parenting http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/3123/all en-US Should You Make Your Young Kids Pay "Rent?" http://www.wisebread.com/should-you-make-your-young-kids-pay-rent <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/should-you-make-your-young-kids-pay-rent" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/family_throwing_coins_into_a_piggy_bank_together.jpg" alt="Family throwing coins into a piggy bank together" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>A young mother named Essence Evans recently posted on Facebook that she charges her five-year-old daughter $1 each for rent, utilities, food, water, and cable out of her weekly $7 allowance. The remaining $2 is the child's money to spend however she wishes. The $5 that Evans takes for &quot;bills&quot; actually goes into a savings account she'll give to her daughter when she turns 18.</p> <p>The internet went berserk. Some people loved this idea, while others thought it took things too far. Whether you agree or disagree with the method, something has to be said for the initiative Evans is taking to teach her young daughter money management and the value of a dollar.</p> <p>Should you follow her example and charge your little ones &quot;rent?&quot; Here are five important lessons you'd be teaching them by having them &quot;pay bills.&quot;</p> <h2>Financial responsibility</h2> <p>From birth until death, you need and deal with money in some capacity. The earlier you learn how to earn, spend, lend, borrow, and invest, the better off you are. By making your little kids pay for living expenses, you teach them very early how to handle money responsibly. It helps them begin the journey of distinguishing wants from needs and prioritizing taking care of their needs first.</p> <p>Before your child is allowed to spend any money, they should be required to &quot;pay their bills&quot; and set money aside in savings of some sort. The action of giving money to them and having them give a portion of it back is a powerful lesson in and of itself. It becomes a normal part of having money. You teach them to save and pay their bills <em>first</em>, which is a powerful tool in keeping them out of financial trouble later in life. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-parenting-mistakes-to-avoid-when-teaching-kids-about-money?Ref=seealso" target="_blank">4 Parenting Mistakes to Avoid When Teaching Kids About Money</a>)</p> <h2>How to budget</h2> <p>Making your kids pay bills before allowing them to spend their money on things they want teaches them the power of budgeting. Budgeting is all about setting priorities and planning. Budgeting teaches them that they <em>can</em> have some of the things they want if they plan correctly. It also teaches them that they cannot afford all of their wants. It drives home the point that there are certain bills that they will always have (rent, utilities, groceries) and they should always plan for those recurring expenses.</p> <p>Teaching them these lessons in a controlled and loving environment is so much more humane than neglecting these lessons and having them learn it the hard way as an adult.</p> <h2>Nothing in life is free</h2> <p>You can't buy love, happiness, peace, or good health. But everything else will cost you. The sooner kids learn this, the better off they will be.</p> <p>Your kids need to know how the financial system works. You should teach them that in order for you to withdraw money at the ATM, you had to deposit money in the first place. They need to know that every time you use a credit card to buy something, you have to pay it back with interest.</p> <p>Teaching them that everything costs money &mdash; including the bed they sleep in, the food on the table, and the internet they enjoy &mdash; is a lasting life lesson that will help guide them into being contentious spenders. It is also important to teach them to always look for the cost in everything. This doesn't mean you should make your kids neurotic, but you do want to ensure that they are aware that everything they ask for costs you something. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/21-things-you-should-make-your-kids-pay-for?ref=seealso" target="_blank">21 Things You Should Make Your Kids Pay For</a>)</p> <h2>The world doesn't owe them anything</h2> <p>Entitlement is one of the leading underlying causes of debt and credit abuse. Teaching your kids that hard work pays off is a valuable lesson. But you also have to teach them that working hard doesn't mean they can have whatever they want. They must learn that they can only have what they can afford.</p> <p>In life, we don't always get what we deserve &mdash; good or bad. Sometimes life is unfair and we have to wait, work harder, or settle for an alternative. The quicker your kids learn this, the more content they will be in the long run. Teaching them to focus on and be grateful for what they do have in lieu of what they don't have or what everyone else has is far more valuable than getting them everything their tiny hearts desire. Helping them develop self-governance and the ability to tell themselves no is more valuable than a giving them a hefty trust fund.</p> <h2>Opportunity cost</h2> <p>Making kids contribute to their living expenses helps teach them about opportunity cost. That lesson is all about being able to pause, weigh all of the options, and make a rational decision. They have to learn that if you have $5 and spend it all on candy, you can't also get a toy. The concept of delayed gratification will slowly be seared into their tiny minds and help them become less impulsive. Even kids who are impulsive by nature will learn (with your guidance) how to stop and consider what else they may want to do with their money.</p> <p>Teaching your kids about opportunity cost also helps them to become rational decision makers. When you make each transaction more about business and less about emotions, they will learn how to make purchases using logic and practicality. You have to model for them how to talk themselves through paying bills and making purchases. When you ask them questions and help them view money objectively, you will help reduce feelings of buyer's remorse and they will become confident in their financial decision-making.</p> <p>In the end, you may not agree with Evans' approach, but you must appreciate and applaud her moxie. Your value system may not allow you to charge your kids rent, but it's important to find some system that can ingrain these lessons into your kids.</p> <p>Fiscal responsibility is one of the greatest things you can teach your children. Failing to teach them how to handle and relate to money will create a type of poverty in them than no amount of money can fix.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fshould-you-make-your-young-kids-pay-rent&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FShould%2520You%2520Make%2520Your%2520Young%2520Kids%2520Pay%2520_Rent__.jpg&amp;description=Should%20You%20Make%20Your%20Young%20Kids%20Pay%20%22Rent%3F%22"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/Should%20You%20Make%20Your%20Young%20Kids%20Pay%20_Rent__.jpg" alt="Should You Make Your Young Kids Pay &quot;Rent?&quot;" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/denise-hill">Denise Hill</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/should-you-make-your-young-kids-pay-rent">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-money-lessons-kids-can-learn-from-the-tooth-fairy">7 Money Lessons Kids Can Learn From the Tooth Fairy</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-use-the-holidays-to-teach-kids-about-money">How to Use the Holidays to Teach Kids About Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/teach-your-kids-about-money-with-their-holiday-gift-lists">Teach Your Kids About Money With Their Holiday Gift Lists</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-family-money-matters-your-kids-dont-need-to-know">9 Family Money Matters Your Kids Don&#039;t Need to Know</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/3-good-money-examples-every-parent-should-set">3 Good Money Examples Every Parent Should Set</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance Family allowance children financial responsibility kids money lessons parenting paying bills rent Tue, 06 Mar 2018 09:30:14 +0000 Denise Hill 2111218 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Successfully Negotiate Everything With Your Kid http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-successfully-negotiate-everything-with-your-kid <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-successfully-negotiate-everything-with-your-kid" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/african_american_mother_with_mixed_race_little_girl.jpg" alt="African American mother with mixed race little girl" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Kids want things. They want lots of things. And while they sure are cute, they don't bring in any income to offset the money you spend on them. In fact, kids are pretty much a money suck from the moment they're born until the day they leave your home. And for some, even kids who've left the nest stay attached to the family wallet.</p> <p>Luckily, you can give your kid a jumpstart on financial literacy through the art of negotiation, even when they're young. This is not a quick method of training by any means. You'll get tired, you'll get frustrated, and on more than one occasion, you'll want to give in to the whining because it will drive you utterly insane.</p> <p>However, in the end it will be worth it. You'll have taught your children the value of money. You will reduce the risk of having a child that depends on your financial support well into their 30s, 40s, and beyond. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-money-conversations-parents-should-have-with-their-adult-kids?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Money Conversations Parents Should Have With Their Adult Kids</a>)</p> <p>Here's how to teach your kids negotiating skills that will last a lifetime.</p> <h2>1. Start slowly</h2> <p>If you're going to start tracking chores, grades, good attitudes, and self-generated initiative while tying that to a well-thought-out compensation system, you're in for a big surprise. It just won't happen that quickly or easily.</p> <p>Choose one or two things to track and reward. Then add more once your kids have come to expect consistent outcomes with those things. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-easy-way-to-set-an-allowance-that-wont-ruin-your-kid?ref=seealso" target="_blank">The Easy Way to Set an Allowance That Won't Ruin Your Kid</a>)</p> <h2>2. Make a trade</h2> <p>You may think you have no advantage in this game. After all, your kids need things and you've got to provide them, right? Yes and no. You're obligated to provide things like food and clothing. Does it have to be fancy food? Must you spring for designer clothing? Unless your kids do something to deserve these premium privileges, the answer should be &quot;no.&quot;</p> <p>They want to eat out at a restaurant? Go to a friend's house? Get extra screen time? These are all perfect opportunities to extract something out of them, like chores, or best behavior. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/21-things-you-should-make-your-kids-pay-for?ref=seealso" target="_blank">21 Things You Should Make Your Kids Pay For</a>)</p> <h2>3. Be consistent</h2> <p>Once you've made a deal with the kiddos, do your best to deliver quickly. Set expectations, terms, and timelines so there is no question on what was negotiated. Put your deal in writing if you have to. Kids will either get super technical or conveniently forget and skew terms in their favor.</p> <p>Being consistent and holding up your end of the deal will show you mean business. For this to work, they need to know there's a reasonable chance that the consequence of their actions will always materialize, whether good or bad. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-parenting-mistakes-to-avoid-when-teaching-kids-about-money?ref=seealso" target="_blank">4 Parenting Mistakes to Avoid When Teaching Kids About Money</a>)</p> <h2>4. Create a system</h2> <p>A system will help you keep track of it all. You can write down tasks and goals on a whiteboard stuck to the fridge or a clipboard as a checklist. If you are an electronic family, keep a spreadsheet or use an app.</p> <p>Furthermore, if money is involved, try to have cash on hand to deliver on your negotiated rewards. It's easy to say you need to get change then totally forget. Your kids will remember and will figure you aren't for real when you don't make good on your promises. They won't be up for negotiating much when this happens. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/3-good-money-examples-every-parent-should-set?ref=seealso" target="_blank">3 Good Money Examples Every Parent Should Set</a>)</p> <h2>5. Be patient</h2> <p>You might think your kids will be very motivated by this sudden change in how money and rewards are handled in your home. They'll get more chances to earn money and other rewards for doing things they should be doing anyway.</p> <p>To you, this new system should be a no-brainer. It seems like a win/win, right? The honest truth is that kids are pretty lazy by nature. Sure, there are those super-motivated, money-savvy kids you'll catch on <em>Shark Tank,</em> but the average kid isn't making deals on <em>Shark Tank</em>.</p> <p>However, kids are also programmable. This is good news because they can be trained on your new system of good and bad consequences. The bad news is that it will take time to program them.</p> <p>Stay committed to the cause and train your kids to understand the cause and effect of laziness versus productivity. If you're patient and consistent, your kids will get used to this way of life. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/should-your-kids-contribute-to-family-money-goals?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Should Your Kids Contribute to Family Money Goals?