as you can.</p> <p>It's commonly advised that by the time you hit retirement age, you should have <em>at least</em> 10 times your current salary in your retirement account. With the current median income hovering around the $60K mark, that means that you should have just over half a million dollars in your fund if you retire this year. If you're a higher earner, let's say you earn $120K a year, that figure should be over a million. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/heres-how-far-1-million-will-actually-go-in-retirement?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Here's How Far $1 Million Will Actually Go in Retirement</a>)</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F7-roadblocks-to-retirement-and-how-to-clear-them&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F7%2520Roadblocks%2520to%2520Retirement%2520%2528And%2520How%2520to%2520Clear%2520Them%2529.jpg&amp;description=7%20Roadblocks%20to%20Retirement%20(And%20How%20to%20Clear%20Them)"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/7%20Roadblocks%20to%20Retirement%20%28And%20How%20to%20Clear%20Them%29.jpg" alt="7 Roadblocks to Retirement (And How to Clear Them)" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-roadblocks-to-retirement-and-how-to-clear-them">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-18"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-plan-for-a-forced-early-retirement">How to Plan for a Forced Early Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-signs-youre-making-all-the-right-moves-for-retirement">8 Signs You&#039;re Making All the Right Moves for Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-to-protect-your-retirement-from-inflation">4 Ways to Protect Your Retirement From Inflation</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-signs-its-time-to-retire">8 Signs It&#039;s Time to Retire</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-save-for-retirement-when-you-are-unemployed">How to Save for Retirement When You Are Unemployed</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Retirement 401(k) benefits golden years homeownership nest egg poverty refinance saving money social security stocks Wed, 29 Nov 2017 10:00:06 +0000 Paul Michael 2062578 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Ways Meeting the 2018 401(k) Contribution Limits Will Brighten Your Future http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-meeting-the-2018-401k-contribution-limits-will-brighten-your-future <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-ways-meeting-the-2018-401k-contribution-limits-will-brighten-your-future" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/piggy_bank_with_retirement_formula.jpg" alt="Piggy Bank with retirement formula" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Starting next year, investors will be allowed to contribute more money into their 401(k)s. In 2018, the limit on annual contributions to a 401(k) plan will rise from $18,000 to $18,500.</p> <p>That additional $500 may not seem like a lot, but you should try and hit the new maximum if you can. Maxing out your 401(k) is often the best way to accumulate a healthy sum for retirement, and there are great tax benefits as well.</p> <p>If you're on the fence about whether you need to direct another $500 into your 401(k), consider these arguments.</p> <h2>1. It could net you tens of thousands of dollars</h2> <p>It's not easy to contribute $18,500 annually into a retirement account. But if you can do it, that extra $500 each year can really pay off. Let's say you're 30 years old and plan to retire at age 65. Assuming a conservative 7 percent return, that extra $500 annually could mean an additional $74,000 overall. If you start contributing that extra $500 starting at age 25, and keep doing it for 40 years, the difference is $106,000 over time &mdash; more than an entire year's worth of living expenses for many people.</p> <h2>2. It's more money for you and less to taxes</h2> <p>If you have $500 in income available, that's money that the IRS will get a share of, unless you place it in a 401(k) plan or traditional IRA. Any money you contribute to these retirement accounts is deducted from your taxable income. If you are in a high tax bracket, that $500 could actually just represent about $300 in your paycheck. If Uncle Sam would take that much anyway, why not invest the whole amount instead?</p> <h2>3. You can find $42 a month</h2> <p>If you are at the maximum contribution now, you can find a way to hit the new ceiling. Eat out less. Ditch the morning coffee. Quit that gym you never go to. If you break down $500 over the course of a year, it comes out to less than $42 a month &mdash; or barely $10 a week. That's the cost of a mediocre lunch out. Even the smallest amount of belt-tightening can help you hit this goal, and it's probably not money you'll notice. But you'll notice it later at retirement time.</p> <h2>4. You may have already maxed out your IRA</h2> <p>If you've been placing money in an individual retirement account (IRA), you may be aware that contribution limits are lower than 401(k) plans. People under age 50 are permitted to contribute only $5,500 each year to an IRA, and it's not uncommon for people to hit that maximum. If your IRA is maxed out, having permission to place an additional $500 in a 401(k) is a huge bonus.</p> <h2>5. The limit might be decreased in the future</h2> <p>We should be thankful that in 2018, the 401(k) contribution limit is rising. That's because some members of Congress have suggested that the limit could be drastically reduced in the future as part of tax reform. Thankfully, it seems like discussion of such changes has been tabled, but there's no guarantee the idea won't be resurrected in the future. In the meantime, it's a good idea to contribute as much as you can.</p> <h2>6. Where else are you going to put your money?</h2> <p>If you have $500 a year to spare, the stock market may be the smartest place to put it. Interest rates are still very low, so placing it into the bank would only result in a few bucks each year. And very few other investments offer the same kinds of consistent returns as stocks. Unless you plan to use the money to purchase a home or start a business, you likely won't do much better on a consistent basis than &mdash; or get the same tax advantages of &mdash; investing in stocks in a 401(k).</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F6-ways-meeting-the-2018-401k-contribution-limits-will-brighten-your-future&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F6%2520Ways%2520Meeting%2520the%25202018%2520401%2528k%2529%2520Contribution%2520Limits%2520Will%2520Brighten%2520Your%2520Future.jpg&amp;description=6%20Ways%20Meeting%20the%202018%20401(k)%20Contribution%20Limits%20Will%20Brighten%20Your%20Future"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/6%20Ways%20Meeting%20the%202018%20401%28k%29%20Contribution%20Limits%20Will%20Brighten%20Your%20Future.jpg" alt="6 Ways Meeting the 2018 401(k) Contribution Limits Will Brighten Your Future" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/tim-lemke">Tim Lemke</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-meeting-the-2018-401k-contribution-limits-will-brighten-your-future">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/3-common-retirement-regrets-you-can-avoid">3 Common Retirement Regrets You Can Avoid</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-tell-if-your-401k-is-a-good-or-a-bad-one">How to Tell if Your 401K Is a Good or a Bad One</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-important-things-to-know-about-your-401k-and-ira-in-2016">5 Important Things to Know About Your 401K and IRA in 2016</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/should-you-choose-a-roth-401k-or-a-regular-401k">Should You Choose a Roth 401k or a Regular 401k?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-only-8-rules-of-investing-you-need-to-know">The Only 8 Rules of Investing You Need to Know</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Investment Retirement 401(k) limits government investing IRA mutual funds stocks taxes Wed, 29 Nov 2017 09:00:07 +0000 Tim Lemke 2058941 at http://www.wisebread.com First Rule of Financial Wins: Avoid Losses http://www.wisebread.com/first-rule-of-financial-wins-avoid-losses <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/first-rule-of-financial-wins-avoid-losses" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/business_financial_opportunity.jpg" alt="Business Financial Opportunity" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>The task of accumulating wealth and ensuring long-term financial security is often discussed alongside the idea of winning. And while it's fine to think of financial planning this way, it may be just as important to simply <em>avoid losing</em>. Smart investing involves looking for gains over time, but also escaping costly losses when the market goes down. Let's take a look at some ways we can &quot;win&quot; financially simply by avoiding losses.</p> <h2>1. Avoid overpriced stocks</h2> <p>The last thing you want is to buy a stock and immediately see it take a dive. If you are a young investor with a long time horizon, you can usually get away with putting your money in the market at any time. But it is important for anyone to avoid buying stocks when they are overvalued and perhaps due for a correction.</p> <p>It's tempting to buy a stock if shares have been moving upward, because we all like to invest in companies that are doing well. At a certain point, however, share prices can be too high based on the company's earnings. It's important to learn the basics of how to tell if a stock is fairly valued.</p> <p>A price-to-earnings ratio is an important consideration in valuing a stock. A P/E ratio is the share price divided by earnings-per-share (EPS). A P/E of more than 25 is on the high side, though P/Es vary by industry. Take time to learn what typical P/E ratios are for the sector you're looking to invest in.</p> <p>Another rule of thumb to keep in mind: If a stock has been consistently setting new 52-week highs, it may be due for a pullback.</p> <p>If a company's share prices seem overvalued, it's wise to practice patience or look elsewhere for better value. This will decrease your likelihood of losing money on the investment.</p> <h2>2. Know when to cut your losses</h2> <p>One common piece of investing advice is to stay the course and avoid panicking when shares of stock fall. This is sensible, but it should be balanced with an awareness of when to cut your losses.</p> <p>There's a fine line between being patient and sticking with a dud investment for too long. It's OK to stick with an investment if the company's underlying financials are still strong, but if the company is seeing shrinking profit margins and revenues, or has completely lost its competitive advantage, it may be time to cut and run. In particular, hanging onto investments during major market downturns can result in massive losses that will take years to recover from. Some financial advisers suggest selling an investment if it drops more than 10 percent in a short amount of time. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-signs-a-stock-is-about-to-tank?ref=seealso" target="_blank">10 Signs a Stock Is About to Tank</a>)</p> <h2>3. Be truly diversified</h2> <p>Most investors know to avoid investing in too much of one thing. Diversification of investments is a key way to avoid a big loss. But sometimes, it's possible to think you are diversified when you aren't. For example, you may think you are diversifying your portfolio by investing in both U.S. based and international stocks. But have you considered that many U.S. companies already have a huge presence internationally? And even if you think you are diversified with various investments and asset classes, many investments still perform similarly, meaning that you're not as diversified as you think.</p> <p>Financial advisers have varying thoughts on the ideal way to diversify. Of course, everyone's portfolio will differ depending on their age, risk tolerance, and projected retirement year. But the basic tenet applies: Don't be too invested in one area.</p> <h2>4. Watch out for investment fees</h2> <p>When you buy and sell stocks and other investments, you'll likely be stuck paying a variety of fees. There are transaction costs for every trade, and maintenance fees and other costs for mutual funds and ETFs. These are costs that are taken out of money you invest, so you not only lose money immediately, but lose out on its potential gains. This can add up to thousands of dollars in the long run.</p> <p>Savvy investors know how to invest well while avoiding high costs. Discount brokerages such as Fidelity and Scottrade allow you to buy and sell stocks for as little as $4.95 per trade. Mutual fund companies including Vanguard, T. Rowe Price, and others have become more cognizant of fees, and are increasingly offering funds with super-low expense ratios. (Generally speaking, it's best look for funds that charge less than 1 percent for expenses.)</p> <p>Keep your costs low when you invest, and you'll find that avoiding these &quot;losses&quot; can boost your gains.