work http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/305/all en-US What to Do If Your Paycheck Bounces http://www.wisebread.com/what-to-do-if-your-paycheck-bounces <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/what-to-do-if-your-paycheck-bounces" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/photo_of_a_young_woman_receive_bad_news.jpg" alt="Photo of a young woman receive bad news" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>British actor Noel Coward said it best: &quot;If you must have motivation, think of your paycheck on Friday.&quot; All the hard work that you put in day after day really pays off when that paycheck hits your bank account.</p> <p>But what happens when you get the &quot;insufficient funds&quot; memo from your employer, of all people? Here's your play-by-play on what do if your paycheck bounces.</p> <h2>1. Contact your employer right away</h2> <p>Go straight to the source and politely explain what happened. In the best case scenario, your employer or payroll administrator will apologize for the mistake and cut you a new check within a few days. If not, then you'll need to complete a few more steps to get your hard-earned dollars.</p> <p>Write down who you talked to, when you talked, and what you both agreed to. Remain calm at all times and ask if you can get a written confirmation that you'll receive a replacement check by a <em>specific date</em>. This is important.</p> <h2>2. Inform your bank</h2> <p>While you wait on your replacement check, call your bank's customer service line and explain the situation. You'll need to do this because depending on your type of account and balance at the time of deposit, your financial institution may hit you with an overdraft or insufficient funds fee. These fees can range from $27 to $35.</p> <p>Here's when that written confirmation from your employer will come in handy: Request a one-time waiver of that pesky fee for depositing a bad check. Your bank is legally entitled to deny your request, but it's worth a shot when you have a clean record or have been a customer for several years. Once again, write down who you talked to, when, and what was said (aka The 3W's).</p> <h2>3. Make sure that bills get paid</h2> <p>This is particularly important if you had any automatic payments that were timed with your paycheck. Immediately contact all people and organizations to which you were going to pay using your paycheck. If you set up automatic bill payments online, you may be able to cancel some or all of them through your customer portals as long as they haven't been processed already.</p> <p>If those payments have already been processed, then your best bet is to contact customer service right away over the phone. Explain the situation to your rep and ask for options to arrange alternate forms of payment, including paying at a physical location, providing a routing number and checking or savings account over the phone, or mailing a check (FYI, that mailing address may be available on your statement). Remember to track The 3W's for all of these calls.</p> <p>Don't forget to politely request to have any applicable penalty fees waived or reversed. Some companies are able to stop the fee from hitting your account at all and others will revert a fee generally within 48 hours. If you're still hit with a penalty, document it.</p> <h2>4. Gather proof that the check had insufficient funds</h2> <p>Just in case you may have to lawyer up, start a &quot;Bad Check&quot; folder. Include in this folder:</p> <ul> <li> <p>Notes from your initial talk with your employer.</p> </li> <li> <p>Notes from the visit or call with your bank.</p> </li> <li> <p>Notes from your talks with people and companies that were counting on that payment;</p> </li> <li> <p>Proof that the check bounced (printout of your bank statement, physical paycheck mailed back to you, or photo from check with insufficient funds stamp if available on your statement or online portal).</p> </li> <li> <p>List of fees applied from your bank (if any).</p> </li> <li> <p>List of fees applied from companies (if any).</p> </li> </ul> <h2>5. Check back with your employer on the promised date of payment</h2> <p>Hopefully, you don't have to wait until the very day of payment. But when you do, then you have every right to remind your employer about the deadline.</p> <p>Got your payment? Good.</p> <p>Is your employer &quot;ghosting&quot; you? Then, keep on reading.</p> <h2>6. Beware over 15- to 30-day late payments</h2> <p>If there's a major bill that you just can't cover, such as rent, car loan payment, or mortgage payment, be proactive and reach out to those companies.</p> <p>Why?</p> <p>For starters, these companies may have a higher amount due when you pay past a certain date. For example, most mortgage lenders make payments due by the first of the month, allow a grace period until the 15th of the month, and start charging a higher amount on the 16th of the month and on. Once your payment becomes 30 days past due, your creditor will report it to the credit bureaus.</p> <p>When there's potential for a 30-day late payment, inform your creditor in writing and request that your potential late payment not be reported due to a situation outside of your control. Send a letter explaining your situation via certified mail, keep a copy for your &quot;Bad Check&quot; folder, and expect a response within 30 days (also for your folder).</p> <h2>7. Notify your state's Department of Labor</h2> <p>Still waiting? Contact your employer again and inform them that you require payment or you will be forced to contact the U.S. Department of Labor. In case of no response, then report your employer to your state's <a href="https://www.dol.gov/dol/location.htm" target="_blank">Department of Labor office</a> backing up your statements with your &quot;Bad Check&quot; folder.</p> <p>Once your complaint has been filed, you're highly likely to get your paycheck &hellip; and possibly a bit extra. In Hawaii, for example, employers who fail to pay wages have to pay back a sum equal to the amount of unpaid wages and annual <a href="http://www.capitol.hawaii.gov/hrscurrent/Vol07_Ch0346-0398/HRS0388/HRS_0388-0010.htm" target="_blank">interest rate of 6 percent</a> from the date that the wages were due. In addition, nonpaying Hawaii employers who can't provide a reasonable explanation are also subject to a fine ranging from $100 to $10,000 and imprisonment up to one year.</p> <p>The employer may also have to provide remedies to cover additional costs, such as late fees and reasonable attorney's fees. Labor laws and filing fees vary by state, but one thing is certain: You'll get paid.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fwhat-to-do-if-your-paycheck-bounces&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FWhat%2520to%2520Do%2520If%2520Your%2520Paycheck%2520Bounces.jpg&amp;description=What%20to%20Do%20If%20Your%20Paycheck%20Bounces"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/What%20to%20Do%20If%20Your%20Paycheck%20Bounces.jpg" alt="What to Do If Your Paycheck Bounces" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/damian-davila">Damian Davila</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-to-do-if-your-paycheck-bounces">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-handle-a-sudden-loss-of-income">How to Handle a Sudden Loss of Income</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-money-moves-every-new-college-student-should-make">7 Money Moves Every New College Student Should Make</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-late-payments-affect-your-credit">How Late Payments Affect Your Credit</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/build-a-secure-future-starting-with-your-next-paycheck">Build a Secure Future Starting With Your Next Paycheck</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance Career Building bills bounced check department of labor employer insufficient funds overdraft fees paycheck work Wed, 05 Jul 2017 08:30:18 +0000 Damian Davila 1974322 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Keep Your Job Search a Secret http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-keep-your-job-search-a-secret <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-keep-your-job-search-a-secret" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/interview_panel.jpg" alt="Interview panel" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Looking for a job can be tricky when you already have one. You want to take your career to the next level, but you don't want to risk the job you currently have &mdash; which can happen if your employer finds out you're trying to jump ship.</p> <p>Use these tips to keep your search a secret until you're ready to put in your two weeks' notice:</p> <h2>Keep your job search to yourself</h2> <p>There's no need to tell anyone else about your job search, least of all your coworkers. It doesn't matter how close you are, it's still none of their business. Loyalty is a fickle beast when positions are up for grabs, and if your coworkers see a chance to get a leg up, you may find yourself thrown under a proverbial bus. Rumors can spread like wildfire, and they'll eventually hit the boss. You could compromise your current employment if you don't have control of the narrative. Best to say nothing at all.</p> <h2>Stay away from company equipment</h2> <p>Using company equipment to conduct a job search seems like an obvious no-no, but you'd be surprised how many people don't recognize the risk until they get caught. Your activities may be monitored, and it'll be hard to explain yourself when IT has proof that you're wasting company time and resources to further your career elsewhere.</p> <p>Always use your personal computer and mobile devices to look for jobs and respond to emails, and only provide your personal phone numbers for calls. Don't use the office copier or fax for resume or other job-search materials, either; you could accidentally leave your resume on the machines, thereby ratting on yourself.</p> <h2>Continue giving 100 percent at your current job</h2> <p>Remember when you were a senior in high school? It was so hard to put forth the effort during that last week of class. It's common to adopt a similar attitude when you're planning to leave a job. You might tell yourself that you'll be gone soon anyway, so why bother trying to impress anyone? But this is a dangerous mentality. It's important to remain professional until the day your tenure ends at your current position.</p> <p>&quot;Don't ease off the gas just because you are thinking about leaving,&quot; says Ryan Naylor, CEO and founder of LocalWork.com. &quot;Maybe that new job won't come, or maybe you want a good referral later. If you do leave, you want to leave behind a continued path of goodwill, not burned bridges.&quot;</p> <h2>Don't announce your intentions on social media</h2> <p>Even though you think your social media accounts are &quot;private,&quot; remain cautious. People are nosy, and it's common practice these days for employers to check in on their employees' social media presence. If you don't say anything, you don't have to explain anything. This is especially true on LinkedIn; use the service to search for open positions and network with contacts, but don't outwardly declare that you're looking for a new job. It's almost guaranteed to get back to your employer.</p> <p>Nancy Schuman, chief marketing officer at recruitment firm Lloyd Staffing, adds, &quot;Make your activity stream on LinkedIn private and turn off broadcasts. Don't list your current employer by name on your resume. Instead, describe it as a 'large financial institution,' 'a well- known consumer products company,' etc.&quot;</p> <p>Same goes for Facebook, Twitter, and any other platforms you use. You may not be directly connected to your boss, but chances are you're connected to someone you work with, or someone who knows someone you work with. These services may help you make connections faster, but it's best to target individuals in your network directly who may be able to help you. It'll certainly be less dangerous than making a blanket post on Facebook about how you'd like a better job.</p> <h2>Don't send resumes to blind ads</h2> <p>When applying for positions, make sure you know to whom you're sending your resume and information. On platforms like Craigslist, often the job description is listed but the employer remains anonymous. This could spell trouble if you inadvertently respond to an ad your current employer is running.</p> <p>Certified career coach Cheryl Palmer relays a story of a job seeker who made that mistake.</p> <p>&quot;A woman once told me that her coworker responded to a blind ad and then was confronted a short while later by someone in the company from Human Resources,&quot; she says. &quot;The HR professional asked her if she was looking for another job. The woman lied and said no. The HR professional responded, 'I got your resume.' It turned out that the job that this woman had unwittingly applied for was at her own company.&quot;</p> <p>If you're posting to job boards, do that anonymously as well. You never know who's on there. If HR is searching for candidates for your office and they find you, you'll have some explaining to do.</p> <h2>Keep your interview attire in your car</h2> <p>Try not to take time off work to go on job interviews, if only to avoid raising a red flag on why your attendance is suddenly sporadic. If need be, schedule interviews during your lunch break or possibly after work. If there's no wiggle room, as a last resort, take one day off from your current job and try to schedule multiple interviews on that day.</p> <p>To expedite the interview process during work hours &mdash; like lunchtime, for instance &mdash; keep interview attire in your vehicle so you can change in and out of it at a discreet location. A suit and tie will be a dead giveaway if you normally wear jeans and a polo. You can only use the &quot;I have a funeral to attend after work&quot; excuse so many times before your coworkers start to think you're an agent of death.</p> <h2>Use references outside your current company</h2> <p>If you're trying to keep your job search a secret, why would you list your current employer as a reference? Surely you can find other people to vouch for you who don't have the power to fire you for making poor decisions.</p> <p>To avoid this predicament, Schuman suggests letting a prospective employer know that you will offer a current reference once you have a job offer. &quot;But do have other references lined up who know you and your work well for them to contact in the interim,&quot; she adds.</p> <h2>Ask for confidentiality at your interview</h2> <p>You may even go so far as to ask the person with whom you're interviewing not to reach out to your current employer. Just mention that you'd rather keep your current employer out of it; most hiring managers will understand.