</a>)</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fhow-to-successfully-negotiate-everything-with-your-kid&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FHow%2520to%2520Successfully%2520Negotiate%2520Everything%2520With%2520Your%2520Kid.jpg&amp;description=How%20to%20Successfully%20Negotiate%20Everything%20With%20Your%20Kid"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/How%20to%20Successfully%20Negotiate%20Everything%20With%20Your%20Kid.jpg" alt="How to Successfully Negotiate Everything With Your Kid" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/aja-mcclanahan">Aja McClanahan</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-successfully-negotiate-everything-with-your-kid">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-parenting-mistakes-to-avoid-when-teaching-kids-about-money">4 Parenting Mistakes to Avoid When Teaching Kids About Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-frugal-living-skills-you-should-be-teaching-your-children">7 Frugal Living Skills You Should Be Teaching Your Children</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-essential-money-moves-for-new-parents">7 Essential Money Moves for New Parents</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-to-manage-costs-while-youre-on-maternity-leave">5 Ways to Manage Costs While You&#039;re on Maternity Leave</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-travel-must-haves-for-nursing-moms">8 Travel Must-Haves for Nursing Moms</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Family Home communication tips how to negotiate Negotiation tips parenting parenting tips Tue, 23 Jan 2018 09:30:09 +0000 Aja McClanahan 2091489 at http://www.wisebread.com Best Money Tips: How to Be a Frugal Parent During the Holidays http://www.wisebread.com/best-money-tips-how-to-be-a-frugal-parent-during-the-holidays <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/best-money-tips-how-to-be-a-frugal-parent-during-the-holidays" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/mother_child_christmas_636545352.jpg" alt="Mother being frugal parent during the holidays" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Welcome to Wise Bread's <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/topic/best-money-tips">Best Money Tips</a> Roundup! Today we found articles on how to be a frugal parent during the holidays, easy investment tips for beginners, and what to do with your time and money when you retire.</p> <h2>Top 5 Articles</h2> <p><a href="https://www.thesimpledollar.com/how-to-be-a-frugal-parent-during-the-holiday-season/">How to Be a Frugal Parent During the Holiday Season</a> &mdash; Get your kids thinking about what the holidays are like without gifts. Talk about things you can do as a family that everyone would enjoy. [The Simple Dollar]</p> <p><a href="https://fortunateinvestor.com/investing-beginners-easy-tips-2017/">Investments for Beginners: 5 Easy Tips to Try in 2018</a> &mdash; Investing doesn't have to be intimating, stressful, and risky just because you're new at it. Learn how to invest your money so that it works for you! [The Fortunate Investor]</p> <p><a href="https://www.listenmoneymatters.com/how-to-retire-decumulation/">How To Retire: What To Do With Your Time And Money</a> &mdash; Work is such a big part of everyday life that it can be difficult to transition to a life without it.&nbsp; [Listen Money Matters]</p> <p><a href="http://www.currentoncurrency.com/6-tips-overcome-vacation-debt/">6 Tips to Overcome Vacation Debt</a> &mdash; Consider buying souvenirs when you first arrive at your destination and be done with spending on knickknacks for the rest of your trip! [Current on Currency]</p> <p><a href="http://yourmoneyyourfreedom.com/7-easy-ways-to-maximize-your-money-this-christmas/">7 Easy Ways To Maximize Money This Christmas</a> &mdash; Yes, you <em>can</em> save money this Christmas&hellip;and maybe even <em>make</em> some money, too!&nbsp; [FreeUp]</p> <h2>Other Essential Reading</h2> <p><a href="https://www.popsugar.com/smart-living/DIY-Citrus-Scented-Kitchen-Cleaning-Products-36750343">3 Essential DIY Cleaners That Will Make Your Kitchen Sparkle</a> &mdash;These all-natural sprays are just as effective as store-bought cleaners at eliminating dirt and grime. [PopSugar Smart Living]</p> <p><a href="https://moneyqanda.com/how-to-start-saving/">How to Get a Month Ahead in Savings Without Much Income</a> &mdash; <em>Do</em> sweat the small stuff. Little changes can lead to gigantic savings in the long term. [Money Q&amp;A]</p> <p><a href="http://moneyminiblog.com/mortgage-home/sell-your-home-quickly/">5 Crucial Steps to Sell Your Home Quickly</a> &mdash; Your property should not only look good, it needs to smell good, too. Make sure you deal with any funky odors before potential buyers show up, especially if you have pets. [Money Mini Blog]</p> <p><a href="https://dyernews.com/3-things-you-should-be-doing-to-promote-your-small-business-online/">3 Things You Should be Doing to Promote Your Small Business Online</a> &mdash; Start experimenting with video if you haven't already! Your video content can help you improve SEO and reach new customers. [Dyer News]</p> <p><a href="https://www.csmonitor.com/Environment/2017/1203/Forest-gumption-How-scientists-are-tapping-everything-from-drones-to-pruning-shears-to-stem-global-warming">Forest gumption: How scientists are tapping everything from drones to pruning shears to stem global warming</a> &mdash; Scientists and researchers around the world are thinking outside the box to help solve global warming. [The Christian Science Monitor]</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/amy-lu">Amy Lu</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/best-money-tips-how-to-be-a-frugal-parent-during-the-holidays">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-frugal-living-skills-you-should-be-teaching-your-children">7 Frugal Living Skills You Should Be Teaching Your Children</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/should-you-make-your-young-kids-pay-rent">Should You Make Your Young Kids Pay &quot;Rent?&quot;</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-affordable-alternatives-to-pet-boarding">5 Affordable Alternatives to Pet Boarding</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/19-frugal-ways-to-entertain-teenagers">19 Frugal Ways to Entertain Teenagers</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/everything-you-need-to-know-about-cloth-diapers">Everything You Need to Know About Cloth Diapers</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Frugal Living Family best money tips Holidays parenting Wed, 06 Dec 2017 09:30:06 +0000 Amy Lu 2067209 at http://www.wisebread.com 7 Essential Money Moves for New Parents http://www.wisebread.com/7-essential-money-moves-for-new-parents <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/7-essential-money-moves-for-new-parents" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/parent_new_baby_625686418.jpg" alt="New parents making money moves" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>As any parent will tell you, having kids can be tough on your wallet. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), the cost of raising a child to the age of 18 works out to around $233,610, give or take, at the moment. That sum of cash covers housing, food, child care, and education, among other necessities. But it doesn&rsquo;t cover the cost of college, which can be tens of thousands of dollars on its own.</p> <p>New parents would be wise to avoid a financial panic and start planning for a financially fruitful future instead. Here are some money moves new parents can make that could make the financial toll parenting takes a lot easier to handle. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/can-you-afford-to-have-a-baby?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Can You Afford to Have a Baby?</a>)</p> <h2>1. Start using a monthly budget</h2> <p>Before you have kids, it&rsquo;s easy to justify spending money on fun. If you&rsquo;re meeting your savings goals and keeping up with bills, <em>why not </em>go out with friends, or spend your excess cash traveling to see the world?</p> <p>While there&rsquo;s nothing wrong with living a little, having children gives you an entirely different perspective. New and often unexpected expenses come with being a new parent. The best way to stay on track financially is by starting a monthly budget and sticking to it. Start with how much you&rsquo;re currently spending, and use your best guess for new baby expenses like diapers, clothes, and toys. You may have to revisit the budget every few months as those expenses change. Create a budget that sets limits on spending with the goal of saving more. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-unexpected-expenses-of-a-new-baby?ref=seealso" target="_blank">15 Unexpected Expenses of a New Baby</a>)</p> <h2>2. Set up an automatic savings plan</h2> <p>Speaking of saving more, parenthood has a way of ruining your big ideas. You might <em>think </em>you&rsquo;re going to take the excess cash in your checking account and move it to savings, but then your kid needs medicine, your nanny share family drops out, or it&rsquo;s time to graduate to a toddler car seat and stroller.</p> <p>The best way to ensure the additional expenses of parenting don&rsquo;t thwart your savings plans is to make all your savings automatic. Set up automatic contributions or transfers to savings as part of your monthly budget, then learn to live on the rest. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/24-tips-for-having-a-baby-without-going-broke?ref=seealso" target="_blank">24 Tips for Having a Baby Without Going Broke</a>)</p> <h2>3. Learn to live on less</h2> <p>&ldquo;Learning to live on the rest&rdquo; may not sound like fun, but it&rsquo;s probably your best bet if you want to stretch your income as far as it can go. The more you can go without or cut from your budget, the more cash you&rsquo;ll have to save for the future or spend on planned activities that might enrich your children&rsquo;s lives.</p> <p>&ldquo;A penny saved is a penny earned&rdquo; is never truer than when you have kids. It takes time to earn money, whereas saving money may not take any time at all. If you want to make your dollars and time count as much as possible, it can pay to learn to live on less and be more thoughtful when it comes to spending the money you&rsquo;ve taken time to earn.</p> <h2>4. Build an emergency fund</h2> <p>Having kids often means recovering from one financial &ldquo;emergency&rdquo; after another. Kids get sick. They need to go to the doctor. They might break an arm playing on the playground or crashing their bike into your car.</p> <p>Kids also need braces and money to play on the soccer team. You&rsquo;ll need cash for once-a-year expenses like supplies and school field trips. And let&rsquo;s not forget about all the other emergencies you need to prepare for in life &mdash; the leaking roofs and the cars that need to be replaced.</p> <p>To prevent these expenses from wrecking your savings, or worse, put you into credit card debt, it is essential to start building an emergency fund early &mdash; before you need it. Most experts suggest you have three to six months' worth of expenses saved.</p> <p>Since that will take a while, you should probably start saving in whatever increments you can, as soon as you can. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-easy-ways-to-build-an-emergency-fund-from-0?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Easy Ways to Build an Emergency Fund From $0</a>)</p> <h2>5. Pay off debt</h2> <p>Debt is such a drag, and that&rsquo;s true whether you have kids or not. When you&rsquo;re in debt, you have to plan your entire life around paying money to people you owe.</p> <p>Not only that, but high interest debt can make getting ahead financially an especially tough hill to climb. When you carry a balance every month, you could be paying oodles in interest each month &mdash; that&rsquo;s basically money down the drain.</p> <p>To make your income stretch as far as it can go, pay down debt while you can. Not only will you avoid the costly drain of interest payments, but you&rsquo;ll free up extra money to save for what matters. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/fastest-way-to-pay-off-10000-in-credit-card-debt?ref=seealso" target="_blank">The Fastest Way to Pay Off $10,000 in Credit Card Debt</a>)</p> <h2>6. Start saving for college</h2> <p>According to College Board, the average cost of a four-year degree could be as much as $152,753 in 18 years. That&rsquo;s a wild amount of money to ponder, but it won&rsquo;t be funny if you sit on this data and never act.</p> <p>Opening a college savings account could help you make a dent in your child&rsquo;s future tuition costs, but only if you start savings early. If you set aside even $50 per month for the next 18 years and earn a 6 percent return, you could save up $18,543.39 for school. Boost that amount to $200 per month, however, and you could have $74,173.57 saved.</p> <p>Depending on your state, you may even score tangible tax benefits for setting money aside. In the <a href="https://www.in.gov/tos/iesa/2419.htm" target="_blank">state of Indiana</a>, for example, you get a 20 percent tax credit on the first $5,000 you contribute every year. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-9-best-state-529-college-savings-plans?ref=seealso" target="_blank">The 9 Best State 529 College Savings Plans</a>)</p> <h2>7. Buy (more) life insurance</h2> <p>A final money move for new parents is buying a life insurance policy &mdash; or even buying more life insurance coverage to supplement the coverage they already have.</p> <p>Before you have kids, you may only need enough life insurance to cover burial costs and your debts. After kids, on the other hand, you have so much more to plan for. You have to buy enough life insurance to replace your income for your child&rsquo;s entire life, for example, and you may even want to buy more coverage to pay for college.</p> <p>You have to think about the prospect of your spouse or partner raising your child alone, and what kind of financial situation you would want to leave them in if you died.</p> <p>Having a child makes issues like life insurance dramatically more important than they were before. You don&rsquo;t just have to think of yourself; you have to think of their future, too.</p> <p>Fortunately, it&rsquo;s easier than ever to get a free quote for life insurance and buy a policy today &mdash; and without ever leaving your home. The sooner you buy, the sooner you can protect your new family if for some reason you&rsquo;re not around.