</p> <h2>5. Understand when the markets may be due for a dip</h2> <p>It's very difficult to time the stock market, and for young investors, it's a good idea to just invest as soon as you can. But it's also possible to avoid big losses by recognizing when the markets may be due for a correction. If it seems like stocks are priced too high based on their earnings, that's one bad sign. A slowdown in economic growth is another, and you should be wary of a spike in inflation and interest rates, too. It's also worth noting if companies are downgrading their earnings predictions for the upcoming quarter, as that could be a sign that business executives are pessimistic. If you recognize any or all of these signs, it may be worth waiting a while before investing too heavily.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffirst-rule-of-financial-wins-avoid-losses&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FFirst%2520Rule%2520of%2520Financial%2520Wins_%2520Avoid%2520Losses.jpg&amp;description=First%20Rule%20of%20Financial%20Wins%3A%20Avoid%20Losses"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/First%20Rule%20of%20Financial%20Wins_%20Avoid%20Losses.jpg" alt="First Rule of Financial Wins: Avoid Losses" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/tim-lemke">Tim Lemke</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/first-rule-of-financial-wins-avoid-losses">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-personal-finance-rules-you-should-be-breaking">15 Personal Finance Rules You Should Be Breaking</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-best-free-financial-learning-tools">9 Best Free Financial Learning Tools</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-online-forums-thatll-help-you-reach-your-financial-goals">9 Online Forums That&#039;ll Help You Reach Your Financial Goals</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/are-you-putting-off-these-9-adult-money-moves">Are You Putting Off These 9 Adult Money Moves?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-money-moves-to-make-if-your-net-worth-is-negative">6 Money Moves to Make If Your Net Worth Is Negative</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance apps budgeting cutting expenses energy efficient fees insurance investing losing saving spending stocks winning Tue, 14 Nov 2017 09:31:09 +0000 Tim Lemke 2053314 at http://www.wisebread.com Teach Your Kids About Money With Their Holiday Gift Lists http://www.wisebread.com/teach-your-kids-about-money-with-their-holiday-gift-lists <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/teach-your-kids-about-money-with-their-holiday-gift-lists" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/mother_and_daughter_exchanging_gifts.jpg" alt="Mother and daughter exchanging gifts" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Giving my children Hannukah presents is one of my favorite parts of the holidays. Seeing their faces light up when they open a gift is one of the best feelings in the world.</p> <p>However, it can be very easy for kids to overlook the message of generosity that we are trying to teach for Christmas and Hannukah. They are bombarded by advertisements on all sides and constant reminders that the holidays are on their way &mdash; which means kids can often fall prey to the <em>gimme gimmes.</em> Many parents see this play out when they ask their kids to create a holiday wish list, and receive an eight-page, single-spaced list of expensive items.</p> <p>But just because children can learn the wrong things from holiday gifts doesn't mean they have to. In fact, parents can use the practice of writing a gift list to teach their kids about budgeting, frugality, generosity, and managing expectations. This year, try one of the following holiday gift lists to help your children learn about money and the true spirit of giving. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-use-the-holidays-to-teach-kids-about-money?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Use the Holidays to Teach Kids About Money</a>)</p> <h2>1. The four gift list</h2> <p>Families following the four gift list rule will give each child:</p> <ul> <li> <p>Something they want.</p> </li> <li> <p>Something they need.</p> </li> <li> <p>Something to wear.</p> </li> <li> <p>Something to read.</p> </li> </ul> <p>When your kids are penning their holiday wish lists, tell them to place each item in one of these four categories. You can make it clear that they can put more than one item in each category, but they will only receive one present from each category. This will help them to better understand the things they truly need and recognize how much they value their various wanted items. If everything on their list is a want, this exercise will help them manage their expectations. It can also potentially spur them to find needs, clothes, and books that they are excited to receive.</p> <p>This rule is also very helpful for parents who often go overboard with gift shopping. When you see something adorable that you'd love to give your child, you'll have to decide if it's worthy of being one of only four &quot;somethings&quot; on the list.</p> <h2>2. Include gifts to others</h2> <p>Last winter, my sons were delighted to watch the animated adaptation of <em>The Snowy Day</em> by Ezra Jack Keats on Amazon. We had long been fans of the classic book, and the sweet story of Peter's adventure in the snow was expanded to tell an animated Christmas story in this short film.</p> <p>One of my favorite parts of the adaptation was the story of Peter's Jewish friend Layla, who delivers a gift to a charity on the sixth night of Hannukah. She explains that it's her family's tradition to give instead of receive on that night of Hannukah, and she and her mother have picked out something special to give away.</p> <p>This tradition is very well-suited to Hannukah, which lasts for eight nights. Parents can easily set aside one night to be about giving to those less fortunate rather than receiving &mdash; but any family can encourage their children to think of others when making their holiday gift lists.</p> <p>In addition to writing down the things that they want, your kids can also include a list of gifts they can give to others. These could be traditional gifts for families in need, or they can be more creative, like writing letters to deployed soldiers or volunteering. By including a place for giving back on their holiday wish list, your kids will learn to associate generosity with your holiday traditions.</p> <h2>3. Create a gift-giving theme</h2> <p>For older children, a fun way to celebrate the holidays and teach frugality is to set a theme for gift giving. For instance, Stacia Mcclure's family would give everyone a hard spending limit, and specify where everyone could shop: &quot;One year, we decided all gifts had to come from a truck stop &mdash; and gift cards were excluded. My dad still talks about that year because he got an entire box of Necco wafers. The hospital gift shop Christmas was also quite entertaining.&quot;</p> <p>Other types of holiday themes might include only buying &quot;As Seen on TV&quot; items, books, games, or food items.</p> <p>Picking a &quot;theme&quot; helps teenagers learn to be creative within a spending framework, which is excellent practice for learning how to be frugal. A teen who can have fun and give a meaningful (or at least hilarious) low-cost gift from a truck stop will learn to think outside the box when it comes to tougher money decisions. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-steps-to-stress-free-holiday-gift-giving?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Steps to Stress-Free Holiday Gift Giving</a>)</p> <h2>4. Ask them to pick a stock</h2> <p>Several years ago, Stephanie McCullough's daughter asked for a new iPod for the holidays. &quot;Instead, I bought her two shares of Apple,&quot; McCullough says, &quot;which cost about the same as a new device at the time. There was no way to know this at the time, but the stock has skyrocketed since then.&quot;</p> <p>If you let your children know that you plan to buy them a share of a company they like, you will not only be giving them a gift that will keep on giving, but you can also help to spark an interest in finance.</p> <p>They can either pick a publicly-traded company they like, or they can do a little research into how well their favorite companies have fared in the market. The latter will help them start to get a sense of figuring out what makes a good investment. Even if they don't research their stock before including it on their gift list, you can invite them to track the stock's price over time to see how their gift is doing.</p> <h2>5. Include a time gift</h2> <p>As much as your children love ripping the wrapping paper off a new toy, what they really want most is to spend time with their parents. You can give them the gift of your time by asking them to include a request on their gift list for something you can do together. For instance, your child might list &quot;baking cookies together&quot; or &quot;going fishing together&quot; on their wish list.</p> <p>While you could always create a &quot;coupon&quot; for the requested time gift, you can also find a small tangible item you could give your child to use for their time gift. For instance, you might give them a new cookbook that you can peruse together to find the perfect cookie recipe, or a fishing hat for them to wear next time you go to the lake.</p> <p>By having your child include a time gift request on their holiday wish list, you are teaching them that the best gifts come from being together, rather than spending lots of money.</p> <h2>The benefit of limits</h2> <p>The magic of the holiday season does not come from tearing into an enormous pile of presents, even though much of our culture tries to convince kids otherwise. Teaching your children to use frameworks for thinking about their holiday gift wishes can help them to better appreciate the real lessons of the season, as well as learn some important money skills that will last them well into adulthood.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fteach-your-kids-about-money-with-their-holiday-gift-lists&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FTeach%2520Your%2520Kids%2520About%2520Money%2520With%2520Their%2520Holiday%2520Gift%2520Lists.jpg&amp;description=Teach%20Your%20Kids%20About%20Money%20With%20Their%20Holiday%20Gift%20Lists"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/Teach%20Your%20Kids%20About%20Money%20With%20Their%20Holiday%20Gift%20Lists.jpg" alt="Teach Your Kids About Money With Their Holiday Gift Lists" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/emily-guy-birken">Emily Guy Birken</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/teach-your-kids-about-money-with-their-holiday-gift-lists">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-use-the-holidays-to-teach-kids-about-money">How to Use the Holidays to Teach Kids About Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-smart-financial-gifts-to-give-your-kids-this-year">6 Smart Financial Gifts to Give Your Kids This Year</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-stocks-your-kids-would-love-to-own">5 Stocks Your Kids Would Love to Own</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-top-money-lessons-to-learn-from-ruth-soukups-unstuffed">4 Top Money Lessons to Learn From Ruth Soukup&#039;s &quot;Unstuffed&quot;</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-financial-gifts-mom-will-love-for-mothers-day">6 Financial Gifts Mom Will Love for Mother&#039;s Day</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance Family children Christmas gifts hannukah Holidays kids money lessons presents stocks wish lists Thu, 09 Nov 2017 08:00:09 +0000 Emily Guy Birken 2046508 at http://www.wisebread.com 5 Investment Moves That Prove You're Finally a Grown-Up http://www.wisebread.com/5-investment-moves-that-prove-youre-finally-a-grown-up <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-investment-moves-that-prove-youre-finally-a-grown-up" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/businessman_protecting_coins_in_saplings.jpg" alt="Businessman Protecting Coins In Saplings" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>You know that investing is a smart move: It's a way to grow your wealth over time and boost the odds that you'll have enough money to live the happiest possible retirement. But how do you know when you're investing your money like a grown-up and not like a kid?</p> <p>It's about taking reasonable risks, doing your research, and changing your investment mix when it makes sense. In other words, you know you're investing like a grown-up when you treat investing like what it is: work.</p> <p>These are the five investment moves that prove you're finally a grown-up.</p> <h2>1. You're not afraid to invest in stocks</h2> <p>It's true that stocks come with more risk. But investing in stocks comes with the potential for much higher rewards, too. If you ignore stocks and only invest in safe assets such as bonds, you run the risk of losing significant profits over time.</p> <p>According to TIME Money, since 1926, portfolios made up mostly of stocks have never had losses that last 20 years or more. These same portfolios reported average gains of more than 10.8 percent annually, while portfolios made up of bonds averaged returns of just 4 percent a year.</p> <p>If you're investing like a grown-up, you won't run away from the high-reward potential of stocks. Instead, you'll make sure to include stocks as part of your overall investment portfolio. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-reasons-to-invest-in-stocks-past-age-50?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Reasons to Invest in Stocks Past Age 50</a>)</p> <h2>2. You do your research</h2> <p>Your friend comes to you with a hot tip, claiming that you absolutely must invest in this new company. They tell you you'll be getting in on the ground floor of something big. An immature investor might jump at that opportunity, but a grown-up will do the research before acting on the tip.