</p> <p>Schuman suggests, &quot;If you are working with a recruiter, tell them your confidentiality must be maintained; ask to be made aware of all prospective opportunities <em>before</em> your resume is referred.&quot;</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/mikey-rox">Mikey Rox</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-keep-your-job-search-a-secret">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-ways-college-grads-can-get-ahead-in-the-job-hunt">11 Ways College Grads Can Get Ahead in the Job Hunt</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-things-you-should-never-include-in-your-cover-letter">7 Things You Should Never Include in Your Cover Letter</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/jumpstart-your-job-search-with-instagram">Jumpstart Your Job Search With Instagram</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-land-the-job-when-youre-overqualified">How to Land the Job When You&#039;re Overqualified</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-hired-by-your-dream-company">How to Get Hired by Your Dream Company</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Job Hunting career confidentiality discreet interviewing new jobs privacy resumes social media work Thu, 01 Jun 2017 08:30:18 +0000 Mikey Rox 1957429 at http://www.wisebread.com This One Skill Can Make You a Better Boss http://www.wisebread.com/this-one-skill-can-make-you-a-better-boss <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/this-one-skill-can-make-you-a-better-boss" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-612387410.jpg" alt="Man learning one skill that can make him a better boss" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>What is it that every great boss has, and every rotten boss lacks? Here's a clue: it's not a fancy degree or something you can buy.</p> <p>The answer is empathy.</p> <p>With it, you can be a boss that is revered. Without it, you're tone deaf and often hated. Along with your actual ability to do the job, it is the most important trait of a truly superb manager.</p> <h2>What is empathy?</h2> <p>This may sound like an obvious, or even patronizing, question to ask. But empathy is often confused with sympathy, which is related, but different.</p> <p>According to TheFreeDictionary.com, empathy is &quot;the ability to identify with or understand the perspective, experiences, or motivations of another individual and to comprehend and share another individual's emotional state.&quot;</p> <p>Sympathy is feeling pity or sorrow for someone else. It is more general, and more distant. Empathy is deeper. It means that you can put yourself in the other person's place, and share their emotions and outlook on life. &quot;I feel sorry for you&quot; is sympathy; &quot;I feel your pain&quot; is empathy.</p> <h2>The importance of empathy in the workplace</h2> <p>Whenever people are asked why they quit their job, &quot;the boss&quot; is often among the top answers. That is no coincidence. Whether the boss is a bully, or just inept, it can make a workplace intolerable. In many cases, a lack of empathy is to blame.</p> <p>Employees want to feel understood and appreciated. An empathetic boss will not only fulfill those needs, but will do it in a way that does not feel forced or &quot;required by management.&quot;</p> <p>If you are not a naturally empathetic person, don't worry. With enough time, support, and encouragement, managers can learn to be empathetic. Here are some positive steps you can take right now to become that beloved boss.</p> <h2>1. Put yourself in the shoes of various employees for a day</h2> <p>It may not always be practical, or even possible. But if you can walk in an employee's shoes for the day &mdash; or even a few hours &mdash; it can completely open your eyes and show you a whole new perspective. This is especially important if you did not come up through the ranks.</p> <p>From taking orders at the front of the store, to working on the production line, to assembling a report, you will gain firsthand experience of the different roles for which you are responsible. It will also send a positive message to your staff.</p> <h2>2. Conduct more one-on-one and group interviews</h2> <p>Your employees want to feel heard. If you never give them the chance to tell you what's on their minds, you aren't leading with empathy.</p> <p>So, arrange regular appointments with them, either for private interviews or group meetings, and let them clear the air. Be open to new ideas, and do not use this time to rebuke anyone, or shoot down suggestions. Make it a positive experience that they look forward to, and make sure good things come from it. Act on the ideas you like, and tell them why you're not implementing ideas you don't like.</p> <h2>3. Get to know staff personally</h2> <p>Ask people how their weekends were. Get to know them beyond the daily grind. How's the family? Are they taking on a lot of extra work at home? This could be the reason they look tired, and have made some mistakes recently. Have they had a major life change, or has there been a bereavement? The more you know, and genuinely understand, the more empathetic you will be, which will in turn make you a better boss.</p> <h2>4. Be open with the staff</h2> <p>You're not expected to be everyone's best friend. You're a boss, and you should define those boundaries. But, there is absolutely nothing wrong with telling people about some of your own management struggles.</p> <p>Your staff may be annoyed because you haven't implemented something they have been requesting for months. Explaining that you have, in fact, been trying to push that through upper management and are being stonewalled will let the team know you're on their side. Don't pass the buck, bad-mouth your bosses, or make yourself out to be a victim. Just let them know you're working for them.</p> <h2>5. Learn to read body language</h2> <p>If you ask how someone's doing and they say they're fine, it may not be the end of the conversation. How do they look? How's their stance? Is their head drooping? Fingers constantly fidgeting? There may be something they want to tell you, but are hesitant to ask. You can break the silence and find out what's wrong. Don't prod. Simply showing genuine concern can have a major positive impact on how your employees view you.</p> <p>Above all, be honest, sincere, and understanding of what your employees do. Learn more about their work, their troubles, their lives, and their hopes for the future. Even if you cannot solve their immediate problems, understanding them will make your staff feel so much better having you as their boss.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/this-one-skill-can-make-you-a-better-boss">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-tips-for-better-workplace-body-language">7 Tips for Better Workplace Body Language</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-7-best-free-tools-to-improve-your-work-performance">The 7 Best Free Tools to Improve Your Work Performance</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-signs-youre-working-for-an-impossible-boss">7 Signs You&#039;re Working for an Impossible Boss</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-warning-signs-that-it-is-not-the-job-for-you">6 Warning Signs that It Is Not the Job for You</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/you-re-fired-20-signs-that-a-pink-slip-is-coming">You’re Fired! 20 Signs That a Pink Slip is Coming</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building body language bosses empathy employees getting to know jobs listening managers understanding work Mon, 22 May 2017 09:00:10 +0000 Paul Michael 1950128 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Succeed at Work Despite Your Lousy Boss http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-succeed-at-work-despite-your-lousy-boss <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-succeed-at-work-despite-your-lousy-boss" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-499579316.jpg" alt="Man succeeding at work despite his lousy boss" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>In an ideal world, your boss would be a great leader, a teacher, a mentor, and someone to be admired and celebrated. As we all know, it's not an ideal world. Sometimes, the boss is so bad, you dread going to work and spend hours looking for a new career. However, there is hope. You can turn the situation to your advantage, and help you &quot;manage&quot; when the boss is a lost cause. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-survive-and-thrive-in-a-job-you-hate?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Survive (and Thrive!) in a Job You Hate</a>)</p> <h2>Get to know everything about them</h2> <p>What motivates them? What makes them happy, in and out of work? What about career goals, or people who inspire them? What do they like to do on weekends? Do they have a hobby? The more you know, the better.</p> <p>When you are armed with this kind of information, you can use it to swing things in your favor. This does not mean sucking up, or blackmail. This is a way to figure out why they make certain decisions, and in turn, gives you the chance to steer them in a direction more favorable to you. For instance, if the boss is micromanaging you, find out if they are worried about their own performance review. They may fear you cannot do the job the way they want it done. If you can prove to them that this fear is unnecessary, they will focus on someone else.</p> <h2>Do not play their game</h2> <p>A really lousy boss will play head games with you. They'll ask you to work late when they know you've got tickets to the concert. They'll put you on a project with someone they know rubs you the wrong way. They'll ask for two hours of work to be done in one hour. You know &mdash; a really nasty piece of work. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-9-types-of-horrible-bosses-and-how-to-manage-them?ref=seealso" target="_blank">The 9 Types of Horrible Bosses &mdash; And How to Manage Them</a>)</p> <p>Despite this, don't let them see that it bothers you. Like any bully, they get their kicks from your reaction. If you brush it off, smile, and happily do everything they request; it will eat them up inside. They'll end up doing something that reflects badly on them, or they'll focus their energy on someone who gives them the response they want.</p> <h2>Keep meticulous records</h2> <p>We live in a world of emails and text messages. If you're having trouble with a boss, start tracking everything. From every email exchange to every closed-door conversation, use technology to build a case against the boss's behavior. Take detailed notes in meetings, and send a copy of those notes to your boss to ensure that you understood everything that was required of you. Get approvals in writing. The more evidence you have, the less chance you will be a scapegoat for anything. Even if the boss is just inept, you can use this technique to keep them on task. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-warning-signs-your-new-boss-may-be-a-bad-boss?ref=seealso" target="_blank">10 Warning Signs Your New Boss May Be a Bad Boss</a>)</p> <h2>Take the initiative</h2> <p>A lousy boss will often keep you out of the loop, and may even try to marginalize your position. This approach keeps their employees uninformed, and as we all know, knowledge is power.</p> <p>Don't settle for this. Do everything you can to find out what you can through other channels. Speak to colleagues in other departments about projects they're working on. Get friendly with people in HR, or upper management. Make yourself available for jobs that the boss has &quot;forgot&quot; to mention in staff meetings. But of course, be polite and respectful to the boss, and make sure he or she knows you have only the best interests of the company at heart.</p> <h2>Give them the impression it was their idea</h2> <p>If you're having trouble getting your initiatives greenlit, you could have a boss who doesn't like employees taking their spotlight. In this situation, you should take a page out of the advertising agency book.</p> <p>Ad agencies often deal with clients who balk at original and bold ideas, so they plant seeds in meetings called &quot;tissue sessions.&quot; Here, the agency works side-by-side with the client to produce an idea, steering the client all the way. The client believes they have helped to birth this idea, and it is blessed with little or no changes. Do likewise. Plant seeds. Make the boss think your great idea is something they were planning to do all along. The people that matter will know who is really responsible for it, and you'll get to do what you want.</p> <h2>Make them look good</h2> <p>At the end of the day, most bosses just want to be successful. They rarely care how that happens, and if you can help in that quest, you'll come out smelling of roses. Ask them how you can help them in their day-to-day duties. Do they have something big in the works that you can assist with? Are they having problems with certain employees, and if so, what can you do to help them smooth things over?</p> <p>Become their most trusted and effective member of staff; the indispensable &quot;right hand man.&quot; They'll start to rely on you more, and you may even help them get promoted. When that happens, you'll be next in line. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-ways-to-suck-up-at-work-that-wont-make-you-feel-slimy?ref=seealso" target="_blank">15 Ways to Suck Up at Work That Won't Make You Feel Slimy</a>)</p> <h2>Learn their triggers</h2> <p>Every boss is different, and as such, your approach to every boss needs to adapt. Some bosses like to be challenged; others will find it offensive and believe it is insubordinate. Some bosses love employees to take the initiative; others will insist on having everything passed by them first. So, learn these triggers, and find ways to work around them. The less you hit their pain points, the better life will be for you. If nothing else changes, the fact that you are no longer ticking them off will make a huge difference in your daily work life. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-signs-youre-working-for-an-impossible-boss?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Signs You're Working for an Impossible Boss</a>)</p> <h2>Have a genuine heart-to-heart</h2> <p>Sometimes, a lousy boss has absolutely no idea they're causing you grief. They really do believe they're doing a great job, and everyone loves them (think Michael Scott from &quot;The Office&quot;).</p> <p>In this instance, you can make life a whole lot easier by clearing the air, and talking about the issues you're having. Now, no one likes to be told they're not performing well, so phrase things delicately. Have solutions at hand for problems you are about to explain. Let them know what their strengths are before pointing out areas of concern. A boss is still a person, and if you charge into their office with your rage level at 11, you'll put them on the defensive.