coworkers http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/3147/all en-US 8 Career Mistakes to Stop Making by 30 http://www.wisebread.com/8-career-mistakes-to-stop-making-by-30 <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/8-career-mistakes-to-stop-making-by-30" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_shocked_computer_000032866368.jpg" alt="Woman learning career mistakes to stop making by 30" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Mistakes &mdash; we all make them, and we all (hopefully) learn from them. When we begin our careers, we make a lot of them. This is only natural, as we are finding our way and often need help, guidance, and understanding. But by the time we have hit 30, we should have five to ten years of experience under our belts. At this point, it is generally understood that we should have learned from those rookie mistakes we made, and we should have grown as employees. If you are making any of the following eight mistakes after 30, you could be jeopardizing your chances for promotions and pay raises.</p> <h2>1. Ignoring the Dangers of Social Media</h2> <p>Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, Snapchat, and many other platforms are here to stay. And most of us use at least a few of them as a way to stay in contact with friends and family. Some people think that having any kind of social media presence is a bad idea, because anything you put on there could be used against you. That's a mistake. You will be expected to have some kind of existence in that world, even if it's not one you actively engage in day-to-day.</p> <p>However, you must also be aware of what you are posting, and who can see it. People have lost jobs, and even had their lives ruined, by one wrong Tweet or Facebook post (<a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2015/02/15/magazine/how-one-stupid-tweet-ruined-justine-saccos-life.html?_r=0">Justine Sacco's story</a> is perhaps the most famous). Know your boundaries. Be social, but keep anything extremely offensive or inflammatory to your own circle of friends. When in doubt, just leave it out.</p> <h2>2. Refusing to Compromise</h2> <p>In many industries, particularly in the field of advertising and design, compromise is a four-letter word. It basically is seen as, &quot;she wants vanilla, I want chocolate, let's mix them together and get a nasty mess no-one wants to eat.&quot; As a young recruit, and for several years after that, you may very well dig your heels in on every decision. It's your way, or no way at all, even if it means being seen as difficult or abrasive by upper management. And to some extent, most people understand the zeal of youth. But by the time you're 30, that mindset needs to change. The reason is, you will have gained the necessary skills to make compromises that do not negatively affect the outcome too much. You will have learned how to negotiate, and how to lose some battles in order to win the war. If you are still refusing to compromise at that age, you are hampering your career.</p> <h2>3. Believing You Know Everything</h2> <p>Hubris is not pretty. It's one thing to have confidence; it's something else to be arrogant and a know-it-all. However, youth and self-confidence can be a heady mixture, and can create a level of self-belief that even Darth Vader would consider a bit over the top. If you're just out of college, you may think you have all the latest knowledge, and the old people at work are relics. After a few years, you have a little experience, and that compounds the self-confidence. But by the time you are 30, that should all be out of your system. You should know, as most of us do, that we always have something to learn, and that anyone can bring something good to the table. It's also a time when we can finally admit we were wrong about something without breaking out in hives.</p> <h2>4. Taking On Too Much Work</h2> <p>This is something many of us do at the start of our careers, and it can have some very detrimental side effects. We want to be eager to please, and want everyone to know that we're here to work hard, and give it 110%. This can, and often does, lead to exhaustion and sloppy results. Overwork leads to lack of sleep, stress, poor judgment, and even a shoddy appearance. You may be working your proverbial butt off, but you look like hell, you're making all kinds of errors, and you are missing deadlines. By the time you have reached 30, that should stop. Know your limits, and only take on the work you can do within the time you have been given, to the best of your abilities.</p> <h2>5. Trying to Be Everyone's Friend</h2> <p>Wayne Campbell from <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0035JGY5I/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=B0035JGY5I&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=I5GBYRMVYFH2UCEB">Wayne's World</a> said it best, in this little exchange with Garth:</p> <p>Garth Algar: &quot;Do you ever get the feeling Benjamin's just using us?&quot;<br /> Wayne Campbell: &quot;Good call. It's like he wants us to be liked by everyone. I mean Led Zeppelin didn't write tunes everybody liked. They left that to the Bee Gees.&quot;</p> <p>You cannot be liked by everyone; it's just not possible. We're all human, and we all have certain things that push our buttons &mdash; and you are going to push those buttons on a few people. At the start of your career, you can wrap yourself up in emotional knots trying to be universally liked. By 30, you should realize that some people will like you, others won't, but as long as everyone is professional it doesn't really matter. Unless, of course, someone starts using that against you. If that happens, have a long talk with HR.