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F7-essential-money-moves-for-new-parents&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F7%2520Essential%2520Money%2520Moves%2520for%2520New%2520Parents.jpg&amp;description=7%20Essential%20Money%20Moves%20for%20New%20Parents"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/7%20Essential%20Money%20Moves%20for%20New%20Parents.jpg" alt="7 Essential Money Moves for New Parents" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/holly-johnson">Holly Johnson</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-essential-money-moves-for-new-parents">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-parenting-mistakes-to-avoid-when-teaching-kids-about-money">4 Parenting Mistakes to Avoid When Teaching Kids About Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-money-rules-thatll-save-you-big-in-babys-first-year">5 Money Rules That&#039;ll Save You Big in Baby&#039;s First Year</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-fun-books-that-will-get-your-kids-excited-about-money">10 Fun Books That Will Get Your Kids Excited About Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-new-parents-can-manage-debt">5 Ways New Parents Can Manage Debt</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-getting-more-sleep-helps-your-finances">How Getting More Sleep Helps Your Finances</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Budgeting Family budgeting tips having kids money tips new baby new parents parenting parenting tips saving money Mon, 04 Dec 2017 09:30:11 +0000 Holly Johnson 2065325 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Prepare Your Kids to Live On Their Own http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-prepare-your-kids-to-live-on-their-own <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-prepare-your-kids-to-live-on-their-own" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/happy_young_girl_with_her_mother_making_dough.jpg" alt="Happy young girl with her mother making dough" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Raise your hand if you have a young adult in your life who isn't ready for the &quot;real&quot; world.</p> <p>It's incredibly common for 20-somethings (and even 30-somethings) to be a little more than clueless when it comes to living on their own. Being able to sustain your independence with both your money and lifestyle is a skill that everyone needs to learn, and every parent needs to start teaching while their kids are still young.</p> <p>The good news is, this is very doable. If you're currently trying to mold impressionable youngsters into self-sufficient adults, here's how you can protect them from a very rude awakening when they go it alone.</p> <h2>1. Teach them basic life skills</h2> <p>I'm fortunate to have grown up in a family of blue-collar Americans who relied on their own wits and two bare hands to get by, and they were eager to pass their skills down to their children and grandchildren. Some of those skills took (I make a mean Bundt cake and clean the house with maid-like results), while others are still a work in progress (I call AAA when I have a flat tire; might as well get my money's worth, right?).</p> <p>These basic life skills should be required teaching at home because your kids won't learn them any place else. I'm a huge advocate for integrating this sort of education into the public school curriculum &mdash; because honestly, what teenager needs to know calculus over income tax prep? &mdash; but as it stands, that responsibility falls to you. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-life-skills-your-kids-wont-learn-in-school?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Life Skills Your Kids Won't Learn in School</a>)</p> <p>As such, it's on you to school your offspring on all of life's dirty little jobs, including but not limited to:</p> <ul> <li> <p>Laundry and other household chores.</p> </li> <li> <p>Grocery shopping, meal prep, and cooking for themselves.</p> </li> <li> <p>Integrating coupons and discounts into their everyday purchases.</p> </li> <li> <p>How credit and debit cards work.</p> </li> <li> <p>How interest rates affect loans.</p> </li> <li> <p>The difference between paying in cash versus relying on credit.</p> </li> <li> <p>How to prepare a resume.</p> </li> <li> <p>How to interview for a job (and not look like a slob).</p> </li> <li> <p>How to comprehend basic contracts.</p> </li> <li> <p>How to drive or use public transportation.</p> </li> <li> <p>How to make and stick to a budget.</p> </li> </ul> <h2>2. Manage their money for their first year of employment</h2> <p>Adults spend their money on frivolous things a lot of the time &mdash; so what do you expect kids to do? As soon as they get a job and start bringing home the bacon, they're rushing straight to their favorite stores for new clothes, taking their boyfriend or girlfriend out on a nice date, and loading up on drive-thru junk food.</p> <p>We all did it.</p> <p>You can curb that behavior by sitting your kid down and letting them know that the Bank of Mom and/or Dad will be in charge of their income for the first year of their first job. Offering them this kind of hands-on guidance and advice is a good way to teach teens how to save and spend wisely.</p> <p>Open two accounts in their name &mdash; checking and savings &mdash; and put 40 percent of their paycheck into each of those accounts. Give them the leftover 20 percent to do whatever they'd like. When expenses arise for which you don't feel responsible, like if they receive a speeding ticket or want to go away for the weekend with friends, explain how the money will come from <em>their</em> checking account to pay for it. You may get some resistance at first, especially if they're used to you forking cash over, but they'll thank their lucky stars they know how to manage money when they strike out on their own.</p> <h2>3. Charge them rent to live in your home once they turn 18</h2> <p>Your kids are adults the day they turn 18 &mdash; a fact that your teenager has probably reminded you of a million times since they started high school &mdash; and it's high time you started treating them accordingly. If they want to be grown-ups with no rules and no curfew but still live under your roof, you have every right to ask for help with the bills.</p> <p>You don't have to charge them fair market value, but a couple hundred bucks a month, or even putting them in charge of a particular bill, is reasonable. I'm also a proponent of teens paying their own cellphone bill starting at age 18. They'll certainly learn to be more responsible with their phones when repairs or replacements are coming out of their own pockets.</p> <h2>4. Help them establish good credit and explain the importance of it</h2> <p>I didn't know anything about how credit worked before I got my first credit card. Given that naiveté, I went on a shopping spree as soon as the card was in my hands, and I didn't/couldn't pay the bill until seven years later. That's what can happen when a clueless 18-year-old gets their hands on a shiny piece of plastic. And in my case, it royally screwed up my credit for a long time.</p> <p>Help your kids avoid my mistake by talking to them about how credit works and the importance of being conscious about building and maintaining a good credit score. Educate them on how good credit affects major purchases like cars and houses and even renting apartments. Their livelihood depends on it &mdash; unless, of course, you want them to live with you forever. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-questions-to-answer-before-giving-your-kid-a-credit-card?ref=seealso" target="_blank">4 Questions to Answer Before Giving Your Kid a Credit Card</a>)</p> <h2>5. Provide less for them once they start driving</h2> <p>As your child's parent or guardian, it's your legal responsibility to provide for them until they're able to provide for themselves. But you can start to cut back on the handouts as soon as they're responsible enough to drive.</p> <p>Certainly you still need to feed, clothe, and provide housing for your child, but they can start doing more for themselves, too. They can run to the store for their own hair product when they run out, open their own wallets for the video games they covet, and even make their own dentist and doctor appointments. Think of it as an education in independence with training wheels. You're still around to guide them through the processes, but they should start accepting tasks as their own.</p> <h2>6. Teach them time management skills</h2> <p>My friends make fun of me for how much I micromanage my own time. Anything I have to do goes straight into my calendar, and I keep a daily to-do list at work while creating side lists on an as-needed basis. As a result, my life runs much smoother.</p> <p>Considering your kids &mdash; especially high-schoolers &mdash; have busy schedules (for which they likely rely on you to keep on track), it will eventually benefit them for you to teach good time-management skills. Teach them how to add to-dos to their smartphone calendars as soon as they receive them, set up alerts for reminders, and help them form a habit of checking their schedule on a daily basis to keep their lives running smoothly.</p> <h2>7. Step back when they have a problem until your help is absolutely required</h2> <p>A large part of maturing to adulthood is learning how to solve problems on your own, and that means you need to let your children make mistakes from time to time &mdash; even when they come to you looking for the easy way out.</p> <p>&quot;There is a tendency for parents to step in too quickly when their children face a problem,&quot; says Jim Seibold, a marriage and family therapist in Arlington, Texas. &quot;Instead of telling them what to do and how they need to fix it, push them to think through options. Ask them what they think they should do. We can then teach by asking them to think about the consequences of their ideas. For instance: 'That sounds interesting, what do you think would happen if you tried that?'&quot;</p> <p>Just as importantly, this approach expresses confidence in your kids. It lets them know that you believe in their ability to think and consider choices, which will be helpful when it's time for them to move out of the house. That alone can be worth its weight in gold for worrisome moms and dads. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-parenting-mistakes-to-avoid-when-teaching-kids-about-money?ref=seealso" target="_blank">4 Parenting Mistakes to Avoid When Teaching Kids About Money</a>)</p> <h2>8. Stop giving them everything they want or think they need</h2> <p>I wasn't deprived of anything growing up, but I wasn't handed everything I wanted, either. Around age 14, my parents encouraged me to start working part time for the money I needed to go out with my friends or buy the things that teenagers want to buy. I wasn't over the moon about it at the time, but I also didn't hate it &mdash; I made new friends, had a sense of freedom, and did what I pleased with my money. In hindsight, it helped lay the foundation of my entrepreneurial spirit, which has gotten me everywhere I've wanted to be in life thus far.</p> <p>Seibold instituted a similar practice in his family, asking his kids to purchase their own electronics, cellphones, and any other luxury they wanted.</p> <p>&quot;They learned to save money they received for birthdays, Christmas, etc., so they could afford these purchases,&quot; he explains. &quot;As parents, we still pay for a lot, but it is important for kids to understand what it means to put off immediate gratification in order to save for something they really want. It may have been 'easy' money since it was gifted, but they still had to learn to save.&quot;</p> <h2>9. Establish good nutritional habits from the get-go</h2> <p>Most of us enjoy junk food every now and then (sometimes a little more often than that &mdash; guilty!), but nutrition and cooking skills all begin with you as a parent. It's your job to raise your children on healthy meals and teach them how to make smart food choices so they're eating a balanced diet. Does that mean you should never order pizza or pull into a drive-thru? No, of course not. But you should be conscious of limiting those instances to help your child establish a healthy relationship with food so they're best prepared to feed themselves responsibly (and cook instead of relying on takeout).</p> <h2>10. Praise your children, but don't go overboard</h2> <p>Encourage your children to express themselves, to try their best at whatever they attempt, and to accept failures gracefully. The truth is, somebody has to be the loser; that's just how life goes. The quicker they learn that they can't always come out on top, the easier life will be. They need both the confidence to reach for their aspirations and the grit to learn and move forward if things don't go their way.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fhow-to-prepare-your-kids-to-live-on-their-own&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FHow%2520to%2520Prepare%2520Your%2520Kids%2520to%2520Live%2520On%2520Their%2520Own.jpg&amp;description=How%20to%20Prepare%20Your%20Kids%20to%20Live%20On%20Their%20Own"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/How%20to%20Prepare%20Your%20Kids%20to%20Live%20On%20Their%20Own.jpg" alt="How to Prepare Your Kids to Live On Their Own" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/mikey-rox">Mikey Rox</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-prepare-your-kids-to-live-on-their-own">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-life-skills-your-kids-wont-learn-in-school">7 Life Skills Your Kids Won&#039;t Learn in School</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/should-you-make-your-young-kids-pay-rent">Should You Make Your Young Kids Pay &quot;Rent?&quot;</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-fun-games-that-teach-your-kids-about-money">6 Fun Games That Teach Your Kids About Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-use-the-holidays-to-teach-kids-about-money">How to Use the Holidays to Teach Kids About Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-fun-books-that-will-get-your-kids-excited-about-money">10 Fun Books That Will Get Your Kids Excited About Money</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Family Lifestyle basics budgeting children discipline first jobs kids life lessons life skills parenting Mon, 27 Nov 2017 09:00:07 +0000 Mikey Rox 2057738 at http://www.wisebread.com 4 Parenting Mistakes to Avoid When Teaching Kids About Money http://www.wisebread.com/4-parenting-mistakes-to-avoid-when-teaching-kids-about-money <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/4-parenting-mistakes-to-avoid-when-teaching-kids-about-money" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/little_girl_looking_at_piggybank.jpg" alt="Little girl looking at piggy bank" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>No matter how well you manage your money, you want your kids to grow up making all the right financial decisions. But if they see you overspending, they might adopt your poor money habits without you realizing it.