</p> <p>This means reading company reports and listening to conference calls. It means studying the product or service this &quot;hot&quot; company is offering. It means seeking out the advice of true financial experts. And, yes, all of that takes time and work. But to invest like a grown-up means you're willing to put in that effort before investing your dollars. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-dumb-stock-picking-mistakes-even-smart-investors-make?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Dumb Stock Picking Mistakes Even Smart Investors Make</a>)</p> <h2>3. You don't sell too quickly</h2> <p>It's tempting to sell a stock when it's either soaring in value or falling. But reacting too quickly to changes in value, whether positive or negative, is the sign of an immature investor. The grown-up investor realizes that investing sometimes requires patience.</p> <p>Consider a stock that rises in value after you buy it. Sure, if you sell it, you'll make a quick profit. But what if you held onto the stock longer? If the stock is a solid one, it might continue to increase in value over time. If you sell too early, you might miss out on plenty of future profit.</p> <p>You also don't want to hold onto a losing investment for too long, but it's still possible to sell too quickly. If you're patient, and if you've done your research on the company before investing, it might make sense to hold onto the stock until its value begins to rebound. If you sell as soon as the stock loses value, you're certain to take a loss. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-secret-to-successful-investing-is-trusting-the-process?ref=seealso" target="_blank">The Secret to Successful Investing Is Trusting the Process</a>)</p> <h2>4. You're not hunting for bargains</h2> <p>You don't want to overpay for stocks, but sometimes investing in a quality company takes a significant amount of money. Grown-up investors know that it's better to invest in a strong company while paying a bit more than it is to get a bargain price for a company that won't perform as well.</p> <p>The truth is, if you want to invest in top companies, you'll have to spend more to do so. Don't let your quest for bargain prices trick you into investing in underwhelming companies.</p> <h2>5. You don't cash out your 401(k) when you change jobs</h2> <p>When you change jobs, you'll usually have to figure out what to do with the 401(k) plan in which you've been investing. The immature move? Cashing it out for a quick buck. The grown-up move? Rolling that 401(k) over into an IRA.</p> <p>If you cash out your 401(k), you'll lose a good portion of the money you saved because of taxes and, depending on your age, penalties for withdrawing the cash too early.</p> <p>By rolling over the funds, you won't suffer any penalties or tax hits, and your money will continue to grow over the years. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-step-by-step-guide-to-rolling-over-your-401k?ref=seealso" target="_blank">The Step-by-Step Guide to Rolling Over Your 401(k)</a>)</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F5-investment-moves-that-prove-youre-finally-a-grown-up&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F5%2520Investment%2520Moves%2520That%2520Prove%2520You%2527re%2520Finally%2520a%2520Grown-Up.jpg&amp;description=5%20Investment%20Moves%20That%20Prove%20You're%20Finally%20a%20Grown-Up"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/5%20Investment%20Moves%20That%20Prove%20You%27re%20Finally%20a%20Grown-Up.jpg" alt="5 Investment Moves That Prove You're Finally a Grown-Up" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dan-rafter">Dan Rafter</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-investment-moves-that-prove-youre-finally-a-grown-up">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-millennial-investors-can-get-past-the-great-recession">How Millennial Investors Can Get Past the Great Recession</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-money-lessons-we-can-learn-from-baseball">8 Money Lessons We Can Learn From Baseball</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-simple-ways-to-conquer-your-fear-of-investing">4 Simple Ways to Conquer Your Fear of Investing</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-reasons-to-invest-in-stocks-past-age-50">7 Reasons to Invest in Stocks Past Age 50</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-types-of-investors-which-one-are-you">8 Types of Investors — Which One Are You?</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Investment 401(k) bargains buy and hold fear grown-up money moves retirement risk stocks Tue, 07 Nov 2017 09:01:07 +0000 Dan Rafter 2045997 at http://www.wisebread.com How the Risk Averse Can Get Into the Stock Market http://www.wisebread.com/how-the-risk-averse-can-get-into-the-stock-market <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-the-risk-averse-can-get-into-the-stock-market" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/business_team_thinking_about_risk_management.jpg" alt="Business team thinking about risk management" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>The stock market can be risky. Just 10 years ago, due to the financial panic and subsequent Great Recession, stocks lost half their value in the course of not much more than a year. But the stock market is also a great investment: Long term gains are large, and even the biggest losses are routinely reversed in a matter of a few years.</p> <p>The upshot is that you should almost certainly have at least some money in the market.</p> <p>But since it's always either rising or falling, and since nobody wants to be foolish, it's often hard to get into, or back into, the market. And yet, because of the large gains the market routinely offers over the long term, it's absolutely worth doing &mdash; even for those terrified of risk. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-over-these-5-scary-things-about-investing?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Get Over These 5 Scary Things About Investing</a>)</p> <h2>Figuring out how much to invest</h2> <p>The best way to think about your portfolio when you're risk-averse is by recognizing that a significant amount of your money is <em>not</em> part of it and should not be invested at all. If you cover your other important financial bases first, you may feel better about investing.</p> <p>First, make sure you have adequate liquidity balances &mdash; that's cash on hand to deal with the fact that your income arrives on one schedule (biweekly paychecks, perhaps) while your bills arrive on a different schedule (some monthly, others perhaps annually or semi-annually).</p> <p>Second, make sure you have an adequate emergency fund to deal with events like an unexpected loss of income, or expenses that come out of the blue. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-easy-ways-to-build-an-emergency-fund-from-0?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Easy Ways to Build an Emergency Fund From $0</a>)</p> <p>Third, make sure you have a plan to fund medium-term expenses (a savings account or CD or maybe an intermediate-term bond fund). These are things you know you're going to buy in the next few years.</p> <p>Once you've got those bases covered, the rest of your money is your investment portfolio.</p> <p>By identifying how much of your money is <em>not</em> part of your investment portfolio, you may find yourself much more comfortable thinking about committing some fraction of the rest of your money to the stock market.</p> <p>However, maybe you've done that and you're <em>still</em> not comfortable. That brings us back to where we started. In particular, it raises the question: If you know the market is the right place for a sizable chunk of your portfolio for the long term, why are you hesitating to commit funds now?</p> <h2>Ask yourself why you're afraid</h2> <p>There are probably two big reasons why people hesitate to get into the stock market: Either because the market seems &quot;too risky,&quot; or because they're &quot;waiting for the right time.&quot;</p> <p>The way to get yourself to make the move into the stock market depends on which reason is blocking you right now.</p> <h3>Too risky</h3> <p>If it's just that the market seems too risky, you can often get started investing by going small. If you can't bring yourself to put 70 percent of your portfolio into stocks (which is actually a reasonable allocation if you're fairly young), can you bring yourself to put 5 or 10 percent in?</p> <p>When I was first starting to invest, most mutual funds had minimum investments that were pretty large (compared to the size of my portfolio), but there are now ways to invest amounts as small as just a few hundred dollars into stocks.</p> <p>If the market seems very risky, pick a very small amount of money &mdash; small enough that you could absorb even a 50 percent loss without endangering your long-term goals &mdash; and take the plunge. Put that small amount into the market. Better yet, set up some sort of automatic investment (a payroll deduction into a 401(k) or an automatic transfer to a mutual fund or brokerage account) that would send a small amount away every month or every paycheck.</p> <p>If you can find an amount small enough that you're willing to risk it &mdash; and especially if you can set up some sort of automated further investments &mdash; you set yourself up to get past your risk aversion the easy way: By seeing gains start piling up right away. And if they don't &mdash; if your investments start off by losing money &mdash; you'll still be OK, for two reasons. First, you'll know that your losses are so small that they scarcely matter over the long term. Second, you'll know that your future investments are buying stocks at a lower price (and buying low is an essential part of &quot;buy low/sell high&quot;). (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-invest-if-youre-worried-about-a-stock-market-crash?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Invest If You're Worried About a Stock Market Crash</a>)</p> <h3>Waiting for the right time</h3> <p>If the issue is that you accept that the market is the right place to be for the long term, but <em>right now</em> is the wrong time to get in (perhaps because the market seems kind of high, perhaps because it has recently dropped and you worry it might drop further, perhaps because you see major risks to the economy from business conditions or the international situation or Congress), I have two thoughts.</p> <p>First, understand that it hardly matters. I saw a study some years back that compared two hypothetical brothers. Each had invested $2,000 a year in stocks in his IRA, but each year one brother had the good luck to make his investment on the day the stock market hit its low for that year. The other brother had the bad luck to make his investment on the day that the market hit its high for the year.</p> <p>The result? After 10 years, it barely mattered. The lucky brother had a tiny bit more money, but both of them had a lot more money than the guy who kept his money in cash waiting for a &quot;better time&quot; to invest that never came.</p> <p>Second, approach it just as I advised the person who thought the market was too risky: Start small.</p> <p>Maybe now isn't the right time to jump in with 70 percent of your portfolio, but surely having 0 percent of your portfolio in the market is the wrong choice.</p> <p>Go ahead and put a little money in. It doesn't have to be a lot. (And, once again, even better if you set up some sort of automated investment so you're continuing to put money into the market regularly over time.)</p> <h2>Finding the right balance</h2> <p>Suppose you do start small, but through a combination of further investments and growth in the market, find yourself a few years down the road with a sizable portfolio and with a large portion of it invested in stocks. When do you have too much in stocks?</p> <p>One answer is that you have too much if it's worrying you. If you're having trouble sleeping at night, or if hearing the market report on the news ruins your appetite, then by all means sell some stocks and put the money into a CD or something. If you're still anxious a month later, sell some more. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/find-the-investing-style-thats-right-for-you?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Find the Investing Style That's Right for You</a>)</p> <p>I would advise that you <em>not </em>use this as an excuse to time the market. The market will always be going up or down and neither circumstance is a good reason to change your mind about having stocks in your portfolio.</p> <p>Instead, you should probably have a target asset allocation. Figure out what you want in stocks (and bonds, real estate, gold, cash, etc.) and buy and sell as necessary to return to that target allocation from time to time &mdash; usually annually is good. This is a process called rebalancing your portfolio. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-basics-of-asset-allocation?Ref=seealso" target="_blank">The Basics of Asset Allocation</a>)</p> <p>An old rule of thumb is to set your stock allocation percentage at 100 minus your age, and invest the rest in bonds. So someone in their 20s would put 70 to 80 percent into stocks while someone in their 60s would put 30 to 40 percent into stocks. That's a perfectly good rule, although with people living so much longer now than even a generation ago, it should probably be a bit more aggressive for people in the years just before and just after retirement. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-reasons-to-invest-in-stocks-past-age-50?Ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Reasons to Invest in Stocks Past Age 50</a>)</p> <p>Your asset allocation is important, but don't let that paralyze you. The worst thing you can do is agonize over your asset allocation to the point that you never get around to investing.</p> <p>Put a little money in stocks right away. Set up some sort of automatic investment. Once you have a tidy sum invested in stocks, start putting some of the new money in bonds. Only after those investments start getting large do you need to think about whether it's time to add some more exotic choices.</p> <p>Start small. Start simple. But above everything else: Start.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fhow-the-risk-averse-can-get-into-the-stock-market&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FHow%2520the%2520Risk%2520Averse%2520Can%2520Get%2520Into%2520the%2520Stock%2520Market.jpg&amp;description=How%20the%20Risk%20Averse%20Can%20Get%20Into%20the%20Stock%20Market"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/How%20the%20Risk%20Averse%20Can%20Get%20Into%20the%20Stock%20Market.jpg" alt="How the Risk Averse Can Get Into the Stock Market" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/philip-brewer">Philip Brewer</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-the-risk-averse-can-get-into-the-stock-market">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-3-rules-every-mediocre-investor-must-know">The 3 Rules Every Mediocre Investor Must Know</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dont-be-fooled-by-an-investments-rate-of-return">Don&#039;t Be Fooled by an Investment&#039;s Rate of Return</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-simple-ways-to-conquer-your-fear-of-investing">4 Simple Ways to Conquer Your Fear of Investing</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-types-of-investors-which-one-are-you">8 Types of Investors — Which One Are You?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-one-mediocre-investor-prospered-after-the-market-crash">How One Mediocre Investor Prospered After the Market Crash</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Investment asset allocation bonds gains investing fear portfolio rebalancing risk averse stock market stocks Mon, 06 Nov 2017 08:30:15 +0000 Philip Brewer 2045391 at http://www.wisebread.com 4 Ways to Protect Your Retirement From Inflation http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-to-protect-your-retirement-from-inflation <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/4-ways-to-protect-your-retirement-from-inflation" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/protecting_your_nest_egg.jpg" alt="Protecting Your Nest Egg" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>When you're saving for retirement, it's easy to forget that the goods you'll be buying years or decades from now will probably cost more, all thanks to inflation. It's important to keep this in mind when planning the amount of money you'll need during your after-work years.</p> <p>Here are five ways you can inflation-proof your retirement savings:</p> <h2>Don't be too conservative</h2> <p>It can be tempting to stow a greater percentage of your retirement income in low-risk bonds, especially as you get nearer to your retirement date. And bonds certainly should be part of your retirement portfolio. But too many people focus too much on bonds. They don't look at the real return on these investment vehicles with the effects of inflation factored in. Because bonds are less risky, they also offer lower rates of return.</p> <p>Say a bond has rate of return of 6 percent. If inflation is at 3 percent, that rate of return is really only 3 percent &mdash; a fairly low payoff.</p> <p>That's why it's important to include some riskier investments, such as stocks, in your retirement savings plan. Yes, there is more risk that stocks will lose value. But stocks also have the potential of providing a far higher rate of return; one that will help overcome the rising costs that come with inflation. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-reasons-to-invest-in-stocks-past-age-50?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Reasons to Invest in Stocks Past Age 50</a>)</p> <h2>Do your research</h2> <p>Investing in just any group of stocks won't help you overcome inflation. Certain companies and financial sectors thrive when inflation rises, while others tend to struggle. For instance, investing in retail stocks might not help you overcome inflation. That's because retailers tend to struggle when high inflation makes the products they are selling unattractive to consumers. However, companies in the agricultural sector tend to do better when inflation is higher. Their stocks, then, are a better hedge against a rising inflation rate.</p> <h2>Invest in treasury inflation-protected securities</h2> <p>Treasury inflation-protected securities, better known as TIPS, are designed to protect investors from inflation. That's because the return is tied to the Consumer Price Index. This is an especially useful tool for investors living on a fixed income, like retirees.</p> <p>Say you invest $100,000 in TIPS. If inflation is 4 percent, your principal balance will now be worth $104,000 after a year. When TIPS reach their maturity date, investors get back either their original principal amount &mdash; what they originally invested &mdash; or one that's been adjusted for inflation, whichever is greater. TIPS also provide a bit of interest income, paying this out every six months. Investors don't have to pay state and local taxes on this interest or on the growth in principal, but they do have to pay federal taxes on that money earned.</p> <p>Investors can purchase TIPS at no cost from the U.S. Treasury in $100 values. You might also be able to invest in TIPS when you invest in a mutual fund that includes them as part of their investment mix.</p> <h2>Invest in commercial real estate</h2> <p>The value of commercial real estate can continue to rise even if the stock market is struggling. By including investments in commercial real estate along with stocks in your retirement savings portfolio, you can build a diverse investment mix that you can then use as a hedge against inflation.</p> <p>The easiest way to invest in commercial real estate is to put your money in a real estate investment trust, or REIT. With a REIT, you'll be pooling your money alongside other investors in commercial real estate buildings such as offices and apartment properties. You can also invest in a mutual fund that includes commercial real estate assets among its investment mix. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-only-5-rules-you-need-to-know-about-investing-in-real-estate?ref=seealso" target="_blank">The Only 5 Rules You Need to Know About Investing in Real Estate</a>)</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F4-ways-to-protect-your-retirement-from-inflation&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F4%2520Ways%2520to%2520Protect%2520Your%2520Retirement%2520From%2520Inflation.jpg&amp;description=4%20Ways%20to%20Protect%20Your%20Retirement%20From%20Inflation"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/4%20Ways%20to%20Protect%20Your%20Retirement%20From%20Inflation.jpg" alt="4 Ways to Protect Your Retirement From Inflation" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dan-rafter">Dan Rafter</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-to-protect-your-retirement-from-inflation">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-roadblocks-to-retirement-and-how-to-clear-them">7 Roadblocks to Retirement (And How to Clear Them)</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-reasons-to-invest-in-stocks-past-age-50">7 Reasons to Invest in Stocks Past Age 50</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-plan-for-a-forced-early-retirement">How to Plan for a Forced Early Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-signs-youre-making-all-the-right-moves-for-retirement">8 Signs You&#039;re Making All the Right Moves for Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-save-for-retirement-when-you-are-unemployed">How to Save for Retirement When You Are Unemployed</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Retirement inflation long term care insurance nest egg protecting your money real estate investing reit risk saving money stocks Fri, 03 Nov 2017 09:00:06 +0000 Dan Rafter 2043245 at http://www.wisebread.com 7 Reasons to Invest in Stocks Past Age 50 http://www.wisebread.com/7-reasons-to-invest-in-stocks-past-age-50 <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/7-reasons-to-invest-in-stocks-past-age-50" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/man_sitting_on_floor_with_piggy_bank_under_money_rain.jpg" alt="Man sitting on floor with piggy bank under money rain" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Conventional investing wisdom says that as people age, they should put less of their money in stocks and more into stable investments such as bonds and cash. This is sound advice based on the idea that in retirement you want to protect your assets in case there is a major market downturn.</p> <p>But there are still strong arguments to continue investing in stocks even as you get older. Few people recommend an all-stock portfolio, but reducing stock ownership down to zero doesn't make sense, either.</p> <p>Consider that many mutual funds geared toward older investors still comprise hefty doses of stocks. The 2020 Retirement Fund from T. Rowe Price, for example, is made up of 70 percent stocks for retirees at age 65, and is still made up of 25 percent stocks when that same retiree is past 90 years of age.</p> <p>Why does owning stocks make sense even for older investors? Let's examine these possible motivations.</p> <h2>1. You're going to live a lot longer</h2> <p>If you are thinking about retirement as you approach age 60, it's important to recognize that you still may have several decades of life remaining. People are routinely living into their 90s or even past 100 these days. Do you have enough savings to last 40 years or more? While it's important to protect the assets you have, you may find that higher returns from stocks will be needed in order to accrue the money you need.</p> <h2>2. You got a late start</h2> <p>If you started investing early and contributed regularly to your retirement accounts over the course of several decades, you may be able to take a conservative investing approach in retirement. But if you began investing late, your portfolio may not have had time to grow enough to fund a comfortable retirement. Continuing to invest in stocks will allow you to expand your savings and reach your target figure. It still makes sense to balance your stocks with more conservative investments, but taking on a little bit more risk in exchange for potentially higher returns may be worth it. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-retirement-planning-steps-late-starters-must-make?Ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Retirement Planning Steps Late Starters Must Make</a>)</p> <h2>3. Other investments don't yield as much as they used to</h2> <p>Moving away from stocks was good advice for older people back when you could get better returns on bonds and bank interest. The 30-year treasury yield right now is about 2.75 percent. That's about half what it was a decade ago and a third of the rate from 1990. Interest from cash in the bank or certificates of deposit will generate a measly 1.5 percent or less. The bottom line is that these returns will barely outpace the rate of inflation and won't bring you much in the way of useful income.</p> <h2>4. Some stocks are safer than others</h2> <p>Not all stocks move up and down in the same way. While stocks are generally more volatile than bonds and cash, there are many that have a strong track record of steady returns and relative immunity from market crashes. Take a look at mutual funds comprised of large-cap companies with diversified revenue streams. Consider dividend-producing stocks that don't move much in terms of share price, but can generate income. To find these investments, search for those that lost less than average during the Great Recession and have a history of low volatility.</p> <h2>5. Dividend stocks can bring you income</h2> <p>Dividend stocks are not only more stable than many other stock investments, but also they can generate cash flow at a time when you're not bringing in other income. A good dividend stock can produce a yield of more than 4 percent, which is more than what you'll get from many other non-stock investments right now. This will help ensure the growth of your portfolio is at least outpacing inflation.</p> <p>If you are unsure about which dividend stocks to buy, take a look at a well-rated dividend mutual fund. The T. Rowe Price Dividend Growth Fund [NYSE: PRDGX], for example, has a three-year total return of more than 10 percent, outpacing the S&amp;P 500. Its overall returns also dropped less than the S&amp;P 500 during the Great Recession.