</p> <h2>6. Complaining About Your Company and Coworkers</h2> <p>Everyone has a bone to pick with their current company, their boss, their coworkers, or even all three. In the early days of our careers, it is very easy to fall into the water cooler gossip traps. We'll complain about the values of the company, the people who make the big decisions, even the products or services they offer. But we have to learn that the walls have ears, and it can easily come back to bite us. By the time we're 30, this should be something we know to leave behind. Yes, it's fine to acknowledge the weaknesses of the company, and where improvements can be made, but do it constructively. Rebuking the hand that feeds you is never going to end well.</p> <h2>7. Letting Others Take Credit for Your Success</h2> <p>There are people out there who are quite happy to let you do all the work, and they're equally happy to step in and take the credit for it. When we begin our careers, these people are hard to spot. We haven't learned to look for the warning signs, and we assume their friendliness is well intentioned. By 30, this is no longer excusable. At this age, you should have enough experience to know when someone is trying to take the credit, and enough confidence to speak out and set the record straight. Don't let anyone get away with that at this stage in your career.</p> <h2>8. Selling Yourself Short</h2> <p>You're young, you're naïve, so who are you to make demands for salary, benefits, vacation time, and sick days? You take what you're given, and are thankful for it, right? Well, when we start our working lives, this is somewhat true. But by the time we reach 30, we should know just how valuable we all are to both our current, and prospective, employers.</p> <p>Take the time to research what you do on sites like salary.com, and scour the web for other information. You are valuable, and sometimes you just have to ask for a pay raise or promotion in order to get one. And when you do great work, let people know. You don't have to brag, but it all goes towards building a case for your worth to your employer.</p> <p><em>Have you made any of these career mistakes? Share with us in the comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-career-mistakes-to-stop-making-by-30">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-tips-for-better-workplace-body-language">7 Tips for Better Workplace Body Language</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/starting-a-new-job-3-rules-to-live-by">Starting a New Job: 3 Rules to Live By</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-that-job-you-hate-keeps-you-poor">6 Ways That Job You Hate Keeps You Poor</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-worst-career-mistakes-and-how-to-avoid-them">The 5 Worst Career Mistakes — and How to Avoid Them</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-ways-to-act-like-a-leader-and-get-ahead-at-work">10 Ways to Act Like a Leader -- And Get Ahead at Work</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building career mistakes coworkers mistakes to avoid office gossip thirtysomethings Tue, 17 Nov 2015 10:15:13 +0000 Paul Michael 1613346 at http://www.wisebread.com 15 Genius Gifts for Office Secret Santa http://www.wisebread.com/15-genius-gifts-for-office-secret-santa <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/15-genius-gifts-for-office-secret-santa" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/employees_holiday_party_000075412619.jpg" alt="Coworkers finding genius gifts for office secret santa" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Secret Santa &mdash; this can be a career minefield disguised as a fun end-of-the year activity. But no matter how limiting the price cap on your office exchange, or how stuck you are on what to buy, there are plenty of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/holiday-gifts-for-your-co-workers">fun and appropriate gifts</a> to go around. Spread a little office cheer with some of these clever finds.</p> <h2>$20 or Less</h2> <p>Twenty bucks is a good budget for some pretty decent gifts, but you should still give this some thought.</p> <h3>1. A DIY Treat That Won&rsquo;t End Up in the Trash</h3> <p><a href="http://www.thekitchn.com/how-to-make-fruit-vodkas-194066">Homemade Vodka Infusion</a> &mdash; $20 (varies depending on ingredients)</p> <h3>2. For the Frazzled Help Desk Staff</h3> <p><a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00LVUPJH2/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B00LVUPJH2&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=PDZJMLB3LRTAIA5H">Have You Tried Turning It Off and On Again? T-shirt</a> &mdash; $19.99</p> <h3>3. For the Receptionist With the Sweet Tooth</h3> <p><a href="http://m.crateandbarrel.com/dark-chocolate-and-sea-salt-peanut-butter-bites/s441298">Dark Chocolate Peanut Butter Bites</a> &mdash; $16.95</p> <h3>4. A Tiny Bike for the Office Cyclist (That Doubles as a Bottle Opener)</h3> <p><a href="http://www.uncommongoods.com/product/bike-multitool-keychain">Bike Multitool Keychain</a> &mdash; $16.50</p> <h3>5. For the Indie Girl Across the Aisle</h3> <p><a href="http://www.urbanoutfitters.com/urban/catalog/productdetail.jsp?id=31035298">Printed Headphones</a> &mdash; $16</p> <h2>$10 or Less</h2> <p>You'll have to work a little harder to stay on budget and get your giftee something great at this price ceiling.