hoarding http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/3112/all en-US 10 Things in Your Basement You Should Throw Out Today http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-in-your-basement-you-should-throw-out-today <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/10-things-in-your-basement-you-should-throw-out-today" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_000050424184_Large.jpg" alt="socked feet christmas decorations" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>I hate to admit it, but I'm a basement hoarder.</p> <p>My subterranean lair is the slightly moldy home to any and every item that I cannot decide what to do with. If it weren't for the fact that our washer and dryer reside in the basement, there probably wouldn't even be room to walk down there. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-things-in-your-kitchen-you-should-throw-out-today">15 Things in Your Kitchen You Should Throw Out Today</a>)</p> <p>But for every item that actually should be stored in my basement, there are at least two others that are just taking up space. It's high time to clean house&hellip; literally! So if you're like me, here are 10 common basement items that you no longer need to hold onto (and the best way of getting rid of them).</p> <h2>1. Computer, Electronic, and Appliance Boxes</h2> <p>It's one of those completely irrational urges: to carefully preserve all of the packaging for any new electronic equipment you purchase. This might have made sense when you bought a desktop computer back in college and expected to move every nine months, but now it's just silly. Break down and recycle all those boxes. You can always get another box if you have to move. Recycling what you have will immediately clear up space in your basement and give you a sense of decluttering accomplishment.</p> <h2>2. Old Electronics</h2> <p>Speaking of technology of yore, how many of you have a VCR or a monitor the size of a sofa hanging out in your basement somewhere? (I actually still have a TV/VCR combo from my college days.) Often, we hang onto these items because we have no idea how to get rid of them. Enter <a href="http://www.earth911.com/">Earth911.com</a>. This website allows you to search for local recycling centers for everything from batteries to electronics.</p> <h2>3. Cables, Wires, and Chargers</h2> <p>Every device you buy comes with a new cable, wire, or charger. Take the time to go through your collection, match up the ones you actually need with the devices you use, and donate the rest to Goodwill or recycle them at <a href="http://www.bestbuy.com/site/global-promotions/recycling-electronics/pcmcat149900050025.c?id=pcmcat149900050025">Best Buy</a>.</p> <h2>4. Owner's Manuals</h2> <p>One of the perks of living in the age of the Internet is the fact that you can recycle all of those manuals you have been carefully saving. You can Google the problem you need to troubleshoot faster than you could find the necessary owner's manual in the pile, anyway.</p> <h2>5. Hazardous Materials</h2> <p>Basements tend to collect everything from half-empty cans of paint, to expired motor oil, to jugs of antifreeze, to expired batteries. Just like your old electronics, you may have held onto these because you don't know how to safely get rid of them. Earth911.com can help you determine where to take these items without harming yourself or the environment.</p> <h2>6. Unused Small Appliances</h2> <p>I'd wager you have a bread machine kicking around somewhere in your basement. Or maybe your mother-in-law gave everyone a crockpot one year for Christmas and yours has never seen the light of day. Nearly every basement has some sort of kitchen appliance that's been used once or twice and then stored. Drop off those George Foreman grills and Williams-Sonoma panini presses at your local Goodwill or Salvation Army. You'll never miss them.</p> <h2>7. Exercise Equipment</h2> <p>When is the last time you used that home elliptical machine for anything other than drying sweaters? Or the skis you bought before you broke your leg in Aspen? If you have pieces of exercise equipment gathering dust in your basement, it's time to clear them out. No, you won't use them and you won't get your money's worth out of them. Believing that you will is just the&nbsp;<a href="http://moneyning.com/money-beliefs/how-loss-aversion-in-behavioral-economics-explains-your-irrational-money-choices/">loss aversion</a>&nbsp;talking, and you'll feel much better to let go of those false beliefs (and the accompanying guilt).</p> <p>When it comes to sports equipment, the options run the gamut from donating them to your local Goodwill or Salvation Army to selling them on Craigslist. It's also a great idea to check with your local YMCA, Boys &amp; Girls Clubs of America, or Special Olympics chapter to see if you can do even more good with your unused equipment. (Not to mention the tax write-off.)</p> <h2>8. Broken or Unused Christmas Decorations</h2> <p>It seems like most basements in America have at least one strand of non-working Christmas lights stored somewhere. You can send your lights to <a href="http://www.holidayleds.com">HolidayLeds</a> for recycling year-round, and receive a coupon good for 15% off LED Christmas lights on the site.</p> <p>If you have an artificial tree even Charlie Brown wouldn't put presents under, check your local drop-off recycling center (or Earth911.com) to find out if you can recycle it.</p> <p>For Christmas ornaments and bulbs that have seen better days, donate them or trash them. Don't assume that you'll make that lovely Pinterest mosaic from the broken pieces.</p> <h2>9. Baby Items</h2> <p>If you're not sure you are done having children, it can be tough to get rid of old baby items. But some baby gear expires (like car seats, for instance), and baby clothes, jumpers, strollers, and the like are generally going to be the worse for wear after spending years in your basement. Donate the usable items.