</p> <p>Some parenting fails teach children about money &mdash; in a bad way. Rather than your kids learning from your mistakes, they might be destined to make the same ones you're making right now. Here are some parenting fails to avoid when teaching your kids about money.</p> <h2>Making impulse buys</h2> <p>Every parent has probably had their child ask for a candy bar or other treat while waiting in the checkout line. Telling them no can be difficult, but it beats raising a child who thinks they're entitled to everything they see.</p> <p>Occasional impulse purchases are fine. Getting an ice cream cone after a tough week at school, or going to see a movie after getting a high test grade can be worthwhile motivators for kids to do better in school. But if you spend too much on an impulse buy &mdash; such as the latest tech gadget &mdash; it can show a lack of restraint in how you shop.</p> <p>Even small impulse buys, if made often, can show your child that it's OK to buy something without giving it much thought. Small purchases add up, and a better lesson would be to put that money aside in a vacation fund for the whole family to enjoy.</p> <h2>Not letting them work for their money</h2> <p>Giving a kid an allowance is a great idea, as long as they work for it. Handing over cash each week without them doing anything to earn it can make you seem like a free ATM. Money doesn't just appear in your pocket magically. You work for it, and so should they.</p> <p>Be it earning money with chores or a part-time job, kids can learn the value of a dollar and find out firsthand how many hours of work it takes to afford that pricey pair of sneakers they want.</p> <h2>Not giving them their own bank account</h2> <p>If your kids don't have a savings account or college savings account by age five, you're doing them a disservice. Heck, if you don't have a savings account or retirement account, you're doing <em>yourself </em>a disservice, while also teaching them the poor habit of not saving for the future.</p> <p>As children become teenagers, parents can teach them about managing money by helping them get an ATM or debit card, a checking account, and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-reasons-to-add-your-teen-as-an-authorized-user-on-your-credit-card" target="_blank">possibly a credit card</a> with a low limit.</p> <p>Birthday money and a percentage of their allowance can be put into their savings accounts. Regular trips to the bank to make those deposits also show them how banks work and why they should save. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-help-your-kid-build-their-first-budget?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Help Your Kid Build Their First Budget</a>)</p> <h2>Having terrible money habits yourself</h2> <p>You don't have to detail every expense in your budget with your children, but they should have a general sense of what you're budgeting for and why. Sharing this info will teach them how to set their own money goals, and how to manage monthly bills before they're responsible for paying them.</p> <p>If you pay your bills late and constantly complain about how you can't afford the gas bill each month, you're setting a poor example of how to budget for basic expenses. Your kids are watching you, so you should be leading by example.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/aaron-crowe">Aaron Crowe</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-parenting-mistakes-to-avoid-when-teaching-kids-about-money">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-fun-books-that-will-get-your-kids-excited-about-money">10 Fun Books That Will Get Your Kids Excited About Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-essential-money-moves-for-new-parents">7 Essential Money Moves for New Parents</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-living-on-a-tight-budget-makes-you-happier">How Living on a Tight Budget Makes You Happier</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-when-youre-rich-dream-buys-that-arent-that-great">5 &quot;When You&#039;re Rich&quot; Dream Buys That Aren&#039;t That Great</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-best-apps-for-busy-working-parents">The 5 Best Apps for Busy Working Parents</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Budgeting Family budgeting budgeting tips parenting parenting fails parenting tips saving money Spending Money Wed, 24 May 2017 09:00:10 +0000 Aaron Crowe 1953075 at http://www.wisebread.com 10 Fun Books That Will Get Your Kids Excited About Money http://www.wisebread.com/10-fun-books-that-will-get-your-kids-excited-about-money <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/10-fun-books-that-will-get-your-kids-excited-about-money" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-597659170.jpg" alt="your kids will love these books about money" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Chances are, you want your child to be financially wise, but every time you start to talk about money management or smart spending, your kid conveniently tunes out. Fun books are the perfect way to get your children thinking about money.</p> <p>You don't necessarily need to force your kids to read heavy economic books. Instead, allow them to enjoy and be inspired by these books about saving, giving, and starting businesses.</p> <h2>1. <em>The Berenstain Bears' Dollars and Sense</em> by Stan and Jan Berenstain</h2> <p><a href="http://amzn.to/2i7aviQ" target="_blank">The Berenstain Bears' Dollars and Sense</a> helps teach kids about allowance management. The book has tear-out checks so that kids can practice writing their own. While most of the population uses <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards-vs-debit-cards-a-comprehensive-comparison" target="_blank">debit cards and credit cards</a>, writing checks is still something that should be learned.</p> <h2>2.<em> The Berenstain Bears' Money Trouble</em> by Stan and Jan Berenstain</h2> <p><a href="http://amzn.to/2j1dwBl" target="_blank">The Berenstain Bears' Money Trouble</a> features the same lovable bears as they start several businesses to earn money. Starting a business isn't easy, even when it's just a lemonade stand. This book goes through those initial obstacles in a fun way.</p> <h2>3. <em>The Berenstain Bears' Piggy Bank Blessings</em> by Stan and Jan Berenstain</h2> <p><a href="http://amzn.to/2j1fFwW" target="_blank">The Berenstain Bears' Piggy Bank Blessings</a> has an overall religious tone, quoting verses, but the story follows the bears as they save money for a surprise birthday present for their mom. My four-year-old enjoys this one, and I enjoy that the book shows the main characters thinking of others.</p> <p>See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-best-sites-to-help-your-kids-learn-about-money?ref=seealso" target="_blank">8 Best Sites to Help Your Kids Learn About Money</a></p> <h2>4. <em>If You Made a Million</em> by David M. Schwartz</h2> <p>Kids throw around &quot;million&quot; without really knowing what it represents. <a href="http://amzn.to/2iw7QSV" target="_blank">If You Made a Million</a> helps children ages seven and older understand the complexity of big numbers in a fun way. While the book was published over two decades ago, it remains a classic, having won the ALA Notable Book and a Reading Rainbow Feature Selection.</p> <h2>5. <em>Prices! Prices! Prices!: Why They Go Up and Down</em> by David Adler</h2> <p>The well-loved author of the Cam Jansen series, David Adler, also happens to be a former math teacher. His book,<a href="http://amzn.to/2iAlvqd" target="_blank"> Prices! Prices! Prices!: Why They Go Up and Down</a> has such fun illustrations and tackles the concepts of supply and demand.</p> <h2>6. <em>Amelia Bedelia Means Business</em> by Herman Parish</h2> <p>Amelia Bedelia is a lovable and quirky character who takes everything literally. There have been many times I have laughed out loud while reading the original Amelia Bedelia series to my daughter, especially when she is told to &quot;dress the turkey&quot; and makes a little suit for the turkey dinner.</p> <p><a href="http://amzn.to/2iAnk6j" target="_blank">Amelia Bedelia Means Business</a> is not written by the original author, but the story still follows the same theme. This one follows a young Amelia Bedelia as she tries to make money, even getting in trouble with the local police.</p> <h2>7. <em>American Girl Library: A Smart Girl's Guide: Money</em> by Nancy Holyoke and Sarah Hunt</h2> <p>American Girl non-fiction titles are both engaging and useful for young girls. <a href="http://amzn.to/2hMVXnq" target="_blank">A Smart Girl's Guide: Money</a> is written in an engaging, magazine-type format. Topics covered are smart shopping tips, making money, and investing. The book includes fun graphics and easy-to-use quizzes.</p> <h2>8. <em>The</em> <em>Babysitter's Club Series</em> by Ann Martin</h2> <p>There might not be any set money lessons in the <a href="http://amzn.to/2iAhDW9" target="_blank">Babysitter's Club Series</a>, but I remember clearly that it helped spark an entrepreneurial spirit in me during my tween years. The idea that a group of teen girls start their own babysitting club had me planning and thinking about doing that myself. While I never started a babysitting club, I still have that entrepreneurial spirit that has allowed me to creatively earn money without a 9-to-5 position. The book series has been redone as a graphic novel, so it will appeal to today's generations.</p> <p>See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-frugal-living-skills-you-should-be-teaching-your-children?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Frugal Living Skills You Should Be Teaching Your Children</a></p> <h2>9. <em>Rock, Brock, and the Savings Shock</em> by Sheila Bair</h2> <p><a href="http://amzn.to/2j1rmUr" target="_blank">Rock, Brock, and the Savings Shock</a> follows twins whose grandpa offers them a 10-week savings plan. Every dollar they save will be matched. One twin saves his money and has over $500 after 10 weeks, while the other twin spends the money foolishly. Tons of great money lessons in here.</p> <h2>10. <em>Isabel's Car Wash</em> by Sheila Bair</h2> <p>From the same author as the title above,<a href="http://amzn.to/2j1rvqX" target="_blank"> Isabel's Car Wash</a> is about a girl who wanted a doll that cost $10. She decides to start a car washing business, but first needs money for supplies. The book follows her adventure of starting a small business so that she can buy her doll.</p> <p>There are so many wonderful books out there that teach kids important money skills. Look for books that teach children the money basics in a fun way, and also look for books that features the main character acting as an entrepreneur.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/ashley-eneriz">Ashley Eneriz</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-fun-books-that-will-get-your-kids-excited-about-money">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-help-your-kid-build-their-first-budget">How to Help Your Kid Build Their First Budget</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-parenting-mistakes-to-avoid-when-teaching-kids-about-money">4 Parenting Mistakes to Avoid When Teaching Kids About Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-use-new-toys-to-teach-kids-about-money">How to Use New Toys to Teach Kids About Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-living-on-a-tight-budget-makes-you-happier">How Living on a Tight Budget Makes You Happier</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/3-good-money-examples-every-parent-should-set">3 Good Money Examples Every Parent Should Set</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Budgeting Entertainment Family budgeting family kids money parenting saving money Spending Money teenagers tweens Mon, 09 Jan 2017 11:00:09 +0000 Ashley Eneriz 1869549 at http://www.wisebread.com 7 Frugal Living Skills You Should Be Teaching Your Children http://www.wisebread.com/7-frugal-living-skills-you-should-be-teaching-your-children <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/7-frugal-living-skills-you-should-be-teaching-your-children" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/kid_education_money_45175586.jpg" alt="Kid learning frugal living skills from parents" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>We all want to pass our frugal living skills on to our kids, but what lessons are most important? How specific should we get? How soon should we start? Don't sweat the details. Sometimes the most important frugal living skills aren't financial skills at all &mdash; they're life skills that serve us well in dozens of ways. Here are seven frugal living skills you should be teaching your children, no matter how young or old they are.</p> <h2>1. Patience</h2> <p>The ability to delay gratification is the foundation of frugality. It gives us space to mentally separate our needs from our wants, time to find the best deals, and &mdash; most importantly &mdash; a chance to let momentary impulses pass us by.</p> <p>As with most lessons, patience is easier to embrace when taught early. For items your kids want, build in wait times that are dependent on their own effort (grades, chores around the house, or progress toward their own personal goals). If their wants change during that time, which is inevitable with children, complete the lesson by pointing out how the slight delay translates into dollars saved. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-being-patient-saves-you-money?ref=seealso">8 Ways Being Patient Saves You Money</a>)</p> <h2>2. Self-Confidence</h2> <p>Here's the dirty little secret that keeps our consumer culture thriving: Advertisers and marketers hate personal confidence and they do everything in their power to knock our self-image off kilter. Every day, we face a barrage of neuroses-inspiring messages that tell us we have the wrong car, wrong clothes, dull hair, bad breath, and hopelessly yellow teeth.</p> <p>Instilling a strong sense of self-confidence can help kids avoid falling victim to these messages for the rest of their lives &mdash; and sacrificing a large part of their personal wealth in the process. Seize every opportunity to reinforce the idea that your kids are fine just the way are and model that truth yourself. Then, when age-appropriate, pull back the advertising curtain. Point out how commercial messages are artfully crafted to make us all spend more than we should by making us all feel less than we are. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/3-ways-confidence-makes-you-better-with-money?ref=seealso">3 Ways Confidence Makes You Better With Money</a>)</p> <h2>3. Collaboration</h2> <p>In our hyper-consumer culture, collaborating and sharing are revolutionary acts because they slightly erode the need for more. Why buy your own lawn mower if you can borrow one from a close neighbor? Likewise, why should your neighbor buy a snowblower if he can use yours a few times a year?</p> <p>Encourage sharing at an early age by helping your kids develop strong communication skills, showing them how to make and honor agreements, and teaching them how to be good stewards of what they (and others) own.</p> <h2>4. Creativity</h2> <p>Making do with less takes creativity and ingenuity. It's how the moms and dads of yesteryear stretched meals, made new clothes from old, bartered for goods, and kept life going on what was often a shoestring budget. Foster your children's imagination with free-form toys, unstructured play, and arts and crafts &mdash; anything that gets them moving, thinking, and exploring new ideas.</p> <h2>5. Negotiation</h2> <p>Knowing how to negotiate on price, payment terms, and extras can save a person thousands of dollars over a lifetime. Teach <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-negotiating-skills-everyone-should-master">essential negotiation skills</a> by example; take your kids with you to flea markets, yard sales, and the used car lot &mdash; any venue where a bit of friendly haggling is expected. Show them how to use to research to their advantage, develop a rapport with sellers, and be fair but fearless in what they ask for.</p> <h2>6. Contentment</h2> <p>Much like low self-confidence, discontentment moves product. Keeping consumers in a constant state of desire is how retailers sell us more than what we need. To complicate matters, teaching children to be content is tricky business in America because we're all afraid of sapping their motivation. While encouraging kids to strive for more is important, make it less about things and money. Instead, help them focus on achieving their personal goals, expanding their experiences, appreciating the moment, and building rich friendships.</p> <h2>7. Individuality</h2> <p>In a world where consumerism and consumer debt is a way of life, choosing a different path takes a steely sense of self. Promoting a spirit of individuality in children helps them cope with &mdash; and even celebrate &mdash; being different. Point out how your family's own spending and saving habits go against the grain and don't be afraid to show the benefits (monetarily and otherwise) of your simpler, saner lifestyle. It will serve them well for the rest of their lives.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/kentin-waits">Kentin Waits</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-frugal-living-skills-you-should-be-teaching-your-children">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/should-you-make-your-young-kids-pay-rent">Should You Make Your Young Kids Pay &quot;Rent?&quot;</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-prepare-your-kids-to-live-on-their-own">How to Prepare Your Kids to Live On Their Own</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-frugal-living-skills-i-wish-my-parents-would-have-taught-me">8 Frugal Living Skills I Wish My Parents Would Have Taught Me</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-money-lessons-kids-can-learn-from-the-tooth-fairy">7 Money Lessons Kids Can Learn From the Tooth Fairy</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/3-good-money-examples-every-parent-should-set">3 Good Money Examples Every Parent Should Set</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Frugal Living Family children family frugal living lessons life lessons money lessons parenting parenting tips skills Tue, 15 Nov 2016 09:00:08 +0000 Kentin Waits 1833153 at http://www.wisebread.com 3 Good Money Examples Every Parent Should Set http://www.wisebread.com/3-good-money-examples-every-parent-should-set <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/3-good-money-examples-every-parent-should-set" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_19397725_MEDIUM.jpg" alt="every parent should set these money examples for their kids" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Here's a scary statistic for you: <a href="https://corporate.troweprice.com/Money-Confident-Kids/images/emk/2016pkmresultsdeckfinal-160322181149.pdf">71% of parents are reluctant</a> to discuss financial matters with their kids. I think the reason so many parents hold back from talking about money with their children is because they feel like they have nothing to offer. Or that kids don't need to learn about money until they're old enough to get a job. But there's a great deal they can learn from you during their younger years.</p> <p>No matter what your financial situation is, how much debt you have, or what you make per year, you can master better financial habits that your kids can learn from. Lead by example with these three important practices.</p> <h2>Maintain a Giving Heart</h2> <p>When your kids are driving you nuts, and you just want to get from your car into the store or restaurant as fast as possible, someone begging for money can seem like an inconvenience. It can be tempting to blow off the person with thoughts like, <em>Get a job</em>, or <em>I don't even have enough money for my own family.</em> Instead, offer to buy the person a meal at the restaurant or a grocery item at the store you are about to enter.</p> <p>This shows your children how to be giving and thoughtful of others. If the person does accept your offer, you can turn it into a simple teaching moment with your children. Say something like, &quot;You know how we always have food to eat or how you have a bed to sleep in? Some people don't have anything.&quot;</p> <p>Many times, the person in need will just want money. This is another great teachable moment. Encourage your children to help meet basic needs, but to not just foolishly throw their money at people. This goes for both homeless people and friends/family members who try to take advantage of others.</p> <h2>Avoid Impulse Buys</h2> <p>We see it in places like Target all the time: A child begs for every toy or sparkly thing. While the mother says, &quot;no&quot; firmly, she also has no reserve as she tosses a cute blouse and table décor into her cart.</p> <p>I'm guilty of this, too. I'm pretty good at keeping my children in check with impulse buys at the store, but I didn't immediately realize that I needed the same lesson. Now when we shop, and my four-year old asks if we can buy something, I try to make that a teachable moment for both of us. I say, &quot;Honey, I know you want a lot of things here, and so do I, but it is so important for us to buy only what we need today.&quot;</p> <p>Does this mean you can never buy anything fun? Of course not. But plan and budget for the fun items, including your children in the process. Maybe saying something like, &quot;Today we are going to pick out some holiday decorations. Our budget is $20 today. Can you help me pick out something?&quot;</p> <p>See also:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-easy-things-science-says-you-should-do-for-your-family?ref=seealso">5 Easy Things Science Says You Should Do for Your Family</a></p> <h2>Set Financial Goals</h2> <p>Goals are extremely important in life. I'm not talking about vague and lofty goals such as, getting out of debt or saving $20,000 by January 1. You need to set concrete goals that have actionable steps, and keep progress of your goals until completion. Don't be afraid to tell older kids what your financial goals are for the year, and give them progress reports. It is important for children to learn that they can accomplish a huge variety of tasks &mdash; saving money, getting healthy, learning a skill, etc. &mdash; if they set and follow through with their goals.</p> <p>To make this a family matter, come up with a fun vacation you can take together. Figure out the cost (don't forget to budget in money for unexpected extras) and the date. For example, if you are planning on spending $2,500 for a weekend vacation in six months, then you would need to save about $100 each week. Make it a fun game by drawing a chart that tracks progress.</p> <p>Another way to help your child understand how to set financial goals is to have them set their own. For example, if they want a certain toy at the store, figure out how much it will cost. Then make a savings jar and a progress chart for them that relates to how much they earn per week through chores. Frugal-mama.com has a&nbsp;<a href="http://www.frugal-mama.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/01/FrugalMamaSavingsProgressThermometerChart.pdf">free savings goal printable</a> to help you track progress.</p> <p>See also:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-reasons-frugal-families-love-boardgame-night?ref=seealso">8 Reasons Frugal Families Love Boardgame Night</a></p> <p>Whether you don't want to burden your kids with your financial woes or you feel like you don't have enough information to give them, think again. You don't have to share every money worry or goal with them, but show them how you manage money and teach them basic financial fundamentals in a fun manner.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/ashley-eneriz">Ashley Eneriz</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/3-good-money-examples-every-parent-should-set">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/should-you-make-your-young-kids-pay-rent">Should You Make Your Young Kids Pay &quot;Rent?&quot;</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/21-things-you-should-make-your-kids-pay-for">21 Things You Should Make Your Kids Pay For</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-fun-books-that-will-get-your-kids-excited-about-money">10 Fun Books That Will Get Your Kids Excited About Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-use-new-toys-to-teach-kids-about-money">How to Use New Toys to Teach Kids About Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-money-lessons-kids-can-learn-from-the-tooth-fairy">7 Money Lessons Kids Can Learn From the Tooth Fairy</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Budgeting Family finances financial lessons kids lead by example money lessons parenting Thu, 27 Oct 2016 09:30:25 +0000 Ashley Eneriz 1821540 at http://www.wisebread.com The 5 Best Apps for Busy Working Parents http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-best-apps-for-busy-working-parents <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/the-5-best-apps-for-busy-working-parents" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/mother_baby_phone_43606458.jpg" alt="Mom using apps for busy working parents" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Working parents need to maximize their time in order to be most efficient. These apps will help working moms and dads better manage kids' routines, plan family outings, and manage family budgets effectively.</p> <p>See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-fun-money-apps-for-kids?ref=seealso">10 Fun Money Apps for Kids</a></p> <h2>1. Happy Kids Timer</h2> <p><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5171/KidTimer_02.PNG" width="605" height="340" alt="" /></p> <p>Having a hard time keeping kids on schedule, especially in the mornings? <a href="http://www.kidssmartzone.com/">HappyKidsTimer</a> is an app your kids use to help them manage their daily morning routines, like making their beds, getting dressed, brushing their teeth, and so forth. The app features timers and fun incentives to help your kids get on their way.</p> <p>Available for Android and iOS.</p> <p>See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-basic-manners-you-must-teach-your-kids?ref=seealso">10 Basic Manners You Must Teach Your Kids</a></p> <h2>2. KidsEatFree</h2> <p><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5171/KidsEatFree.PNG" width="340" height="605" alt="" /></p> <p>Busy parents often don't have time to cook &mdash; and dining out with the whole family gets expensive, fast. Restaurateurs have responded with a variety of kids eat free promotions. Too many, in fact, for busy parents to track. <a href="https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/kids-eat-free-restaurant-finder/id933114765?mt=8">KidsEatFree</a> is the free app that helps you find free kids' meals nearby, keeping your family on time &mdash; and on budget.</p> <p>Available for iOS.</p> <p>See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-frugal-and-delicious-meals-to-make-with-your-kids?ref=seealso">10 Frugal and Delicious Meals to Make With Your Kids</a></p> <h2>3. Mint.com</h2> <p><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5171/Mint_AppStore.jpeg" width="341" height="605" alt="" /></p> <p>Speaking of budgets, busy parents need to manage their family's money while they are managing the kiddoes. <a href="https://www.mint.com/">Mint.com</a> remains the gold standard free app for tracking all your spending, paying bills, setting and tracking budgets, and monitoring overall net worth.</p> <p>Available for Android and iOS.</p> <p>See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/these-5-apps-can-fix-your-finances?ref=seealso">These 5 Apps Can Fix Your Finances</a></p> <h2>4. VarageSale</h2> <p><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5171/VarageSale_01.PNG" width="340" height="605" alt="" /></p> <p>If you're keen on sticking to your budget, <a href="https://www.varagesale.com/">VarageSale</a> is great for connecting busy parents with others who want to buy or sell used family and children goods. You can make extra cash off your used stroller or crib &mdash; or you can pick up gently used ones for a great price. Look at all the cute outfits!</p> <p>Available for Android and iOS.</p> <p>See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-sell-your-kids-stuff-at-a-consignment-sale?ref=seealso">How to Sell Your Kids' Stuff at a Consignment Sale</a></p> <h2>5. Trekaroo</h2> <p><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5171/Trekaroo.PNG" width="340" height="605" alt="" /></p> <p>Finally, even the busiest, most goal-directed families need some downtime. <a href="http://www.trekaroo.com/">Trekaroo</a> helps hardworking parents plan and budget family outings &mdash; everything from faraway vacations to local day trips. The app finds kid-friendly activities when and where you need them. Even better, each destination includes reviews from other busy parents who've already been, so you can get the inside scoop way before you get there.