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-succeed-at-work-despite-your-lousy-boss">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-8-types-of-bad-bosses-and-how-to-survive-them">The 8 Types of Bad Bosses — And How to Survive Them</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-signs-youre-working-for-an-impossible-boss">7 Signs You&#039;re Working for an Impossible Boss</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-career-tips-your-younger-self-would-give-you">9 Career Tips Your Younger Self Would Give You</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-make-public-speaking-less-terrifying">How to Make Public Speaking Less Terrifying</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/they-offered-you-a-promotion-and-no-pay-raise-now-what">They Offered You a Promotion and No Pay Raise. Now What?</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income advice bad bosses employment managers strategies stressful jobs success work Mon, 10 Apr 2017 08:00:11 +0000 Paul Michael 1921764 at http://www.wisebread.com The 8 Types of Bad Bosses — And How to Survive Them http://www.wisebread.com/the-8-types-of-bad-bosses-and-how-to-survive-them <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/the-8-types-of-bad-bosses-and-how-to-survive-them" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-507516322.jpg" alt="Man learning how to survive bad bosses" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Most of us have a boss (unless you work for yourself!). For the majority of us, the boss is just someone we deal with as part of the daily grind. However, some bosses stand out for all the wrong reasons. Here are the eight worst offenders; which one do you have?</p> <h2>1. The Comedian</h2> <p>If you have ever seen an episode of either the UK or U.S. version of &quot;The Office,&quot; you know this kind of boss all too well. This kind of boss has one driving priority &mdash; to be popular. He or she will be cracking jokes at every meeting, and will have an office filled with &quot;wacky&quot; gadgets and posters that put a dorm room to shame.</p> <p>However, they are so focused on getting people to like them that they refuse to make tough decisions. They won't reprimand anyone for fear of losing a friendship. And they certainly won't make changes that are necessary, but unpopular. This kind of boss will lead to the downfall of his or her department.</p> <h3>Game plan</h3> <p>You know what motivates this boss, so use it to your advantage. Suggest that making certain decisions may not appear popular in the short term, but will make the boss a hero in the long term. At the very least, laugh at his or her jokes, and stay popular long enough to get a few raises and promotions before moving on to a different department, or company, that is not destined for a nose-dive.</p> <h2>2. The Seagull</h2> <p>The seagull boss flies into the department (often from another location or division), makes a lot of noise, and will &quot;take a dump&quot; on everything from a great height before quickly flying away. They don't know the real problems and strengths associated with the daily routine, and they really don't care. All they want to do is look good by making everyone else look bad. Nothing you do will ever be good enough, and even if you implement their ideas, you will be blamed when they don't work. This kind of boss reduces morale quicker than a pay cut and a canceled holiday party.</p> <h3>Game plan</h3> <p>First, don't react &mdash; at least, not negatively, and not to his or her face. They have power that you don't, and they are happy to use it against you. Let the seagull boss do what they have come to do, but take it all with a huge grain of salt. Then, when they leave, figure out as a team what you need to do to make the suggestions work, or improve the department to the standards that have been set, without annoying the boss or tanking morale even further.</p> <h2>3. The Ladder Climber</h2> <p>This boss has enough ambition for the whole department, but lacks the moral fiber of conscience to care how the promotions happen. Stepping on good employees to climb just one rung is seen as &quot;all part of the job.&quot; They'll smile to your face and bad-mouth you behind your back. They will take credit for your work, and put their mistakes firmly on your shoulders. They want just two things &mdash; promotions and raises. And if you get in the way, you're history.</p> <h3>Game plan</h3> <p>Don't do anything to impede their success. They're the boss, so they have the upper hand. Instead, be civil, and even ask how to help them achieve their goals. Your aim is to get them promoted into a position that no longer impacts your daily life. Hopefully, they'll take a job somewhere else for more pay and a better title. If you happen to send them these opportunities, saying they are meant for greatness, even better.</p> <h2>4. The Insufferable Martyr</h2> <p>Whatever this boss is doing, they're doing it for you. And, they work harder than anyone in the office. You think you had it rough last week? Well, just listen to their sob stories and be put in your place. 100-hour weeks. Being berated by clients and management. Rewriting proposals during their daughter's sixth birthday party. Building a time machine just to go back a week and stop a disaster from happening. OK, so maybe not that bad, but it does get ridiculous. Everyone rolls their eyes but stays quiet as this boss recounts the worst week of their life, which happens every single week.</p> <h3>Game plan</h3> <p>You really only have one way to deal with this one; go along with it. If you challenge them that they don't have it as rough as they say they do, they'll consider you to be unempathetic and against them. However, you really don't want to enable this behavior &mdash; it makes things worse. Just nod, agree that life is tough, and move on.</p> <h2>5. The Faker</h2> <p>There's an old saying; &quot;Fake it till you make it.&quot; Sometimes, people in business fake it really well, and sadly, they're still faking it by the time they become your boss. You won't learn anything from this type of manager, other than how to bite your lip when they say something that's clearly wrong. However, they got this far, and the chances are they'll continue to do well by employing the same charm and guesswork that got them here in the first place.</p> <p>If they have friends in high places, they'll take full advantage of that favoritism. If you're good at your job, they'll use you to make themselves look good. They may even ask you to do their job for them, in a roundabout kind of way. And as you wonder how they ever got this far, they'll get yet another raise and promotion. It really is infuriating.</p> <h3>Game plan</h3> <p>It's tempting to set a trap for &quot;the faker&quot; to show how little knowledge they actually have. But, a word of warning: Setting them up, perhaps in a meeting, will only put you on their bad side. They have spent years, or even decades, avoiding detection by those in power. They have more excuses than you'll ever be able to combat, and they have a long memory. You do not want to get on their bad side, especially with this kind of move. At some point, they'll either move on, or make a mistake they cannot squirm out of. Keep your cool.</p> <h2>6. The Chicken Little</h2> <p>The sky is always falling for this boss. Corporate is constantly down on his or her department, and the pink slip is coming any day now. Jobs are going to be severed. Wages cut. Bonuses slashed. Everything is horrible, the department is doomed, and you should start looking for new work because it's all going wrong.</p> <p>The problem with this kind of boss, other than the constant stress he or she exerts on employees, is that it can be a self-fulfilling prophecy. Time spent stressing and running around looking for answers becomes more important than the actual job. It gets noticed, and they eventually seal their own fate; perhaps yours as well.</p> <h3>Game plan</h3> <p>Be careful what you believe, and what you toss aside as speculation and worrying. There are always problems in every company, and news can be taken one way or another. In all likelihood, there could be some truth to the doomsday predictions, but more than likely, it's a storm in a teacup. Do your own research, and make your own conclusions.</p> <h2>7. The Sleazebag</h2> <p>This usually applies to male bosses, but that does not mean women are excluded from exhibiting this kind of behavior. This boss is all hands and roaming eyes. They notice every time you wear something that reveals a little skin. They make suggestions that would not even belong in a locker room. And, they make your skin crawl the second they walk into the room.</p> <p>You feel uncomfortable in their presence, and sometimes, you even feel afraid. This kind of boss will use his or her power to take advantage of every situation, and will often try to blackmail you into giving in to their horrid advances.</p> <h3>Game plan</h3> <p>Nip this one in the bud, and fast. Keep meticulous records of every interaction, every email, every voicemail, and anything that will support your genuine claim of harassment. Then, take it to HR. If you don't have an HR department, take it to the most senior person on the executive staff. And if that happens to be your boss &hellip; you need to leave.</p> <h2>8. The Mosquito</h2> <p>They are the back seat driver of the office. They come up behind you when you're working, and you hear them breathing in your ear. They look over your shoulder, they bug you 15&ndash;20 times a day, and they never seem to take a hint that you do not appreciate their constant irritation.</p> <p>This boss is something of a micromanager, but also seems to be at a loose end for the entire working week. Why don't they have something better to do? Why are they looking at every line you write, or every job you start? Why don't they just leave you alone!?</p> <h3>Game plan</h3> <p>First, prove to them that you know what you're doing. If they're bugging you because they don't trust you, it's time to gain that trust. If they are just the kind of person who likes to hover, have a genuine heart-to-heart. Tell them you appreciate the checking in, but you get more work done when you're left to do it yourself. But when you need their excellent advice, you will definitely ask for it.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-8-types-of-bad-bosses-and-how-to-survive-them">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-4"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-succeed-at-work-despite-your-lousy-boss">How to Succeed at Work Despite Your Lousy Boss</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-signs-youre-working-for-an-impossible-boss">7 Signs You&#039;re Working for an Impossible Boss</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/they-offered-you-a-promotion-and-no-pay-raise-now-what">They Offered You a Promotion and No Pay Raise. Now What?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/turn-your-passion-into-a-living">Turn Your Passion Into A Living</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-never-to-bring-up-in-a-job-interview">5 Things Never to Bring Up in a Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income bad bosses employment managers morale strategies work Fri, 07 Apr 2017 09:00:13 +0000 Paul Michael 1922960 at http://www.wisebread.com 9 Career Tips Your Younger Self Would Give You http://www.wisebread.com/9-career-tips-your-younger-self-would-give-you <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/9-career-tips-your-younger-self-would-give-you" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-596344056.jpg" alt="Hearing career advice your younger self would give you" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Hindsight is 20/20, so there may be a lot you wish you could say to your younger self. However, your younger self may also have some great advice to help you with your career today. Below are some of the top job tips that past you might offer. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-career-tips-you-wish-you-could-give-your-younger-self?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Career Tips You Wish You Could Give Your Younger Self</a>)</p> <h2>1. Don't settle</h2> <p>We all sometimes settle with work and personal matters, but your younger self wouldn't accept so many compromises. If you're long overdue for a promotion, stuck feeling taken advantage of, or simply miserable at your place of work, figure out what you want and what you deserve, and set out to achieve it. You should be happy with where you are in your professional life, not just mindlessly coasting through.</p> <h2>2. Be more aggressive and proactive</h2> <p>Your younger self would want you to stand up for your convictions, be aggressive in your desires, and be proactive about getting what you want. A good place to start is <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-times-you-should-demand-a-raise?ref=internal" target="_blank">asking for a raise</a>.</p> <h2>3. Follow your passion</h2> <p>As we get older, we sometimes feel compelled to put aside our interests and passions while we address the responsibilities and demands of adulthood. But if we put them aside for too long, we lose ourselves in day to day duties and forget about the things that really drive and excite us. Is this the job or career you really want? Are there classes you can take or communities you can join to pursue your passion? Don't leave it on your back burner any longer.</p> <h2>4. Don't waste time at a job you hate</h2> <p>Your younger self was eager to set out on the career path. You had fire, passion, and determination to succeed in your field. Younger you would have never tolerated riding it out in a job you couldn't stand just for the sake of a paycheck &mdash; so why would you do that now? If you dread work every day, stop wasting your time hating on a soul-sucking job, and start focusing your energy on finding a new one. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-signs-you-should-quit-your-job?ref=seealso" target="_blank">8 Signs You Should Quit Your Job</a>)</p> <h2>5. Don't let money cloud your judgment</h2> <p>You undoubtedly made a lot less money in your younger days, but you likely were okay with making minimum wage back then. As we make more money, lifestyle creep can cloud our assessment of what we need versus what we want. This might cause us to make decisions that keep us unhappy. Take stock of what you have, what you really need, and what you really want out of life.</p> <h2>6. Leave your work at the office</h2> <p>During the earlier days of summer and college jobs, you didn't bring your work home with you. Now, it can be difficult to draw the line between home and work, especially with your smartphone delivering emails and easy access to documents via the cloud. Your younger self would remind you to enjoy your personal time at home, and devote your entire self to work while you're at the office.