</p> <p>As for those car seats, there are specific guidelines for disposing of them.</p> <p>Car seats generally expire within six years of purchase because the foam padding degrades over time. If your car seat is newer than six years old and has never been in an accident, you may be able to give it to another family, although you will likely have to pass it along to someone you know personally. Most parents are (understandably) leery of accepting a used car seat from a stranger.</p> <p>If you cannot donate your seat, you may be able to recycle it. There are <a href="http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/news/2013/10/what-to-do-with-a-used-car-seat/index.htm">recycling centers in 11 states</a> that will accept used and expired car seats for recycling. Otherwise, you can dismantle the seat, remove the straps, and recycle the plastic and metal portions of the seat while trashing the rest. As a last resort, you can dispose of the seat in the trash, provided you have removed or cut the straps so the seat cannot be used again.</p> <h2>10. Games With Missing Pieces</h2> <p>Just because you <em>could</em> play Monopoly with a handwritten B&amp;O Railroad card doesn't mean you want to. It's time to just get rid of any games with missing pieces. It's likely that you will have to just trash/recycle these misfit toys, but it's always a good idea to post such games on <a href="https://www.freecycle.org/">Freecycle</a> to see if a local artist-type could use some random game pieces.</p> <p><em>What items are you still keeping in your basement that you have not gotten around to throwing out? What items do you plan to keep forever in your basement, no matter how much it will confuse future archeologists (and your current significant other)?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/emily-guy-birken">Emily Guy Birken</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-in-your-basement-you-should-throw-out-today">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-smart-ways-to-keep-your-entire-life-clutter-free">10 Smart Ways to Keep Your Entire Life Clutter-Free</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-clear-out-financial-clutter">How to Clear Out Financial Clutter</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-things-you-wont-ever-use-again-and-should-throw-out-today">12 Things You Won&#039;t Ever Use Again and Should Throw Out Today</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-only-5-words-you-need-to-declutter-your-life">The Only 5 Words You Need to Declutter Your Life</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-questions-to-ask-yourself-to-help-you-declutter">8 Questions to Ask Yourself to Help You Declutter</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Organization basement clutter declutter hoarding Mon, 23 Feb 2015 12:00:08 +0000 Emily Guy Birken 1302027 at http://www.wisebread.com How My Hoarder Family Saved Christmas http://www.wisebread.com/how-my-hoarder-family-saved-christmas <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-my-hoarder-family-saved-christmas" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/5241952209_fae44c7811_z.jpg" alt="Christmas tree" title="Christmas tree" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="167" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Hoarding runs in my family. The only reason why most of our homes don&rsquo;t reflect the OCD chaos of our brains is because we manage our belongings with the ferocity that most people reserve for calorie counting and fantasy football leagues. While none of my relatives live in squalor, as my cousin Carolyn puts it, &quot;In our family, we file things horizontally.&quot; We are all wannabe minimalists with messy desktops. Although we joke about becoming crazy dog ladies or building a maze made of old National Geographic magazines in the living room, we all worry that one day we will fall victim to our belongings. So, after looking with mortification at the packed garbage cans stuffed with the aftermath of Christmas 2001, my extended family took a radical step in the direction of less stuff &mdash; we agreed to stop giving Christmas gifts to each other. Even to the kids. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/simple-living-lessons-i-learned-from-hoarders">Simple-Living Lessons I Learned From&nbsp;&quot;Hoarders&quot;</a>)</p> <p>This decision had several unintended consequences, all of them good.</p> <h2>We Regained Other Celebrations</h2> <p>Last year, 38.9% of Americans <a href="http://www.nrf.com/modules.php?name=News&amp;op=viewlive&amp;sp_id=1225">started shopping for Christmas in </a><em><a href="http://www.nrf.com/modules.php?name=News&amp;op=viewlive&amp;sp_id=1225">October</a>,</em> a statistic that is entirely believable to anyone who has noticed Christmas decorations jostling for shelf space with Halloween costumes at stores across the country. In addition to freeing up more time and money for Halloween and Thanksgiving, family birthdays in December and January suddenly got the attention they deserved. My grandmother, who was born on December 28, told me that she never got a real birthday. Sandwiched between Christmas and New Year&rsquo;s Eve, her birthday had always been an important holiday <em>travel</em> day for friends and family.</p> <p>My youngest cousin&rsquo;s birthday is in the first week of January, so she was pleased that her birthday became a special day instead of just an afterthought to the December holidays. While Christmas presents were verboten, birthday presents were not. She quickly decided that the additional two weeks she had to wait to get &ldquo;The Toy of the Year&rdquo; were worth the extra attention.