</p> <p>Available for Android and iOS.</p> <p><em>What are your go-to apps for managing life with kids?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/janet-alvarez">Janet Alvarez</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-best-apps-for-busy-working-parents">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-apps-that-make-budgeting-fun-no-really">7 Apps That Make Budgeting Fun — No Really!</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-smart-ways-to-save-on-smartphones">5 Smart Ways to Save on Smartphones</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-fun-books-that-will-get-your-kids-excited-about-money">10 Fun Books That Will Get Your Kids Excited About Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-parenting-mistakes-to-avoid-when-teaching-kids-about-money">4 Parenting Mistakes to Avoid When Teaching Kids About Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-manage-your-money-no-budgeting-required">How to Manage Your Money — No Budgeting Required</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Budgeting Technology apps budgeting managing money money management parenting phone phone apps productivity saving money smartphone Tue, 09 Aug 2016 11:00:11 +0000 Janet Alvarez 1768674 at http://www.wisebread.com 4 Brilliant Tips From "Smart Mom, Rich Mom" http://www.wisebread.com/4-brilliant-tips-from-smart-mom-rich-mom <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/4-brilliant-tips-from-smart-mom-rich-mom" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/smart_mom_baby_000088665045.jpg" alt="Learning brilliant tips from Smart Mom Rich Mom" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>It's hard enough to save money and focus on building personal wealth when you're single and building your career. But while also raising a family? Forget it. It feels almost impossible. Your kids need to be clothed, fed, cared for, educated, socially stimulated, and financially supported, over and over again until the day they move out of the house and can live on their own. And all of those needs require money in order to be met. Oh, and also? You have needs, too. It's easy to toss those aside, but they are equally as important.</p> <p>It's overwhelming! However, you can create a deep and cozy financial cushion while raising your little ones.</p> <p>Personal finance expert Kimberly Palmer knows this feeling all too well. And in her new book, <em>Smart Mom, Rich Mom</em>, she examines the outdated misconception that women can't become savvy investors while also raising a family.</p> <p>Building personal wealth has historically been a Boys Club, with women serving as mothers and arm candy &mdash; nothing more &mdash; to the powerful men who handle the family finances. Obviously this stereotype needs to be blasted to smithereens, because it's ridiculous and utterly incorrect, and Palmer's advice serves as the metaphorical grenade to do just that. From the very first page, she pulls the pin out and ultimately clears the path for you to become just what her title suggests: a smart mom, and a rich mom. It's a must-read for all aspiring financial lady bosses. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-common-money-misconceptions-about-women?ref=seealso">4 Common Money Misconceptions About Women</a>)</p> <p>Here are four of her most brilliant tips.</p> <h2>1. Understand Your Power</h2> <p>Women have much more financial responsibility &mdash; and power &mdash; than they know. And that trend is increasing.</p> <ul> <li>By 2020, women will control two-thirds of the country's wealth, and 90% of us will handle our finances completely on our own at some point in our lives, due to death or divorce, according to Fidelity.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>In four out of 10 households with children, moms are the only or primary breadwinners, according to the Pew Research Center.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Yet, according to a report from Boston Consulting Group, most women are unhappy with the level of service from their financial services providers, and many feel as if they are &quot;talked down to&quot; by male advisers.</li> </ul> <p>Clearly, the industry has yet to recognize that our lack of male reproductive parts in no way inhibits our ability to be our household's money boss. And in fact, a lot of us are pretty good at it.</p> <p>So don't ever second-guess your power as a financially savvy investor. Don't ever allow your adviser or anyone else make you feel like a clueless housewife.</p> <h2>2. Focus on the Bigger Picture</h2> <p>In chapter one, &quot;Save (and Spend) Like a Mother,&quot; Palmer notes how the Great Recession made saving money cool again. It's no longer embarrassing to shop generics or clip coupons, because why should anyone spend more than they need to?</p> <p>But the practice of penny pinching and coupon clipping are methods of short-term saving, and because they can become time-consuming habits, they can lead to short-term financial planning, too.</p> <p>Not that we should nix the couponing altogether, but we need to leave room to focus on the bigger picture. Palmer suggests finding ways to save more on the grand scheme of things, like with a flex-spending account for childcare, or negotiating monthly bills to put that extra money into your savings account. In a perfect comparison, Palmer encourages becoming more of a &quot;skilled shopper&quot; and not just a &quot;discount chaser.&quot;</p> <h2>3. Embrace Your Ambition</h2> <p>In chapter four, &quot;Like a Boss,&quot; Palmer describes how exhausted she felt after the birth of her first child, and how that exhaustion led to concerns about not being able to contribute financially to the household while on maternity leave. Such a painfully relatable concern, I just wanted to leap onto the page and hug this woman for acknowledging it. You spend your early life building your career, becoming self-sufficient, and then you spend nine months growing a human in your middle, only to be left feeling rundown and dependent on your partner, in every possible way, during those first months of motherhood.</p> <p>Of course, as we all do, Palmer made it through the tough transition. And she did so by keeping that flame of ambition burning. She took on freelance work; she used her child's naptime as time to grow her Etsy shop. She had a moment of clarity early on that motivated her to create her own income stream, and ultimately ensure that her new baby would be given the best care, and the best life possible. So when those moments come, latch on and find ways to be your own boss.</p> <h2>4. Own Your Independence</h2> <p>In chapter five, &quot;Investing Mamas,&quot; Palmer talks about the importance of learning to manage your finances your own, as early on as possible. &quot;We are going to be on our own at some point,&quot;she writes,&quot; whether through choice, tragedy, or the simple fact that wives tend to outlive their husbands. That&rsquo;s why we need to know how to manage our investments with the same confidence we apply to paying bills or planning the week&rsquo;s meals.&quot;</p> <p>So while it's helpful for spouses to split household duties down the middle to make life easier, there shouldn't be a task that your partner does that you have no idea how to do, especially when it comes to managing money.</p> <p>Not only are Palmer's tips insightful and relatable, but she also provides clear, actionable steps at the end of each chapter to help you become the financially savvy, and independent woman you want to be. The book ends with a 12-month guide to creating a year of financial growth and brilliant organization so that in just a year's time, you can go from a stressed, overworked mama, to confident, money-savvy mom boss. Palmer is in your corner, and she's rooting for you to succeed.</p> <p><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5171/Palmer%2C%20Smart%20Mom.jpg" width="605" height="459" alt="" /></p> <p>Feeling inspired yet? Pick up your copy of <a href="http://www.kimberly-palmer.com/smartmomrichmom/"><em>Smart Mom, Rich Mom</em></a>, on sale today!</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/chrissa-hardy">Chrissa Hardy</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-brilliant-tips-from-smart-mom-rich-mom">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-take-one-vacation-day-and-save-thousands">How to Take One Vacation Day and Save Thousands</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/flashback-friday-38-money-lessons-we-can-learn-from-celebrities">Flashback Friday: 38 Money Lessons We Can Learn From Celebrities</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-financial-perks-of-being-in-your-20s">The Financial Perks of Being in Your 20s</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-personal-finance-skills-everyone-should-master">12 Personal Finance Skills Everyone Should Master</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-money-lessons-to-take-from-the-great-depression">9 Money Lessons to Take From the Great Depression</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance Frugal Living Entertainment book reviews budgeting building wealth frugal living investing frugal living hacks Kimberly Palmer new books parenting parenting on a budget saving money Wed, 01 Jun 2016 09:00:11 +0000 Chrissa Hardy 1718633 at http://www.wisebread.com 5 Money Rules That'll Save You Big in Baby's First Year http://www.wisebread.com/5-money-rules-thatll-save-you-big-in-babys-first-year <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-money-rules-thatll-save-you-big-in-babys-first-year" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_000072976509_Double.jpg" alt="Mom saving big in baby&#039;s first year" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>My family is expecting a new addition in June, and we're beyond psyched! Since this is our second child, we won't be making a registry list or having a baby shower. With almost five years between kids, however, we certainly are in need of a few things. Here's how we're planning to save throughout our baby's first year on gear and clothing, and how you can, too!</p> <h2>1. Digging Deep</h2> <p>Before doing anything else, I looked through all the bins of my daughter's baby stuff. For families where kids have tight age gaps, this is a natural. Reuse what you can. Unfortunately, if you do have a longer period of time between kids, like we do, things like car seats can expire, and other gear might be recalled. We've cleared out the items we cannot use and assessed the condition of the rest.</p> <p>Stuff like clothing can stand the test of time with babies because they wear outfits for only a couple months before they outgrow them. Cloth diapers are also a great item to use again, doubling the initial savings. And if you have old baby gear you'd rather not use, try reselling it for cash for the new things you want to buy.</p> <p>We find out soon if we're having a girl or boy, so if things are looking blue, I have a huge mountain of clothing I can sell at the local second-hand shop. <em>[Editor's note: It's a girl!]</em></p> <h2>2. Buying Used</h2> <p>That's right &mdash; you can sell your old stuff, but you can also buy used to save money. When I was a first-time mom, I didn't take advantage of thrift shops and other second-hand opportunities. This time around? I know better. That expensive baby swing you have on your shopping list might get a whopping two months of use. Babies grow out of toys and clothes in what seems like minutes. What does this mean? Thrift shops and consignment stores are teeming with quality gear at a fraction of the original price.</p> <p>Check around your town to find shops that sell gently used baby items. You may even find places online, like a local Facebook garage sale group, where you can browse listings right now. We have a Salvation Army, Good Will, Thrifty Shopper, and a specialty store called Once Upon a Child. Check these places often (once every week or two weeks) to see what comes in. And monitor for sales and other events. Our local Once Upon a Child recently had a huge bag blowout sale, where you could get an entire packed bag of clothing for just $15. One of my friends calculated that she got $100 worth of like-new clothing in just one bag.</p> <h2>3. Buying Smart</h2> <p>Of course, there are things we will want or need to buy new. For those items, I'm taking my time and using my shopping ninja powers. Whenever I'm out at Target or Walmart and see something we might need, I pull out my phone and check around for the best price. If I see a better price listed somewhere else online, I march to customer service and ask about their price-matching policy. I've never been denied a lower price if I can produce the proof on my phone. (Related: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/heres-how-to-get-a-sale-price-match-at-16-popular-stores?ref=seealso">Here's How to Get a Sale Price-Match at 16 Popular Stores</a>)</p> <p>That being said, I do the majority of my shopping online, so I go through sites like Ebates to get cash back on whatever I'm buying. I also used the Black Friday, Cyber Monday, and other seasonal sales events to my advantage this year. My tip? Make a list of what you are looking to buy, then browse around your favorite shops online to look for sales, savings codes, or other promotions. Pregnancy lasts over nine months, so you'll likely see what you're looking for at a discounted price with time and patience.</p> <h2>4. Needing Less</h2> <p>Another advantage of being a seasoned mom is that I know I don't need everything on those fussy registry must-have lists. In theory, babies only need basic clothing, somewhere safe to sleep, breast milk or formula, and love. The rest is extra. Well, for the most part. Your own must-have list will look different compared to mine. But before you buy everything you're told you need, think about your own lifestyle.</p> <p>For us, this means we don't need a bassinet or moses basket because the baby will sleep in a Pack 'N Play in the early days (that we'll also use for traveling well beyond the first year). We likely won't need to stock up on bottles if breastfeeding goes well again. I'm skipping the travel system because we never used one with our daughter and plan to, instead, carry our baby in a ring sling that I bought used. You get the idea. A lot of registry lists get you prepared for absolutely every scenario you might encounter. Try to resist the items that don't make sense to you and your way of life.