</p> <h2>7. Take advantage of the weekend</h2> <p>Your younger self probably spent weekends hanging out with friends, relaxing at home, and spending quality time to just recharge and enjoy life. Don't lose sight of that! Weekends exist for a reason &mdash; you aren't a machine. Spend your days off doing something fun instead of worrying about work or fulfilling obligations. Clear your head with a relaxing road trip, take up a new hobby (maybe even <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-awesome-money-making-hobbies?ref=internal" target="_blank">one that will pay off</a>!), or just sleep in. The weekend is your time to unwind; honor it.</p> <h2>8. Seek out other opportunities</h2> <p>Let's admit it: Some of us lose motivation as we get older. We settle into routines, and never bother to see what good things could be waiting just around the corner. Your younger self jumped at new opportunities, and even sought them out. Put forth the effort to learn a new skill, network with other pros, and even <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-freelance-gigs-anyone-can-do-to-make-extra-money?ref=internal" target="_blank">take up a side gig</a>. In addition to furthering your career, you could make some extra money, too!</p> <h2>9. Don't fear change</h2> <p>Your younger self didn't fear change. Starting over with a new job, even if it means leaving your old comfortable one behind, can be scary &mdash; but your younger self would have made that leap in an instant to better your life. Or maybe you turned down your dream gig because it required a move to a different city or state. Would your younger self have shunned such a change? Yes, any major change, especially a professional one, can be nerve-wracking. And, these decisions do admittedly get tougher as we get older and put down roots. But never be afraid to try &mdash; you could end up missing out on something great.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/andrea-cannon">Andrea Cannon</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-career-tips-your-younger-self-would-give-you">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-pearls-of-career-wisdom-from-brian-tracy">6 Pearls of Career Wisdom From Brian Tracy</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-stay-motivated-on-the-job">6 Ways to Stay Motivated on the Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-7-best-free-tools-to-improve-your-work-performance">The 7 Best Free Tools to Improve Your Work Performance</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-deal-when-youre-way-behind-at-work">6 Ways to Deal When You&#039;re Way Behind at Work</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-signs-youre-working-for-an-impossible-boss">7 Signs You&#039;re Working for an Impossible Boss</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income Productivity advice being proactive career tips jobs motivation procrastinating work younger self Wed, 29 Mar 2017 09:00:12 +0000 Andrea Cannon 1914690 at http://www.wisebread.com You Got a Raise! Now What? http://www.wisebread.com/you-got-a-raise-now-what <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/you-got-a-raise-now-what" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-510329664.jpg" alt="Man got a raise, so now what?" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>So, you got a raise! Now, it's time to start putting that money to work for you. While your first thought might be <em>shopping spree</em>, consider instead these other options that will build your wealth and secure your financial freedom.</p> <h2>Have Realistic Expectations</h2> <p>Your raise may sound like a lot, but once you receive your paycheck, you may be surprised to find how little your take-home pay actually changed. Don't make plans based on a quick mental calculation. Get the actual amount from your paycheck to know how the raise will actually impact you.</p> <h2>Make a Plan</h2> <p>Of course it's okay to reward yourself <em>a bit </em>for working hard and getting a raise. But don't just pocket the extra money and add it to your fun budget. Check your savings, credit card debt, and investments to see which areas can use a boost, and put your raise there. You can decide to put three months' worth to <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/fastest-way-to-pay-off-10000-in-credit-card-debt?ref=internal" target="_blank">pay down your debt</a>, and then take a one month break to splurge. Consider your financial goals and how every dollar makes a difference toward reaching them.</p> <h2>Increase Your Emergency Savings</h2> <p>In an ideal world, you should have a three to six month cushion in your <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/a-step-by-step-guide-to-creating-your-emergency-fund?ref=internal" target="_blank">emergency fund</a>. If you already have a sizable emergency fund, then you don't need to worry about saving more with your increased income. Otherwise, saving more now will mean less stress later when an unexpected event hits your wallet hard.</p> <h2>Pay Down Debt</h2> <p>Paying off debt should be a priority in your plan to gain financial freedom. It can also help improve your credit score, save on interest, and reduce stress. Consider putting your raise toward debt payments. Even a small amount that you can add to your monthly payments will significantly lower the interest paid and help you pay it off faster.</p> <h2>Increase Your Retirement Savings</h2> <p>Can you put some of that raise into your retirement accounts? Your retirement contribution might also automatically increase as it is usually based on a percentage of your gross pay. Have you at least set your 401K contributions to get the full amount of matching from your employer? If you have an another retirement account, like a Roth IRA, get your annual contribution out of the way.</p> <h2>Refinance Your Loans</h2> <p>With a higher income, you may be eligible for better rates on a personal loan, mortgage, and car loan. You can apply for better loans now or wait for your credit score to increase after you've made some positive changes (such as paying down debt and lowering your debt-to-credit ratio).</p> <h2>Start Investing</h2> <p>It's never too early to pad your wealth with smart investing. These days the startup capital required is minimal. You can start investing with a few hundred dollars. <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/a-guide-to-online-brokers-for-investing-newbies-and-beyond?ref=internal" target="_blank">Online brokerages</a> often have a low minimum with low fees. <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/should-you-trust-your-money-with-these-4-popular-financial-robo-advisers?ref=internal" target="_blank">Financial robo advisers</a> can take a lot of the work out of figuring out what to buy. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-cheap-easy-ways-to-invest-your-first-1000?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Easy Ways to Invest Your First $1,000</a>)</p> <h2>Have Fun</h2> <p>It won't hurt to reward yourself a bit for a job well done. Have a celebratory dinner or buy an affordable gadget that you've been wanting. You can also start saving toward a vacation or other large purchase.</p> <h2>Prove Your Employer Right</h2> <p>Getting a raise means you've done a good job and deserve to be rewarded for it. Prove your employer right by continuing your positive behaviors, always putting your best foot forward, and looking forward to the next raise. You may also want to write a thank you card, especially if your manager or boss worked hard to get you the raise.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/andrea-cannon">Andrea Cannon</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/you-got-a-raise-now-what">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-you-must-do-before-you-quit-your-job">5 Things You Must Do Before You Quit Your Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-improve-your-finances-using-social-media">How to Improve Your Finances Using Social Media</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/wanna-put-away-some-cash-take-a-vacation">Wanna Put Away Some Cash? Take A Vacation!</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/getting-by-without-a-job-part-1-losing-a-job">Getting by without a job, part 1--losing a job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/turn-your-passion-into-a-living">Turn Your Passion Into A Living</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance Career and Income budgeting debt repayment extra money income job paychecks promotions raise saving money work Wed, 01 Mar 2017 11:00:10 +0000 Andrea Cannon 1898693 at http://www.wisebread.com They Offered You a Promotion and No Pay Raise. Now What? http://www.wisebread.com/they-offered-you-a-promotion-and-no-pay-raise-now-what <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/they-offered-you-a-promotion-and-no-pay-raise-now-what" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-525955132.jpg" alt="" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="141" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>There are usually two ways to get a pay bump in your career; either you move to a new job that offers more money and a better title, or you get promoted at your current company with a raise. These days though, a promotion is not always accompanied by a bigger paycheck. When this happens, you may be wondering: Is it worth it?</p> <p>Let's look at the arguments for, and against, this new trend.</p> <h2>Yes! Take the Promotion Even Without a Raise</h2> <p>If there's a title change on the table, but no extra money to accompany it, there are still plenty of positives to consider.</p> <h3>1. You Will Gain More Experience</h3> <p>Hands down, one of the best reasons to take a promotion without a raise is to take advantage of the experience you'll get. Moving into a bigger role means more responsibility, more work, and more to learn. While it would be ideal to be compensated for this, remember that experience in and of itself is a kind of compensation. Think about it: Everyone who is paying many thousands of dollars to get an education, or learn a new skill, is paying for experience. You're getting this additional experience at no cost to you, and it can only help you grow and become a better employee.</p> <h3>2. It Looks Great on Your Resume</h3> <p>A <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-resume-mistakes-that-will-hurt-your-job-search?ref=internal" target="_blank">flat resume</a> is like a flat landscape; it's not very inviting. If you're looking to move jobs, you want to show your prospective employer that you have achieved things. You made waves, you made a difference, and you climbed the ladder. Promotions without pay raises do that just as effectively as those that come with extra cash. After all, how often do you put a specific salary next to each job or position you ever held? So, if you get promoted from Account Manager to Account Director, but there's no raise in pay, don't worry too much. It may not pay off now, but when you do move to a different job, you can jump right in at the higher level.</p> <h3>3. You May Get Additional Benefits Aside From the Pay</h3> <p>So you're not getting any extra money. But, what else does the promotion give you? Ask, and you may be surprised at the additional benefits that could come with the job. In some companies, that promotion can mean extra vacation days and personal days. In others, it may mean that you can work at home occasionally, or travel more. Some companies will give you extra discounts on products and services, or freebies. You may be able to get the cost of your cellphone bill reimbursed, or get a free company phone, which eliminates the need to pay for your own. Is there a company car? All these benefits, and more, add up to either saving money, or you not having to spend it, and that's a kind of pay raise.</p> <h3>4. With a Better Title Comes a Bigger Role in the Company</h3> <p>Even without the extra money, a promotion can be an excellent way to get more gravitas at work. Now, you have the title to push through ideas that might not have gone very far before. You may also have people reporting to you, which means you can delegate some of the less interesting work to them. It is rare &mdash; very rare &mdash; for a promotion to give you nothing more than a title change. Take the chance to grab those advantages. Or even better, suggest some. If the new title doesn't come with more money, can it come with something else? Get creative.</p> <h3>5. Turning a Promotion Down Can Look Bad</h3> <p>Finally in the &quot;for&quot; camp, it's the one point you cannot ignore. How is this going to look? It may be that the company is in financially unstable times, and cannot afford to give you more money right now. But, they really want you to take a bigger role, and more responsibility. They may well be counting on you. Saying &quot;Not without a raise&quot; can make you look mercenary, and while it is your right to do so, it could have implications further down the road. So, think hard before saying no. You may be saying no to a bigger promotion and actual raise down the road.</p> <h2>No! Don't Take That Promotion Without a Raise</h2> <p>More problems and no more money? Here's why you should consider declining the offer.</p> <h3>1. It's More Responsibility for the Same Money</h3> <p>Or, to put it another way, it's a pay cut. Look closely at the new title, and look at how the new job differs from your current role. Do you have to come in earlier and leave later? Are you on the road more? Are you now handling a much bigger workload, more stress, and the working lives of a lot of new people now reporting to you? Will this mean less time with your family or other relationships? Will you have to sacrifice hobbies and other personal interests? You may even have to relocate, and without more money, that could be impossible. Weigh up all these options carefully.</p> <h3>2. You Don't Want to Be a Pushover<strong> </strong></h3> <p>As an employee, you want to be respected. You do what you are required to do, and you do it well. But, you do not want to be a pushover, either. Taking a promotion without a pay raise might leave you feeling taken advantage of. Explore the reasons why this promotion comes without money. Does the company have a good excuse? It's certainly not the norm to get a promotion without extra pay, so what's the party line from HR?