</p> <p>On a side note, people who hear about our no-Christmas-gift policy seem to worry that the kids in my family are somehow suffering from Scrooge levels of deprivation&hellip;which was something actually worried about for the first year. However, there are several gigantic loopholes in the no-gift rule. First, while the kids don&rsquo;t receive gifts from the family, they do get Christmas gifts from their friends. Secondly, everyone still gets a stocking full of candy on Christmas morning. Most importantly, during their winter break from school, the kids are allowed to ignore bedtime, sleep in as late as they want, eat dessert for breakfast lunch and dinner, and watch television with impunity. We had anticipated that there would be a lot of griping from the under-14 camp, but to their credit, I can&rsquo;t remember one instance where any of my younger cousins complained about their lack of Christmas gifts. Perhaps they&rsquo;ve been secretly pouting all these years, but I suspect that they prefer the additional freedom in lieu of opening a few more presents on Christmas morning.</p> <h2>It Allowed Us to Be Smarter Shoppers</h2> <p>Removed from the mass hysteria that is now part of Christmas shopping, we were able to shop after-Christmas sales without a deadline, but with all the post-holiday consumer reports. Because the kids got to play-test the &ldquo;must-have toys&rdquo; at their friends&rsquo; homes in the weeks after Christmas, their birthday present lists got shorter, not longer. Some things, they realized, just didn&rsquo;t hold up to the hype.</p> <h2>We Saved a Ton of Money</h2> <p>Last year, the average American shopper <a href="http://outright.com/blog/infographic-the-commerce-of-christmas/">spent over $700 just on Christmas gifts</a>. While my family is pretty frugal, our combined savings still amount to several thousand dollars every year. Not spending money on gifts that go under the tree allowed us to spend money on family experiences like tickets to the zoo to see the Christmas lights. Two years ago, our huge extended family went to Las Vegas for a reunion at Christmas, a trip that a lot of us would not have been able to afford had we spent the money on traditional gifts.</p> <p>Also, after Christmas, the price of just about everything drops dramatically. An expensive Christmas gift suddenly becomes an affordable birthday or graduation gift on December 26. When I got married this year, I know all the wedding gift cards from my relatives were purchased at a steep discount in January from gift card exchange sites like <a href="http://plasticjungle.com">Plastic Jungle</a>.</p> <h2>We Retained Our Sanity</h2> <p>Christmas shopping is stressful. A Consumer Reports survey from last year uncovered that 6% of Americans were <a href="http://www.creditdonkey.com/christmas-ghost.html ">still carrying Christmas debt from 2010</a> on their credit cards when they started shopping for Christmas 2011. British financial analysts estimate that one in three Britons will go into debt to pay for Christmas this year. Every January, credit counselors report a 25% spike in business as consumers come to grips with their <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-avoid-holiday-debt-starting-now">holiday overspending</a>. I don&rsquo;t know one responsible person with debt who isn&rsquo;t haunted by it. We discovered how easy Christmas is to enjoy when there are no bad financial repercussions lurking around the corner.</p> <p>Additionally, while giving and receiving gifts should be pleasurable, a lot of giving has become a kind of social currency, with the givers hoping that the cost of their gifts are accurately appraised, for their full value, by the receivers. A lot of the pleasure of giving a gift is imagining the pleasure that it will bring the recipient. People are often so stressed out by end of the year deadlines that choosing gifts becomes more about efficiency and budgeting than about figuring out what will bring their loved ones the most joy. By removing the obligation of Christmas gifts, we were all able to delete a giant task from our end of the year to-do lists, which was, frankly, a relief.</p> <h2>We Saved a Lot of Time</h2> <p>I can&rsquo;t speak for everyone, but for me, shopping &mdash; even online shopping &mdash; takes up a lot of time. Not shopping freed up time to enjoy other holiday activities like trimming the tree, baking 80 dozen cookies to give out to friends and neighbors, <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/surviving-the-holiday-season-entertaining-and-being-entertained-on-a-budget">attending and hosting parties</a>, caroling, and looking at Christmas lights.</p> <h2>It Allowed Us to Be Generous</h2> <p>What is the Christmas spirit about if not kindness to others? Christmas morning is now spent serving Christmas dinner to people who really need a nice meal, not sitting around the tree. We have the extra time and the extra money to help out local charities. My great-aunt was a lifelong patron of the Dumb Friends League, aka the city pound. Every dog she&rsquo;d ever owned had been a rescue. One of our favorite holiday activities is bringing toys and treats to the pound at Christmastime and spending the day petting all the dogs.</p> <h2>It Gave Us New Holiday Traditions to Enjoy</h2> <p>Like ex-smokers huffing on second-hand smoke, my cousin Carolyn and I still love to window-shop the day before Christmas and experience the apex of American consumerism. Only instead of buying, we enjoy the vulgar splendor of the mall at Christmastime by people watching from the comfort of the Cinnabon.</p> <p>This year my family will celebrate our 10th gift-free Christmas. What started as a strategy to keep our closets tidy, ended up bringing us closer together with each other and our community. It&rsquo;s our own little Christmas miracle.