</p> <h2>6. Busts are often followed by bigger booms</h2> <p>A person who retired 10 years ago would have stopped working right when the market crashed, and there's a good chance they may have lost a significant chunk of their savings. That's bad. But it's important to note that in the decade since, the S&amp;P 500 has gone up every year at an average of more than 8.5 percent annually. In other words, someone who lost a lot from the crash of 2007&ndash;2008 will have gotten all of their money back and much more if they stayed invested in stocks.</p> <p>This is not to suggest that older investors should be unreasonably aggressive, but they should be aware that a single bad year or two probably won't completely wipe you out financially. If your retirement is long, you may see some market busts, but you'll also see some long stretches of good returns.</p> <h2>7. You may still be helping out your kids</h2> <p>When you're retired, you're supposed to be done with child rearing and helping out your kids financially, right? Unfortunately, it seems that older Americans are continuing to lend a hand to their children even as they grow into adulthood and have children of their own.</p> <p>A recent survey from TD Ameritrade said that millennial parents between the ages of 19 and 37 receive an average of more than $11,000 annually in the form of money or unpaid child care from their parents. With these additional costs on the horizon, those approaching retirement age may still want to invest in stocks to build their nest egg further. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/are-you-ruining-your-retirement-by-spoiling-your-kids?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Are You Ruining Your Retirement by Spoiling Your Kids?</a>)</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F7-reasons-to-invest-in-stocks-past-age-50&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F7%2520Reasons%2520to%2520Invest%2520in%2520Stocks%2520Past%2520Age%252050.jpg&amp;description=7%20Reasons%20to%20Invest%20in%20Stocks%20Past%20Age%2050"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/7%20Reasons%20to%20Invest%20in%20Stocks%20Past%20Age%2050.jpg" alt="7 Reasons to Invest in Stocks Past Age 50" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/tim-lemke">Tim Lemke</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-reasons-to-invest-in-stocks-past-age-50">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-simple-ways-to-conquer-your-fear-of-investing">4 Simple Ways to Conquer Your Fear of Investing</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/is-there-such-a-thing-as-a-safe-investment">Is There Such a Thing as a &quot;Safe&quot; Investment?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/heres-how-far-1-million-will-actually-go-in-retirement">Here&#039;s How Far $1 Million Will Actually Go in Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-to-protect-your-retirement-from-inflation">4 Ways to Protect Your Retirement From Inflation</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-make-sure-you-dont-run-out-of-money-in-retirement">How to Make Sure You Don&#039;t Run Out of Money in Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Investment Retirement adult children bonds cash dividend stocks giving money to kids income late starters life span living longer risk saving money stocks yields Thu, 05 Oct 2017 09:00:06 +0000 Tim Lemke 2031342 at http://www.wisebread.com 8 Types of Investors — Which One Are You? http://www.wisebread.com/8-types-of-investors-which-one-are-you <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/8-types-of-investors-which-one-are-you" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/businessman_reading_a_newspaper.jpg" alt="which type of investor are you" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Do you tend to invest in a particular way? Identifying which type of investor you are can help you understand the potential pitfalls of your investment approach &mdash; and how to improve your chances for better investment returns. Which type of investor are you?</p> <h2>1. Automatic investor</h2> <p>The automatic investor is all about convenience. Everything related to investing is set on autopilot. Automatic contributions to investment funds come out of every paycheck or are withdrawn from the bank account on a certain day of the month. This type of investor doesn't spend much time or effort thinking about investing, and doesn't need to since everything is automatic. They don't have to remind themselves to invest; it's checked off their financial to-do list.</p> <p>The potential downside for the automatic investor is losing touch with where investment funds are going and how the investment portfolio is performing. If you are not paying attention, you may not have investment selections that meet your current goals, and you may not identify and remove low performing investments or funds with high fees. If you don't check in at least occasionally, this hands-off approach may cost you. Rebalancing your portfolio once or twice a year by transferring funds to maintain your desired proportions of stocks to bonds should be sufficient to keep your investment portfolio on track. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-most-important-thing-youre-probably-not-doing-with-your-portfolio?ref=seealso" target="_blank">The Most Important Thing You're Probably Not Doing With Your Portfolio</a>)</p> <h2>2. Daily Dow watcher</h2> <p>The Dow watcher is constantly up to speed. They know at any time if the stock market is up or down. The current market price and chart is only a tap away on their smartphone. This type of investor knows how much their portfolio is worth and worries about how much they are losing when the market has a bad day. Nothing goes over the Dow watcher's head.</p> <p>The risk for the Dow watcher is that he or she can easily get stressed out by day-to-day ups and downs in the market. They may even get discouraged when the market is going down and decide to sell stock when the price is low &mdash; the worst time to sell! It's good to be informed, especially when it comes to your investments, but if you find yourself too glued to the Dow's daily performance &mdash; it might be a good idea to <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/want-your-investments-to-do-better-stop-watching-the-news" target="_blank">step away from the news</a> for a bit. Checking in on the stock market and your investment portfolio quarterly is probably more than frequent enough, and you can use the time you save for something more productive and enjoyable.</p> <h2>3. Active trader</h2> <p>The active trader is a studious investor. This type of investor tries to time the market by figuring out that a stock is going up before other investors realize it &mdash; and then selling when it is near the peak price before most investors figure out that it is going down. This type of investor pores over market and economic data, reads business articles, and is well-informed about business trends and news. He or she is willing to take risks for a chance at big returns.</p> <p>If you're an active trader, tread carefully; you can easily lose significant money if your timing is off. Trading fees can also get expensive if your investment approach requires making a lot of trades. You are much more likely to make money from buying good stocks and holding them for the long haul.</p> <h2>4. Conscientious investor</h2> <p>Conscientious investors put their money where their morals are. They have limits to what activities and products they are willing to be involved with in order to make a buck. For example, some conscientious investors invest only in socially-responsible or environmentally-responsible companies, and avoid owning shares in companies that promote values or products contrary to their moral principles. This type of investor is likely to exert economic influence through consumer purchasing decisions as well as through their stock picks.</p> <p>This type of ethical investing unfortunately can limit a person's investment options, which may result in lower returns. But some things are worth more than money to conscientious investors. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/a-simple-guide-to-socially-responsible-investing?ref=seealso" target="_blank">A Simple Guide to Socially Responsible Investing</a>)</p> <h2>5. Property investor</h2> <p>Not every investor owns stocks. The property investor owns real estate, collectibles, gold, and maybe even bonds. He or she wants to invest in things that they can understand and control to some extent. This type of investor may not trust Wall Street and avoids the volatility of stocks.</p> <p>Historically, however, stocks have had great investment returns compared to other investment types, so property investors who shy away from the stock market could be missing out. Large cap value stocks can be a relatively safe way to start off in stock investing for first-time stock investors.</p> <h2>6. Bargain investor</h2> <p>This is the kind of investor that pounced on GM stock when it was $1 per share in 2009. Of course there is risk that bargain stocks could become worthless, but there is potential for the stock price to bounce back. The bargain investor looks carefully at P/E ratios to check the share price relative to earnings per share when deciding what stock to buy.</p> <p>Bargain hunters should be wary though &mdash; sometimes stocks with low prices are trading at a low price for a good reason. The bigger the bargain, the more research is merited into why the price is so low before you buy.</p> <h2>7. Company loyalist</h2> <p>The company loyalist owns a disproportionate amount of stock from an individual company. This could be a trendy stock that inspires loyalty like Apple or Tesla, or the company loyalist could own a large amount of his or her own employer's stock.</p> <p>Owning a large amount of any single company stock can be risky. The company could <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-these-8-company-stocks-fared-following-scandal" target="_blank">experience a major scandal</a> or product failure and the stock price could tank. Remember Enron? Owning a lot of stock in the company you work for is even riskier, because if something goes wrong you'll not only lose value in your stock fund, but you may lose your job at the same time. Some financial advisers suggest that owning more than 10 percent to 15 percent of your company's stock may be too much.</p> <h2>8. Portfolio tweaker</h2> <p>The portfolio tweaker is not really an active trader, but likes to adjust and fine tune his or her portfolio frequently by making transfers between funds to get the desired balance between large cap, mid cap, small cap, foreign, domestic, growth, value, and bond investment categories.</p> <p>While it is good to adjust your portfolio occasionally to meet your investment goals, frequently selling investments that are performing well just to meet an arbitrary &quot;balance&quot; in your portfolio may not be the best move and could hurt your overall return. As we advised the automatic investor, portfolio rebalancing once or twice per year is a good interval for most investors.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F8-types-of-investors-which-one-are-you&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F8%2520Types%2520Of%2520Investors%2520Which%2520One%2520Are%2520You.jpg&amp;description=8%20Types%20of%20Investors%20%E2%80%94%20Which%20One%20Are%20You%3F"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/8%20Types%20Of%20Investors%20Which%20One%20Are%20You.jpg" alt="8 Types of Investors &mdash; Which One Are You?" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dr-penny-pincher">Dr Penny Pincher</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-types-of-investors-which-one-are-you">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-3-rules-every-mediocre-investor-must-know">The 3 Rules Every Mediocre Investor Must Know</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-too-much-investment-diversity-can-cost-you">How Too Much Investment Diversity Can Cost You</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dont-be-fooled-by-an-investments-rate-of-return">Don&#039;t Be Fooled by an Investment&#039;s Rate of Return</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-simple-ways-to-conquer-your-fear-of-investing">4 Simple Ways to Conquer Your Fear of Investing</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-the-risk-averse-can-get-into-the-stock-market">How the Risk Averse Can Get Into the Stock Market</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Investment automatic company stock dow ethical investing portfolio property investors returns risk stock market stocks types Fri, 08 Sep 2017 08:00:05 +0000 Dr Penny Pincher 2017190 at http://www.wisebread.com 8 Surprising Ways Confidence Can Hurt Your Investments http://www.wisebread.com/8-surprising-ways-confidence-can-hurt-your-investments <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/8-surprising-ways-confidence-can-hurt-your-investments" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/strong_man_self_confident_young_entrepreneur.jpg" alt="Strong man, self confident young entrepreneur" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>There may come a moment when you feel like you have this investing thing all figured out. You've made some great stock picks and your portfolio is going gangbusters. But are you letting your confidence get the best of you and your investments?</p> <p>Being confident is OK. You need some confidence in yourself to invest in the first place. But being too cocky can lead you to make bad investment choices, and have a blind spot to your own weaknesses. Here are some of the ways confidence may actually hurt your investments.