work http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/305/all en-US 10 Frugal Ways to Reduce Workplace Stress http://www.wisebread.com/10-frugal-ways-to-reduce-workplace-stress <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/10-frugal-ways-to-reduce-workplace-stress" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_meditating_work_000078035075.jpg" alt="Woman finding cheap and free ways to reduce workplace stress" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Work stress often seems like a normal part of adulthood. Deadlines, demanding bosses, irritating coworkers, and of course, the dreaded TPS reports can all work together to make your blood pressure spike and your temper rise, even if you love your job.</p> <p>You might think that lowering your stress level at work requires either drastic action, like quitting your job, or an expensive habit, like booking a daily massage. But there are lots of little ways to improve your stress level at work, often without having to spend a dime. And not only will these stress reduction techniques help you to feel calmer and more contented at work, but they will also help improve your productivity.</p> <p>In no time, you'll be back to writing your TPS reports with a whistle on your lips and a song in your heart. (Unfortunately, this might not help your cubicle-mate's stress level.) The next time you're feeling stressed and overwhelmed at the office, try one of these stress reduction techniques.</p> <h2>1. Create an Interruption List</h2> <p>One of the things that makes work feel overwhelming is when you have a sense that you have worked all day without making any progress. This stress-inducing problem comes from the fact that it takes an average of <a href="http://www.fastcompany.com/944128/worker-interrupted-cost-task-switching">23 minutes and 15 seconds</a> to get back on task after an interruption. This means you can get to the end of your workday exhausted and with very little to show for it.</p> <p>Though modern technology exacerbates the problem of interruptions, it is relatively simple to turn off the notifications on your email, phone, and instant messaging systems. The more difficult type of interruption to deal with comes from your co-workers who stop by your desk.</p> <p>This is why Stever Robbins, author of <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0312662610/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=0312662610&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=ZKCC4F4HRGHBIEIG">The Get-it-Done Guy's 9 Steps to Work Less and Do More</a>, suggests that you institute an interruption list. This is a simple sheet of paper where you jot down the details of the issue your co-worker is bringing to you. You then set aside a half hour to an hour later in the day to deal with the items on your interruption list. Rather than splitting your focus, you give your current project 100% of your attention, and you can later give your co-worker's issue 100%, too. That's a win-win.</p> <h2>2. Sit Up Straight or Strike a Pose</h2> <p>As a lifelong sloucher, I can tell you that hunching over my keyboard and folding my legs into origami on my desk chair feels pretty comfortable. But the way I sit at work can add to my stress.</p> <p>That's because, according to Andy Yap, a post-doctoral associate and lecturer at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, &quot;<a href="http://business.time.com/2014/01/22/5-scientifically-proven-ways-to-reduce-stress-at-work/">Your posture influences psychology</a> and that influences behavior.&quot; Sitting in a tight, constricted position makes you feel stressed.</p> <p>This is partially because such positions do not look powerful or confident. Yap's colleague, Social Psychologist Amy Cuddy has found that adopting confident postures &mdash; like Superman's wide-legged, hands-on-hips stance &mdash; has an effect on emotion, behavior, and hormone levels. Cuddy calls these postures &quot;<a href="http://www.people.hbs.edu/acuddy/in%20press,%20carney,%20cuddy,%20&amp;%20yap,%20psych%20science.pdf">power poses</a>,&quot; and they include almost any pose that is space-occupying, open, and expansive.</p> <p>Even if you have to &quot;fake&quot; the confidence or serenity, sitting tall with a straight spine, or adopting the man of steel's favorite pose (while imagining your cape billowing in the wind) for as little as two minutes, can improve your confidence and stress level.</p> <h2>3. Make Every Day Thanksgiving With a Gratitude List</h2> <p>It can be very easy to get sucked down into the misery of day-to-day stress, particularly if your workplace has a high-pressure culture or you have been facing unrelenting back-to-back deadlines.</p> <p>An excellent antidote to these kinds of stresses is taking a moment to feel gratitude for the things that are going well in your life. Practicing <a href="http://www.webmd.com/women/features/gratitute-health-boost">gratitude has mental health benefits</a>, because it has &quot;tremendous positive value in helping people cope with daily problems, especially stress,&quot; according to University of California Davis psychology professor Robert Emmons.</p> <p>An easy and quick way to do this is to write down a list of things you are grateful for, and post it somewhere you can easily see it. Then, when you feel yourself getting overwhelmed, you can look up and remember how supportive your significant other is and how much you love seeing your dog's wagging tail at the end of each day.</p> <p>You can also make gratitude a habit by jotting a new item down each day.</p> <h2>4. Talk to Yourself&hellip; By Name</h2> <p>Talking to yourself does not mean becoming that person at your job who is always mumbling about his red Swingline stapler or the insufficient cake-to-person ratio at the office birthday party. In fact, you already engage in self-talk, where you might say, &quot;I got this!&quot; right before an important presentation, or &quot;I'm an idiot!&quot; after blowing the presentation.</p> <p>According to psychologist Ethan Kross, however, <a href="https://www.psychologytoday.com/articles/201505/the-voice-reason">referring to yourself in the first person</a> (i.e., <em>I</em> or <em>me</em>) is causing you more stress and sapping your confidence. If you instead start using your name and <em>you</em> when you talk to yourself, you create enough psychological distance to enable self-control and minimize rumination, which Kross describes to as &quot;a handmaiden of anxiety and depression after we complete a task.&quot;</p> <p>Kross explains that &quot;when dealing with strong emotions, taking a step back and becoming a detached observer can help. It's very easy for people to advise their friends, yet when it comes to themselves, they have trouble. But people engaging in this process, using their own first name, are distancing themselves from the self, right in the moment.&quot;</p> <p>So next time you are feeling overwhelmed, take a deep breath and say, &quot;You can do this,&quot; in the same way you'd tell your best friend.</p> <h2>5. Turn on Some Tunes</h2> <p>Researchers are just now starting to understand the seemingly-magical properties of music, which we have long known to be able to soothe the savage beast. According to recent studies, not only does listening to music regulate several cardiac and neurological functions, but it can also produce <a href="http://www.researchgate.net/publication/51500863_From_music-beat_to_heart-beat_A_journey_in_the_complex_interactions_between_music_brain_and_heart">measurable biochemical stress-reducing effects</a>.</p> <p>Having your favorite songs playing in the background while you work can be one of the most effective methods for reducing your stress level on a regular basis.</p> <h2>6. Make Yourself a Nice Cup of Tea</h2> <p>At the risk of sounding like an overbearing mother in a 19th Century British novel, a cup of tea really can cure all that ails you. Not only have studies found that drinking <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17013636">black tea improves your cortisol</a> (stress hormone) levels, and that green tea works as an antidepressant, but the act of making tea for yourself can help you to feel &quot;cared for.&quot; (Think of Sheldon Cooper's insistence on making a hot drink for someone in distress.)</p> <p>In addition, holding onto a warm cup can help you feel &quot;<a href="http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/wordofmouth/2014/oct/28/hot-drinks-science-tasting-notes">warmer</a>&quot; (as in friendlier) toward your coworkers and place of work. Our brains form judgments about others in the same spot where we process warmth of temperature, so just the fact that you are holding a hot beverage can help to make the world look a little warmer to you.</p> <p>If you're all for the break and the warmth, but prefer a cup of joe over tea, remember that the caffeine in coffee can make your heart race, which is hardly helpful if you're already stressed. In addition, tea is also incredibly hydrating. This is important because stress can cause dehydration, since your adrenal glands are pumping out stress hormones &mdash; including a hormone called aldosterone, which helps regulate the body's fluids and electrolytes. If you're stressing at work, the cup of tea can help keep your hydration in check.</p> <h2>7. Declutter Your Desk</h2> <p>Trying to get something done in a cluttered work environment is not just frustrating when you can't find the latest memo from your boss that you <em>know</em> is around here somewhere. Working among clutter can also raise your stress levels, making it harder to focus on your job.</p> <p>A <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2013/03/10/opinion/sunday/living-with-less-a-lot-less.html?pagewanted=2&amp;_r=0&amp;hp">UCLA study of 32 families</a> from Los Angeles found that stress hormones spiked while the mothers spent time dealing with their belongings. (This effect was true of every single mother, but not necessarily every father studied). The researchers theorize that physical clutter overloads your senses because it is competing for your attention, which means your performance will be decreased, your stress levels will increase, and your ability to think creatively can be impaired. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-clutter-keeps-you-poor">8 Ways Clutter Keeps You Poor</a>)</p> <p>Clutter isn't the same for everyone, however, so if you're perfectly comfortable with a fine layer of expense reports and Cheeto dust on your desk, don't worry about living up to someone else's expectation of &quot;decluttered.&quot;</p> <p>If you think better with a clear and ordered space, however, then take a few minutes to clear off your desk and set things in order when you're feeling stressed. Not only will you get a small boost for having accomplished a task, but you'll be in a better place to focus and think creatively about your work.</p> <h2>8. Do Some Coloring</h2> <p>It may feel a little juvenile, but breaking out your crayons, colored pencils, or markers to color in a lovely picture has great stress-reducing benefits for even the most mature of adults. Research has shown that coloring offers the artist a sense of well-being and quietness, while also stimulating the parts of the brain associated with motor skills, the senses, and creativity. And since coloring is a focused, creative, and bounded (that is, it doesn't require you to reinvent any wheels) activity, it can be both soothing and calming for a work-stressed individual.</p> <p>Publishers have gotten in on the message that coloring isn't just for kids anymore. You can find <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1941325122/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=1941325122&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=S6VMA7H7MEWHBSYW">coloring books for adults</a> filled with images like mandalas and stained glass windows &mdash; and nary a cartoon character to be found.</p> <h2>9. Watch an Adorable Cat Video</h2> <p><iframe width="420" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/4IP_E7efGWE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <p>You might remember the recent research out of Japan concluding that <a href="http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0046362">viewing images of cute baby animals increases productivity</a>. But productivity is not the only benefit from such an adorable break from work. <em>Aww</em>-ing over kittens and puppies will also help lower your stress levels.</p> <p>According to research by <a href="http://theconversation.com/cat-lovers-rejoice-watching-online-videos-lowers-stress-and-makes-you-happy-43460">Jessica Gall Myrick of Indiana University Media School</a>, negative emotions are lowered and positive emotions are increased after viewing Internet cat videos. This is true even if you are watching cat-on-a-roomba videos because you are procrastinating. According to Myrick, &quot;even if they are watching cat videos on YouTube&hellip; while they should be working, the emotional pay-off may actually help people take on tough tasks afterwards.