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/max-wong">Max Wong</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-my-hoarder-family-saved-christmas">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-paths-to-a-greener-back-to-school-season">6 Paths to a Greener Back-to-School Season</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/everything-you-need-to-know-about-cloth-diapers">Everything You Need to Know About Cloth Diapers</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-ultimate-recycler-utah-man-saves-70-000-beer-cans">The ultimate recycler - Utah man saves 70,000 beer cans</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-garden-as-classroom">The Garden as Classroom</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-your-bad-credit-can-impact-your-kids">How Your Bad Credit Can Impact Your Kids</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Family Green Living cheap holidays gift-free christmas hoarding Tue, 06 Nov 2012 10:36:44 +0000 Max Wong 955105 at http://www.wisebread.com 7 Reasons Why Self-Storage Is a Really Bad Idea http://www.wisebread.com/7-reasons-why-self-storage-is-a-really-bad-idea <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/7-reasons-why-self-storage-is-a-really-bad-idea" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/2270207802_1c16be06c0_z_0.jpg" alt="self storage" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="141" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>According to The Self Storage Association, there are roughly 49,000 storage facilities in the U.S. alone. Self storage has consistently been the fastest growing area of the commercial real estate industry, representing $22 billion in annual U.S. revenues in 2011. But why? Why are Americans so willing to saddle themselves with material albatrosses that sap their monthly income? Have we become such a nomadic and unsettled people that our consumerism can only keep up with our lifestyles through acres of augmented storage? I&rsquo;ll leave that up to the social and cultural critics to decide.</p> <p>If you&rsquo;re considering entering the fray and renting a storage unit, or if you&rsquo;re rethinking the value you get out of your current storage arrangement, let me offer a few arguments against these businesses that dot our landscape. Here are seven reasons why renting a self-storage unit is a bad idea. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-tyranny-of-stuff">The Tyranny of Stuff</a>)</p> <h3>1. Most Stored Objects Depreciate in Value</h3> <p>Unless you&rsquo;re storing gold or silver (an ill-advised move at most storage facilities), the objects you&rsquo;re housing are probably depreciating in value. Though I know some storage situations are unavoidable (i.e., a last minute move for a job, family emergency, divorce), the pay-off long-term just doesn&rsquo;t seem worth it when you consider the replacement cost of the stored items.</p> <h3>2. Extra Offsite Storage Promotes Acquisition</h3> <p>Having overflow storage options at the ready encourages needless acquisition. Often, storage units enable <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/help-from-a-former-pack-rat-getting-rid-of-stuff">hoarding tendencies</a> and prevent us from moving on from objects and the places and times in our lives that they represent.</p> <h3>3. Storage Fees Can Be a Financial Drain</h3> <p>This one is obvious, but still insidious. There&rsquo;s something overwhelming about having a storage unit full of stuff. We tend to ignore it, become exhausted at the thought of moving it, and avoid figuring out how to get rid of it. Inertia sets in and we (almost gladly) fork over the $65.00 or $75.00 a month to maintain the status quo. After a few years of paying our monthly dues, we&rsquo;ve spent enough to buy to good used car and have nothing to show for it besides the same old anxiety-producing pile of stuff.</p> <h3>4. Storage Facilities Often Lack Adequate Security</h3> <p>There doesn&rsquo;t appear to be any uniform approach to security measures across the self-storage industry. Some facilities are well-lit, some aren&rsquo;t; some have attendants on-site, some don&rsquo;t; some units have solid walls and metal doors, others are made of wire and plywood. For an industry that&rsquo;s basking in the riches of a society on the move, why is there no self-governance, no rating system, and no standardized security?</p> <h3>5. If You Can Store It for Years, You Can Live Without It</h3> <p>Professional organizers and decluttering experts sing the same refrain &mdash; if you haven&rsquo;t used it in six months or a year, you can live without it. The same logic applies to the objects we&rsquo;re warehousing in our storage units. If you can box it up and lock it up for years, do you really need it? If it&rsquo;s not used regularly, what&rsquo;s its real value?</p> <h3>6. Unpaid Storage Bills Equal Secured Debt</h3> <p>Many folks don&rsquo;t think about the contents of their unit as security against delinquent storage payments. But it only takes few episodes of &quot;Storage Wars&quot; to be set straight on that point. Unpaid storage fees are made up, in part, by auctioning off the contents of each unit. In many cases, the contents can be sold and renters are still liable for the remaining balance. If you&rsquo;re storing <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/maintaining-memories-how-to-save-old-photographs">family photos</a>, heirlooms, or other memorabilia, is it worth the risk to potentially have your items held captive or sold to the highest bidder?</p> <h3>7. Storage Services Are a Questionable Value</h3> <p>Considering the cost, the tendency for objects to depreciate in value while in storage, the inertia that off-site storage can lead to, and the lack of uniform security of facilities, I have a hard time seeing the <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-self-storage-units-are-more-sad-museums-than-savvy-solutions">value in long-term storage services</a>. It begs the question &mdash; wouldn&rsquo;t our money be better spent processing and organizing the items we have and purging what&rsquo;s left over?