</p> <h3>6. For the Sales Team That Holds Their Meetings at the Wine Bar</h3> <p><a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002VYT6JE/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B002VYT6JE&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=UCSRROVQSH6ZH6YB">Wine Teeth Wipes</a> &mdash; $9.04</p> <h3>7. When Holiday Sweets Leave Sticky Screens</h3> <p><a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00FOM5VTE/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B00FOM5VTE&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=RORPNKVOGVXLN3AK">Dodocool Microfiber Magic Smart Cleaning Cloth</a> &mdash; $9</p> <h3>8. For Your <em>Three&rsquo;s Company</em>-Loving Gen X Boss</h3> <p><a href="https://fancy.com/things/193291391961404921/Mini-It-Color-TV-Memo-Pad">Mini It Color TV Memo Pad</a> &mdash; $9</p> <h3>9. An Office Pet That Won&rsquo;t Starve Over Labor Day Weekend</h3> <p><a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002NLSB1O/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B002NLSB1O&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=OIYPYLMJHGLECWPE">Fish Bowl With Swimming Fish</a> &mdash; $8.44</p> <h3>10. For the Accountant Who&rsquo;s Afraid Real Bacon Will Give Him Cancer</h3> <p><a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004MBNK5K/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B004MBNK5K&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=ZRGPXLXDQBGAW5CN">Bacon-Flavored Toothpaste</a> &mdash; $6.91</p> <h2>$5 or Less</h2> <p>While five bucks is very budget friendly, finding something memorable at this price point can be a real challenge.</p> <h3>11. For Those Midday Snacks and Spreads</h3> <p><a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00421ATIQ/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B00421ATIQ&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=FRL7DUEET5AMD2AY">Zyliss Sandwich Knife and Condiment Spreader</a> &mdash; $4.99</p> <h3>12. For Reminding Tech Support of the Power of the Reboot</h3> <p><a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00677Q77K/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B00677Q77K&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=BRLMZZECTYUWWK57">Reboot Power Charms</a> &mdash; $4.95</p> <h3>13. For the Cute Staff Librarian</h3> <p><a href="http://www.hm.com/us/product/45247?article=45247-A">Owl Candles</a> &mdash; $3.95</p> <h3>14. For the Fidgety Conference Attendee</h3> <p><a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004CM5DFE/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B004CM5DFE&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=ZUJSXYZQ7YSVFMLR">iCube Puzzle</a> &mdash; $3.44</p> <h3>15. A New Use for Cardboard</h3> <p><a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00SIPD0AG/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B00SIPD0AG&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=UGRPMVKE4YYZGHIP">Google Virtual Reality Cardboard Glasses With Resin Lens</a> &mdash; $2.89</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/carrie-kirby">Carrie Kirby</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-genius-gifts-for-office-secret-santa">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-5"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/25-great-gifts-for-5-or-less">25 Great Gifts for $5 or Less</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/avoid-these-5-common-holiday-budget-pitfalls">Avoid These 5 Common Holiday Budget Pitfalls</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-art-of-the-group-gift">The Art of the Group Gift</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/is-it-worth-paying-more-for-faster-shipping">Is it worth paying more for faster shipping?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/14-frugal-christmas-decorating-hacks">14 Frugal Christmas Decorating Hacks</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Shopping coworkers gift exchanges Holidays secret santa Fri, 13 Nov 2015 15:16:01 +0000 Carrie Kirby 1607650 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Reasons Your Coworkers Think You're a Slacker http://www.wisebread.com/6-reasons-your-coworkers-think-youre-a-slacker <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-reasons-your-coworkers-think-youre-a-slacker" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/man_work_paper_airplane_000022233591.jpg" alt="Man realizing why his co-workers think he&#039;s a slacker" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Think you're pulling the wool over your coworkers' eyes when you're not pulling your weight around the workplace? Think again. Not only do your colleagues notice, but they're probably starting to resent you for having to pick up your slack. Nip your <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-office-mistakes-everyone-makes-but-doesnt-talk-about">underperformance problem</a> in the bud with these six signs that you're the weakest link, and help bring balance back to an otherwise out-of-sync office.</p> <h2>1. Taking Credit For Something You Didn't Do</h2> <p>Everybody knows there's no 'I' in team, but your co-workers are starting to realize that there are a few 'I's in &quot;biggest jerk in the office&quot; if you're grandstanding about accomplishments that were a group effort &ndash; especially if it's to make up for your lack of contribution in the first place. Everyone on the team should share in group wins equally, but more importantly, each person should be giving their all to the effort, so that win can be attributed to everyone on the team. If you're prone to riding the coattails of others, it's time to break that habit and work harder for your money.