</p> <h2>1. You develop a selective memory</h2> <p>Maybe you bought shares of Facebook when they were trading below $25, and have made a killing on the investment since. You like to hold up that one purchase as proof of your genius as an investor. But are you forgetting about the other investments that didn't do so well? On balance, are you really any smarter than anyone else out there?</p> <p>Don't let your memory of one great decision delude you into thinking you have a special gift as an investor. Doing so can make you believe that every stock will eventually turn out to be a winner, even if there's no rational basis for your confidence.</p> <h2>2. You have too much faith in the market</h2> <p>While it's true that history shows the stock market has gone up consistently over time, it's still important to protect your investments against a possible downturn. As you get older and approach retirement age, consider shifting some investments into less volatile instruments, such as bonds, even if you believe the market will continue to go up.</p> <p>It's also important to avoid being too optimistic about markets in the short term. If you're investing money that you need in a year or two, the stock market may not be the best place to put it. Having faith in the market is crucial to building wealth over time, but protecting your investments against a down period is also part of the formula for success.</p> <h2>3. Your portfolio is not properly balanced</h2> <p>So you've had some great success with some of your investments, and decide to buy more shares of those that have done the best. There's nothing wrong with buying a lot of something if it performs well for you, but it's important to keep your overall portfolio from getting out of whack. This means not being too heavily invested in one particular stock or group of stocks.</p> <p>Ideally, your portfolio should have a nice mix of stocks from various industries, sectors, and asset classes. Depending on your retirement age, mixing in some bonds and dividend stocks may also make sense. You may fall in love with a certain investment, but you should not let it dominate your portfolio. Diversification is key to mitigating risk. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-basics-of-asset-allocation?ref=seealso" target="_blank">The Basics of Asset Allocation</a>)</p> <h2>4. You're taking on too much risk</h2> <p>Investing is not without risk, and you must be comfortable with that if you plan to accumulate wealth over time. But don't be too tempted to take on extra risk just to chase higher returns. It's one thing to invest heavily in stocks, but it can be financial suicide to go after notoriously volatile investments, or to engage in risky practices like trading on margin or buying and selling options.</p> <p>The best approach is to build a portfolio that roughly performs in line with the whole stock market, ensuring that you'll likely make money over time but will avoid catastrophic downturns that wipe out your whole savings.</p> <h2>5. You never check up on your investments</h2> <p>For most people, it's not necessary to check your investments every day and obsess over every movement in the markets. But you don't want to completely ignore your investment accounts, either. Even if you are invested in simple, reliable things like index funds, an occasional check-in is usually a good idea. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-4-best-investments-for-lazy-investors?ref=seealso" target="_blank">The 4 Best Investments for Lazy Investors</a>)</p> <p>Without a checkup, you may be unaware that certain investments are underperforming. You might allow your portfolio to become unbalanced, leaving you under- or over-invested in some areas. You may be left unaware of company sales or mergers that result in changes to your investment mix. Don't get cocky; the stock market has gone up reliably over time, but your investments still need some tending to from time to time.</p> <h2>6. You trade too often</h2> <p>Let's face it: Buying and selling stocks can be fun. And when you feel confident in your stock picking abilities, you'll feel the urge to trade stocks frequently. You may even feel like you can &quot;time&quot; the market. But trading frequently has financial consequences.</p> <p>First, if your stocks are in a taxable brokerage account, you'll end up paying tax on any gains when you sell. Second, most brokerage firms charge a commission for every trade. These expenses can put a dent in the value of your portfolio.</p> <h2>7. You miss out on popular, but well-performing investments</h2> <p>Imagine there's a hot stock that everyone is buying. But you stay away, because you think everyone else is dumber than you. Your confidence got in the way of rationally examining an investment on its merits rather than being influenced by the decisions of others. Buying a stock just because it's popular is silly, but so is refusing to buy it for the same reason. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-everyday-things-that-are-surprisingly-awesome-investments?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Everyday Things That Are Surprisingly Awesome Investments</a>)</p> <h2>8. You hold on to investments too long</h2> <p>Years ago, you bought 100 shares of OmniCorp and it netted you a massive return in the first year. You still have some of those shares, but the company has since been struggling, and may even declare bankruptcy. But still, you refuse to cut your losses and sell, because you made so much money from this stock early on. You are utterly convinced the company will turn things around, despite all evidence to the contrary. This is a dangerous mentality to have, and can cost you plenty in the long run.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F8-surprising-ways-confidence-can-hurt-your-investments&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F8%2520Surprising%2520Ways%2520Confidence%2520Can%2520Hurt%2520Your%2520Investments.jpg&amp;description=8%20Surprising%20Ways%20Confidence%20Can%20Hurt%20Your%20Investments"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/8%20Surprising%20Ways%20Confidence%20Can%20Hurt%20Your%20Investments.jpg" alt="8 Surprising Ways Confidence Can Hurt Your Investments" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/tim-lemke">Tim Lemke</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-surprising-ways-confidence-can-hurt-your-investments">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-signs-youre-a-helicopter-investor-and-how-to-stop">8 Signs You&#039;re a &quot;Helicopter Investor&quot; (And How to Stop)</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-too-much-investment-diversity-can-cost-you">How Too Much Investment Diversity Can Cost You</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-signs-an-etf-isnt-right-for-you">8 Signs an ETF Isn&#039;t Right for You</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-costly-mistakes-diy-investors-make">9 Costly Mistakes DIY Investors Make</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dont-be-fooled-by-an-investments-rate-of-return">Don&#039;t Be Fooled by an Investment&#039;s Rate of Return</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Investment arrogance confidence fees rebalancing risk stock markets stocks taxes trading Wed, 26 Jul 2017 08:00:17 +0000 Tim Lemke 1988261 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Save for Retirement When You Are Unemployed http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-save-for-retirement-when-you-are-unemployed <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-save-for-retirement-when-you-are-unemployed" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/latin_american_woman_saving_in_a_piggybank.jpg" alt="Latin American woman saving in a piggy bank" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>When you're unemployed, saving for retirement may be the last thing on your mind. It may seem impossible to save for the future when you have no steady income to even pay basic bills.</p> <p>But depending on your situation, it may still be possible to build your nest egg even if you're not working full-time. Here are some tools and suggestions for keeping an eye on the future during a period of joblessness.</p> <h2>Familiarize yourself with IRAs</h2> <p>Individual retirement accounts (IRAs) are great for people who don't have access to employer-sponsored retirement plans like 401(k) accounts. A traditional IRA is similar to a 401(k), in that any contributions are deducted from whatever taxable income you have. With a Roth IRA, on the other hand, earnings are taxed up front, but any gains you have won't be taxed when you withdraw money at retirement age.</p> <p>IRAs are useful for people who are self-employed, or who earn money inconsistently through part-time or freelance work. So if you're not employed full-time but still have some earned income, these accounts can help you save.</p> <h2>Think of retirement savings as a necessary expense</h2> <p>When you're unemployed, it's important to get a handle on all of your expenses so that you know where you need to cut. You may find that there are a lot of costs (luxury purchases, eating out, cable TV) that can be taken out of your household budget, while other expenses (food, electricity, debt payments) are more necessary. If you think of retirement savings as a necessity, you will be forced to cut spending elsewhere.</p> <h2>Roll over your old 401(k)</h2> <p>If you've been laid off from a job, you will no longer be able to contribute to the 401(k) you may have had from your employer. But the account will still exist and the money is still yours. You can let the old 401(k) account sit, but it's better to roll it into a traditional individual retirement account (IRA). The IRA will give you more flexibility and investment options, and may also have lower fees. And you can begin contributing to it once you have any earned income at all.</p> <h2>Focus on rebalancing</h2> <p>You may not be able to add much to your retirement accounts, but you can work to make sure they are optimized. This means making sure you have the right mix of investments based on your retirement date, and getting the optimal blend of stocks in various industries and asset classes. It's always smart to examine your portfolio to ensure you are not over- or underinvested in any one area.</p> <h2>Look for higher bank interest rates</h2> <p>If you're not taking in much income for the time being, you need to have your cash savings working for you. That means any cash savings you have should generate as much income as possible. Interest rates are still quite low, but many online banks offer interest rates on CDs and savings accounts that are higher than average.</p> <h2>Avoid the temptation to cash out</h2> <p>It may be tempting to take money out of your retirement funds, but you should avoid it if at all possible. One of the best ways to see your retirement savings grow is to let your investments do their thing. You can see a meaningful increase in your retirement savings just from market gains, even if you're not contributing for the time being.</p> <p>Withdrawing from retirement accounts, however, has consequences. First, any money you take out has no chance to grow and help you expand your overall retirement savings. Second, there are penalties and taxes associated with taking money out of retirement accounts early. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-questions-to-ask-before-you-borrow-from-your-retirement-account?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Questions to Ask Before You Borrow From Your Retirement Account</a>)</p> <h2>Continue to focus on growth, if you can</h2> <p>If you are unemployed and have some investments in a taxable brokerage account, you may be tempted to shift them to dividend stocks or other income-producing investments. This can give you extra income at a time when you may need it. But making this kind of adjustment could have a long-term negative impact on the overall growth of your portfolio. If dividends, bonds, or other income-focused investments will help you keep the lights on, fine. But it's best to focus on finding other sources of income, or reduce your spending first before going this route.</p> <h2>Reinvest dividends, if you can</h2> <p>If you do have dividend stocks already, you can still contribute to your retirement portfolio by reinvesting any dividend income you get from stocks. You may be tempted to use that investment income to pay bills and help get through your unemployed period, but if you can get by without it, direct the dividends to buy more stocks and other investments instead. Even small contributions added to your retirement accounts can add up to considerable savings over time.</p> <h2>Get your spouse involved</h2> <p>Perhaps you never thought to include your spouse in retirement planning because you felt it wasn't necessary while you were working. Now his or her income can be directed to help you save. This may be a challenge, since they are now also working to help pay more of the bills. But there are some ways to use your spouse's income for your own retirement accounts. If you have a traditional or Roth IRA, your spouse's earned income can go toward your account. (Note: This is only allowed if you file your taxes jointly.)