</p> <p>I realize that self-storage can be like a huge convenience when life throws you a curve ball. But as an ongoing strategy for managing the &ldquo;stuff&rdquo; in our lives, it&rsquo;s a losing proposition. Maybe it&rsquo;s time to grab a few friends, throw the doors open, load up the trunk, and have a yard sale.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F7-reasons-why-self-storage-is-a-really-bad-idea&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F7%2520Reasons%2520Why%2520Self-Storage%2520Is%2520a%2520Really%2520Bad%2520Idea.jpg&amp;description=7%20Reasons%20Why%20Self-Storage%20Is%20a%20Really%20Bad%20Idea"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/7%20Reasons%20Why%20Self-Storage%20Is%20a%20Really%20Bad%20Idea.jpg" alt="7 Reasons Why Self-Storage Is a Really Bad Idea" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/kentin-waits">Kentin Waits</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-reasons-why-self-storage-is-a-really-bad-idea">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-downsize-and-declutter">How to Downsize and Declutter</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-smart-ways-to-keep-your-entire-life-clutter-free">10 Smart Ways to Keep Your Entire Life Clutter-Free</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-ways-a-deep-declutter-can-improve-your-life">12 Ways a Deep Declutter Can Improve Your Life</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/25-things-to-throw-out-today">25 Things to Throw Out Today</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-garage-sale-items-that-sell-like-hotcakes">12 Garage Sale Items That Sell Like Hotcakes</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Home Organization decluttering hoarding renting self storage Wed, 22 Aug 2012 10:24:40 +0000 Kentin Waits 952263 at http://www.wisebread.com Simple-Living Lessons I Learned From "Hoarders" http://www.wisebread.com/simple-living-lessons-i-learned-from-hoarders <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/simple-living-lessons-i-learned-from-hoarders" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/2195176341_558469c3f5_z_0.jpg" alt="clutter" title="clutter" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Give me a strong cup of coffee and a marathon of the TV show &quot;Hoarders,&quot; and I will get my house cleaned. It seems there&rsquo;s nothing quite so motivating as a caffeine-fueled, hoarding-motivated cocktail to whip my house in shape and restore my sense of simplicity and balance.</p> <p>Without making light of the very real journey each of the featured guests are on, there are some quiet truths I always take away from that show. &quot;Hoarders,&quot; and shows like it, are commentaries on American consumerism and reminders (in the extreme) of what&rsquo;s important in life. What follows are a few simple-living lessons I learned from &quot;Hoarders&quot; &mdash; lessons that are timeless and universal; lessons that go well beyond the shock and awe of what viewers see on the show. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/25-things-to-throw-out-today">25 Things to Throw Out Today</a>)</p> <h3>Things Are Only Valuable If They&rsquo;re Used</h3> <p>The value of anything we own lies in the beauty, joy, or usefulness it brings. Though, arguably, hoarders may get some satisfaction out of possessing things, each thing is rendered useless because of the sheer quantity of competing items, their condition, and their inaccessibility. If I have 15 dustpans, how can know where they all are? How can I use each one? Why would I need to? What is an unused dustpan besides conceptual art?</p> <h3>There Is an Inverse Relationship Between Quantity of Things and Joy</h3> <p>This is an important and hard-won lesson. We all need a basic level of material items to live a convenient and comfortable life. But after a certain point, objects crowd us out, require too much maintenance, monopolize our time, and require near-constant labor to pay for. Over time, the chase for newer, better, bigger, different, and more things saps our joy. Recognizing this, simplifying our needs, and embracing our own optimal level of &quot;stuff&quot; is liberating.</p> <h3>Objects Become More Useful When They Are Shared</h3> <p>As mentioned earlier, hoarding objects renders most of them useless. That&rsquo;s because the value of an object typically lies in its utility. Hoarding so much that there&rsquo;s no way to use it all takes the worth out of objects. But putting stashed items we don&rsquo;t or can&rsquo;t use back into the consumer cycle takes them out of the abstract. Isn&rsquo;t it wonderful to <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-best-10-items-to-borrow">give an item to a friend</a>, donate it charity, sell it in a yard sale, or set in on the curb, knowing it will be used? An old lawn mower mows again; a great book has new reader; a rusty bike gets a new lease on life.</p> <h3>Possessions Reflect Our Inner World</h3> <p>Whether we like it or not, the things we choose to surround ourselves with reflect our inner world. Sometimes, it&rsquo;s a literal reflection; sometimes, it&rsquo;s artificial. But things always have way of displaying our priorities, confessing our fears, and betraying our secrets. People who struggle with hoarding are stark examples, but maybe no starker than the rest of us.</p> <h3>It&rsquo;s a Fine Line Between Acceptable and Not-Acceptable Shopping</h3> <p>Our modern consumer world can be a confusing place. Shopping, spending, saving, and storing is beyond a national pastime &mdash; it&rsquo;s downright patriotic. It seems to me that the line between a typical consumer and hoarder is sometimes drawn quite arbitrarily. Maybe hoarding shows strike such a chord with audiences because we all see a bit of ourselves on the screen.