&quot;</p> <h2>10. Take a Brisk Walk</h2> <p>The connection between exercise and stress relief is well studied. Not only does exercise boost your production of endorphins, which are your brain's feel-good hormones, but the physical activity is a way of realigning your focus away from whatever is stressing you, <a href="http://www.wholeliving.com/133849/walking-stress-relief">similar to how meditation works</a>.</p> <p>What's even better is that you can get these benefits from exercise with nothing more than a brisk 10 to 15 minute walk. No Crossfit, three-mile hike, or pickup game of basketball required.</p> <p>If you can recruit a walking buddy to chat with while you exercise, you'll also reap the benefits of socializing along with the endorphins, and you'll also be more likely to start a long-term stress reduction habit.</p> <p><em>What are other cheap or free ways you de-stress at work?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/emily-guy-birken">Emily Guy Birken</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-frugal-ways-to-reduce-workplace-stress">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-5"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-terrible-things-science-says-you-do-to-your-body-every-day">9 Terrible Things Science Says You Do to Your Body Every Day</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-little-stressors-you-can-easily-eliminate-today">6 Little Stressors You Can Easily Eliminate Today</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/relax-and-conquer">Relax And Conquer</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-yoga-can-teach-you-about-money">5 Things Yoga Can Teach You About Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-cheap-ways-to-lower-your-blood-sugar">13 Natural and Easy Ways to Lower Your Blood Sugar</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income Life Hacks Health and Beauty job stress stress stress reducer stress relief work work pressure Wed, 16 Dec 2015 12:00:08 +0000 Emily Guy Birken 1619708 at http://www.wisebread.com Ace Your Next Performance Review With These 7 Tricks http://www.wisebread.com/ace-your-next-performance-review-with-these-7-tricks <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/ace-your-next-performance-review-with-these-7-tricks" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_working_happy_000022817538_0.jpg" alt="Woman learning ways to ace her performance review" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>An upcoming performance review can certainly mess with your emotions. On one hand, you may be ready to hear what your employer has to say, especially if a positive review might result in a salary increase. On the other, you may be nervous at the possibility that you're not meeting your employer's expectations. And that sucks. But there's plenty you can do beforehand to maximize your performance review. Consider these seven tips to help ensure you get those gold stars.</p> <h2>1. Go in With an Open Mind</h2> <p>Prior to meeting with your boss for a performance review, you need to prepare your mind for the possibility of hearing something negative. Overall, your boss may be satisfied with your performance. But there's always room for growth, so she might also highlight areas that need improving.</p> <p>It's natural to become defensive, but don't immediately jump in and offer an explanation or justify your actions. Let your boss finish and listen to her concerns. There may be some truth to those claims. Besides, any negative feedback you receive likely comes from a good place. Your employer wants you to succeed and reach your potential. If she didn't, she wouldn't bother providing feedback.</p> <h2>2. Ask for Clarification</h2> <p>You're not the only one nervous during a performance review. Your employer may also be a little anxious, especially if he's bringing up items you need to work on. If he's nervous or has to meet with many of your coworkers in a short amount of time, he may rush the review or not express himself clearly. This can result in vague statements and misunderstandings. You shouldn't leave the meeting confused or puzzled, so don't be afraid to ask for clarification or specific examples. You can't improve your work performance when you don't fully understand the issue.</p> <h2>3. Understand Your Employer's Expectations</h2> <p>If you don't receive a good performance review, the problem may have nothing to do with lack of effort, but rather different expectations. In your mind, you're hitting the mark and helping the company succeed, yet your boss thinks otherwise. For example, maybe you put a lot of time and energy into meeting deadlines, but your boss feels you don't take the initiative or contribute to the team in other ways. To maximize the takeaways from a performance review, ask your boss to clarify her expectations. Based on this information, you can set short and long-term goals to improve your performance.</p> <h2>4. Take Notes During the Review</h2> <p>Your employer may have a lot to say during a performance review, and you may forget some of the important points. Therefore, come prepared to take notes. You can jot down your weaknesses, as well as your strengths. This way you'll get a clear picture of how you're performing as a whole. Taking notes also leaves a good impression with your employer. This shows that you're committed to improving and growing as an employee and giving 100% to the job.</p> <h2>5. Don't Slack After a Positive Review</h2> <p>Performance reviews aren't always negative. Your employer may have nothing but good things to say about your work performance. You might meet all his expectations, and you might be the best worker on the job. It's okay to give yourself a pat on the back, but don't let a perfect review go to your head. Let this be your motivation to continue on the right path. This isn't the time to slack off or think you don't have to work as hard. You want to continue to impress your employer so that your next review will be equally positive.</p> <h2>6. Summarize Key Points</h2> <p>To show your boss you were listening during the review, end the meeting by summarizing in your own words his <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-certifications-that-add-big-to-your-salary">suggestions for improvement</a>. Briefly explain how you plan to address these issues moving forward.</p> <h2>7. Schedule a Mid-Year Review</h2> <p>If possible, don't wait until your next performance review to track your progress. During the initial meeting, discuss goals with your employer and then see if you can schedule another meeting in the upcoming months to evaluate your progress thus far. If your employer conducts annual performance reviews, maybe you can schedule another meeting in six months. Or if your employer conducts reviews every six months, perhaps he can schedule a follow-up review in three months.</p> <p><em>What do you do to maximize your performance review? I'd love to hear some of your tips in the comments below.</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/mikey-rox">Mikey Rox</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/ace-your-next-performance-review-with-these-7-tricks">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-6"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-ways-to-improve-your-performance-at-work">12 Ways to Improve Your Performance at Work</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-unmistakeable-signs-youre-slacking-at-work">5 Unmistakeable Signs You&#039;re Slacking at Work</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-bad-habits-that-are-ruining-your-career">6 Bad Habits That Are Ruining Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-tips-for-better-workplace-body-language">7 Tips for Better Workplace Body Language</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building boss employee Office performance review work work performance Mon, 16 Nov 2015 09:15:53 +0000 Mikey Rox 1612346 at http://www.wisebread.com 4 Ways an Income Gap Can Strain Your Relationship http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-an-income-gap-can-strain-your-relationship <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/4-ways-an-income-gap-can-strain-your-relationship" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/couple_breaking_up_000043320308_1.jpg" alt="Couple learning ways income gap can strain their relationship" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Money is the <a href="http://www.cnbc.com/2015/02/04/money-is-the-leading-cause-of-stress-in-relationships.html">leading cause of arguments</a> in married couples. Income disparity, when one person makes much more than the other, can be a surprising source of stress. If you're one of these couples, be on the lookout for these four ways an income disparity could harm your relationship.</p> <h2>1. Holding on to Old Gender Roles</h2> <p>Women are more and more likely to have higher education and a&nbsp;<a href="http://fivethirtyeight.com/datalab/how-many-women-earn-more-than-their-husbands/">higher paying salary</a> than their significant other. However, in heterosexual relationships in which women are the &quot;breadwinners,&quot; the women are actually <em>still</em> doing more housework than men. That doesn't sound like an equal partnership. That might also be why the divorce rate jumps 50% for couples in which the woman earns the higher income.</p> <p>So much inequality comes from not being comfortable to speak up, and worse, tacitly defaulting to your parents' roles. Having a deep and meaningful conversation about gender and money is important in a relationship &mdash; find each other's biases and challenge them. Outdated and unreasonable gender expectations should not dictate what happens in your relationship.</p> <h2>2. Using Salary as Leverage</h2> <p>For many, money equals power. So when one partner earns more than the other, the higher earner can easily become the de facto decision-maker in where to vacation, what to buy for dinner, the kind of house you live in, and what kind of hobbies you partake in. This is precisely the kind of power imbalance that leads to highly toxic relationships.</p> <p>Resolve to discuss medium-to-major expenditures with your partner before making them. As long as you share your household, it's always half theirs. It's also key to encourage your partner's goals. Aid them generously, in faith that s/he would do the same for you if the roles were reversed.</p> <h2>3. Acting Defensive Over Earning Less</h2> <p>Earning less than your partner can make you feel as if you don't matter, because one salary is floating most of the household. This can lead to resentment, or worse, a childlike attachment and dependency on the other to help you financially.</p> <p>Just because your income accounts for a smaller percentage of the household finances doesn't mean that your role in the relationship is smaller. This comes up a lot when one person decides to stay home to take care of the kids. But remember that contribution to the household is not measured by income.</p> <h2>4. Letting Money Determine Your Partner's Worth</h2> <p>The easiest way to avoid fights is to assign financial contributions on a sliding proportion scale. Instead of letting your partner struggle to pay 50% of the utilities, <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/create-your-first-shared-budget-without-blowing-up-your-relationship">find a shared budget</a> that allows him or her to pay what they can afford. Or, agree on new terms &mdash; like one being in charge of all groceries and utilities, while the other pays the rent or mortgage.</p> <p>Also, it's time to ban the word &quot;breadwinner.&quot; Not only is it divisive, it assigns a &quot;winner/loser&quot; dynamic, which has no place in a loving domestic relationship. If you think less of your partner for doing the dishes, or if you think more of a partner for earning more material wealth, you have set yourself up for trouble.</p> <p>It's time to stop being combative about status. Feeling more or less important is only true if you believe it.</p> <p><em>Is there an income gap in your relationship? How do you get over it?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/amanda-meadows">Amanda Meadows</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-an-income-gap-can-strain-your-relationship">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/3-simple-ways-to-split-bills-with-your-spouse">3 Simple Ways to Split Bills With Your Spouse</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-have-an-above-average-life-for-below-average-prices">How to Have an Above-Average Life for Below-Average Prices</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/getting-by-without-a-job-part-2-boost-income">Getting by without a job, part 2--boost income</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/is-six-figures-really-that-much">Is Six Figures Really That Much?