</p> <h3>3. Your Company May Be Hiding Something<strong> </strong></h3> <p>There's a scene in the movie <em>Fun With Dick and Jane</em> where Jim Carrey's character, who works for an Enron-like company, gets a big promotion only to find out he's the fall guy for his company's fall into the toilet. Sadly, this is not just something that happens in the movies. People sometimes get promoted into jobs that are dead ends, or into positions that make them immediately liable for something bad happening. You really need to do the research here. What exactly does this promotion entail? What is the state of the department? Talk to people who had that position before you. Get the scoop before you even consider saying yes, or no.</p> <h3>4. The Position May Require You to Actually Spend More Money</h3> <p>Not only will you be doing more work for the same money, but it's possible you'll have to dip into your pocket more as well. The promotion may require you to buy clothing and equipment that won't be reimbursed by the company. You may have to do a lot more driving, which means more gas and more wear and tear. You may have to organize and attend lunch meetings, which are once again not reimbursed. Ask what is required of you in the new role, and do the math.</p> <h2>What to Do?</h2> <p>As you can see, there are more reasons &quot;for&quot; taking this promotion than &quot;against&quot; it. But, that doesn't mean you should blindly take any promotion that comes without a raise. Take each situation on a case-by-case basis. Really look into it. Chances are, it's a good career move, even if it doesn't do anything for your bank account. But, there are risks, and they can be big ones. Good luck.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/they-offered-you-a-promotion-and-no-pay-raise-now-what">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-reasons-you-shouldnt-vacation-shame-your-coworkers">7 Reasons You Shouldn&#039;t &quot;Vacation Shame&quot; Your Coworkers</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-signs-youre-working-for-an-impossible-boss">7 Signs You&#039;re Working for an Impossible Boss</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-deal-when-you-hate-your-new-job">How to Deal When You Hate Your New Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-money-moves-to-make-the-moment-you-get-a-promotion">8 Money Moves to Make the Moment You Get a Promotion</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/you-got-a-raise-now-what">You Got a Raise! Now What?</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income employment job titles promotions pros and cons raises resumes work Mon, 27 Feb 2017 10:00:20 +0000 Paul Michael 1896816 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Ways to Deal When You're Way Behind at Work http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-deal-when-youre-way-behind-at-work <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-ways-to-deal-when-youre-way-behind-at-work" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_stressed_work_488912550.jpg" alt="Woman finding ways to deal when she&#039;s behind at work" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Being overwhelmed and falling behind at work may be a universal phenomenon, but it is possible to get back to a solid footing. If you are drowning in incomplete TPS reports, here are six ways you can improve the situation and get your head back above water.</p> <h2>1. Take 20 Minutes Every Morning to Review and Plan</h2> <p>Truly productive people start their mornings by taking 20 minutes to review their calendars and create their to-do lists for the day. This allows them to be prepared for whatever the day ahead has to offer.</p> <p>This is the sort of habit that often goes out the window as soon as a major work deadline looms large. When you are overwhelmed at work, it can be tempting to jump right in as soon as you get to the office. There are fires to put out and meetings to attend, so you don't have the time to plan out your day.</p> <p>But skipping the 20-minute morning review means you are surprised by plans, meetings, or interim due dates that slip your mind while you're focused on the big project. Make sure your morning starts with a plan so that you can prevent today's small deadline from becoming a major problem tomorrow.</p> <h2>2. Say No to More Work</h2> <p>When it comes to optional work projects, the way to say no is simple, but not easy. It's a matter of getting in the habit of saying &quot;My plate is full right now.&quot;</p> <p>However, the harder issue is when your boss is trying to assign you more work on top of what you are already doing. Pushing back against such an assignment is not simple, and it can feel very uncomfortable.</p> <p>The best way to handle such an addition to your workload is to ask for and provide open communication. Set a meeting with your boss to agree on what your priorities, goals, and objectives are for all of your projects, so it's clear what can and cannot reasonably get done. Request regular progress review meetings so everyone will be clear on what is happening and when. It's important for you and your supervisor to recognize your abilities and limitations and not try to squeeze blood from a turnip.</p> <h2>3. End the Procrastination Cycle</h2> <p>Scientists have found that procrastination has less to do with time than emotion. Chronic procrastinators are often choosing not to start their work because it gives them momentary emotional relief &mdash; but the level of guilt they feel over procrastinating means they are not really improving their emotional state by avoiding the dreaded task.</p> <p>Even the best of us fall victim to procrastination, but chronic procrastinators can find themselves spiraling into an endless procrastination cycle: Putting off a dreaded task makes them feel guilty and ashamed, which causes them to have less cognitive and emotional energy available to be productive, which makes them even less likely to start the task.</p> <p>So how do you end the procrastination cycle?</p> <p>There are two proven methods for interrupting this loop. The first is an <a href="http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1111/1467-9280.00441" target="_blank">external deadline</a>. Knowing that you are beholden to another individual is often enough to force you to just get started in order to meet the deadline. If you can't ask your supervisor for hard deadlines, creating self-imposed deadlines is not as effective, but still better than nothing.</p> <p>The second method of interrupting the procrastination loop is to regard your mood as a fixed state. According to a 2001 study by Dianne Tice, students didn't procrastinate when they were primed to believe <a href="https://www.psychologicalscience.org/observer/why-wait-the-science-behind-procrastination#.WH-4qRsrJPY" target="_blank">their mood was fixed</a> &mdash; but when they thought their mood could change (especially if they thought it could improve), they procrastinated. It can be tough to start your work if you are in a bad mood, but if you just accept that your bad mood is here to stay, you're more likely to roll up your sleeves and get to it.</p> <h2>4. Procrastinate Productively</h2> <p>If you truly feel like you emotionally need to avoid a task that you should be working on, there are far better ways to dodge it than by surfing Facebook. Instead, you should work on another task that may not be as time-sensitive, but still needs to get done.</p> <p>This used to be my favorite way to get homework done in college. When I had a major project due, the days leading up to the due date would often find me working on homework for other classes. This allowed me to feel the emotional relief of procrastination without allowing me to fall into the shame associated with a procrastination cycle.</p> <p>You can also take this habit one step further by creating a <a href="http://ayearofproductivity.com/procrastinate-more-productively/" target="_blank">procrastination list</a>. This idea comes from Chris Bailey, the blogger behind A Year of Productivity. Your procrastination list will include any items you're allowed to work on when you find yourself procrastinating. This will help you to still use your time productively if you procrastinate. Alternatively, if you find that nothing on your procrastination list is appealing, then you are more likely to just get started on the task you'd otherwise avoid.</p> <h2>5. Nip Complaining in the Bud</h2> <p>When you are overwhelmed, it can feel great to complain about your heavy workload to your coworkers, friends, family, and glassy-eyed cashiers who really don't care about your TPS reports. But complaining only offers you momentary relief. If you keep talking about how rough it is, you're likely to make yourself feel even worse about the situation.</p> <p>So if you are tempted to complain about your bozo boss and his unrelenting workload, stop yourself and think about what could be a more constructive use of your conversations. Perhaps you could ask a coworker to help you with a task, or request that your spouse take over school drop-off for the week so you can get to work a few minutes earlier to plan your day. Use your conversations as an opportunity to reduce your sense of being overwhelmed, rather than magnify it by complaining.</p> <h2>6. Get Some Rest</h2> <p>Sleep seems like an easy place to cut back when there are more tasks than hours in the day. But staying up late to finish a project isn't just bad for your health, it's actually counterproductive if you want to get your work done. Not only does lack of sleep make you <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21075236" target="_blank">more easily distracted</a>, which means it will take you longer to get your work done, but fatigue can also hurt your job performance.</p> <p>One of the best things you can do to chip away at your seemingly endless to-do list is protect your sleep time. Don't let work encroach on your rest, or you'll find that both your rest and your work are worse off.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/emily-guy-birken">Emily Guy Birken</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-deal-when-youre-way-behind-at-work">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-7-best-free-tools-to-improve-your-work-performance">The 7 Best Free Tools to Improve Your Work Performance</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-career-tips-your-younger-self-would-give-you">9 Career Tips Your Younger Self Would Give You</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dont-panic-how-to-meet-a-deadline">Don&#039;t Panic! How to Meet a Deadline</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-easy-ways-to-have-energy-after-work">7 Easy Ways to Have Energy After Work</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Productivity behind schedule boredom deadlines falling behind planning procrastinating sleep to-do lists work Fri, 27 Jan 2017 11:00:09 +0000 Emily Guy Birken 1881551 at http://www.wisebread.com 10 Things to Bring Up With Your Boss at Your Annual Review http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-to-bring-up-with-your-boss-at-your-annual-review <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/10-things-to-bring-up-with-your-boss-at-your-annual-review" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-516336973.jpg" alt="bring up these things at your annual review" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Every year, you will have that one meeting that can have a massive impact on your career, your finances, and your future. It's your annual review. While some people see it as a necessary evil, or approach it as &quot;going through the motions,&quot; it should be thought about carefully. What you say can make all the difference.</p> <h2>1. Talk About Your Achievements Over the Past Year</h2> <p>Your boss may already know all the great things you've done. However, they may also be too busy to know everything you've done, or your level of involvement in the projects you took part in. This is your time to shine, and to give your boss the ammunition needed to give you a raise or a promotion. Don't just talk about the things you were assigned to do. Mention the projects you did on your own, or the initiatives you spearheaded. If there were significant financial benefits to the company, or great PR came from something you did, bring all that to the conversation. You want to take this time to show just how invaluable you really are.</p> <h2>2. Focus on You, Not on Others</h2> <p>Unless you work for some kind of utopia, you'll be surrounded by a mixed bag of people. Most will be great, and you'll get along well with them. Some, however, will be a constant thorn in your side. They may take the credit for things you've done. They may be lazy, or incompetent. They may suck up to the boss, or leave early every day. It doesn't matter. This is your review, and it's about <em>you</em>. If you turn this into a whining session, you will not look good. If the person in question is as bad as you know them to be, it will all come out&hellip; probably during his or her review. And if it doesn't, well, find the time to talk it over with the boss later. But your review &mdash; that's all about you, not your worst enemy. Similarly, don't <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-your-boss-wishes-you-knew" target="_blank">tell the boss</a> what he or she did wrong over the last year, and never use this time to pour scorn on the company. You're looking for a raise or a promotion. That is unlikely to happen if you are biting the hand that feeds you.</p> <h2>3. Ask How You Can Be Even More Help to the Company</h2> <p>The phrasing on this one has to be correct. You don't want to sound like there's lots of room for improvement in your performance. But, showing a willingness to do more, work harder, and take on extra projects will always go down well. Do some preparation and see where you could fill some holes. Ask your boss if you can help bring other departments up to par with your own (assuming you're rocking it). Find out what the boss wants to improve upon, and be proactive. If there's one thing a company likes more than a model employee, it's a model employee who takes the initiative.</p> <h2>4. Be Careful What You Ask For</h2> <p>You may have worked late nights and weekends all year long. You may well have saved the company millions of dollars, or landed a cherry account. All of this will be covered over the course of your actual review. By pushing the issue of more money, and a raise in position, you're moving out of the go-getter category, and into the greedy one. You'll be viewed as entitled, or worse, only in it for the money and ladder-climbing. If the subject comes up naturally, you can of course take the boss's lead, and mention that you are ready for more responsibility. Promotions come with raises, so you don't need to talk about dollars yet. And in most companies, significant raises are not given without a promotion anyway.