</p> <h3>Objects Tend to Distance Us From One Another</h3> <p>Not only is there a declining return on joy once we reach a certain level of material comfort, there&rsquo;s also a decline in intimacy and connectedness to one another. Maybe a bigger house isolates us from our neighbors, the expense of a new car forces us to work 10 hours more per week, or a smartphone kills the family dinner conversation. New toys can be wonderful, but without mindful use, they can intrude upon and interfere with our most important relationships. Watch any random episode of &quot;Hoarders&quot; to see the havoc that unchecked accumulation has on friends and families.</p> <p>My hat goes off to each of guests featured on the show. The lessons they&rsquo;re learning so publicly are lessons we can all take to heart in large and small ways. <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/frugality-simplicity-and-sustainability">Simplify</a>. Simplify. Simplify.</p> <p><em>Are you a fan of &quot;Hoarders&quot;? How do you react to shows like it and how has it changed your behavior or attitude about what&rsquo;s enough?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/kentin-waits">Kentin Waits</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/simple-living-lessons-i-learned-from-hoarders">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-in-your-basement-you-should-throw-out-today">10 Things in Your Basement You Should Throw Out Today</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-easy-ways-to-declutter-your-digital-life">5 Easy Ways to Declutter Your Digital Life</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/simplicity-and-being-cheap">Simplicity and being cheap</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-4-types-of-clutterers-which-one-are-you">The 4 Types of Clutterers: Which One Are You?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-i-wish-i-had-known-when-i-started-living-frugally">What I Wish I Had Known When I Started Living Frugally</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Lifestyle declutter hoarding simplicity TV shows Tue, 08 May 2012 10:24:10 +0000 Kentin Waits 927598 at http://www.wisebread.com Spot shortages of gasoline? http://www.wisebread.com/spot-shortages-of-gasoline <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/spot-shortages-of-gasoline" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/no-fuel-next-km.jpg" alt="No fuel next 375 km" title="Fairly Isolated" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="226" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>As long as prices are free to rise, I wouldn&#39;t expect much in the way of gasoline shortages--at least not widespread, long-lasting ones.  But it&#39;s actually pretty easy to produce a local, short-term one.  In fact, it doesn&#39;t take much more than people worrying that there might be one.</p> <p>Suppose one local filling station has a supply glitch and the local TV stations and local paper run with scary headlines over a picture of the &quot;No gas&quot; sign.  If that prompts any sizable fraction of drivers to stop in their local filling station for a precautionary extra fill-up, that could do it all by itself.</p> <p>Think of it this way:  The average car&#39;s gas tank is about half full--for every guy who just filled up, there&#39;s another guy who&#39;s about to fill up.  Multiple one-half the size of the average gas tank by the number of vehicles in your city, then compare that to total amount of gasoline in all the filling stations in town.</p> <p>Doing a back-of-the-envelope calculation for my town, I&#39;d guesstimate that there&#39;s around 100,000 cars and trucks that use gasoline and that the average tank could probably hold another 10 gallons of gasoline if they went out for a fill-up.  So, that&#39;s a potential demand for maybe 1 million gallons of gasoline, if they all decided to top off their tanks.</p> <p>A typical filling station might have tanks to store 25,000 gallons of gasoline, but of course their tanks are only half-full on average as well, so that means around 12,500 gallons per station.  So, the potential surge-demand of everybody deciding that they really ought to top their tanks off could drain some 80 gas stations dry.</p> <p>Now, it&#39;s pretty unlikely for one overblown story about gas shortages to send everyone out to fill up their tank, and there&#39;s also probably more than 80 stations in town.  But these things can feed off one another--if a demand surge runs one station dry, the &quot;No gas&quot; signs at that station feed the surge by sending another batch of people off to fill their tanks.  That runs another couple of stations dry and so on.  At the same time, of course, everybody is doing all their ordinary driving--all this demand is <strong>in addition to</strong> the ordinary, everyday demand.</p> <p>It might seem a little counter-intuitive, but my recommendation for dealing with this risk is that you <a href="/fill-your-tank">keep your tank full</a>.  (This is in keeping with my general advice on the <a href="/the-ethics-of-hoarding">ethics of hoarding</a>--as long as you&#39;re buying what you&#39;re going to use in the reasonably near future, you&#39;re not contributing to the shortage.)  </p> <p>It means that you won&#39;t contribute to the problem--your tank is already full (or nearly), so you don&#39;t need to rush out for a fill-up if gas shortages hit the news.  It also means that you won&#39;t be severely impacted by the minor, local, short-term supply disruptions that are an entirely predictable consequence of the kind of supply shocks that are pushing prices up.</p> <p>Frankly, we&#39;d all be better off if gasoline were a bit easier to hoard--it&#39;d mean that more people had a stockpile and wouldn&#39;t need to go rushing off to the filling station when news broke of possible shortages.  It&#39;s hard, though, to hoard more than what fits in your tank--storing gas in gas cans doesn&#39;t work well (the gasoline evaporates), plus it&#39;s dangerous (gasoline is flammable, explosive, and toxic).  A proper underground storage tank is expensive, and subject to considerable regulation.