</p> <h2>2. Arriving Late and Leaving Early</h2> <p>Showing up a few minutes late here and there isn't a huge problem, but if you're strolling into the office six minutes late everyday and leaving five minutes early &ndash; which probably seems innocuous, because it's a small amount of time in each instance &ndash; you're not being respectful of your position or all your colleagues who are there at the beginning and end of their shifts every day. And if you think about it, those 11 paid minutes a day that you're skipping out on really add up. If you operate on that hypothetical schedule for five days a week, you've wasted nearly an entire hour of your company's time &ndash; and that won't go over well for long.</p> <p>&quot;People who are chronically late either don't see it as a problem, or don't think the people around them care; neither are true,&quot; says Chad Reid, director of communications for an&nbsp;<a href="http://www.jotform.com">online form builder</a>. &quot;While habitually late people are typically late to things well beyond the office, it can be addressed.&quot;</p> <p>If this sounds like you, you're likely in need of a routine change that could include going to bed earlier, waking up earlier, preparing for the next day ahead of time, altering your route to work, or other time-saving measures that could save your job.</p> <h2>3. Spending Too Much Time on Social Media</h2> <p>Many of us have integrated social media into our jobs, and for some of us it's actually a requirement that we keep up our companies' presences online. Fair enough. But just because managing social media accounts is in your job description, that doesn't give you carte blanche to spend endless hours browsing Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram (unless that's what you were specifically hired to do), nor does it mean that you can access your personal accounts for prolonged periods of time while your tasks at hand are neglected. Your co-workers won't be happy if your project is late but your online statuses are always up to date, and your boss eventually will want to have a word with you if your social media usage starts to affect your performance.</p> <p>One of the biggest ways to reveal your lack of engagement is to be active on social media but not active in meetings, via email, and in general interactions with colleagues,&quot; says career coach Jane Scudder. &quot;The way to avoid this? Of course, number one is to be more engaged within your role. Another is to limit your social media presence during work hours.&quot;</p> <p>If you're a slave to social media at work, take measures to reduce how much time you spend on it by shutting off your phone or placing it in a place that's not readily accessible (like a drawer or cabinet), manually block the sites you know you're prone to visit, or schedule social media time to get your fix, but limit it to only a few minutes or just on your lunch break.</p> <h2>4. Enjoying Extended Lunch Breaks</h2> <p>Speaking of lunch breaks&hellip; if you're taking leisurely lunches &ndash; 35 or 40 minutes instead of the allotted half-hour or more than an hour if you have that luxury &ndash; it's time to reel it in. Just like arriving late and leaving early, self-extending your lunch break is not only unethical and rude, but it's also akin to stealing money from your employer because you're still stuffing your face with your sandwich instead of manning your position at your desk and fulfilling that day's duties for which you're being paid.</p> <p>While this habit is noticeable if you leave the office for lunch &ndash; because at least one of your coworkers is totally clocking you &ndash; it's much easier to take extra time for yourself if you prefer to eat at your desk. It's not always a problem, of course, but if your work pace is affected and your coworkers have noticed, it's time to assess the situation and reevaluate your lunch strategy.</p> <h2>5. Slowing Down Operations With Non-Workplace Issues</h2> <p>Office camaraderie is important to a productive and motivated workspace &ndash; you don't have to be friends with your co-workers, but you should get along &ndash; so engaging in non-work banter can be beneficial to day-to-day operations. If you're commandeering the conversation, however, and sucking up valuable work time with outside issues that hold everyone else up &ndash; like relationship drama, sappy kid stories, or questionable tales of your weekend activity &ndash; you're weaving a web of negativity that will affect everyone around you. To stay on everyone's good side, limit your banter and anecdotes of home life to times when everyone can kick back and relax for a few minutes, contribute, and enjoy the conversation.</p> <h2>6. Delegating the Lion's Share of Work to Subordinates</h2> <p>If you're in a position of authority, it's critical to toe the line carefully in order to excel at your job, gain and maintain the respect of your colleagues, and set yourself up for promotion. You'll need to delegate some of the work, of course (that's in your job description), but if you're delegating so much of the work that your minions are doing the lion's share of it while you sit back and watch, you run the risk of running yourself right out the door. Just because you're in a boss-type position doesn't mean you get to be bossy. Delegate responsibilities fairly, and avoid establishing a trap that befalls many professionals who dole out orders &ndash; becoming a tyrant who thinks they're above the grunt work. Unless you own the company, you're still on somebody's payroll, and you need to fulfill your duties at or (ideally) above expectations if you'd like to be seen as a good leader and, you know, remain employed.</p> <p><em>Are there other signs of underperformance that you'd like to add? Do you have a co-worker who's not pulling his or her weight? Let's talk about it in the comments below.