</p> <h2>5. Ask Questions and Be Conversational</h2> <p>Annual reviews can be tough on the boss. If he or she has a lot of people to see, it can be a daunting task. So doing a review with someone who won't speak until they are spoken to, and gives one word answers, is no fun at all. This is your chance to really get into the review, and make it more of a give and take than a one-way street. Ask questions about the direction the company is going, or what you can do to make the boss's life easier. Get chatty, without getting too nonchalant or blasé. This will leave a lasting impression on your boss.</p> <h2>6. Don't Let Your Requests Seem Like Threats</h2> <p>Saying you will quit unless things are changed in your favor &mdash; that's a threat. And it can go down in a few ways. If you are incredibly valuable to the company, and at the current time are irreplaceable, your demands may well be met. But, you will be viewed differently after the fact, and no boss or company likes to be held over a barrel. They will be making plans to replace you in the long term.</p> <p>However, most of the time, you just won't get your own way by making threats. And you have to be ready to get your bluff called; if it is a bluff, of course. If you say you will leave unless you get X, Y, and Z, and those demands are not met, you only have two options: leave, or look foolish. Are you ready for either of those outcomes?</p> <h2>7. Ask for Clear Goals for the Future</h2> <p>An annual review is there not just to look over the past year, but to set career goals for the year ahead. It's a way of saying, &quot;If you do all this, and more, you can expect good things at your next review.&quot; So don't let those goals be vague, or go unaddressed. As the meeting starts to wrap up, ask for specific goals for the next year that you can write down. After the meeting, email them to the boss, and if need be, HR. When your next review comes around, and you have done more than what was asked of you, you will have great ammunition for a raise and promotion.</p> <h2>8. Be Wary of Too Much Honesty</h2> <p>Remember that this is a review, and not a conversation with a friend. Don't say that you're &quot;bored&quot; or that you're &quot;doing the bare minimum.&quot; Being bored is on you. Doing only the bare minimum is also on you. You are an adult, and you can influence the kind of work you do. There is always the chance to take on more work, create new initiatives, or find ways to make your department grow. If you're bored, you're simply not trying. By indicating you have lost interest in your job, you are telling your boss to go out and find someone who would kill to be in your shoes. The boss wants an enthusiastic, driven employee. If you are beyond saving, why not give that role to someone who genuinely wants it? Instead, use this time to ask for more responsibility, or bring up new ideas. You'll look like a go-getter.</p> <h2>9. Accept Full Responsibility for the Things You Did Wrong</h2> <p>You're not a kid in middle school. You cannot say, &quot;I didn't do that&quot; or &quot;But that wasn't really my fault.&quot; As an adult employee, you have to own your mistakes, and show that you have learned from them. If you missed a deadline, admit it. But explain how you will do things differently to ensure it never happens again. If you cost the company money, or a sale, tell the boss why it happened, and what you have learned from it. As Thomas Edison famously said, &quot;I have not failed&hellip; I've just found 10,000 ways that won't work.&quot; You can turn any of these negatives from the past year into avenues for personal growth that will benefit you, the boss, and the company.</p> <h2>10. Maintain a Positive Attitude</h2> <p>You may have had one a heck of a bad year. The tension between you and the boss may be so thick that it fills the room. However, your attitude needs to be positive, and you should be genuinely interested in what you can do to make things right. Saying &quot;Wow, I have <em>so, so</em> been looking forward to this,&quot; sarcastically is not going to do you any favors. You will set the wrong tone for the rest of the review, and nothing good will come of it. Use this as a chance to clear the air in a way that makes you both feel like progress has been made.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-to-bring-up-with-your-boss-at-your-annual-review">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-ways-to-rekindle-passion-for-your-job">12 Ways to Rekindle Passion for Your Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-times-you-should-demand-a-raise">5 Times You Should Demand a Raise</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-stay-focused-at-work-despite-your-chatty-coworkers">How to Stay Focused at Work Despite Your Chatty Coworkers</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-times-you-should-never-feel-guilty-at-work">8 Times You Should Never Feel Guilty at Work</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building annual review career goals career tips job tips work work etiquette Thu, 12 Jan 2017 10:30:33 +0000 Paul Michael 1872419 at http://www.wisebread.com Jumpstart Your Job Search With Instagram http://www.wisebread.com/jumpstart-your-job-search-with-instagram <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/jumpstart-your-job-search-with-instagram" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-518955296.jpg" alt="use Instagram for your job search" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Instagram, like Facebook and Twitter, is huge. No doubt you already have an account, post often, and follow friends, family, celebrities, and brands. But Instagram is not simply a fun way to share photos and fill up your spare time. When used correctly, and judiciously, it can be an excellent tool that can be used in your job hunting.</p> <h2>Follow the Companies You Want to Work For</h2> <p>Almost every company has an Instagram page these days. They're a small expense on the marketing budget, and with the correct use of hashtags, combined with shareable content, they can be a very cost-effective way to spread awareness. You should use this to your advantage.</p> <p>Find the Instagram page of the company (or companies) you are applying to, and see what they're posting about. Instagram is a visual medium, so it will no doubt be a lot of creative, eye-catching content. Don't just look at the pictures though; read the post copy. And go back at least a year &mdash; even further if it's available. You want to absorb as much as you can. Take down notes. What are the major themes that keep cropping up? Which posts got the most likes? Which ones sparked conversation? You can use all of this in the interview, or use it to guide your application and cover letter. This is a great way to background check any company.</p> <h2>Vet Your Current Instagram Account Carefully</h2> <p>Chances are, you already have an Instagram account. If that's the case, hopefully it doesn't contain content that could be off-putting to potential employers. People live their lives in public these days, and often don't consider the consequences of posting whatever comes into their heads. Instagram doesn't allow content that is very NSFW, but these days that is a fine line. It will still allow images that are provocative in many ways, and whether personal, sexual, or political, if it's too edgy, it could lead to your downfall.</p> <p>Employers look for you on social sites, and they can make a snap decision based on your Instagram posts that is not reflective of who you actually are. With that in mind, look through your posts and consider deleting anything that you would not want someone bringing up in an interview. While it was fun to chug that yard of ale, it may not exactly reflect the professionalism some companies are looking for.</p> <h2>Create an Instagram Account Based on the Job You Want</h2> <p>You should seriously consider having an Instagram account that is directly tied to your career, and your future in the industry. If you're in advertising or marketing, set up an account that focuses on those areas of expertise. The same strategy can be used for any industry focus. You should already be actively interested in your profession anyway, so your personal Instagram account could already reflect some of that.</p> <p>However, friends and family may not want to follow you if that's all you're posting. So, create and maintain an account that is dedicated to posts that are going to be of interest to the next company looking to hire you. And once again, keep the content appropriate for the industry. Obviously if you want to work in children's television, your account is going to look a lot different from someone who wants to be a fashion photographer.</p> <h2>#Hashtags Are Invaluable</h2> <p>Some Instagram users will often have a laundry list of hashtags in their posts. You've no doubt seen things like &quot;#writing #creativewriting #poetry #wordsonfleek #englishlanguage #scholar&quot; and thought, <em>Wow, that's overkill.</em> Actually, it's not.</p> <p>Hashtags like these are signposts that bring people to your posts based on their interests. If you're really into vintage cars, searching #vintagecars on Instagram brings up over 350,000 entries. #KimKardashian delivers over 4.9 million posts! So how can this help you? Well, what kind of job are you looking for? If you want to be a DJ in a local club, start posting images and tagging them with the name of the club you'd like to work for, plus other relevant tags based on night life and music. If you want to be considered for a top job in an ad agency, tag the agency you'd really like to work for, and maybe the names of the accounts they work on, and the senior executives. Hashtags, when used correctly, can be a precise way to get the right people looking at your posts. And of course, you can also search for hashtags of employers and get the same advantages.</p> <h2>Make Professional Connections</h2> <p>There are over <a href="https://www.statista.com/statistics/272014/global-social-networks-ranked-by-number-of-users/" target="_blank">500 million monthly active users</a> on Instagram. That's around one in 15 people in the world. Consider that for a moment. One fifteenth of the world's population actively posts to Instagram every single month. And the chances of someone influential in your industry being on Instagram? It's a certainty. So, use Instagram to make connections. Follow the people in your industry who are making waves. Go local, and find people near you who can make a difference. Like their posts. Comment on them. Tag them in posts you think will interest them. You'll be amazed at how quickly a professional relationship can sprout from a few months of Instagram interaction.</p> <h2>Cross-Link to Other Social Media Sites</h2> <p>There are over <a href="https://www.statista.com/statistics/272014/global-social-networks-ranked-by-number-of-users/" target="_blank">1.7 billion monthly active users on Facebook</a>, and over 300 million on Twitter. Then, there are the other more niche social media platforms that still generate a lot of traffic, including Pinterest and Snapchat. Most professional Instagram users these days will use their account to drive people to their other sites, and that's smart. While you may follow someone on Instagram, you may not realize they are also active on Twitter and Snapchat. So, do the same. Cross-link, or cross-post, to other sites. Many companies have a much greater Facebook presence than Instagram, but the two are not mutually exclusive. By linking the accounts, the chances of making connections with influential people in your industry skyrocket. And, you have a greater chance of being found by your next employer if you spread yourself across many sites.</p> <p>Remember, Instagram, like many other social media sites, has many layers. On the surface, it can simply be a fun and easy way to share images, and find like-minded people. But dig deeper, and you have a tool available to you that can land you a job, or even <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-social-media-can-save-you-money?ref=internal" target="_blank">generate some income</a>.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/jumpstart-your-job-search-with-instagram">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-keep-your-job-search-a-secret">How to Keep Your Job Search a Secret</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-being-passive-kills-your-job-prospects">4 Ways Being Passive Kills Your Job Prospects</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-best-jobs-for-work-life-balance">4 Best Jobs for Work Life Balance</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-youre-sabotaging-your-job-hunt">7 Ways You&#039;re Sabotaging Your Job Hunt</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-to-bounce-back-from-job-rejection">4 Ways to Bounce Back From Job Rejection</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income Job Hunting career instagram job search social media unemployed work Thu, 29 Dec 2016 11:00:09 +0000 Paul Michael 1864338 at http://www.wisebread.com 8 Ways to Deal When You Work With Someone You Hate http://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-to-deal-when-you-work-with-someone-you-hate <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/8-ways-to-deal-when-you-work-with-someone-you-hate" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_93735987_MEDIUM.jpg" alt="how to deal when you hate your coworker" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>We can choose our friends, but we can very rarely choose our coworkers. We're just a bunch of people working for the same company, and we're told to get along. And to be fair, that's what happens most of the time. We make friends. We have relationships. Some people aren't exactly our first choice, but they're okay. However, occasionally, there is that one person that stands out from the crowd. Not only do we dislike them; we hate them with a passion. It can consume our every waking thought. If you are in this same boat, here are eight ways to help you cope.</p> <h2>1. Avoid Them Whenever Possible</h2> <p>Yes, you work with that person, but how often you interact with them could be controlled. Maybe you can do more of your communication through email, or even texts. If you know they'll be sitting in a certain spot at lunchtime, have your lunch somewhere else, or a little earlier or later in the day. If they're in a meeting with you, don't sit close enough to force conversation. If you're working on a project together, limit the time spent in the same room. Do whatever you can to keep your interactions to an absolute minimum. And it goes without saying, activities outside of work should be avoided at all costs. At least at work, you know there will be a certain level of company-mandated civility.