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/financial-independence-is-more-than-just-a-number">Financial Independence Is More Than Just a Number</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Lifestyle Breadwinner budgets gender Households income marriage work Tue, 03 Nov 2015 19:15:54 +0000 Amanda Meadows 1603576 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Reasons Your Coworkers Think You're a Slacker http://www.wisebread.com/6-reasons-your-coworkers-think-youre-a-slacker <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-reasons-your-coworkers-think-youre-a-slacker" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/man_work_paper_airplane_000022233591.jpg" alt="Man realizing why his co-workers think he&#039;s a slacker" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Think you're pulling the wool over your coworkers' eyes when you're not pulling your weight around the workplace? Think again. Not only do your colleagues notice, but they're probably starting to resent you for having to pick up your slack. Nip your <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-office-mistakes-everyone-makes-but-doesnt-talk-about">underperformance problem</a> in the bud with these six signs that you're the weakest link, and help bring balance back to an otherwise out-of-sync office.</p> <h2>1. Taking Credit For Something You Didn't Do</h2> <p>Everybody knows there's no 'I' in team, but your co-workers are starting to realize that there are a few 'I's in &quot;biggest jerk in the office&quot; if you're grandstanding about accomplishments that were a group effort &ndash; especially if it's to make up for your lack of contribution in the first place. Everyone on the team should share in group wins equally, but more importantly, each person should be giving their all to the effort, so that win can be attributed to everyone on the team. If you're prone to riding the coattails of others, it's time to break that habit and work harder for your money.</p> <h2>2. Arriving Late and Leaving Early</h2> <p>Showing up a few minutes late here and there isn't a huge problem, but if you're strolling into the office six minutes late everyday and leaving five minutes early &ndash; which probably seems innocuous, because it's a small amount of time in each instance &ndash; you're not being respectful of your position or all your colleagues who are there at the beginning and end of their shifts every day. And if you think about it, those 11 paid minutes a day that you're skipping out on really add up. If you operate on that hypothetical schedule for five days a week, you've wasted nearly an entire hour of your company's time &ndash; and that won't go over well for long.</p> <p>&quot;People who are chronically late either don't see it as a problem, or don't think the people around them care; neither are true,&quot; says Chad Reid, director of communications for an&nbsp;<a href="http://www.jotform.com">online form builder</a>. &quot;While habitually late people are typically late to things well beyond the office, it can be addressed.&quot;</p> <p>If this sounds like you, you're likely in need of a routine change that could include going to bed earlier, waking up earlier, preparing for the next day ahead of time, altering your route to work, or other time-saving measures that could save your job.</p> <h2>3. Spending Too Much Time on Social Media</h2> <p>Many of us have integrated social media into our jobs, and for some of us it's actually a requirement that we keep up our companies' presences online. Fair enough. But just because managing social media accounts is in your job description, that doesn't give you carte blanche to spend endless hours browsing Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram (unless that's what you were specifically hired to do), nor does it mean that you can access your personal accounts for prolonged periods of time while your tasks at hand are neglected. Your co-workers won't be happy if your project is late but your online statuses are always up to date, and your boss eventually will want to have a word with you if your social media usage starts to affect your performance.</p> <p>One of the biggest ways to reveal your lack of engagement is to be active on social media but not active in meetings, via email, and in general interactions with colleagues,&quot; says career coach Jane Scudder. &quot;The way to avoid this? Of course, number one is to be more engaged within your role. Another is to limit your social media presence during work hours.&quot;</p> <p>If you're a slave to social media at work, take measures to reduce how much time you spend on it by shutting off your phone or placing it in a place that's not readily accessible (like a drawer or cabinet), manually block the sites you know you're prone to visit, or schedule social media time to get your fix, but limit it to only a few minutes or just on your lunch break.</p> <h2>4. Enjoying Extended Lunch Breaks</h2> <p>Speaking of lunch breaks&hellip; if you're taking leisurely lunches &ndash; 35 or 40 minutes instead of the allotted half-hour or more than an hour if you have that luxury &ndash; it's time to reel it in. Just like arriving late and leaving early, self-extending your lunch break is not only unethical and rude, but it's also akin to stealing money from your employer because you're still stuffing your face with your sandwich instead of manning your position at your desk and fulfilling that day's duties for which you're being paid.</p> <p>While this habit is noticeable if you leave the office for lunch &ndash; because at least one of your coworkers is totally clocking you &ndash; it's much easier to take extra time for yourself if you prefer to eat at your desk. It's not always a problem, of course, but if your work pace is affected and your coworkers have noticed, it's time to assess the situation and reevaluate your lunch strategy.</p> <h2>5. Slowing Down Operations With Non-Workplace Issues</h2> <p>Office camaraderie is important to a productive and motivated workspace &ndash; you don't have to be friends with your co-workers, but you should get along &ndash; so engaging in non-work banter can be beneficial to day-to-day operations. If you're commandeering the conversation, however, and sucking up valuable work time with outside issues that hold everyone else up &ndash; like relationship drama, sappy kid stories, or questionable tales of your weekend activity &ndash; you're weaving a web of negativity that will affect everyone around you. To stay on everyone's good side, limit your banter and anecdotes of home life to times when everyone can kick back and relax for a few minutes, contribute, and enjoy the conversation.</p> <h2>6. Delegating the Lion's Share of Work to Subordinates</h2> <p>If you're in a position of authority, it's critical to toe the line carefully in order to excel at your job, gain and maintain the respect of your colleagues, and set yourself up for promotion. You'll need to delegate some of the work, of course (that's in your job description), but if you're delegating so much of the work that your minions are doing the lion's share of it while you sit back and watch, you run the risk of running yourself right out the door. Just because you're in a boss-type position doesn't mean you get to be bossy. Delegate responsibilities fairly, and avoid establishing a trap that befalls many professionals who dole out orders &ndash; becoming a tyrant who thinks they're above the grunt work. Unless you own the company, you're still on somebody's payroll, and you need to fulfill your duties at or (ideally) above expectations if you'd like to be seen as a good leader and, you know, remain employed.</p> <p><em>Are there other signs of underperformance that you'd like to add? Do you have a co-worker who's not pulling his or her weight? Let's talk about it in the comments below.</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/mikey-rox">Mikey Rox</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-reasons-your-coworkers-think-youre-a-slacker">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-4"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-stay-motivated-on-the-job">6 Ways to Stay Motivated on the Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/wanna-put-away-some-cash-take-a-vacation">Wanna Put Away Some Cash? Take A Vacation!</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/getting-ahead-at-work-are-you-a-hammer-or-a-swiss-army-knife">Getting Ahead At Work: Are You A Hammer Or A Swiss Army Knife?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-frugal-ways-to-reduce-workplace-stress">10 Frugal Ways to Reduce Workplace Stress</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-make-your-sluggish-workday-go-a-lot-faster">How to Make Your Sluggish Workday Go (a Lot) Faster</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income Productivity coworkers job performance slacker work work performance Tue, 20 Oct 2015 09:15:27 +0000 Mikey Rox 1593787 at http://www.wisebread.com 5 Times You Should Demand a Raise http://www.wisebread.com/5-times-you-should-demand-a-raise <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-times-you-should-demand-a-raise" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/000033126062.jpg" alt="" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>You haven't seen a raise since the Great Recession hit the country, and you probably feel overdue for a salary bump. But when is the right time to ask your boss or supervisor for a raise? Does your timing play a role in whether you're likely to nab that paycheck boost? It sure does. Here are five times when you should demand &mdash;&nbsp;or at least ask for &mdash; a raise from your boss.</p> <h2>1. You've Made or Saved Your Company Money</h2> <p>Have you worked on a new advertising campaign that has increased sales at your company? Maybe you've recommended new technology that has saved your company thousands of dollars per year.</p> <p>If you've done something that has either boosted your company's revenues or cut its expenses, there might be no better time than now to <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-essential-facts-women-should-know-before-asking-for-a-raise">ask for a raise</a>. Just make sure to remind your supervisor of the benefit you've just brought your company. And if your boss refuses your request for a pay raise even when shown this evidence? Then it might really be slow going to get a raise at this company.</p> <h2>2. You've Surpassed a Goal</h2> <p>Maybe your boss asked you to land three new clients this quarter, but you brought in five. Or maybe your supervisor asked you to create a new video promoting a product in three months and you wrapped your work in just two. If you've not only met, but surpassed, a big goal, it's time to ask for a raise &mdash;&nbsp;especially if you do so consistently.</p> <p>Your goal when asking for more money is to show your employer how valuable you are to the company. You want your boss to know that the extra money you're requesting pales in comparison to your value.</p> <p>The best time to prove this is when you've exceeded your boss' expectations.</p> <h2>3. You Just Got Another Job Offer</h2> <p>There's something appealing about negotiating from a position of strength. If you've gotten a job offer from another company, you now have an advantage when it's time to negotiate a raise.</p> <p>Don't be afraid to tell your boss that you've gotten an offer from another firm. Tell your boss, too, that you'd like to stay put, but that you'll need a salary bump to do so. If your boss doesn't want to lose you, the odds are good that your raise will be forthcoming.</p> <p>Be careful, though. Only threaten to leave if you really are willing to accept your new job offer. And don't ever bluff your boss by pretending that you've been offered another job. This could backfire if your boss refuses your request for a raise. If you don't have that fallback job to turn to, life can get pretty awkward around the office.</p> <h2>4. You've Been Asked to Train a New Employee</h2> <p>If your boss asks you to train a new employee, it's a sure sign that your boss respects and appreciates the work you've done. Your boss thinks you are talented and knowledgeable enough to mentor a new worker.</p> <p>Now that you know this, there are few better times to request a raise. Remind your boss that you are taking on a new responsibility by training an employee and that you'd like to be rewarded for it.</p> <h2>5. Your Division Is Thriving</h2> <p>Maybe your entire company isn't raking in the big dollars, but your division or department is thriving. It's actually growing and generating an ever-increasing amount of profits. If this is the case, you can ask for a raise confidently even if your company isn't having a record-setting year.</p> <p>Remind your boss that you are an integral part of the company division that is performing well. And offer evidence that your work is part of the reason for that success.</p> <p>No matter when you ask for a raise, make sure that you come armed with concrete reasons why you deserve the paycheck boost. It's not enough to remind your boss that you haven't had a raise in five, seven, or 10 years. You need to convince your boss that your performance is boosting the company, and that you're too much of a valued employee to potentially lose over a $5,000, $10,000, or $20,000 raise.</p> <p><em>How have you successfully asked for a raise? Share in the comments below!