</p> <p>As a practical matter, keeping your vehicle tank full is about as far toward hoarding gasoline as the ordinary person can go.  Fortunately, it&#39;s far enough to help considerably.</p> <p>I&#39;m old enough to remember the gas lines in the 1970s.  Those were largely caused by government controls on prices.  (Price controls are the classic way to create a shortage.)  If there are no price controls, I would would expect any shortages to be minor, local, and temporary.  But just because there won&#39;t be severe, widespread, and long-lasting shortages, doesn&#39;t mean that there won&#39;t be any.  An extra half-tank of gasoline makes it a non-issue if there&#39;s a minor glitch in gasoline distribution affects a few local stations.  If you let your tank get close to empty, that same minor glitch could see you driving on fumes, hoping that the next station has gas--and in no position to do comparison shopping if the price looks a little high.</p> <p>On a previous post on a related topic, one commenter reported that the process of evacuating for Katrina produced spot shortages of gasoline.  Clearly, anyone trying to flee a disaster is better off if they can just go, without having to stop for gasoline--possibly having to wait in long lines.  In an emergency, some fraction of the gas stations may be inaccessible--fallen trees, flood waters, or the police blocking traffic some directions.  In addition, some stations may be closed because their workers have already evacuated or the power is out.  The stations that are open will be the first to run out of gasoline.</p> <p>Of course, don&#39;t wait until there&#39;s news of gas shortages to take this advice.  That would make you part of the problem.  Do it now.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/philip-brewer">Philip Brewer</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/spot-shortages-of-gasoline">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/save-more-gas-by-safely-following-trucks">Save More Gas by Safely Following Trucks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-is-gasoline-so-cheap-a-cost-comparison-of-40-common-household-liquids">Why is Gasoline So Cheap? A Cost Comparison of 40 Common Household Liquids</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-will-you-do-when-gas-drops-below-150-a-gallon">What will you do when gas drops below $1.50 a gallon?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-will-you-do-when-gas-hits-4-per-gallon">What will you do when gas hits $4 per gallon?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-wisebread-helped-me-get-45mpg-out-of-my-28mpg-car">How Wisebread helped me get 45mpg out of my 28mpg car.</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Cars and Transportation gasoline hoarding shortages Sun, 15 Jun 2008 11:49:38 +0000 Philip Brewer 2177 at http://www.wisebread.com The ethics of hoarding http://www.wisebread.com/the-ethics-of-hoarding <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/the-ethics-of-hoarding" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/bags-of-rice.jpg" alt="Bags of rice" title="Bags of Rice" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="157" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>In the Philippines, they&#39;re threatening life sentences for traders hoarding rice.   In the United States, grocers need to put limits on rice purchases just to keep their shelves stocked.  Philippine traders are now afraid to fill their warehouses, for fear of being called a hoarder.  Even ordinary US shoppers are worrying that buying a big bag of rice might make them a hoarder.  In this climate, it&#39;s worth thinking about what hoarding actually is.</p> <p>Let me start by saying what it isn&#39;t.  Stocking your pantry with goods that you&#39;re going to use isn&#39;t hoarding.</p> <p>Hoarding is buying goods and storing them in the hope of selling them at a higher price.</p> <p>Of course, there&#39;s an aspect to that in practically every business.  Ordinary business behavior is different from hoarding mainly in that most businesses add value--the baker transforms the flour into bread, the butcher cuts up a carcass into steaks and chops.  Just repackaging can add value--the wholesaler buys rice by the railcar and sells it in 50 pound sacks to the grocer who then sells it to shoppers by the pound.</p> <p>Ordinary businesses also have a steady flow to their buying and selling.  The gas station may have thousands of gallons of gasoline in its underground tanks, but that gasoline is for sale every day, not held off the market waiting for the price to go up.</p> <p>A hoarder, though, doesn&#39;t add value by transforming the product in some useful way, nor does he make his money on the markup from wholesale to retail.  He just buys stuff and holds on to it, hoping to sell after the price goes up.</p> <p>Merely doing that is ethically neutral--often, in fact, beneficial.  A clever hoarder will buy when prices are low (which is a source of price support for suppliers who would otherwise be suffering) and then sell when prices are high (providing supplies when there would otherwise be a shortage).  If he makes a profit, it&#39;s a legitimate return on the capital that was tied up during a period of low prices.  Buying low and selling high is not just a way to make money, it also helps stabilize the market, protecting both suppliers and consumers.</p> <p>Hoarding becomes ethically objectionable when the hoarder waits until prices are already high, and then buys goods in the hope that prices will go even higher.  That&#39;s not stabilizing.  That can turn tight supplies into shortages and send prices up to where basic staples are beyond the means of all but the wealthy.</p> <p>Note that this sort of hoarding is also not a very good way to make money.  If supply and demand are already clearing, at whatever price, there&#39;s no particular reason to suppose that prices will go even higher.  