</p> <h2>5. Waiting</h2> <p>As of today, my list of to-buy baby items is pretty minimal. I'm sure I'll eventually want or need some stuff for convenience or &mdash; let's be honest &mdash; just for fun. But for now, I'm waiting on making those purchases until after the baby arrives. As I've waited, some of my friends have even offered up to let me borrow things like bouncers and rocking chairs. Another friend handed me a stack of never-used cloth diapers she didn't need when her son was a baby.</p> <p>Once our little one is here, I'm also resisting the urge to buy things ahead of time. With my daughter, I thought I was being frugal by stocking up on clearance clothing with sizes a year in advance. The problem is that not all children grow at the same rate. My daughter didn't end up fitting in a lot of the duds I bought to &quot;save money,&quot; defeating the entire purpose. In the end, if we can live without whatever it is for another day or two, chances are we don't need it in the long run.</p> <p><em>How are you saving money as a new parent? Share with us in the comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/ashley-marcin">Ashley Marcin</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-money-rules-thatll-save-you-big-in-babys-first-year">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-essential-money-moves-for-new-parents">7 Essential Money Moves for New Parents</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-fun-books-that-will-get-your-kids-excited-about-money">10 Fun Books That Will Get Your Kids Excited About Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-parenting-mistakes-to-avoid-when-teaching-kids-about-money">4 Parenting Mistakes to Avoid When Teaching Kids About Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/24-tips-for-having-a-baby-without-going-broke">24 Tips for Having a Baby Without Going Broke</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/3-good-money-examples-every-parent-should-set">3 Good Money Examples Every Parent Should Set</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Budgeting Family baby frugal living new parents parenting saving money Fri, 12 Feb 2016 10:00:05 +0000 Ashley Marcin 1653873 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Best Jobs for Working Moms and Dads http://www.wisebread.com/6-best-jobs-for-working-moms-and-dads <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-best-jobs-for-working-moms-and-dads" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_000075489143_Large.jpg" alt="working mom loving her job" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Working moms and dads seek jobs that provide a blend of good pay, flexibility, and plenty of time off. It's all about striking that ever-important work-life balance. What careers have it all? Here are just a few jobs you might consider if you're a parent and craving a change.</p> <h2>1. Web Developer</h2> <p>The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) expects <a href="http://www.bls.gov/ooh/computer-and-information-technology/web-developers.htm">new web developer positions</a> to grow 27% by 2024. This is wonderful news if you're a mom or dad into designing and maintaining websites. The median pay for web developers is $63,490 per year or $30.52 per hour. While about one in seven in this position are self-employed, there's a lot of opportunity to work from home full- or even part-time. You just need a computer, coding experience, and a dose of creativity.</p> <h2>2. Freelancer</h2> <p>As a freelance writer, I set my own hours, choose the weight of my workload, and do it all from the comfort of my home office. I write when my daughter is at preschool, while she's sleeping, and I sneak in other bits of work when I find the time. Mustering the discipline to stay focused at home can be a challenge, and quarterly taxes are sometimes annoying. Overall, though, I feel fortunate to have discovered such a wonderful way to use my college degree in writing and pay a nice chunk of our monthly bills.</p> <p>Not great with words? According to <em>Time Magazine</em>, there are at least 17.8 million freelancers who <a href="http://time.com/money/4023097/freelance-economy-facts-stats/">work over 15 hours</a> a week in the United States. A few of the highest paying freelance positions include patent lawyers ($112 per hour), voiceover artists ($72 per hour), and programmers ($61 per hour). Even better, a whopping 2.9 million freelancers brought home over $100,000 in pay last year.</p> <h2>3. IT Data Scientist</h2> <p>What exactly does an IT data scientist do? Just solves complex problems in computing and discovers new uses for existing technology. That's all.</p> <p>The BLS explains that as a computer and information research scientist, you need some major skills and education. Many people interested in this type of work will need to hold a Ph.D. in computer science (or a related field), though some jobs in the federal government only require a bachelor's degree. IT data scientists <a href="http://www.bls.gov/ooh/computer-and-information-technology/computer-and-information-research-scientists.htm">earn high salaries</a> (median salary of over $100,000) and only one in 10 worked over 40 hours per week in 2014. If you can swing it, the job outlook is solid with 11% growth leading up to 2024.</p> <h2>4. K-12 Teacher</h2> <p>My husband is a high school English teacher. While many may argue that teachers don't get paid enough for their work, the time off, benefits, and opportunities to make extra money are excellent. He leaves for work around 7 a.m. and can be home by 3 p.m. most days of the week. He has 10 weeks off during the summer months and many more throughout the year for holidays and breaks. To supplement our income, he even took on a couple coaching gigs that have increased his salary by more than $10,000 per year.</p> <p>Many teachers also enjoy unique time off benefits, especially related to child care leaves. In New York City, for example, a teacher can apply for <a href="http://schools.nyc.gov/Offices/DHR/HealthBenefitsLeavesAbsence/NonMedicalLeave/default.htm">child care leave</a> at a maximum of four years after a birth or adoption. Though there is no pay or health insurance during this time, having the option to stay home with a job ready and waiting is certainly appealing to many parents.</p> <h2>5. Other Education</h2> <p>Online adjunct faculty get the best of both worlds with the option to work from home and set their own hours. As the site GetEducated explains, the BLS <a href="http://www.geteducated.com/career-center/detail/online-instructor-post-secondary">doesn't yet separate data</a> with traditional and online post-secondary teachers. Some estimates come in at around $1,500 and $2,500 per semester-long course, but pay varies wildly by institution and position. More and more people are choosing to continue their educations online, so job growth is expected to climb in this field.</p> <p>You'll need an advanced degree and some experience to hold a curriculum development job. Once you're in, many positions are full-time and allow you to work from home. How much will you make? About $60,000 a year. Not too shabby.</p> <h2>6. Call Center Representatives</h2> <p>You've probably been on the phone with a call center representative at one time or another. Some handle customer complaints, while others work on sales or order processing. These folks are employed in most every industry across the board. Did you know that many of them do it from home and set their own hours? It's true!</p> <p>The BLS reports that the median <a href="http://www.bls.gov/ooh/office-and-administrative-support/customer-service-representatives.htm">pay for call center representatives</a> is around $30,000 but the education level required is just a high school diploma. On-the-job training is short and sweet, too. Positions are expected to grow some 10% between now and 2024.</p> <p><em>Don't see your amazing gig listed here? Feel free to share your own top picks in the comments below!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/ashley-marcin">Ashley Marcin</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-best-jobs-for-working-moms-and-dads">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-to-manage-costs-while-youre-on-maternity-leave">5 Ways to Manage Costs While You&#039;re on Maternity Leave</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/24-tips-for-having-a-baby-without-going-broke">24 Tips for Having a Baby Without Going Broke</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/when-should-you-say-no-to-those-who-want-to-borrow-money-from-you">When Should You Say No to Those Who Want to Borrow Money from You?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-secrets-about-life-and-career-from-office-space">7 Secrets About Life and Career From &quot;Office Space&quot;</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-alternatives-to-nagging">15 Alternatives to Nagging</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income Family parenting work from home work life balance working dad working mom Thu, 04 Feb 2016 00:15:34 +0000 Ashley Marcin 1649807 at http://www.wisebread.com Everything You Need to Know About Cloth Diapers http://www.wisebread.com/everything-you-need-to-know-about-cloth-diapers <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/everything-you-need-to-know-about-cloth-diapers" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/baby_diaper_change_000049964944.jpg" alt="Parents learning cloth diapering basics" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>One way you can save big bucks during baby's first years is by cloth diapering, especially if you plan on having multiple children and can reuse them. Choosing cloth for your child will also save you tons of cash on <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-best-trash-bags">trash bags</a> (not to mention heaps of diapers in the landfill). Here's the process broken down for those who might be curious or even feel intimidated.</p> <h2>How It Works</h2> <p>Many people are surprised to learn that cloth diapering doesn't take a whole lot more effort than standard diapering. You put the diaper on your child, he or she soils it, you change the diaper, and then you start fresh. The only difference is that you'll be dealing with the diapers again on the washing end. As you can imagine, getting the job done requires some planning and practice.</p> <p>The good news: laundering diapers is far less gross and time-consuming than you might think. And there are many options available to you depending on your commitment level and lifestyle.</p> <h2>Types of Diapers</h2> <p>There are a multitude of cloth diapering options, and what you choose is up to you. Some diapers have a gazillion snaps. Others have tricky Velcro closures. Some need covers. Others come in two parts. Here are the most common types &mdash; demystified.</p> <h3>1. Pocket</h3> <p>The majority of my cloth diapers were pocket style from <a href="http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=as_li_ss_tl?_encoding=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;field-keywords=bum%20genius%20pocket%20diaper&amp;linkCode=ur2&amp;rh=i%3Aaps%2Ck%3Abum%20genius%20pocket%20diaper&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;url=search-alias%3Daps&amp;linkId=D32B7OKWILONMOMC">bumGenius</a>. Basically, the diaper comes in two parts &mdash; the waterproof outer shell and the absorbent insert. Our diapers fit our daughter from a few weeks after she was born until she was potty trained. Stuffing and un-stuffing does take a few extra minutes at wash time, but it becomes automatic.</p> <h3>2. All-in-Ones</h3> <p>If you choose <a href="http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=as_li_ss_tl?_encoding=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;field-keywords=all-in-one%20diaper&amp;linkCode=ur2&amp;rh=i%3Aaps%2Ck%3Aall-in-one%20diaper&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;url=search-alias%3Daps&amp;linkId=7S3KD65PIFLRURHZ">all-in-one diapers</a> (AIO), you'll get everything you need in one convenient package. There's no stuffing or covers required because it's all sewn together. My only issue with AIO is that they take longer to dry than the other types. Otherwise, they're super easy to use and come in a variety of fabrics.</p> <h3>3. Prefolds</h3> <p>A lot of people picture <a href="http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=as_li_ss_tl?_encoding=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;field-keywords=prefold%20diapers&amp;linkCode=ur2&amp;rh=i%3Aaps%2Ck%3Aprefold%20diapers&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;url=search-alias%3Daps&amp;linkId=556WLYXRRNKOXFJM">prefold diapers</a> when they think of the cloth process. This type is much like what your mother or grandmother may have used with pins, but it's still a popular choice today and most often the best choice for your budget. Instead of pins, you can use snazzy <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004YWKWJO/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B004YWKWJO&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=ZCF7D3XWJUB2Z2GH">diaper fasteners</a>. You'll cover your prefolds with a <a href="http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=as_li_ss_tl?_encoding=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;field-keywords=prefold%20cover&amp;linkCode=ur2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;url=search-alias%3Daps&amp;linkId=GUGNZRWDPDH45VNL">waterproof cover</a>.</p> <h3>4. Fitted</h3> <p><a href="http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=as_li_ss_tl?_encoding=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;field-keywords=fitted%20diaper&amp;linkCode=ur2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;url=search-alias%3Daps&amp;linkId=AAZBTMFBJ7NGI44P">Fitted diapers</a> also require waterproof covers. The key difference between fitted and prefolds is that they don't need folding or any special fastener to stay closed. If you choose this type, you'll have to buy different sizes as your baby grows. Each size fits a good range of weights, though.</p> <h3>5. Hybrids</h3> <p>I eventually added some <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B003ZYM06K/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B003ZYM06K&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=5M6LGQVHONC6VQ2U">gDiapers</a> to my collection when we started traveling and using a sitter more frequently. As the name implies, hybrid diapers provide a mix of options depending on your preferences. You can fill the reusable waterproof cover with a disposable or cloth insert. They come in one-size and individual sizes. Hybrid diapers certainly offer the most flexibility in the bunch.