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dan-rafter">Dan Rafter</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-times-you-should-demand-a-raise">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-9"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-a-side-hustle-can-further-your-career">5 Ways a Side Hustle Can Further Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/25-signs-that-youve-been-at-the-same-job-too-long">25 Signs That You&#039;ve Been at the Same Job Too Long</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-unexpected-costs-of-a-higher-paying-job-offer">4 Unexpected Costs of a Higher-Paying Job Offer</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-to-say-to-your-boss-to-get-a-promotion-or-raise">5 Things to Say to Your Boss to Get a Promotion or Raise</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Extra Income career career goals raise raise at work work Thu, 15 Oct 2015 15:00:29 +0000 Dan Rafter 1592421 at http://www.wisebread.com 5 Ways Your Wardrobe Is Holding You Back at Work http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-your-wardrobe-is-holding-you-back-at-work <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-ways-your-wardrobe-is-holding-you-back-at-work" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/000062594038.jpg" alt="Woman realizing her wardrobe is holding her back at work" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Whether your workplace has a dress code or not, what you wear &mdash; and how you wear it &mdash; plays a huge part in how you are perceived.&nbsp;</p> <p>Yes, you definitely need to do more than dress well to get the job you want. After all, doing the job well will always be the most important factor in anyone's career. But there are good reasons why dressing the part can help your career efforts. Here are some ways a poor wardrobe can hold you back at work.</p> <h2>1. Lost Trust</h2> <p>When what you wear mirrors the message you want to get across &mdash; whatever that is &mdash; you will come across as authentic, and authentic people are seen as trustworthy. If you want to seem responsible and organized, but you wear wild colors or clashing prints, it might be hard for people to believe that you have the characteristics you're trying to embody.</p> <p>Figuring out what your message needs to be can be complex. Think of words that describe a person who does the job you want well. Then evaluate your wardrobe based on those descriptors. If, for instance, your company tends to hire people who are intense to be salespeople, see if your clothes match that adjective. If they don't, make some changes so that they do.</p> <h2>2. Lost Power</h2> <p>Wearing a great suit not only <a href="http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2015/04/wearing-a-suit-makes-people-think-differently/391802/">changes how you are perceived</a>, but also how you feel about yourself. When you dress formally, people perceive you as powerful. You begin to pick up on these feelings and so begin to perceive yourself as more powerful, as well. This is a feedback loop that can help you move up at work, since powerful people tend to get what they want.</p> <p>If a suit isn't appropriate in your workplace, figure out what the equivalent might be. What would it mean to dress even slightly more formally? Try that out and see if it helps you. The only places where this doesn't always apply are jobs where everyone wears uniforms. Even there, though, changing something like your footwear or your accessories can often make you look more formal.</p> <h2>3. Lost Professionalism</h2> <p>There are many ways clothing can cause people to see you as less professional than you might actually be. If your clothes don't fit right, are too casual, or show inappropriate amounts of skin, you won't have as professional of an air as you would have if your clothes were up to snuff. This can cause you to lose out on promotions, especially those that might make you more visible.</p> <p>If you aren't sure whether your clothing is appropriately professional, ask someone. Find someone whose clothing you admire and see if they would mind giving you some feedback. Ask them how your own wardrobe comes across at work and what they would do to improve it. Yes, this requires you to be vulnerable, but it can also help you make huge strides ahead in the workplace.</p> <h2>4. Lost Sense of Belonging</h2> <p>When you're part of a department or a team, it's important that you dress on par with those around you. Look at the people you work with and evaluate their wardrobes. Are they stylish? Do they wear brightly colored accents, or do they stick to neutral tones? Do they stand out in a crowd or try to blend in? If you dress like the people around you, you will look more like you belong in that particular workplace. Whether that's good or bad depends on your particular personality and workplace goals.</p> <p>Make sure that you don't become part of the background, though. Your clothes roughly match those of your team of coworkers, but they still need to fit well and be appropriate to your personality. And, if there's any doubt, dress a bit more formally than the people around you. It makes you look like you are competent and in charge.</p> <h2>5. Lost Respect</h2> <p>There are so many ways your clothing can cost you respect at work &mdash; from unprofessional or inappropriate attire to clothes that make you look too junior for your role. Most employers want to bring on and promote people who respect themselves and respect the workplace, because these are people that they, in turn, can respect.</p> <p>Many of the issues that cause you to lose respect can be easily remedied. Buy a new suit for <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-essential-steps-to-take-before-a-job-interview">your interview</a> and have it tailored to fit. Err on the side of formal dress, rather than informal. Make sure your clothes are clean and pressed and that nothing is hanging out where it shouldn't. These basic steps can mean the difference between having the job you want and having none at all.</p> <p>If wardrobe is a struggle for you and you feel like it is holding you back at work, consider working with a wardrobe consultant. You can find these people online, though different wardrobe professionals may focus on different industries or different levels of dress (business casual vs. business formal, for example). While this can involve a significant financial investment, that will pay off over the years if you can get a job that makes you happy and pays more.</p> <p><em>Do you think your wardrobe is holding you back at work? How can you change that?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/sarah-winfrey">Sarah Winfrey</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-your-wardrobe-is-holding-you-back-at-work">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-10"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-never-to-bring-up-in-a-job-interview">5 Things Never to Bring Up in a Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-to-do-before-your-first-day-at-a-new-job">5 Things to Do Before Your First Day at a New Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-unexpected-costs-of-a-higher-paying-job-offer">4 Unexpected Costs of a Higher-Paying Job Offer</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/long-hours-and-other-employer-demands">Long Hours and Other Employer Demands</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building clothing Dress for Success employment office attire wardrobe work Fri, 09 Oct 2015 17:00:54 +0000 Sarah Winfrey 1578894 at http://www.wisebread.com 7 Ways Your Smartphone Is Hurting Your Career http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-your-smartphone-is-hurting-your-career <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/7-ways-your-smartphone-is-hurting-your-career" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/man_using_smartphone_000023567993.jpg" alt="Man learning his smartphone is ruining his career" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>For many professionals, mobile devices are their lifeline, helping them to stay on top of the job all hours of the day &mdash; but that&rsquo;s not always a good thing. Here are seven ways <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-best-smartphones">your smartphone</a> is hurting your career.</p> <h2>1. Multitasking During Meetings</h2> <p>In many offices, multitasking is encouraged. But can it be considered productive when you&rsquo;re in an important meeting and your attention is otherwise engaged in your smartphone? Not only is it an inefficient use of time to have your face buried in your device while a co-worker is delivering a presentation, it&rsquo;s also quite rude &mdash; and a lot of us are guilty of it.</p> <p>According to the second annual Bank of America Trends in Consumer Mobility Report, a study that explores new insights into how, when, and why people are using their smartphones, nearly one-quarter (24%) of Americans fess up to <a href="http://newsroom.bankofamerica.com/files/doc_library/additional/2015_BAC_Trends_in_Consumer_Mobility_Report.pdf">multitasking on their smartphone</a> during meetings, and 27% say they are guilty of taking a phone call on public transportation (one my biggest pet peeves). Millennials (ages 18&ndash;34) are the guiltiest generation of these behaviors at 33% and 39%, respectively.</p> <h2>2. Texting the Boss Something Inappropriate</h2> <p>Accidentally sending text messages to the boss is embarrassing and easy to do, but now we have to contend with audio messages gone awry via SMS, especially if you have an iPhone with an updated iOS (Apple has added a small microphone feature next to the text window, which is extremely easy to hit by accident).</p> <p>When asked about the most embarrassing moments with their smartphone, nearly one-third (30%) of respondents on the BoA Trends in Mobility Report cite loud ringtones going off in a quiet place, followed by accidentally calling someone (19%), and sending a personal message/photo to the wrong person (16%) &mdash; at least a small percentage of which are images that will send you straight to the unemployment line. Don&rsquo;t do it, don&rsquo;t do it, don&rsquo;t do it.</p> <h2>3. Checking Your Device Too Frequently</h2> <p>I&rsquo;m sometimes amazed that my friends get anything at all done at work as much as they&rsquo;re on their phones. Texting, updating social media, browsing the Internet &mdash; it&rsquo;s all a time suck that can put you in a precarious position if it starts to become a noticeable and productivity-killing habit.</p> <p>Which the Trends in Mobility Report says it is. A prominent majority (89%) of adults check their mobile device at least a few times a day, with 36% checking &ldquo;constantly,&rdquo; the BoA study reveals.</p> <p>That&rsquo;s way too much by any standard, but particularly at work.</p> <h2>4. Responding to Work Correspondences Too Quickly</h2> <p>We&rsquo;ve all hastily responded to a work e-mail while distracted &mdash; driving to work (you know you do it), out to lunch, having a couple drinks at happy hour &mdash; and in doing so, we run the risk of being sloppy, curt, and even misunderstood. Too much of that can start to affect your reputation, or, worse, give you a new one that&rsquo;s hard to live down.</p> <p>&ldquo;We have come to expect a response within minutes of sending an e-mail, but immediate responses aren't always the best or most productive responses,&rdquo; says Dana Campbell, a career strategy and expert in stress resiliency techniques. &ldquo;Hasty responses lack intuitive and sound thinking and smartphone responses are often shortened and lack tact which could lead your reader to misinterpret what you said. It&rsquo;s fine to read e-mail on your phone, but hold off on responding to messages until you can focus on developing the response and can type full sentences.&rdquo;</p> <h2>5. Letting Your Productivity Lag</h2> <p>I&rsquo;ve touched on the productivity aspect of overuse of your smartphone at work, but it&rsquo;s not enough to say that&rsquo;s it&rsquo;s negatively affecting how much you&rsquo;re able to get done &mdash; or not get done, as the case may be. It&rsquo;s also important to put a hard number to how much time you&rsquo;re wasting when you engage with your device.</p> <p>&ldquo;Every time you check your phone it can take up to 15 minutes to refocus on the task at hand,&rdquo; Campbell says. To cut back, &ldquo;Turn alerts and your ringer off. Better yet, put your phone in a drawer and pull it out during planned breaks,&rdquo; Campbell adds.</p> <h2>6. Disrupting Your Sleep Pattern</h2> <p>It&rsquo;s not fair to place <em>all</em> the blame on why we can&rsquo;t sleep on smartphones. We&rsquo;ve been tossing and turning for centuries, and our mobile devices are just one more cause of insomnia. <em>The Atlantic</em> recently published the findings of a 2012 study, however, that revealed the percentage of certain age <a href="http://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2015/02/how-smartphones-are-ruining-our-sleep/385792/">demographics that lose sleep</a> due to technology &mdash; with Millennials at the highest percentage, unsurprisingly &mdash; and also an explanation as to why: Smartphones (and tablets) emit what&rsquo;s known as &ldquo;blue&rdquo; light, which is picked up by special cells behind our eyeballs that essentially tell our brain that it&rsquo;s morning. What I&rsquo;m getting at here is that your attempts at sleep are futile, Earthlings, so long as you&rsquo;re Facebooking under the covers before bed.