</p> <h2>Plan to pay into accounts later</h2> <p>If you are unemployed but expect to be working in short order, you can postpone contributions to your IRA and add money later, even if it's after the end of the year. In fact, you can contribute to an IRA all the way up until April 15 of the following year. So for example, let's say you planned to max out your IRA by making monthly payments. (This would be about $458 monthly for a total of $5,500 for the year &mdash; the maximum amount allowed by the IRS for people under 50.) But let's say you are out of work from August through October of that year. You can hold off on contributing during that time and make up the difference in later months, even the first few months of the following year, if necessary.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fhow-to-save-for-retirement-when-you-are-unemployed&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FHow%2520to%2520Save%2520for%2520Retirement%2520When%2520You%2520Are%2520Unemployed.jpg&amp;description=How%20to%20Save%20for%20Retirement%20When%20You%20Are%20Unemployed"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/How%20to%20Save%20for%20Retirement%20When%20You%20Are%20Unemployed.jpg" alt="How to Save for Retirement When You Are Unemployed" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/tim-lemke">Tim Lemke</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-save-for-retirement-when-you-are-unemployed">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/yes-you-can-pay-for-education-with-an-ira">Yes, You Can Pay for Education With an IRA</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-signs-youre-making-all-the-right-moves-for-retirement">8 Signs You&#039;re Making All the Right Moves for Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-roadblocks-to-retirement-and-how-to-clear-them">7 Roadblocks to Retirement (And How to Clear Them)</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-make-sure-you-dont-run-out-of-money-in-retirement">How to Make Sure You Don&#039;t Run Out of Money in Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-reasons-to-invest-in-stocks-past-age-50">7 Reasons to Invest in Stocks Past Age 50</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Investment Retirement 401(k) contributions dividends interest rates job loss loss of income rebalancing Roth IRA saving money stocks traditional ira unemployment Wed, 12 Jul 2017 09:00:14 +0000 Tim Lemke 1979037 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Make Sure You Don't Run Out of Money in Retirement http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-make-sure-you-dont-run-out-of-money-in-retirement <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-make-sure-you-dont-run-out-of-money-in-retirement" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/nest_made_of_american_currency_horizontal.jpg" alt="Nest Made of American Currency Horizontal" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>An annuity is a stream of fixed payments that's guaranteed, often for as long as you live. Having an annuity can make retirement more secure, but it's hard to recommend them as investment vehicles, because almost every annuity on the market is a terrible investment. They tend to be sold by salesmen, so they're often loaded with fees. And, because being upfront about the fees would make them hard to sell, these fees are obscure (often outright hidden) and are typically different for every product, making it especially hard to comparison shop. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dont-know-what-annuities-are-you-might-be-missing-out?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Should You Get an Annuity?</a>)</p> <p>But my experience these past few years &mdash; helping older relatives with their finances, and starting to take the little pension I earned as a software engineer &mdash; has given me a new perspective on annuities. Having an annuity is more than just nice: It's wonderful! It's just <em>buying</em> them that's usually terrible.</p> <p>Fortunately, there are a few that are worth buying. You don't hear about them often, because they don't siphon off a big chunk of your investment to pay a salesman, so salesmen don't push them.</p> <h2>Why annuities are great</h2> <p>It used to be that anyone with a good job retired with an annuity in the form of a pension. This is how I've gotten my recent experience with just how great it is to have an annuity: All my older relatives are now receiving pensions.</p> <h3>You never outlive your income</h3> <p>The main thing that's great about an annuity is that having one means you're never going to be broke. Even if you overspend and run down your savings, even if the stock market crashes or you make terrible investment decisions and your investment portfolio takes huge losses, you'll still get that monthly check for as long as you live.</p> <p>You don't <em>need</em> to have an annuity to arrange that &mdash; you can live off capital in a way that makes it last the rest of your life &mdash; but an annuity makes it much easier.</p> <h3>They can raise your income</h3> <p>The other thing that's great about an annuity is that it can, at least potentially, be more money to live on. See, the only safe way to live off capital is to just spend the income from your investments. But that's not much money (especially these days).</p> <p>If you knew how long you were going to live, you could spend down your capital so that you'd die with just enough money to pay off your last month's bills. But since you don't know how long you're going to live, you have to make a conservative estimate, holding back enough capital so that you won't go broke even if you live to 100. (Of course even that might not be enough. What if you live to 114?)</p> <p>The company that provides your annuity has a much easier job. They don't need to know whether you'll live to 97 or kick the bucket at 67. They count on the fact that the average person will live an average life span. They can arrange the terms of the annuities so that the payouts don't exhaust the total pool until the last person dies. The fact that some people die the month after their pension starts means that there's enough money to pay for the people who go on to live for decades.</p> <p>Offset against that is the fact that the company that's providing your annuity needs to make a profit, and it also needs to hold back a reserve against the possibility that it'll get unlucky and a bunch of their customers will live longer than average &mdash; but both of those factors are relatively small.</p> <h2>Annuitize, but how much?</h2> <p>If you accept the idea that you probably ought to have an annuity of some size, the next question is: How big should the annuity be?</p> <p>At one extreme, you could just annuitize all your money &mdash; take all your savings and investments (except your checking account and your emergency fund) and buy an annuity. Then you'd know what your income would be for the rest of your life and you could budget for it.</p> <p>I recommend against that. There are many reasons why it's <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/on-the-importance-of-having-capital" target="_blank">worth having some capital</a>. Your capital earns an investment return and it also provides a measure of safety as a backup to your emergency fund. It makes it possible to fund expenses beyond your bare-bones budget. Perhaps most important, having some capital saves you money in all kinds of different ways &mdash; because you have funds on hand, you can take advantage of deals, you can avoid high-interest borrowing, and you have money to put down a large security deposit in cases where that will save you money.</p> <p>At the other extreme, you could annuitize none of your money and just live off your capital. I've just explained the downsides to that.</p> <p>You want to be somewhere in the middle. With a modest annuity, you're protected from running your income down to zero, and yet you can preserve some amount of capital.</p> <p>My advice is this: You should annuitize <em>enough to cover your rock-bottom expenses</em>, the lowest amount you could live on indefinitely. That way, you're putting yourself in a position where you can be sure you can get by no matter what happens to your investments, while preserving enough of an investment portfolio to fund your other life goals &mdash; travel, making a major purchase, leaving an estate to your heirs, etc.</p> <p>Before you start shopping for annuities, be sure to take into account any annuities you already have. But unless you're old, and even then only if you had a pretty good job at a pretty big company for many years, you probably aren't going to have a great pension. (If you're only kind of old, and worked at a pretty big company for a few years before they all phased out their traditional pensions in the early 2000s, maybe there's a small pension waiting for you. If so, that's great. Even if it's not enough to live on, it's a very positive contribution to your retirement income.)</p> <p>However, most people reading this probably won't get a good pension.</p> <p>Fortunately, there is an annuity you very likely do have.</p> <h2>The annuity you already have</h2> <p>You almost certainly already have an annuity in the form of a national pension scheme, such as Social Security. The amount of Social Security you will get depends on your own employment history. For most people, it will provide a large fraction of the &quot;rock-bottom expenses&quot; I recommend you cover with an annuity, but you can generally expect there to be some gap.</p> <p>If you have an employer-sponsored pension, even a small one, it may well cover the gap. If you don't, I recommend that you cover it with an annuity that you buy.</p> <h2>How to buy an annuity</h2> <p>As I said at the beginning, most of the annuities you can buy are terrible investments, but there are good ones. It is possible to buy an individual annuity and get an OK deal. It's just hard because the companies that sell them make it virtually impossible to compare one annuity to another.</p> <p>This is especially true for the sorts of annuities that are most like a pension: The ones set up so you make a payment every month starting in your 30s or 40s, then get a check every month starting when you're 65.</p> <p>Those are called deferred annuities (because you defer getting your money until age 65), and they're always terrible. They always have what are called &quot;back-end&quot; fees &mdash; money that the salesman gets to keep when you figure out that you've made a terrible deal and want to get (some of) your money back. The rules on back-end fees are always different.</p> <p>To make it even harder, these sorts of annuities are usually bundled with some sort of life insurance (supposedly so that if you die before you retire your estate won't &quot;lose&quot; all the money paid into the annuity) &mdash; and of course the details of those insurance policies are always different as well.</p> <h3>Comparison shopping</h3> <p>It is possible to buy an annuity in a way that does allow you to compare them. Don't buy one with monthly payments. Instead, save and invest the money in the stock market yourself during your working years. Then, when you're ready to retire, buy what's called a &quot;single premium immediate annuity&quot; &mdash; you put up a big chunk of money today, and then start receiving monthly payments immediately that last for the rest of your life. (The monthly payments, of course, should equal the gap you identified between your Social Security and your rock-bottom budget.)</p> <p>That is something that's easy to compare: How much do you have to pay today for a stream of income that starts next month and lasts the rest of your life? You can get a few quotes and pick the best deal.</p> <p>These sorts of annuities usually don't have the life insurance policy that supposedly protects against your dying before you start taking payments, because the payments start immediately. That's good. Bundling in life insurance just makes it harder to compare prices. If you need life insurance, buy a life insurance policy separately.</p> <p>Be very careful of letting them include any sort of survivor benefit, because that can also make the annuities harder to compare (although as long as the rules are exactly the same, it is at least possible). One alternative, if you need a survivor benefit, is to buy a life insurance policy that will pay off enough for your spouse to buy his or her own annuity.</p> <p>As an aside, let me mention that the annuity salesmen among you are going to jump in and point out that you're giving up an important tax advantage if you only consider an immediate annuity. This is technically true, but in fact is pretty unimportant. Let me just say this: If you are maxing out your 401(k), <em>and</em> your IRA, <em>and</em> your Roth IRA, there is an opportunity to tax shelter a bit more money through an annuity contract. In practice, I'm willing to bet that the tax advantage will never equal the fees you're going to end up paying.</p> <p>If you do save your money in a 401(k) or IRA, there are tax rules for using that money to buy your annuity. Follow the rules and you won't owe any taxes when the money is used to buy the annuity. You will, however, pay taxes on the annuity payments when you receive them (just like you would if you'd taken distributions from the tax-deferred plan directly).</p> <h3>Where to buy</h3> <p>Pretty much any life insurance company will sell you an annuity, but I only know of two places to get a good one: Vanguard and TIAA-CREF. (There used to be a third, but Berkshire Hathaway got out of the business a few years ago.)