</p> <h2>2. Have a Serious One-On-One</h2> <p>Sometimes the hate between two people can be traced back to one or two incidents that have been blown out of proportion. On other occasions, it may be a misunderstanding that has grown into resentment, which has created undue hostility. For all you know, they could be holding a grudge against you that has turned their attitude very sour. And the same may be said about you. This could all be in both of your heads, so find the time to sit down at lunch, or a coffee break, and address the elephant in the room. &quot;Look, we really seem to have some hostility between us&hellip;can we talk about it? Would you like to say something? Is there anything I can do or say to address this?&quot; Of course, if you really hate someone, but they are blissfully unaware of it, this approach will not work.</p> <h2>3. Remember That It's Okay to Really Dislike Someone</h2> <p>A lot of us have this feeling that everyone should like us, and everyone should, in turn, be likable. But that's just not human nature. Some people will always rub us the wrong way. Some people are polar opposites of us, and although they have many friends, we are never going to be one of them. As long as you don't act out on that hatred, you can simply reassure yourself that this person is always going to be someone in your life that makes your skin crawl, but that when you leave work, you don't see them. And that's totally fine.</p> <h2>4. Keep the Hate to Yourself</h2> <p>When you start spewing your feelings of hate and disgust to other coworkers, you are on a slippery slope to getting fired. At the very least, people will certainly think less of you, and may even think you speak just as badly about them behind their backs. It's bad enough that you have to go through every workday feeling tense and annoyed; you do not want to add office gossip about you into the equation. If you really have to blow off some steam about your coworker, do it out of the office, preferably with a close friend or family member who can help you calm down.</p> <h2>5. Find Something Else to Concentrate On</h2> <p>There is an old proverb that goes something like this: &quot;Holding onto anger is like drinking poison and expecting the other person to die.&quot; If you hate someone (and hate is a strong emotion) then you are angry, pent up, frustrated, and on edge. That's not good for you, your career, or your health. So, take the focus off the <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-stay-focused-at-work-despite-your-chatty-coworkers">coworker who is making you miserable</a>, and instead find something to occupy your mind. Maybe it's a big project at work. Perhaps it's a hobby that can keep your mind ticking over. Some people find it cathartic to turn that hate into something that can be positive, like volunteering to fight animal abuse, homelessness, or a disease. Whatever you do, don't let hate consume you. It can be channeled for good.</p> <h2>6. Maybe It's Not Them. Maybe&hellip;It's You.</h2> <p>A little bit of introspection never hurt anyone. Famous advertising CEO Bill Bernbach kept a small piece of paper in his pocket, and carried it for his entire career. It said, &quot;Maybe they're right.&quot; In the advertising world, this was a way to bring him down to earth and consider the opinions of the client, his coworkers, and anyone else who may offer a dissenting opinion. When it comes to someone you hate, take the same approach.</p> <p>Maybe you took an instant dislike to them for the wrong reasons. Perhaps they remind you of someone else you really dislike. Or worse, their worst traits remind you of your own. Take a long, hard look at why you hate this person, and reflect upon it. The results may surprise you.</p> <h2>7. Get to Know Them a Little Better</h2> <p>It may seem counterintuitive to spend more time with someone you passionately dislike, but it can actually be very helpful. It's very possible that your opinion of the person is based on half-truths, brief encounters, and misunderstandings from emails and phone calls. In fact, emails are notorious for causing upsets, as tone and body language cannot be read in the text. Therefore, by spending more time with that person, you may get to know &quot;the real them.&quot; You may even find that you get to like them, rather than just understand them. Or maybe even make a new friend. It sounds crazy to think hate can turn into friendship, but it happens all the time.</p> <h2>8. Put Them Out of Your Mind</h2> <p>Your hate is giving this person more time in your life than they should ever have. You're concentrating on them way too often. So they suck at their job. They have a bad attitude. They microwave the smelliest fish dishes on a daily basis. In the grand scheme of things&hellip;so what? Unless this person is doing something to you that is significantly worrying or dangerous (in which case, HR can get involved quickly) you are simply putting too much focus on annoying behavior. Even if they stole a promotion out from under you, or take credit for some of your work, your hatred is not going to change how they act in the future. Just realize you're the better person.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-to-deal-when-you-work-with-someone-you-hate">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/3-reasons-you-are-more-than-your-job">3 Reasons You Are More Than Your Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-frugal-ways-to-reduce-workplace-stress">10 Frugal Ways to Reduce Workplace Stress</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-write-a-resume-12-steps-to-your-next-job">How To Write A Resume: 12 Steps To Your Next Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/jumpstart-your-job-search-with-instagram">Jumpstart Your Job Search With Instagram</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-pearls-of-career-wisdom-from-brian-tracy">6 Pearls of Career Wisdom From Brian Tracy</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income Life Hacks annoying coworker career career advice coworker job hacks job stress work Thu, 17 Nov 2016 11:30:11 +0000 Paul Michael 1834561 at http://www.wisebread.com 12 Frugal Skills You Must Have to Survive Mondays http://www.wisebread.com/12-frugal-skills-you-must-have-to-survive-mondays <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/12-frugal-skills-you-must-have-to-survive-mondays" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_tired_work_90063805.jpg" alt="Woman learning frugal skills to survive the holidays" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Mondays are difficult for everyone. The beginning of a new workweek means you can't sleep in, you have to manage office politics again, and you need to deal with the stress of your day-to-day grind once again. However, we've come up with some frugal skills that can help you better survive Monday, that doesn't cost much or anything at all.</p> <h2>1. Become an Early Bird</h2> <p>It may seem crazy to wake up early on a Monday, but this can be the best way to get your day and week started on the right path. You'll feel more productive first thing in the morning, which can carry over into your workday. You can get your day started off right by taking some time to have coffee and catch up on the news, or have a relaxing stretch to wake up your body and mind. Get to bed early on Sunday night so that it's easier to <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-morning-mantras-that-ll-help-keep-your-finances-on-track">wake up early</a> on Monday and to ensure you don't go to work feeling drowsy.</p> <h2>2. Don't Skip Breakfast (or Coffee)</h2> <p>Breakfast is an important part of every day, but that's especially true on Mondays. Going to work hungry will only make the workday more difficult. Having a balanced breakfast can help boost your metabolism, energy, and productivity.</p> <p>Coffee is another essential part of any Monday morning. It can make you more alert and productive, provide the much-needed energy you crave, and is just a fun way to enjoy the morning. On Mondays, consider dolling up your coffee a bit, with seasonal creamers, <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-best-milk-frothers">frothy milk</a>, or a dollop of whipped cream.</p> <h2>3. Have a Plan, But Take It Easy</h2> <p>Fill in your calendar and to-do list over the weekend, so you can begin Monday with an organized mind. However, you don't want to add too much to your plate. Monday is already stressful enough, so take it easy on yourself and spread your tasks out throughout the week. If you feel stressed, move anything that you can from your Monday to-do list to your Tuesday to-do list. Make sure to also schedule any Monday meetings for after lunch, so you have some time to break into Monday.</p> <h2>4. Focus on the Positives</h2> <p>Over the weekend, focus on what's good about your job. This can put you in a positive frame of mind and will make you more grateful to return to work on Monday.</p> <h2>5. Embrace the Calming Power of Music</h2> <p>Listen to upbeat music that puts you in a good mood on your commute to work and/or while you get ready in the morning. It can boost your energy and put you in a positive frame of mind.</p> <h2>6. Wear What Makes You Happy</h2> <p>Consider wearing your favorite outfit or taking a few extra minutes on your morning skin care or hair routine so you feel more confident throughout the day. If you have a new outfit or accessory, wear it on Monday. If you don't have a new outfit to show off, consider breaking out your new pen or upgrading your office supplies on Monday.</p> <h2>7. Make Monday Your Splurge Day</h2> <p>If you've been good and eat at home for most meals, then you deserve a splurge day. Make Mondays your splurge days so you have something to look forward to. Whether that means going to favorite coffee shop for a latte and pastry or going out with friends for a once-a-week lunch outing, it can make your Monday more bearable (and maybe even fun).</p> <p>If you're trying to stay healthy and watch what you eat, then Mondays can be your splurge days, where you can have an indulgent dessert or treat yourself to fast food. Knowing that your splurge day is approaching on Monday can also help keep you on track over the weekend, and limit your overall restaurant spending if you keep it to one day per week.</p> <h2>8. Plan Fun Activities</h2> <p>One of the best things to do when tackling stressful situations like interviews, auditions, speeches, and stressful Monday mornings, is to plan something fun for that evening. It gives you incentive to get through the day and will keep you in a positive frame of mind. Knowing that you have something fun coming up can even make the day go by more quickly. Whether you plan a date night, meet with coworkers for happy hour, or simply plan a quiet and frugal home spa night (complete with a bath, facial mask, and calming music), make plans that you can look forward to throughout the day. If you consistently do this every week, you will actually look forward to Mondays before you know it.</p> <h2>9. Avoid Office Politics</h2> <p>Poisonous coworkers can make a stressful Monday morning even worse. Try avoiding office politics and any coworkers that might make your day more difficult. Politely let any coworkers know that you're very busy if they come around your workspace.</p> <p>If your boss tends to make Mondays even more stressful, stay calm and try not to let any negativity affect your attitude or productivity. Get your work done to the best of your abilities so that your boss has less incentive to visit your desk. You may even consider getting into the office five minutes earlier, so that you can get your coffee and settle in before the boss even gets there.</p> <h2>10. Take Your Breaks</h2> <p>Taking your daily breaks is especially important on a Monday, which can already be more stressful than the average workday. If you're having a particularly difficult Monday, consider getting some fresh air, or taking deep breaths during your daily break. You might even want to schedule a walk with a coworker during your lunch break to boost your mood and energy.</p> <h2>11. Don't Slack On Friday</h2> <p>If you leave most of your work for Monday morning, make a bigger effort to get more done on Friday. That way, you won't have as much to deal with when you return to the office on Monday. This can also make your weekend more relaxing because you won't have so much work hanging over your head.</p> <h2>12. Take Advantage of the Weekend</h2> <p>The weekend is usually reserved for having fun and getting things done, but it's also important to focus on relaxing and refreshing yourself for the upcoming week. Unplug for the weekend. Don't check your email or voicemail unless you need to, especially if you won't respond until Monday anyway.</p> <p>By getting enough sleep, exercising, and setting some time aside for yourself, you can enter the workweek more rested and ready to tackle the work at hand. Take a bath, take a nap, ask your spouse for a massage, and get in a good amount of exercise over the weekend; your body will thank you for it on Monday.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/andrea-cannon">Andrea Cannon</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-frugal-skills-you-must-have-to-survive-mondays">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/flashback-friday-45-life-lessons-youd-give-to-your-younger-self">Flashback Friday: 45 Life Lessons You&#039;d Give to Your Younger Self</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-smart-new-uses-for-hair-clips">15 Smart New Uses for Hair Clips</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-smart-and-frugal-uses-for-epsom-salt">10 Smart and Frugal Uses for Epsom Salt</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/flashback-friday-51-ways-to-organize-your-whole-life-in-2017">Flashback Friday: 51 Ways to Organize Your Whole Life in 2017</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-to-lower-water-heater-costs">7 Ways To Lower Water Heater Costs</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Frugal Living Life Hacks case of the Mondays coffee energy frugal living I hate Mondays life hacks Mondays sleep work Mon, 14 Nov 2016 10:30:27 +0000 Andrea Cannon 1830895 at http://www.wisebread.com Your Stressful Job May Be… Making You Healthier? http://www.wisebread.com/your-stressful-job-may-be-making-you-healthier <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/your-stressful-job-may-be-making-you-healthier" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_stressed_work_85247123.jpg" alt="Woman learning her stressful job might be making her healthier" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Yes, stress has a negative effect on our health. It can raise our blood pressure, increase the risk of heart disease, and contribute to obesity and other illnesses. And that may seem like reason enough to quit your high-pressure job, but before you throw in the towel and dust off your resume, there's something you should know about job-related stress.