</p> <p>Nip this habit in the bud to get more sleep &mdash; and be more alert and productive at work, because duh &mdash; by moving your charging dock across the room instead of next to the bed. Set a time to disconnect and stick to it. It&rsquo;ll be weird at first, yeah, but you may also find that you&rsquo;re able to relax and get some of those much-needed <em>Z</em>s.</p> <h2>7. Seeming Disconnected Despite Being Constantly Connected</h2> <p>It&rsquo;s ironic how now that we&rsquo;re connected 24/7, we&rsquo;ve never seemed more disconnected. Ever get that feeling? That&rsquo;s because we&rsquo;re buried in our smartphones and devices so much of our lives that we often forget to stop and take inventory of what&rsquo;s happening around us. That can be problematic at work if you&rsquo;re not able to find a balance between what needs to happen via mobile technology, e-mail, and the like, and what needs to happen in real life &mdash; like interacting with actual human beings.</p> <p><em>Has your smartphone usage affected your career? Are there other ways that you&rsquo;d like to add that smartphones are hurting our careers? Let me know in the comments below.</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/mikey-rox">Mikey Rox</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-your-smartphone-is-hurting-your-career">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-gadgets-every-work-at-home-professional-needs">6 Gadgets Every Work at Home Professional Needs</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-terrible-things-science-says-you-do-to-your-mind-everyday">5 Terrible Things Science Says You Do to Your Mind Everyday</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-your-smartphone-saves-you-money">8 Ways Your Smartphone Saves You Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-never-to-bring-up-in-a-job-interview">5 Things Never to Bring Up in a Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Technology distractions mobile phone multitasking sleep deprivation smartphone work Wed, 23 Sep 2015 21:00:19 +0000 Mikey Rox 1561258 at http://www.wisebread.com 5 Unmistakeable Signs You're Slacking at Work http://www.wisebread.com/5-unmistakeable-signs-youre-slacking-at-work <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-unmistakeable-signs-youre-slacking-at-work" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/man_asleep_at_work_000009078649.jpg" alt="Man learning signs that he&#039;s underperforming at work" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Nobody wants to be considered an underperformer, but unfortunately, there are times when most of us fall behind at work or don't fully meet our responsibilities. Catching &mdash; and correcting &mdash; underperformance early is the surest way to get back on solid footing quickly. Here are five classic signs of underperformance to watch for.</p> <h2>1. No One Gives You Real Responsibility</h2> <p>Sure, there are a zillion projects you'd love to do for your company&hellip; but no one will give them to you. Missing out on a project here or there happens to everyone &mdash; after all, only one person or team can get each assignment. But when you feel like you never get the projects you want, and the data backs you up, there's a good chance you're underperforming.</p> <p>Generally, the projects people want are high profile or important in some way. And bosses usually trust these sorts of projects to employees they know they can count on. If you never get one, it may mean that they aren't sure you will follow through in a way that makes them look good.</p> <p>Attack this head-on by doing the very best you can with whatever projects are on your plate right now. Do what you have to do to make sure the project is completed successfully, and the next one you get may be better. Do this long enough and you will prove your worth to the company and show management that you can handle the serious responsibility of high profile work.</p> <h2>2. You Find Yourself Making Excuses</h2> <p>When someone asks you about a part of your job that isn't going so well, what do you say? Do you take responsibility, or do you offer an excuse? Sometimes, bad things happen and the outcome truly is out of your control. If you're offering excuses fairly frequently, though, it probably means that you aren't working hard enough, but don't want to admit it.</p> <p>The next time you hear yourself making an excuse, take note. Think about whether it is legitimate. If you aren't sure, ask someone you trust to help you evaluate the situation. Then, take steps to take responsibility for what is going wrong. Talk to your boss proactively and come up with a plan of attack. Then follow through, no matter what comes up.</p> <h2>3. You're on Your Mobile &mdash; A Lot</h2> <p>Whether you like them or not, mobile phones are an important part of the ways we live and do business. However, you don't need to be on your phone all the time while at work. If, when you think back over the last few days, you realize that you spent the majority of your time talking, texting, or emailing on your phone, there's a good chance you're underperforming.</p> <p>Think about it. Your mobile phone is rarely the most efficient way to do things. <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-you-should-never-say-in-a-work-email">Emailing</a> goes much quicker on a computer. And emailing or talking on the phone is usually a faster way of handling things than texting. Really, the only things most efficiently handled on a phone are (wait for it...) phone calls. If you're using your phone <em>in the office</em> to do other things, you aren't working as efficiently as possible.</p> <p>To counteract this, put the phone down. Lock it in a coworker's desk, if you need to, or set aside certain times each day where you use it and put it away the rest of the time. Beyond that, make sure that, when you are using your phone at work, you're using it because it is the only or the best way to take on a task.</p> <h2>4. You Can't Articulate Your Goals</h2> <p>If you don't know what you're working towards, it's hard to perform well. Whether you can't articulate your goals because no one told you what they are or because you don't remember them (or didn't pay attention in the first place), not knowing where you are going almost guarantees that you are underperforming.</p> <p>If you don't know your goals, sit down with your manager to lay them out. And if your manager doesn't know them or can't articulate them, do the best you can to set some for yourself. Even if you don't know what your manager values, you can probably make some educated guesses as to what would impress him or her. Write these out for yourself and you will probably find yourself working towards them in a much more focused, efficient manner.</p> <h2>5. You Miss More Deadlines Than You Hit</h2> <p>Everyone misses a deadline now and then. It's not good, but it happens. Sometimes, it can't be helped. Other times, it means you lost a bit of focus and you can easily regain that. Occasionally, though, missing deadlines becomes a way of working. When this happens, it tends to indicate that the deadline-misser is underperforming.</p> <p>Think about your deadlines over the last six months. How many did you hit? How many did you miss? If you have missed more than you hit, you are underperforming.</p> <p>To pull yourself out of the deadline missing rut, figure out what is going wrong. Are you bored? Are you saving everything until the last minute? Are you at the mercy of other people who are saving everything until the last minute? Be brutally honest with yourself. If you find that you have any responsibility in the matter (and you probably do!), start making changes. Set aside time each day for projects with approaching deadlines. Reward yourself for the time you spend working. And do whatever you need to do to finish the next project on time (and the next one, and the next one).</p> <p>Take the time to evaluate your performance today and change whatever needs to change in order to improve your focus and efficiency. In less time than you think, you can find yourself a more valuable member of your company.</p> <p><em>Do you think you're underperforming? What do you plan to do about it?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/sarah-winfrey">Sarah Winfrey</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-unmistakeable-signs-youre-slacking-at-work">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-bad-habits-that-are-ruining-your-career">6 Bad Habits That Are Ruining Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-you-should-never-say-in-a-work-email">10 Things You Should Never Say in a Work Email</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-tips-for-better-workplace-body-language">7 Tips for Better Workplace Body Language</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/ace-your-next-performance-review-with-these-7-tricks">Ace Your Next Performance Review With These 7 Tricks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-times-you-should-speak-up-at-work">10 Times You Should Speak Up at Work</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building job security laziness morale Office procrastination responsibility underperforming work Mon, 14 Sep 2015 09:00:15 +0000 Sarah Winfrey 1555517 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Things You Need to Stop Asking HR For http://www.wisebread.com/6-things-you-need-to-stop-asking-hr-for <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-things-you-need-to-stop-asking-hr-for" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/000022497444.jpg" alt="" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>When the HR department I work at got a new boss a number of years ago, one of her first official acts was to put a copy of an article entitled <a href="http://www.fastcompany.com/53319/why-we-hate-hr">Why We Hate HR</a> into each of our mailboxes. Honestly, it stung, but some of the author's issues with HR were understandable.</p> <p>Human Resources can be an odd place to work, because it's sort of in the middle &mdash; between management and staff. HR doesn't plan or direct the vision of the company; it coordinates the administrative functions. Management often uses HR as a sort of an enforcer, or a gatekeeper, which can lead to negative impressions. Truth be told, though, most of us in HR are there because we do want to help support the inner workings of our organization. Here are six instances, however, when they simply cannot help you.</p> <h2>1. HR Cannot Help You Get the Job You Want</h2> <p>That's not HR's function. While Human Resources is responsible for recruiting and screening, the actual interview and hiring decisions are usually made by managers. Human Resources can, however, help you figure out which jobs you may be qualified for, accept your application, screen it, check references, and put it on a list for the hiring manager. Any additional &quot;help&quot; to you would likely interfere with a fair hiring process &mdash; and that's plain unfair to others.</p> <h2>2. HR Cannot Help You Get a Promotion</h2> <p>We don't doubt that you deserve a promotion, or that you're the best candidate, but again, that's up to a manager. If you have been an exemplary employee, though, we can help you <em>demonstrate </em>that to your hiring manager with copies of performance reviews, records of attendance, records of training, and the like.</p> <h2>3. HR Does Not Give Out Raises</h2> <p>Yes, you have been here a long time. Yes, you are terrific. Yes, you absolutely do deserve a raise. But no: we don't give them out. At the risk of sounding like a broken record, that's a management decision. HR can <em>implement</em> raises, but another level has to make that decision. We also keep an eye on the industry to make sure our company's pay is competitive, and the recruiters speak up when it's not.</p> <h2>4. HR Does Not Determine How Much Leave You Get</h2> <p>We just track those hours &mdash; we don't decide how many you receive. That's a company decision, or in some cases, decided upon through collective bargaining. When employees need to take leave, I can honestly say we do our best (above and beyond) to find whatever we can. We all have families, too, so there is a great deal of empathy. Every HR department I have worked in has been extremely creative with coming up with a patchwork of vacation, sick, comp time, flex time, family leave, temporary disability, shared leave, and leave without pay.</p> <h2>5. HR Does Not Determine Benefits</h2> <p>We understand that you want and need them, and if they are available to you, we'll help you sign up for them. A little personal responsibility comes into play here, and I wish I had a nickel for every person who missed a <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-to-get-cheaper-health-insurance">health insurance</a> open enrollment period or never returned forms. If employees don't respond to phone calls or emails, there is only so much the benefits people can do.