</p> <h3>6. Used</h3> <p>Seriously. There are thousands of people who incorporate used cloth diapers into their stashes. In fact, that's another reason cloth is a good investment &mdash; you can sell them or reuse them when your baby is done. Check out sites like <a href="http://clothdiapertrader.com">ClothDiaperTrader</a> where you can get gently used diapers for a fraction of their original prices.</p> <h2>Smart Setup</h2> <p>Once you've chosen your diaper type(s), move your attention to your diaper station setup. Much of what you assemble will be the same as if you were using disposables. However, there are some key things that will make life easier on you and others who diaper your child.</p> <h3>1. Diaper Pail and Liner</h3> <p>You'll need somewhere to store the dirty diapers while they're waiting to be washed. We used a tall <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004L9L3KW/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B004L9L3KW&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=ONSCRGLHSFCGLMP4">plastic garbage can</a> with a snap-shut cover and wheels. Instead of lining it with a garbage bag, we bought two reusable <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004Q2Z9TK/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B004Q2Z9TK&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=4YMSAPCV7A6ZBOVR">diaper pail liners</a> that get washed with the diapers. Toss the diapers in the bin, wheel it to your washing machine, and go.</p> <h3>2. Prep Your Diapers</h3> <p>If you use pocket diapers, prefolds, hybrids, or anything else with more than one part &mdash; stuff it or lay it out ahead of time. I used to do this while watching television when they were fresh from the dryer. If you use all-in-ones, you can skip this step. Regardless, taking a bit of time to have everything organized is well worth it.</p> <h3>3. Diaper Liners</h3> <p>Over time, diaper creams and salves can cause the diaper to lose its absorbency. If you need to use creams on your baby, you'll want to use <a href="http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=as_li_ss_tl?_encoding=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;field-keywords=cloth%20diaper%20liners&amp;linkCode=ur2&amp;rh=i%3Aaps%2Ck%3Acloth%20diaper%20liners&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;url=search-alias%3Daps&amp;linkId=F3TCUUSCVQZPT5BV">diaper liners</a> to protect the fabric from buildup. To make sure you use them, stick them somewhere next to your wipes. Bonus: Diaper liners also make cleaning up solids much easier.</p> <h3>4. Cloth Wipes</h3> <p>Using <a href="http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=as_li_ss_tl?_encoding=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;field-keywords=cloth%20wipes&amp;linkCode=ur2&amp;rh=i%3Aaps%2Ck%3Acloth%20wipes&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;url=search-alias%3Daps&amp;linkId=END2OJ54XJRTHJIO">cloth wipes</a> is entirely optional. But if you're already washing diapers, tossing in wipes isn't that much more work. You can even make your own cloth wipes by cutting pieces of flannel fabric and soaking them in a gentle <a href="http://www.zany-zebra.com/cloth-wipe-solution.shtml">wash solution</a> that's just a mixture of water, soap, and oil. Keep your wipes in a plastic bag or container until you're ready to use.</p> <h2>Notes on Laundering</h2> <p>To keep your stash fresh and friendly for your child's bum, you'll want to wash every day or every other day. Jillian's Drawers, a cloth diaper shop near where I live, suggests washing no more than <a href="https://www.jilliansdrawers.com/newtocloth/washingcloth">12 to 18 diapers at a time</a>, using your machine's highest water level setting and hot water.</p> <p>Try sticking to detergents that leave little residue, fragrance, and other gunk on diapers. Skip fabric softeners. The buildup can make diapers lose their absorbency over time. You can use specific diaper detergents like <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B003N0JXSO/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B003N0JXSO&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=LGUI5RZZ56WNR3YD">Rockin' Green</a> or <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00F8LIZQM/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B00F8LIZQM&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=H3VBRZQXI5C6AZZL">Molly's Suds</a>. A lot of people use plain Tide or <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00AM16MZO/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B00AM16MZO&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=LVNYB2W6UHZX7W6J">Charlie's Soap</a>.</p> <p>What about number two? It's also a great idea to install a <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00OKSCWN6/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B00OKSCWN6&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=HPMQJTMACZRZBJN3">diaper sprayer</a> on your toilet to help wash away solids before they sit for too long. It takes just minutes and can save you a big stink later.</p> <p>And when it comes to drying, the sun works wonders. If you can, put your diapers on a line outdoors and let the air freshen and the sun zap out stains. Otherwise, dry prefolds and diaper inserts in your machine. Try hanging covers and other diapers on a line or drying rack. They'll keep their integrity longer with gentler care.</p> <p><em>What does your cloth diapering process look like? Any tips to share?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/ashley-marcin">Ashley Marcin</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/everything-you-need-to-know-about-cloth-diapers">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/should-you-make-your-young-kids-pay-rent">Should You Make Your Young Kids Pay &quot;Rent?&quot;</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-fun-books-that-will-get-your-kids-excited-about-money">10 Fun Books That Will Get Your Kids Excited About Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/3-good-money-examples-every-parent-should-set">3 Good Money Examples Every Parent Should Set</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-lessons-about-money-i-learned-after-having-twins">7 Lessons About Money I Learned After Having Twins</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-prepare-your-kids-to-live-on-their-own">How to Prepare Your Kids to Live On Their Own</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Family Green Living babies cloth diapers eco-friendly kids parenting reusing Thu, 08 Oct 2015 15:00:42 +0000 Ashley Marcin 1578820 at http://www.wisebread.com 7 Parenting Mistakes Everyone Makes But No One Talks About http://www.wisebread.com/7-parenting-mistakes-everyone-makes-but-no-one-talks-about <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/7-parenting-mistakes-everyone-makes-but-no-one-talks-about" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/child_surprised_face_000056888518.jpg" alt="Child pointing out parenting mistakes everyone makes" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>As parents, we all want the best for our kids. But we all make mistakes. And while <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-4-worst-mistakes-good-parents-make">parenting mistakes</a> may not be brought up at birthday parties and playdates, you can be reasonably sure most parents have struggled with at least a few of these.</p> <h2>1. Protecting Your Child From Every Risk</h2> <p>It's hard to see your child going through anything difficult, from getting a bump or scrape, to dealing with the mean kids on the playground. A common parenting mistake, however, is protecting your child from any hard situation. Recent research shows that <a href="http://healthland.time.com/2013/02/22/hover-no-more-helicopter-parents-may-breed-depression-and-incompetence-in-their-children/">insulating our kids from adversity</a> may make them less resilient in the long run, leading to depression when faced with the real problems in life.</p> <p>Start building resilience in your children early on by allowing them to take risks, and to experience and solve problems by themselves. At the same time, ensure that they feel loved and accepted, which will help them to have the courage to tackle challenges outside the home.</p> <h2>2. Structuring Too Much of Your Child's Time</h2> <p>In today's climate of &quot;tiger&quot; parenting, it can often feel like you have to schedule your child for every activity in order to get ahead. But research shows that over-structuring your child's time &mdash; whether with violin lessons, language studies, art classes, or sports teams &mdash; can actually harm his or her &quot;executive function,&quot; the ability for the child to self-direct their own activities. Research shows that <a href="http://www.theatlantic.com/education/archive/2014/06/for-better-school-results-clear-the-schedule-and-let-kids-play/373144/">self-regulation and free play</a> are vital for the child's future independence and academic achievement. So let your child enjoy being in charge of his/her own little world.</p> <h2>3. Praising Your Child in the Wrong Way</h2> <p>We know that parental approval and praise is an essential part of building a child's self-esteem, but we have to be cautious of <em>how</em> we dole out that praise. Excessively praising everything your children do can actually damage them in the long run, causing them to be afraid of trying new things or challenging themselves, for fear of losing their parents' approval. Recently, studies have shown that excessive praise can <a href="http://www.forbes.com/sites/alicegwalton/2015/03/09/parents-stop-overvaluing-your-kid-you-may-create-a-future-narcissist-study-says/">feed narcissism and over-inflated egos</a>. At the same time, withholding praise can also cause insecurity. So how should we praise our kids?</p> <p>Experts tend to think that praising their effort is the best way to praise our children. Instead of saying &quot;You're so smart!&quot; or &quot;You won!&quot; focus instead on the effort that your child put in to achieve their goal. Praise kids in proportion to how much they deserve it &mdash; don't make a big deal out of something that should be a routine responsibility. Tell them you're proud of them when they treat others with kindness and generosity. Tell your kids often that you love them, but don't send the message that they are better than or superior to other children.</p> <h2>4. Shaming Your Child</h2> <p>We all want our children to behave, but sometimes the methods we choose can have lasting consequences. Embarrassing your child in public may force them to behave as you wish in the short-term, but is unlikely to improve your relationship in the long-term. Shame is one of the most painful and anxiety-causing experiences of childhood. Because shaming attacks the person, rather than the behavior, it can damage a child's self-esteem. And because shaming denotes a lack of respect for the child, it can in turn cause the child to <a href="https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/the-legacy-distorted-love/201209/shaming-children-is-emotionally-abusive">lose respect for the parent</a>.</p> <p>If you find yourself yelling phrases like, &quot;What's wrong with you?&quot; or berating your child in public, you may need to check your own behavior. It can be hard to be kind when you're frustrated, but be mindful of how you speak to your child. Treat him/her the way you would like to be treated, and use words that foster mutual respect.</p> <h2>5. Not Taking Time to Empathize</h2> <p>One of the most important things you can do as a parent is to be empathetic to your child. Empathy means truly listening to your child, understanding how he or she feels, and putting yourself in your child's shoes. The problem is, it's not always easy to empathize with your child when you're tired, busy, in a hurry, and your child is screaming their head off in the Target checkout lane.</p> <p>Remember that children aren't necessarily trying to push your buttons &mdash; they just don't have the tools to manage their emotions yet. Get down at your child's level, look into their eyes, and try to understand how they're feeling. We all need to have our feelings acknowledged by a loving, accepting, parent. While you may not agree with the feelings or behavior, and will still need to enforce boundaries, simply letting your child know that you see how he/she really feels will go a long way towards fulfilling their emotional needs.</p> <h2>6. Refusing to Admit You're Wrong</h2> <p>As parents, we want to hold onto the authority in the household. But as role models, if we never admit our mistakes, how can we expect our children to? Admitting when you're wrong, apologizing, and working to right that wrong, shows our children that we respect them, and that we are willing to accept responsibility for our actions. We need to teach our children how to learn from their mistakes, not to be defensive and evasive when we've done something wrong. In addition, swallowing our pride shows kids that we love them more than we love being right.</p> <h2>7. Being Driven by Guilt</h2> <p>We're all flawed humans, no matter how perfect your friends' parenting may seem on Facebook. Don't dwell on your mistakes and let guilt drive your relationship with your kids. Instead, enjoy your time with your children, and remember that tomorrow is another day. We're all trying to do the best job we can, so cut yourself a little slack.</p> <p><em>What parenting mistakes do you struggle with?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/camilla-cheung">Camilla Cheung</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-parenting-mistakes-everyone-makes-but-no-one-talks-about">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-prepare-your-kids-to-live-on-their-own">How to Prepare Your Kids to Live On Their Own</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-having-a-family-boosts-your-career">6 Ways Having a Family Boosts Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/should-you-make-your-young-kids-pay-rent">Should You Make Your Young Kids Pay &quot;Rent?&quot;</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-frugal-living-skills-you-should-be-teaching-your-children">7 Frugal Living Skills You Should Be Teaching Your Children</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-basic-manners-you-must-teach-your-kids">10 Basic Manners You Must Teach Your Kids</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Family behavior child psychology children discipline parenting raising kids Wed, 23 Sep 2015 11:00:24 +0000 Camilla Cheung 1561948 at http://www.wisebread.com