</p> <p>As much as you'd like to banish all that frustration from your life, consider that your constant 9-to-5 headache may be making you healthier. Yep, you read that correctly. Recent research found that a moderate amount of everyday stress has a surprising positive effect on the brain and body. Now, this doesn't mean you should run out and get the most stressful job you can find, or stay in occupations that push you over the edge. There's good stress and there's bad stress, and it's important to understand how each affects the human body. Chronic stress, which lasts for weeks or months, is bad stress, and can trigger long-term problems. But considering that our bodies are wired to react to stress, the everyday pressures you deal with at work aren't necessarily a bad thing. Here's why. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-to-turn-your-stress-into-money?ref=seealso">8 Ways to Turn Your Stress Into Money</a>)</p> <h2>1. It Improves Brainpower</h2> <p>Whether you're facing tight deadlines or preparing for an upcoming meeting with a difficult client, these types of situations can increase your stress level and send you into panic mode. Every job has its fair share of pressure, and at times it can feel as if you have too much on your plate. These aren't the most favorable circumstances, but the upside is that manageable amounts of stress can improve your brainpower. This not only helps you perform better on the job, it also boosts cognitive function over time.</p> <p>The reason is that moderate stress encourages the production of neurotrophins, a type a brain chemical that supports the growth and survival of nerve cells. So while chronic stress slowly damages brain structure, research shows that short-term stress has the opposite effect and stimulates the growth of new brain cells. A study discovered that<a href="http://greatergood.berkeley.edu/article/item/the_surprising_benefits_of_stress">exposure to short-lived stress</a> triggered the development of new nerve cells in the brains of laboratory rats. After two weeks, the lab rats had improved mental performance. Researchers concluded that controlled, manageable stress on the job prompts a similar reaction in humans, improving our memory, concentration, and alertness.</p> <h2>2. It Boosts Your Immune System</h2> <p>Some people who battle ongoing stress notice a difference in their health because too much stress can suppress the immune system. This makes us more susceptible to illness and infections. But with regard to short-term stressors &mdash; such as those you might experience at work &mdash; these types of demands have the potential to reinforce or strengthen protective chemicals in your body, which can give your immune system a pick-me-up.</p> <p>High-tense situations set in motion a fight-or-flight response, which is a physiological reaction to a perceived threat. This is an inborn response that prepares your body to fight or flee impending danger. Your heart rate increases, your body releases adrenaline and extra sugar for energy, and you react more instinctively. According to a study by the Stanford University School of Medicine, the <a href="https://med.stanford.edu/news/all-news/2012/06/study-explains-how-stress-can-boost-immune-system.html">fight-or-flight response activated by short-term stress</a> not only jump-starts a spontaneous reaction from your body's resources, it also promotes stronger immune function, which makes it easier for your body to ward off and fight infections.</p> <h2>3. It Lowers Your Risk of Prolonged Stress</h2> <p>Short-term stress also increases resiliency and teaches you how to confront and tackle everyday pressures and demands. The first time you come up against a particular situation, you might crumble or think you don't have strength to handle the hurdle. But the more you face the problem and overcome the stressor, the easier it is to cope in the future.</p> <p>If you toughen up and develop positive strategies to manage your time and emotions, you're less likely to suffer from chronic stress. As a result, you decrease the risk of health problems triggered by prolonged stress, such as heart disease, cancer, and infections.</p> <h2>4. It Might Help You Live Longer</h2> <p>Do you want to live longer? Your stressful job might be the secret weapon. A study conducted by the Indiana University found that &quot;employees in stressful positions were a third <a href="http://time.com/money/4536431/stressful-job-health/">less likely to die than those with less strenuous jobs</a>.&quot; These findings might have you scratching your head, especially since we already know the negative consequences of stress, but the study also revealed that those in stressful positions who lived longer were also in control of their workflow.</p> <p>The study, which took place between 2004 and 2011 and included thousands of workers, concluded that participants who enjoyed greater flexibility in their stressful jobs were 34% less likely to have died than participants in high-pressure jobs who enjoyed little freedom. One theory is that participants with less control in their high pressure jobs were more likely to adopt unhealthy habits as a way to cope with their circumstances. These habits included overeating (which leads to obesity, high blood pressure, diabetes, and heart problems), and smoking, which increased the risk of cancer and other health problems.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/mikey-rox">Mikey Rox</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/your-stressful-job-may-be-making-you-healthier">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/3-reasons-you-are-more-than-your-job">3 Reasons You Are More Than Your Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-important-reasons-to-always-call-in-sick-when-youre-sick">8 Important Reasons to Always Call In Sick When You&#039;re Sick</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-to-keep-anxiety-from-ruining-your-budget">5 Ways to Keep Anxiety From Ruining Your Budget</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-frugal-ways-to-reduce-workplace-stress">10 Frugal Ways to Reduce Workplace Stress</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/flashback-friday-84-frugal-ways-to-eliminate-stress">Flashback Friday: 84 Frugal Ways to Eliminate Stress</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income Health and Beauty anxiety depression frustration Health stress stressful job work work life balance Thu, 10 Nov 2016 10:00:07 +0000 Mikey Rox 1830273 at http://www.wisebread.com 12 Ways to Rekindle Passion for Your Job http://www.wisebread.com/12-ways-to-rekindle-passion-for-your-job <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/12-ways-to-rekindle-passion-for-your-job" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_73237551_MEDIUM.jpg" alt="rekindle passion for your job" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Not loving your job, or even hating it, seems to be a part of life these days. Drew Carey once said, &quot;Oh, you hate your job? Why didn't you say so? There's a support group for that. It's called everybody, and they meet at the bar.&quot;</p> <p>Some people are lucky, and always love their jobs, but most of us love it for a while, before forgetting its highlights and focusing on its flaws. However, your current job doesn't have to be a drag. All it takes is a paradigm shift.</p> <h2>1. Write Down the Good Parts of Your Day</h2> <p>There is good and bad in everyone, and in every day. Even on the days that result in you getting home with a scowl on your face, drinking a double scotch, and pulling out your hair for two hours, something good must have happened. True, it may be hard to find, but try and dig.</p> <p>Make a log, on your computer or in a journal. Perhaps a coworker gave you a compliment. Maybe you had a really tasty bagel on the way to work. Or, was the sun shining as you walked from the car or train to your office? When it's something much bigger, like working in a project you really enjoyed, log that in detail. As you look back over your weeks, and months, you'll see a record of enjoyment. That can help make the negative feelings go away.</p> <h2>2. Hang Out With People That Make You Happy</h2> <p>People at work can be a great source of happiness. In fact, all those times that you laughed at work, or felt happiness, most likely came from your interactions with other people. So, find ways to interact more with the people that make you feel good about yourself. And conversely, avoid the people who drag you down. That guy who never has anything good to say about the job, or anyone else, is not going to make you feel great. But the one who lifts your spirits can bring you into a different attitude quickly. Stick with the positive ones.</p> <h2>3. Compare Your Job to One That Sucks</h2> <p>We measure our misery or success by those around us. While you may think you have a job that stinks, do a little digging, and find out what jobs really do suck. You may hate what you do now, but would you rather be doing something demeaning for minimum wage? (And if the answer is yes to that one, maybe you really do <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-careers-you-dont-need-a-ton-of-experience-to-start">need to move on</a>.) Some people in other countries are risking death for barely enough money to feed and clothe themselves. How does your job stack up? If you're still complaining about monotonous data entry, or not having the complete respect of your peers, it may be time to rethink your outlook.</p> <h2>4. Remember What Your Job Allows You to Do</h2> <p>So most of the time, the job is awful. However, what does it allow you to do that isn't awful? Maybe it's the two-week vacation you took to a tropical island. Perhaps it helped pay for the Harley Davidson parked in your driveway, or season tickets to see your favorite sports team. Yes, while your job may not make you happy, it provides the income and security to bring wonderful things into your life.</p> <h2>5. Find the Positive in the Little Things</h2> <p>Looking at the big picture isn't always the best strategy. You have to find joy in some of the smaller aspects of your day-to-day routine. Maybe it's the fact that you get to sit down, put your feet up, and drink coffee a few times a day. Hey, you get paid for it. That's nice. Maybe it's even smaller than that. Your chair felt really comfy, or you got a great parking spot. You don't have to concentrate on the whole day, or the big issues. Find something small, each day, to be thankful for.</p> <h2>6. Take Moments Just for Yourself</h2> <p>Even at work, you can have some &quot;me time.&quot; Employers are required to give you adequate work breaks. Take that time to switch off, completely. That means go outside, walk around, read a book, close your eyes and listen to music, or meditate. It may not always be possible to do that, depending on what you do and where you work, but there should always be an opportunity to find a moment of peace in the daily grind.</p> <h2>7. Ignore What You Cannot Change</h2> <p>You'll often hear people worrying about things that are, to be blunt, completely out of their control. The easiest way to deal with these problems is to shut them out. If layoffs are coming, you will not have any control over that situation, so ignore it. By all means, prepare for the worst, but get on with your day. If the company has a system in place that you blatantly disagree with, but cannot change, then forget about it. If you cannot change something, you are giving it way too much energy by obsessing about it. You'll feel much happier if you accept what is beyond your control.</p> <h2>8. Fix What You Can Change</h2> <p>There may be things in your company that you cannot control, but there are also things you can definitely impact. If you hate the way your office space is set up, see what you can do to change it. Are your hours flexible? Can you get the awful coffee replaced with a better brand? Can you talk about dress code, or suggest new methods of doing things that will save people time? You are never going to change the way the CEO does business, but you may be able to change his mind on having plants in the building, or endorsing &quot;bring your kids to work day.&quot;</p> <h2>9. Get Really, Really Organized</h2> <p>A lot of the stress we encounter in our daily routine comes from a lack of organization and preparation. Too often, we can leave ourselves too little time to get a certain task done. We may rush to work, have a messy office, or miss appointments. Get around this by organizing, and using the latest apps for your smartphone. You can set reminders that take the worry out of a daily schedule. You can log the names and important information about all of your clients and colleagues. Everything can be setup to work smoothly, and with more organization comes less stress, and a better outlook on the job.</p> <h2>10. Take Significant Time Off If You Can</h2> <p>If you really are just completely burned out, get away from it all. Some people, especially in America, are afraid to take time off. They say it looks bad, or they might not be seen as indispensable. There is simply no excuse not to take time off, especially if it drastically changes your attitude. If you have a few weeks of vacation saved up, take them. Even if it's just to stay at home, you need to escape. If you have sick time, use it to heal your mind. And if things have become really bad, <a href="https://www.dol.gov/whd/fmla/">look into FMLA.</a> You can take up to 12 weeks off, every year, and your job will be protected. You will be covered if it's a serious health condition, and <a href="http://thelawdictionary.org/article/what-are-employees-right-to-stress-leave/">depression or stress can be debilitating.</a></p> <h2>11. Find Ways to Take on New Responsibilities</h2> <p>If the daily grind is wearing you down, find something new to do at work. Some factories do this as a way to prevent burnout, rotating people to different stations after a few hours to avoid a lack of concentration, and to keep accidents from happening. If you're always working on the same old stuff, see what you can do to shake things up. Can you swap roles with someone? Can you take on a new task? Can you create a new initiative? You would be surprised how much a change is as good as a rest.</p> <h2>12. Quit Being a Complainer</h2> <p>At the end of the day, your own attitude about your job can drag you down. Henry Ford, among others, said, &quot;Whether you think you can, or you think you can't &mdash; you're right.&quot; Attitude can be the difference between seeing an opportunity for success, or something destined to fail. Complaining also brings others down around you. And that, in turn, can feed into morale issues and bad company culture. So, cheer up. Look at the list above, and find ways to change your outlook. You can bring a spark back to your career that could ignite something huge.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-ways-to-rekindle-passion-for-your-job">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. 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