In fact, over the medium term--once suppliers have a chance to grow more or make more, and once consumers have a chance to adjust their habits to use less, you can expect prices to go back down.  Hoarders buying at that point may drive the price up in a speculative frenzy, but once they start selling, the price will go right back down again, meaning that most of them won&#39;t make any money.  They will, though, make the price gyrate.  It&#39;s those price gyrations, together with the shortages caused by taking the product off the market, that make hoarding objectionable.</p> <p>From an ethical point of view, there&#39;s no reason for ordinary consumers to worry that they might be doing something bad by stocking up.  In fact, the stockpiles of ordinary consumers are a positive, stabilizing force when there are supply and price shocks, because the consumer with a stockpile will naturally limit purchases when there&#39;s a shortage.  It&#39;s only the consumers with bare shelves who are buying when the price has just shot up.</p> <p>Hoarding is a bad word, though--something that you wouldn&#39;t want to be accused of, even if you could make a reasoned argument about the stabilizing effects of stockpiles.  In the US, we&#39;re not at the point of ugly mobs forming when someone carries a couple extra bags of rice out of the grocery store, but Americans are as good at forming ugly mobs as people anywhere.</p> <p>Ethics aside, as a simple, practical matter, you don&#39;t want to be trying to build your stockpile after shortages are already in the news.  Once that happens, cut back on use to make your current supplies last.  Switch to stockpiling stuff that&#39;s still cheap--there&#39;s always something, unless times are very bad indeed.  Especially during a time of shortages and soaring prices, there&#39;s <a href="/huge-tax-free-investment-returns">no better investment</a>.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/philip-brewer">Philip Brewer</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-ethics-of-hoarding">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/in-times-like-these-separate-the-want-from-the-need">In times like these, separate the want from the need.</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/debit-or-credit-which-one-should-you-choose-at-the-checkout">Debit Or Credit? Which One Should You Choose At The Checkout?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/lower-your-credit-card-interest-rate-and-reduce-your-phone-bill-immediately-and-easily">Lower Your Credit Card Interest Rate and Reduce Your Phone Bill, Immediately and Easily</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-ways-you-are-sabotaging-your-weekly-grocery-budget">9 Ways You Are Sabotaging Your Weekly Grocery Budget</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/beware-the-nasty-secret-of-the-craigslist-free-section">Beware, The Nasty Secret Of The Craigslist Free Section</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Budgeting Consumer Affairs Food and Drink Investment Shopping hoarding rice stockpiling Sun, 04 May 2008 20:40:24 +0000 Philip Brewer 2065 at http://www.wisebread.com The ultimate recycler - Utah man saves 70,000 beer cans http://www.wisebread.com/the-ultimate-recycler-utah-man-saves-70-000-beer-cans <p><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/wisebread_imce/canscanscans.jpg" alt="Cans" title="Cans" width="321" height="430" /></p> <p>Wow, am I late to the news. But hey, it&#39;s a great frugal story or recycling, even if it is completely insane.</p> <p>The <a href="http://www.ksl.com/?nid=148&amp;sid=268346">story broke in May of last year by Utah station KSL</a> . I thought it was an urban legend, but it&#39;s all real. The Utah chap, who I won&#39;t name here, collected these cans over an unknown period of time. But with 70,000 in the house, it works out at 1 beer PER HOUR every day for EIGHT YEARS. That&#39;s a ot of drinking. Presumably, it took more like 15 years to accumulate. Thispack-rat style of hoarding is not unheard of, with many people living in homes filled with garbage. It is believed these people can&#39;t throw anything away because they feel like they&#39;re throwing a part of themselves away. </p> <p><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/wisebread_imce/67072.jpg" alt="morecans" title="morecans" width="326" height="244" /> </p> <p>As someone who has recycled cans for a long time for free, I wondered what 70,000 cans would get back in cold, hard cash. I was actually shocked that it was only $800! Seems like a rip-off for that amount of metal.</p> <p>Just in case you can&#39;t quite make them out, the cans are all Coors Light. I suspect the Coors Light folks aren&#39;t going to be jumping on this PR opportunity anytime soon. Have you heard of any stranger collections? Let us all know in the comments area. Now, I&#39;m off to drink a few thousand cans of beer...and a bag of peanuts. </p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-ultimate-recycler-utah-man-saves-70-000-beer-cans">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-i-saved-30000-and-helped-the-earth-at-the-same-time">How I Saved $30,000 and Helped the Earth at the Same Time</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/make-money-recycling">Make Money Recycling: Get Paid to Recycle by 15 Websites</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-rid-of-your-old-electronics">How to Get Rid of Your Old Electronics</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/should-we-pay-2-per-pound-for-garbage-disposal">Should We Pay $2 Per Pound for Garbage Disposal?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/cash-for-trash-making-money-recycling">Cash for Trash: Making Money Recycling</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Green Living alcoholism beer cans cans Coors Light hoarding OCD recycling saving trash into cash Utah Tue, 03 Apr 2007 04:47:10 +0000 Paul Michael 442 at http://www.wisebread.com