</p> <p>The main problem with buying directly from an insurance company is just that their annuity sales operations are organized around their annuity salesmen, who will immediately start trying to sell you something that's more profitable (to them) than a single premium immediate annuity &mdash; that's the step you avoid by going through Vanguard or TIAA-CREF. (They also have enough buying power to get especially good rates, because they bring in large numbers of customers.)</p> <p>If you're sure you can bear up under the sales pressure, there's no reason not to get quotes directly from the insurance companies. (Just because I don't know of any other good places to buy one doesn't mean there aren't any.) Insurance companies that sell annuities will be very easy to find &mdash; just do an internet search for information about annuities and you'll get a dozen ads for them and for online tools to compare their offerings.</p> <p>You're handing over a large fraction of your wealth and counting on the insurance company to be around for the rest of your life, so you want to have considerable confidence in the financial soundness of the company you pick. I would not consider any company rated less than A by the insurance grading firm A.M. Best, and I'd be happier with one rated A+.</p> <h3>Buy when rates are high</h3> <p>To buy an annuity, you have to put up a pretty sizable chunk of cash. (Vanguard quotes the cost today to a 65-year-old male buying a single premium immediate annuity of $1,000 a month for the rest of his life as being $180,052.)</p> <p>Unless you're rich, the cost of an annuity that covers your rock-bottom expenses is going to be a large fraction of your entire retirement savings &mdash; which is OK, because it's going to be a large chunk of your entire retirement income.</p> <p>The insurance company that sells you your annuity is going to invest that sizable chunk of cash in a portfolio of stocks and (mostly) bonds, and then use the dividends from those stocks and (mostly) the interest payments from those bonds to pay your annuity. Because of this, an annuity is much cheaper when interest rates are high.</p> <p>If you bought an annuity right before the financial crisis, you made out very well. If you wanted to buy one in the past eight or nine years, you probably found that they were incredibly expensive. But in the current era of rising interest rates, annuities are becoming more affordable again.</p> <p>Still, if you're approaching retirement age, understand that there is no rush. Figure out your rock-bottom expenses &mdash; and then live with that budget as an experiment. Maybe you'll find that you'll need more than that in retirement. Maybe you'll actually need less. Do some comparison shopping. Take your time. Then, when you've got a pretty good handle on the expense of your retirement lifestyle, at a time when interest rates are up a bit and you're ready to quit working, go ahead and buy that annuity.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/philip-brewer">Philip Brewer</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-make-sure-you-dont-run-out-of-money-in-retirement">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-8"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dont-be-fooled-by-an-investments-rate-of-return">Don&#039;t Be Fooled by an Investment&#039;s Rate of Return</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-reasons-to-invest-in-stocks-past-age-50">7 Reasons to Invest in Stocks Past Age 50</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/bookmark-this-a-step-by-step-guide-to-choosing-401k-investments">Bookmark This: A Step-by-Step Guide to Choosing 401(k) Investments</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-save-for-retirement-when-you-are-unemployed">How to Save for Retirement When You Are Unemployed</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-you-need-to-know-about-the-easiest-way-to-save-for-retirement">What You Need to Know About the Easiest Way to Save for Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Investment Retirement annuities benefits bonds fees interest rates investment vehicles life insurance pensions stocks Fri, 26 May 2017 08:30:09 +0000 Philip Brewer 1953940 at http://www.wisebread.com Don't Let Outdated Money Advice Endanger Your Money http://www.wisebread.com/dont-let-outdated-money-advice-endanger-your-money <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/dont-let-outdated-money-advice-endanger-your-money" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-503170570.jpg" alt="Woman ignoring outdated money advice" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>We've all received unsolicited financial advice, often from well-meaning relatives and friends. In many cases, this advice is useful. But a lot of &quot;classic&quot; personal finance advice simply hasn't aged well, and is now viewed as flawed. It's just not applicable anymore in today's world.</p> <p>Before you blindly accept any money advice you receive, be sure to do some additional research to find out if the advice is outdated. Here are nine examples of financial tips that may no longer apply.</p> <h2>&quot;Find a good employer and stay forever&quot;</h2> <p>Many of us know an older relative that began working at a company as a teenager and then retired from that same firm four decades later. Often, they walked away with a sizable pension and even health benefits for life. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/if-youre-lucky-enough-to-receive-a-pension-here-are-6-things-you-need-to-do?ref=seealso" target="_blank">If You're Lucky Enough to Receive a Pension, Here Are 6 Things You Need to Do</a>)</p> <p>This doesn't happen much anymore. Job security is not what it once was. A decline in labor unions means that guaranteed annual pay increases are a thing of the past. And a pension? Forget it.</p> <p>There's a lot of evidence now that switching jobs periodically will result in higher pay increases. And with the introduction of 401(k) plans, retirement savings are portable when your employer changes.</p> <h2>&quot;Pay off all of your debt as soon as you can&quot;</h2> <p>This is not so much &quot;bad&quot; advice, it's just less than ideal. Yes, it's a fine goal to remain as close to debt-free as possible, but in the current environment, carrying <em>some </em>kinds of low-interest debt may be more beneficial for you in the long run.</p> <p>Let's say you have a 30-year fixed-rate mortgage and were fortunate enough to lock in a low 3.5 percent interest rate. Let's also say stock market returns are averaging 7 percent per year. Over time, you're going to be better off using any extra money you have to invest in stocks rather than pay off your loan early. Generally speaking, if your investment returns outpace current interest rates, there's not much incentive to pay off debt early.</p> <h2>&quot;Technology is a fad&quot;</h2> <p>There was a time when some of the most savvy investors dismissed many tech stocks because they didn't understand them. The bubble collapse of advertising-dependent dot-com companies in the late 1990s didn't help the image of this sector. But there's no denying the fact that investing in technology companies with solid business models has been a clear path to wealth in recent years.</p> <p>All you need to do is look at the incredible returns for companies like Amazon, Apple, Netflix, Facebook, and others. A full 15 percent of companies in the S&amp;P 500 are technology companies, and they comprise most of the companies traded on the NASDAQ.</p> <p>Tech stocks are still notoriously volatile, but if you ignore the sector completely, you're ignoring some big potential returns.</p> <h2>&quot;Max out your 401(k)&quot;</h2> <p>While there's still little question that you should take advantage of your employer's 401(k) plan, people aren't quite as eager anymore to recommend that you contribute the maximum amount allowed. That's because over time, we've learned that the investment options and fees in many plans are rather lousy.</p> <p>Now, the best advice is to contribute to your 401(k) up to the amount that is matched by your employer. After that, begin contributing as much as you can into a Roth IRA, which offers tax-free growth and a wide array of investment choices.</p> <h2>&quot;Education debt is good debt&quot;</h2> <p>Attending college isn't a bad thing, but don't be cavalier about the impact that student loan debt will have on your financial wellbeing. College costs are increasing, along with stories of students and new grads being weighed down by tens or even hundreds of thousands of dollars of debt. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-ways-to-pay-back-student-loans-faster?ref=seealso" target="_blank">15 Ways to Pay Back Student Loans Faster</a>)</p> <p>Carrying this debt can create a ripple effect that impacts your ability to save, purchase a home, or invest. And student loan debt can't be discharged in bankruptcy. Nowadays, any thought of borrowing for school should not be taken lightly.</p> <h2>&quot;Diversify your portfolio with a mix of stocks and bonds&quot;</h2> <p>Financial advisers have always emphasized diversification, but over time there's evidence that younger investors don't need to devote as much of their portfolio to fixed-income investments. Investing in bonds is useful for people who are nearing retirement age. But if you've got a long way to go before you stop working, you'll be best off with mostly stocks, which will offer much better returns and greater potential to meet your retirement goals.</p> <p>There is more risk and volatility associated with buying stocks, but a long time horizon will give you plenty of time to recoup any losses and then some (especially since people are living longer than ever). If you're not sure what stocks to invest in, pick a simple, low-cost index fund that mirrors the performance of the overall stock market.</p> <h2>&quot;Try to become a millionaire&quot;</h2> <p>There is an enormous amount of mystique surrounding the $1 million mark, and there's no question that saving that amount is something to be proud of. But a million dollars won't carry you as far as it once did. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-reasons-being-a-millionaire-is-overrated?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Reasons Being a Millionaire Is Overrated</a>)</p> <p>If you plan to retire at age 60, keep in mind that you need your nest egg to last for 30 years or more. Will $1 million allow you to maintain your lifestyle and pay for things like long-term care? It's certainly possible to retire with $1 million, but you may still have to live conservatively to make the money last.</p> <h2>&quot;Always buy instead of rent&quot;</h2> <p>Homeownership is a powerful thing. It allows you to build equity and get some possible tax breaks while also offering you a place to live. But we've learned in recent years that it's not for everyone.</p> <p>Home prices are sky high in many areas of the country, and having a mortgage payment that's too expensive can make it hard to save for the future or even live comfortably. Remember that just because you qualify for a loan of a certain size doesn't mean that's a sensible loan size for you.</p> <p>The best advice now is to purchase a home if you believe you can make a large down payment and then comfortably make monthly payments while still saving for other future needs. If you're not quite there yet, don't fret. Renting is OK as long as you're still saving, investing, and building your net worth in other ways.</p> <h2>&quot;Buy Coca-Cola stock&quot;</h2> <p>For decades, you'd often hear investors gloat about the consistent, predictably great returns from Coke. Heck, the great <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-best-pieces-of-financial-wisdom-from-warren-buffett" target="_blank">Warren Buffett</a> owns a ton of shares and drinks several Cokes a day.</p> <p>It's still a good company, but anyone who bought Coca-Cola shares in recent years will have seen below-average market returns. Shares have risen just 18 percent in the last five years compared to nearly 70 percent for the S&amp;P 500. Quite simply, the company has had to work very hard to maintain profits in an age when people are increasingly concerned about the health impact of sugary drinks and snacks.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/tim-lemke">Tim Lemke</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dont-let-outdated-money-advice-endanger-your-money">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-4"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/are-you-putting-off-these-9-adult-money-moves">Are You Putting Off These 9 Adult Money Moves?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/millennial-millionaires-how-the-brokest-generation-can-also-become-the-richest">Millennial Millionaires: How the Brokest Generation Can Also Become the Richest</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-financial-resolutions-you-can-conquer-before-new-years">10 Financial Resolutions You Can Conquer Before New Year&#039;s</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-online-forums-thatll-help-you-reach-your-financial-goals">9 Online Forums That&#039;ll Help You Reach Your Financial Goals</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-ways-to-increase-your-net-worth-this-year">10 Ways to Increase Your Net Worth This Year</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance 401(k) bad advice debt education investing pensions retirement saving money stocks student loans Fri, 19 May 2017 09:00:09 +0000 Tim Lemke 1948480 at http://www.wisebread.com