</p> <h2>6. HR May Not Provide the Training You Need</h2> <p>In difficult financial times, training is often on the &quot;cut&quot; list, and we may not have the funds to provide what you need. Much of the training funds available have to be used for mandatory training, and not anything above and beyond.</p> <p>That doesn't mean that HR won't help you, though. Check with your HR training person. They will likely be happy to search and find what you need, either at local colleges, universities or private training programs, or via the Internet. We will also help you put together a job shadowing experience, find you a mentor, or a preceptor.</p> <p><em>In what ways is your company's HR department a friend or a foe?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/marla-walters">Marla Walters</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-things-you-need-to-stop-asking-hr-for">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-signs-youre-working-for-an-impossible-boss">7 Signs You&#039;re Working for an Impossible Boss</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/incentive-plans-always-go-awry">Incentive plans always go awry</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-hire-employees">How to hire employees</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-frugal-ways-to-reduce-workplace-stress">10 Frugal Ways to Reduce Workplace Stress</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-reasons-your-coworkers-think-youre-a-slacker">6 Reasons Your Coworkers Think You&#039;re a Slacker</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income administration hr department human resources management Office work Wed, 02 Sep 2015 15:00:23 +0000 Marla Walters 1545000 at http://www.wisebread.com 5 Things Never to Bring Up in a Job Interview http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-never-to-bring-up-in-a-job-interview <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-things-never-to-bring-up-in-a-job-interview" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_job_interview_000041648702.jpg" alt="Woman learning topics to never discuss in job interview" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Congrats on <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-essential-steps-to-take-before-a-job-interview">scoring that interview</a>! You clearly deserved it based on your resume and cover letter, but don't blow the opportunity by prattling on about these five topics you should never discuss <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/16-major-dos-and-donts-at-a-job-interview">during a job interview</a>.</p> <h2>1. Dirt on Your Former Employer</h2> <p>When your interviewer lists what makes their company special, it's really tempting to take that as a cue to rail against your old employer. But you should definitely avoid dishing about your former boss' failings, missteps, or the company culture. That leaves a lasting impression of a negative and petty employee. As far as they know, you will probably do the same to them in the future, and who wants that? Keep talking about your old company down to what you learned and how you honed your skill set &mdash; nothing more.</p> <h2>2. Personal or Romantic Details</h2> <p>Your <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/master-these-15-interview-questions">interviewer asks you questions</a> like, &quot;Do you have other commitments or life events that might get in the way of your job?&quot; This is not the time to start listing all of your very personal plans. Your dating status should not be vocalized. Giving too much background information on your family is also bad. Did you mother get sick last year and you had to take care of her for a while? Sorry, you can't bring that up in an interview &mdash; it may look like playing the sympathy card. Basically, personal details not only make the interviewer uncomfortable, but they take the focus off of your competence in the workplace.</p> <h2>3. Benefits and Payment</h2> <p>Don't mess with the process: Asking about the finer details of payment and benefits during the interview will not only dock you points, but you probably won't even get an answer until after you've been offered the job (which is now slightly less likely if you asked too early). Don't risk looking impatient and greedy. Your most burning question has to wait until you've floored them enough to get the offer.</p> <h2>4. Your Other Job Interviews</h2> <p>It's only Tuesday and you've got six more interviews this week, but that's not your current interviewer's business. Don't let them force your hand, but don't let them think they are just another interview, either. <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-scary-thoughts-everyone-has-during-a-job-interview">Stay confident</a>, positive, and genuinely interested in the position you're interviewing for each time. Bringing up your other prospects won't help you unless you have a solid job offer with competitive pay and benefits to use as leverage.</p> <h2>5. Religion and Politics</h2> <p>Yes, that same bit of etiquette your mother taught you is especially important in your career. Unless you're interviewing for an NGO or a political think tank, politics and religion are not safe water cooler discussion topics nor are they worth broaching in the job interview. Think what a disaster it would be if your interviewer didn't agree with your views! How you vote or pray should not determine whether or not you're a good employee, so don't give them a chance to judge your values outside of the office.</p> <p><em>What interview topics do you consider taboo? Share them in comments here, instead!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/amanda-meadows">Amanda Meadows</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-never-to-bring-up-in-a-job-interview">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-your-wardrobe-is-holding-you-back-at-work">5 Ways Your Wardrobe Is Holding You Back at Work</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-to-do-before-your-first-day-at-a-new-job">5 Things to Do Before Your First Day at a New Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-unexpected-costs-of-a-higher-paying-job-offer">4 Unexpected Costs of a Higher-Paying Job Offer</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-resume-rules-you-should-be-breaking">4 Resume Rules You Should Be Breaking</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/long-hours-and-other-employer-demands">Long Hours and Other Employer Demands</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building employment interview etiquette job interviews professional work Thu, 27 Aug 2015 17:00:14 +0000 Amanda Meadows 1533316 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Bad Habits That Are Ruining Your Career http://www.wisebread.com/6-bad-habits-that-are-ruining-your-career <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-bad-habits-that-are-ruining-your-career" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/man_offering_cigarettes_000053360546.jpg" alt="Man discovering bad life habits that impede him at work" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>We all have our own list of little bad habits &mdash; some longer than others. Maybe you talk with your mouth full or cut people off when they're speaking. (I'm guilty of the latter myself.) But while these habits seem benign enough on the surface, they can sometimes interfere with your career and potentially affect your upward mobility &mdash; and subsequently, your finances.</p> <p>How can you identify which of your naughty little habits to consider correcting? Here's a look at six examples that can potentially impede your work and make it harder for you to get ahead.</p> <h2>1. Being a Negative Nancy &mdash; Or Ned</h2> <p>There's nothing more annoying than being around someone who complains and whines about everything. It doesn't matter if it's about family, work, or life, they always take a glass half-empty approach and find something wrong with everything.</p> <p>If this description fits you, you might argue that this is who you are or that you've always been this way. But what you may not realize is that being negative about life can impact how you feel about your work. (See also:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-banish-negative-thoughts?ref=seealso">6 Ways to Banish Negative Thoughts</a>)</p> <p>No matter where you work or what you do, nothing is ever going to go perfectly. Your employer will get on your nerves, some of your coworkers might be slackers, and you might not be completely satisfied with your job description or salary. It's okay to vent, but constantly complaining and whining about a situation and being negative isn't going to change anything. You're only going to make your life harder.</p> <p>Yes, there's a downside to every job, but rather than focus on what's wrong at work, focus on what's right. A positive mindset helps you stay motivated and increases productivity. You're not likely to give your employer 100% if you don't feel good about your job, and this lack of effort can affect whether you receive promotions and raises.</p> <h2>2. Always Running Late</h2> <p>Your friends and family might accept that you're always running 10 or 20 minutes behind schedule. Lord knows mine have. Your employer, however, may not be as understanding. If you never arrive to work on time and you're always late coming back from lunch, you'll have a hard time fitting all your work into a single day. And if your day gets off to a slow start, there's a chance that you'll miss deadlines and delay projects, which puts everyone behind schedule. If your boss realizes that you're the common denominator in project delays, this can affect your reputation and whether you move up in the company, and possibly put your job on the line.</p> <h2>3. Social Media Addiction</h2> <p>If you're glued to your phone or tablet 24/7 and you can't go longer than 10 minutes without checking your Instagram, Facebook, or Twitter, you'll have a difficult time trying to get through an eight-hour workday. Being able to keep up with your friends and family via social media helps you stay connected even when you're far away, for sure. But if your notifications are going off every five minutes and you're pausing work several times a day to respond to comments, like photos, or read the latest news on your newsfeed, you're not giving your work the attention it deserves. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-to-break-your-social-media-habit?ref=seealso">5 Ways to Break Your Social Media Habit</a>)</p> <p>Besides, your employer can very easily access your accounts and see what, when, and where you're updating. Push the limit and you may find yourself with a newfound freedom to engage your social media without that pesky job holding your back.</p> <h2>4. Skipping Meals</h2> <p>Whether you're trying to lose weight or you're the type of person who forgets to eat when your mind's occupied (like me!), skipping meals interferes with work performance more than you realize. You need as much physical and mental energy as possible to get through the day, especially if you have a demanding job. Skipping lunch can eventually affect how you feel about your job and result in feelings of sluggishness, irritability, and brain fog.</p> <p>&quot;When workers skip a lunch break on a regular basis, they often don't realize that fatigue and burnout are creeping up on them until they wake up one day and 'suddenly' feel less enthusiastic about their jobs or businesses,&quot; says Dr. Janet Scarborough Civitelli, a workplace psychologist at&nbsp;<a href="http://www.vocationvillage.com">VocationVillage.com</a>.</p> <h2>5. Procrastinating</h2> <p>Everyone procrastinates from time to time. If you're not excited about something, it's much easier to put it off until tomorrow or the next day. Procrastination can affect your health if you're the type of person who puts off checkups, and it can affect your personal finances if you wait until the last minute to pay bills and end up paying late. However, the effects of procrastination don't stop there, as it also affects your work and career.</p> <p>If you're a chronic procrastinator, you might put off important work assignments until the last minute, especially those that are challenging or boring. This can result in missing deadlines and targets, or rushing to complete an assignment at the last minute and making careless mistakes. Understand that procrastination at work doesn't only affect you &mdash; it affects the whole organization. It only takes one slacker to slow productivity to a crawl, and your job might be in jeopardy if your bad habits start affecting the company's bottom line.</p> <h2>6. Smoking</h2> <p>I don't need to explain how bad smoking is for your health, or how it increases the risk of cancer, heart disease, and stroke. You already know that. But you might not realize how smoking impedes your work.</p> <p>Every smoke break at work takes time away from your job duties. Sneaking away for a four or five-minute break every couple hours may not seem like a big deal, but these minutes add up over the course of a day, week, or year, which affects overall production. Smoking can also weaken your immune system, resulting in more sick days, and some of your coworkers might have to pick up the slack to accommodate for your absence. And if your boss restricts the number of smoke breaks employees can take, you might not get your nicotine fix when you need it. This can trigger irritability, nervousness, and affect the quality of your work. For those reasons &mdash; and a million more &mdash; do yourself a favor and kick the habit once and for all.</p> <p><em>Are there other bad life habits you've noticed that impede one's work? Let me know in the comments below.</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/mikey-rox">Mikey Rox</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-bad-habits-that-are-ruining-your-career">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-unmistakeable-signs-youre-slacking-at-work">5 Unmistakeable Signs You&#039;re Slacking at Work</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-tips-for-better-workplace-body-language">7 Tips for Better Workplace Body Language</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/ace-your-next-performance-review-with-these-7-tricks">Ace Your Next Performance Review With These 7 Tricks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-times-you-should-speak-up-at-work">10 Times You Should Speak Up at Work</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-youre-sabotaging-your-next-promotion">5 Ways You&#039;re Sabotaging Your Next Promotion</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Life Hacks Career Building bad habits negativity Office procrastination skipping meals smoking social media work Fri, 21 Aug 2015 09:00:38 +0000 Mikey Rox 1526961 at http://www.wisebread.com 4 Unexpected Costs of a Higher-Paying Job Offer http://www.wisebread.com/4-unexpected-costs-of-a-higher-paying-job-offer <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/4-unexpected-costs-of-a-higher-paying-job-offer" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_bored_000039342058.jpg" alt="Woman learning unexpected costs of a high paying job offer" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>You've just been offered a job that will give you a significant boost in salary. It's a given that you should take it, right?</p> <p>Maybe not.</p> <p>That's because sometimes a bigger salary isn't enough to overcome the other negatives that come with a <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-things-to-do-on-your-first-day-at-a-new-job">new job</a>: Maybe your commute will be longer. Maybe you'll need to put in longer hours. Maybe the work will be more stressful, ultimately making you less happy.</p> <p>Here are four key factors to consider before deciding to take that more lucrative position:</p> <h2>1. A Long Commute</h2> <p>Nothing can ruin an otherwise perfect new job like a long commute. Just consider the wasted time. The U.S. Census Bureau found that in 2014, it took workers an average of 25.4 minutes to get to work one way. And, yes, that comes out to more than 50 minutes spent in the car each day for the average U.S. worker.</p> <p>If you log 50 weeks of work for the year, that comes out to more than 200 hours of your life each year spent commuting to and from work. That's a lot of time to spend in the car.</p> <p>If your new job requires a longer commute than this average &mdash; or significantly longer than the one you're already logging &mdash; think carefully before accepting it, even if your salary will jump. You'll grow tired of a long commute quickly, even if your bank account is expanding.</p> <h2>2. It Will Damage Your Health</h2> <p>A long commute can also worsen your health. The data isn't the freshest, but a 2010 study from Gallup found that adults who commute more than 90 minutes one way to work were more likely to suffer from obesity, high cholesterol, back pain, and neck pain.</p> <p>If your work pays you more but is less interesting, that can have a negative impact on your health, too. A 2012 study from Gallup found that 15.5% of U.S. workers who were &quot;actively disengaged&quot; at work reported that they suffered from high levels of stress and worry and lower levels of happiness.</p> <p>And 27.1% of workers who were both uninterested in their work <em>and </em>had a one-way commute of 45 minutes or more reported the same.</p> <p>The message is clear: Make sure that you are interested in your new job, especially if your commute is a longer one. If you're not, you might not be happy with your working life, even if you are earning a bigger paycheck.</p> <h2>3. Less Family Time</h2> <p>You might think that your family will appreciate your larger paycheck. Maybe it will help you save more for your children's college education. Or maybe you'll be able to buy a bigger home or take fancier vacations.</p> <p>And here's an interesting factor: A study published in the March 2015 edition of the Journal of Marriage and Family found that the amount of time parents spend with their children has no real relationship to how successful or happy their children turn out to be. What's more important, according to the study, is the amount of money parents have and their social resources. This would seem to suggest that your higher-paying job &mdash; because it funnels more money into your family &mdash; would actually be more important than spending more time with your children and spouse.</p> <p>So you don't necessarily have to feel guilty about spending less time with your children. But &mdash; and this is a big but &mdash; what if you want to spend more time with your children and spouse? A higher-paying job with a long commute might mean that you have fewer hours to spend with your family each week. And if that is making you, your spouse, or your children unhappy, than maybe your newer, higher-paying job isn't the best choice, no matter what the most recent research shows.</p> <h2>4. You Love Your Current Coworkers</h2> <p>What makes people happy at work? The TINYpulse Engagement Survey published in 2014 found that coworkers are the most important factor for workplace happiness.</p> <p>The survey found that employee happiness is 23.3% more related to connections with coworkers than it is with interactions with direct supervisors. In other words, if you like your cubicle mates, you'll be happier at work.</p> <p>So if you enjoy taking lunch twice a week with Matt from accounting, you might want to think twice before giving that up to take a new job. Sure, you'll find new co-workers wherever you work. But what if those new co-workers aren't as friendly as Kathy from human resources or Joe from IT? You might find yourself less satisfied while at work.</p> <p><em>Have you ever turned down a higher-paying job? Why or why not?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dan-rafter">Dan Rafter</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-unexpected-costs-of-a-higher-paying-job-offer">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-4"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-never-to-bring-up-in-a-job-interview">5 Things Never to Bring Up in a Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/crime-scene-cleaner-and-4-other-trades-that-pay-surprisingly-well">Crime Scene Cleaner and 4 Other Trades That Pay Surprisingly Well</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-good-reasons-to-become-a-contractor">8 Good Reasons to Become a Contractor</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-your-wardrobe-is-holding-you-back-at-work">5 Ways Your Wardrobe Is Holding You Back at Work</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building employment job offer raise salary work Mon, 20 Jul 2015 09:00:12 +0000 Dan Rafter 1490913 at http://www.wisebread.com 7 Signs You're Working for an Impossible Boss http://www.wisebread.com/7-signs-youre-working-for-an-impossible-boss <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/7-signs-youre-working-for-an-impossible-boss" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_stressed_at_work_000012868043.jpg" alt="Woman learns she&#039;s working for an impossible time" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>So you think you have a bad boss. You actively dislike her, and sometimes you count how many days you can go without having to have a serious interaction. But you doubt yourself. Maybe it's not as bad as it seems. Maybe it's just you.</p> <p>If you're not sure if <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-9-types-of-horrible-bosses-and-how-to-manage-them">your boss is impossible</a>, look for the characteristics below. It's important that you figure this out, because a bad boss doesn't just make you feel bad, but can make you <a href="http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/is-your-boss-making-you-sick/2014/10/20/60cd5d44-2953-11e4-8593-da634b334390_story.html">more likely to get sick</a>, too.</p> <h2>1. Your Boss Has Astronomically High Standards</h2> <p>Does your boss hold you to standards that you can't actually meet? Does he expect you to perform better and better each month, even in your slow season? Does she praise only top performers?</p> <p>All of these are different ways of having standards that are too high. No one can be at the top of their game all the time, and a good boss will understand that. A boss who is so difficult to please will make you feel badly about yourself, no matter how well you do your job. And that is an impossible situation for you.</p> <h2>2. Your Boss Is Never Wrong</h2> <p>Does your boss have to be right in every single conversation, whether it's about doing business or March Madness brackets? People who always have to be right are impossible in any situation, but they are particularly damaging at work because they can't empower their employees. Instead, they end up shooting them down.</p> <p>A good boss will be able to admit mistakes, but will also point out good ideas that come from sources outside herself. She will be willing to implement these ideas, to get behind them, and she won't claim them as her own when someone asks.</p> <h2>3. Your Boss Offers No Guidance</h2> <p>An impossible boss doesn't help you set goals, aim for a particular level of performance, or anything else. If you don't know where you are going and your boss won't discuss it with you, you can end up in any number of impossible situations.</p> <p>Many times, you end up in an impossible situation when your boss won't offer guidance because, whether they say so or not, they have some idea about how they want you to perform. You can be going along thinking everything is fine, only to find out at some point that you haven't met some standard. That's maddening because it doesn't give you a chance to try something different so that you can improve.</p> <h2>4. Your Boss Isn't Open to New Ideas</h2> <p>When you present your boss with a new idea, how does he respond? Is he open and willing to hear more, or does he shoot it down simply because it's not the way things have been done before?</p> <p>Impossible bosses are so afraid of change that they aren't willing to innovate. Often, they want their employees to sit down, shut up, and do the work the way they were trained to do it. While that works some of the time, it's impossible to move forward without innovating. New technology and processes come out all the time and adaptation is essential to growth.</p> <h2>5. Your Boss Is Inconsistent</h2> <p>Does your boss promise things but doesn't follow through? Does she seem to forget that she has committed to things? This can make you feel like she doesn't really care about her employees, or that everything else is more valuable to her than you are.</p> <p>This characteristic makes your boss impossible because you can't trust her. You never know when she will follow through and when you will be left in the dust wondering what happened. This distrust will eventually spread, until you just may avoid dealing with her because of how you feel afterwards.</p> <h2>6. Your Boss Doesn't Listen</h2> <p>When you have work-related concerns, you've got to be able to trust that your boss will listen to you. Whether you have a question about some new software, need to report a co-worker, or feel like someone is asking you to perform a task that isn't part of your job, you need to be able to talk to your boss.</p> <p>If you can't talk to him, you can end up feeling stuck. If there's no way to move forward without help and you can't get the help you need because your boss won't listen, there's not much you can do. It's impossible.</p> <h2>7. Your Boss Can't Communicate</h2> <p>Whether your boss's communication problems stem from her not being available or willing to talk, or because she thinks she's explaining things when she's actually not, a boss who can't communicate is impossible.</p> <p>If you don't know what to do or how to go about it, you will either end up doing nothing or doing something wrong. When mistakes come about because an employee was never given clear instructions, that's frustrating. And when your boss thinks she communicated well, it's even more difficult.</p> <p><em>So, do you think your boss is impossible? If so, what do you plan to do about it? </em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/sarah-winfrey">Sarah Winfrey</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-signs-youre-working-for-an-impossible-boss">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-6"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-tips-for-better-workplace-body-language">7 Tips for Better Workplace Body Language</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-difficult-jobs-that-are-worth-the-effort">10 Difficult Jobs That Are Worth the Effort</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-things-you-need-to-stop-asking-hr-for">6 Things You Need to Stop Asking HR For</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/whats-an-employee-to-do-part-1">What&#039;s an employee to do? Part 1</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-warning-signs-that-it-is-not-the-job-for-you">6 Warning Signs that It Is Not the Job for You</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income bosses employment jobs Office work Thu, 02 Jul 2015 15:00:09 +0000 Sarah Winfrey 1471142 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Gadgets Every Work at Home Professional Needs http://www.wisebread.com/6-gadgets-every-work-at-home-professional-needs <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-gadgets-every-work-at-home-professional-needs" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/female_student_000056371408.jpg" alt="Woman using gadgets every work at home professional needs" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Desk jockeying from the comfort of your home? Make your home office way more awesome with these six gadgets. They can help increase your productivity, reduce boredom, and make <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-worst-work-from-home-jobs">working from home</a> much easier.</p> <h2>1. Multi Device Keyboard</h2> <p>Need to switch from iPad to laptop, and back again without fumbling for cables or constantly restarting the Bluetooth connection? This <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00MUTWLW4/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B00MUTWLW4&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=5CYHDAML4NWYGBQR">multi-device keyboard</a> makes it easy &mdash; as simple as turning a dial. It's wireless and completely mobile, making it easy to move around the house or pack on business trips.</p> <h2>2. Smart Light Bulb</h2> <p>I've been on spreadsheet grinds that go so long that when I look up, the sun's set and it's dark as a cave in my office. It's time to consider switching the home office lighting to the new <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00TJ4WMZE/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B00TJ4WMZE&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=PXVTF3FRNDVCHGYE">GE Wink</a>, which can be controlled by both your home dimmer and from anywhere with a smartphone app. Try one in your office and one in the living room, so you can brighten, dim, or turn off the light without having to leave the desk.</p> <h2>3. Bluetooth Headphones or Speaker</h2> <p>My Bluetooth speaker has been a lifechanger. When playing back a video for work, I can actually hear it without tethering myself to the computer with corded headphones. If you want a big sound for less, try the <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00D6OHHEE/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B00D6OHHEE&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=2VIIEZBOSHOE5DCW">Photive Bluetooth speaker</a>, which is by far the best value in the Bluetooth speaker market. It also holds a single charge for days.</p> <p>For those who like lush headphones, these <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00MR8Z28S/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B00MR8Z28S&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=IFTL42CB5APW6QWD">Jabra Bluetooth headphones</a> are awesome. They're comfortable, have well rounded sound, and work within a decent range. You can finally enjoy work tunes and grab something from the fridge at the same time!</p> <h2>4. USB Key</h2> <p>This really handy <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00A3U7IS4/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B00A3U7IS4&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=QMPCHVGQGAS6MOVJ">USB stick by LaCie</a> fits onto your key ring, but it's also shaped and sized like a key! This makes it lightweight and less bulky than your current USB drive. You'll also find it very hard to fill because it holds a sizable 32GB of drive space, making this the perfect goto on-the-go USB solution.</p> <h2>5. Desk Elliptical</h2> <p>Everyone knows it now: Sitting is a disease. But even if you work from home, you probably also need to work at a desk. There are options such as the standing desk, or the treadmill desk. But, If you want to remain sitting most of the time yet keep your blood flowing (perhaps even burning some extra calories), try this <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00SIBYETQ/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B00SIBYETQ&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=E2CQUHTE3LOAKWEC">under-desk elliptical</a>. It's compact, light, and easy to use. Plus, it's a great value compared to full-size home gym equipment.</p> <h2>6. Tylt Vu Charging Pad</h2> <p>This is really cool: An affordable and convenient <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00DG8NUC8/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B00DG8NUC8&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=YY3JNJKHK5OP4BYB">home charging pad</a> that's good for any smartphone. No more misplacing cords, then scrounging for them in a hurry when your phone is at 3% battery. It's also small enough to keep on your desk and take along on business trips.</p> <p><em>What are some other gadgets you can't work from home without?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/amanda-meadows">Amanda Meadows</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-gadgets-every-work-at-home-professional-needs">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-5"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-to-stay-productive-while-working-from-home">5 Ways to Stay Productive While Working From Home</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-life-skills-every-freelancer-needs">8 Life Skills Every Freelancer Needs</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-your-smartphone-is-hurting-your-career">7 Ways Your Smartphone Is Hurting Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-convince-your-boss-to-let-you-work-from-home">How to Convince Your Boss to Let You Work from Home</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-essential-tools-for-telecommuting">5 Essential Tools for Telecommuting</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Technology freelancing gadgets home office telecommute work work from home Mon, 29 Jun 2015 09:00:13 +0000 Amanda Meadows 1467957 at http://www.wisebread.com 5 Ways You're Sabotaging Your Next Promotion http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-youre-sabotaging-your-next-promotion <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-ways-youre-sabotaging-your-next-promotion" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/man_saying_no_000035683416.jpg" alt="Man sabotaging his next promotion" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>There's no way to know when or if you'll be promoted at work. And as promotions happen to others, you might wonder why your boss never offers you the job. Sure, some employees are more qualified and a better fit for a position, but there's also a chance that you're sabotaging <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-times-youre-better-off-without-a-promotion">your next promotion</a> without realizing it. Give yourself a better shot at a cushier position by avoiding these five moves that sabotage your chances.</p> <h2>1. You're Constantly at War With Your Boss</h2> <p>Since you and your boss work closely together, it's safe to say that you won't see eye-to-eye on every single issue. Having a minor argument or disagreement with your employer doesn't necessarily signal the end of your career. Most employers are reasonable and forgiving, and able to look past small issues with no hard feelings. On the other hand, if you're always getting into battles with your boss, your attitude and behavior could hold you back.</p> <p>If there's an employee with the same qualities and skills as you, who is also able to work well with others, your employer may feel that they're a better candidate for the promotion. You have to learn how to pick your battles and realize your employer is not your equal. In other words, slow your roll, feisty, and good things may come.</p> <h2>2. You Have a Negative, Toxic Attitude</h2> <p>Not only can arguing or fighting with your boss sabotage a promotion, but being a negative person can have similar consequences. You might not back talk to your employer, but if you're known as the &quot;office complainer,&quot; or if you constantly voice how much you hate your assignments, don't expect any promotions to come your way. Even if you're only speaking out of frustration, too much negative talk can get back to your employer. He might conclude it's safer to promote someone who's happy on the job, since this person will likely stick around longer than you.</p> <h2>3. You're Too Emotional</h2> <p>Every job has good days and bad days, and sometimes you might have to hide in your office and have a good cry. Yeah, we've all been upset or overwhelmed by work at some point, but if you've had more bad days than good days, or if you have a reputation for being fragile or too sensitive, your boss might think you're unable to handle a promotion. This is especially true if the new job is demanding and stressful. He might feel the position is a better fit for someone with a thicker skin. Plus, if you're crying in your office, there's a high probability that you'll come off looking emotionally unstable. Grin and bear it as best you can, then eat your feelings when you get home (not really, but pizza and ice cream always make me feel better). If it's a chronic problem, it may be a new job that you need, not a promotion.</p> <h2>4. You Hide in the Background</h2> <p>When the time comes to promote within, employers look for employees with the best qualities, skills, and drive for the position. Unfortunately, if you're the type of person who likes to hide in the background, your boss might not recognize your desire to move up or see you as a go-getter. As a result, your name doesn't pop into mind when it's time to promote someone.</p> <p>If your future plans involve moving up the career ladder, you have to go the extra mile and take the initiative. This is how you get noticed by employers, especially when working for a large company. You might not advance if you do just enough to get by.</p> <p>Even if you're an introvert or a low-key person, you must be willing to step outside your comfort zone. For example, you can volunteer for projects, or accept assignments that give you the opportunity to use your leadership skills and show your boss what you're capable of. The rest of the office might think you're a suck-up, but will you care when you're getting paid the bigger bucks? One, there's nothing wrong with being dedicated and enthusiastic about your job, and two, I didn't think so.</p> <h2>5. You're Not Teachable</h2> <p>It doesn't matter how much you know or how well you do your job, there's always room for growth. Moving up in the company isn't just about having the necessary skills and experience &mdash; you also have to be teachable.</p> <p>If you're a know-it-all who doesn't listen to instructions or suggestions, your employer might feel you're not the right person for a particular position. Additionally, you might miss out on new opportunities if you don't keep your skills up-to-date. Moving up within an organization might require taking a course or a workshop and gaining an understanding of new software and technology. If you're not willing to continue your education, your employer will promote someone who is.</p> <p><em>Do you have other examples of how we might be sabotaging our chances for a promotion? Let me know in the comments below.</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/mikey-rox">Mikey Rox</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-youre-sabotaging-your-next-promotion">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-6"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-unmistakeable-signs-youre-slacking-at-work">5 Unmistakeable Signs You&#039;re Slacking at Work</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-bad-habits-that-are-ruining-your-career">6 Bad Habits That Are Ruining Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-tips-for-better-workplace-body-language">7 Tips for Better Workplace Body Language</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/ace-your-next-performance-review-with-these-7-tricks">Ace Your Next Performance Review With These 7 Tricks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-times-you-should-speak-up-at-work">10 Times You Should Speak Up at Work</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Office promotions raises sabotaging work Mon, 22 Jun 2015 09:00:08 +0000 Mikey Rox 1462212 at http://www.wisebread.com