</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/mikey-rox">Mikey Rox</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-reasons-your-coworkers-think-youre-a-slacker">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-5"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-stay-motivated-on-the-job">6 Ways to Stay Motivated on the Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/wanna-put-away-some-cash-take-a-vacation">Wanna Put Away Some Cash? Take A Vacation!</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/getting-ahead-at-work-are-you-a-hammer-or-a-swiss-army-knife">Getting Ahead At Work: Are You A Hammer Or A Swiss Army Knife?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-pearls-of-career-wisdom-from-brian-tracy">6 Pearls of Career Wisdom From Brian Tracy</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/find-work-worth-doing">Find work worth doing</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income Productivity coworkers job performance slacker work work performance Tue, 20 Oct 2015 09:15:27 +0000 Mikey Rox 1593787 at http://www.wisebread.com 7 Tips for Better Workplace Body Language http://www.wisebread.com/7-tips-for-better-workplace-body-language <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/7-tips-for-better-workplace-body-language" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/work_meeting_000049064816.jpg" alt="Coworkers using body language rules to succeed at work" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>No matter how hard you work to gain respect at your workplace, seriously unprofessional body language can send much of your hard work out the window. In fact, in face-to-face communication, research shows that your words account for only 7% percent of your interaction &mdash; 38% is in your tone of voice, and 55% is in your nonverbal cues, or body language.</p> <p>To help you succeed at work, we've compiled seven <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-body-language-mistakes-that-can-sabotage-any-social-interaction">body language rules</a> to keep in mind as you interact with coworkers, your boss, or external contacts.</p> <h2>1. Keep Your Facial Expressions in Check</h2> <p>Facial expressions speak louder than words. If you're engaged in a conversation but your facial expression is bored, angry, or confused, it's noticeable. Don't be rude &mdash; make sure your face is expressing a degree of professionalism. Don't be someone you're not, but make sure you understand the delicate balance between work and emotion.</p> <h2>2. Walk With Confidence</h2> <p>Pick up your feet when you walk. Don't shuffle or stomp. Make sure your shoes fit. One of my pet peeves is when coworkers wear shoes that are too high, don't fit, or just seem generally uncomfortable. Stand tall when you walk, with your hands at your side. If you are about to walk into a room with a lot of strangers or to give a speech, practice power posing in the bathroom or empty room.</p> <h2>3. Eye Contact is Key</h2> <p>Maintaining eye contact makes you trustworthy, likeable, and powerful. When you're in a conversation, be careful to also pay attention to what is being said. Don't stare &mdash; engage. Also, look from one eye to the other to keep from turning your eye contact into something creepy, and make sure to look back and forth slowly so the person you're talking to doesn't notice. Most importantly, look away occasionally or you'll make the other person feel uncomfortable.</p> <h2>4. Practice Your Handshake</h2> <p>For the majority of my adult life, my handshake has always been strong. It almost always results in a conversation about weak handshakes where hands go limp. Those can be embarrassing, so practice yours &mdash; it should be firm and steady. Handshakes should only last between two and five seconds, and don't forget to engage in eye contact. If you're meeting someone for the first time, be sure to repeat the name or use one of these <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-tips-for-remembering-names">memory tricks</a> so you don't forget it.</p> <h2>5. Keep Good Posture</h2> <p>When you're in a meeting, pretend you're constantly in Pilates. Don't know what that means? It means to keep the crown of your head straight up and your shoulders squared. Slouching sends the wrong impression, and a lowered head gives the impression that you're not telling the truth or that you're ashamed. Keep your body upright to show you are listening and have confidence in the interaction..</p> <h2>6. Don't Cross Your Arms</h2> <p>Use open body language when you're engaging with someone professionally. Keep your body turned toward the person you're talking to and expose your torso. Crossing your arms shows weakness and nervousness. If you lack confidence in your body, don't let it show.You can use your hands to talk, but don't overdo it. This can be distracting and also show nervousness.</p> <h2>7. Quit Fidgeting!</h2> <p>I have very long hair, and I constantly touch it. (Why do I touch my hair so much? Honestly, it's because I'm always worried about how it looks.) I've been working on this slowly, but surely. Experts agree that playing with your hair, biting your nails, and playing with your jewelry shows you are embarrassed about your appearance or nervous about the interaction. So, stop! No one is going to notice your appearance unless you point it out through your nonverbals, so let it go.</p> <p><em>What other body language cues are essential to manage in the workplace? Tell us in the comments section below.</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/jennifer-holder">Jennifer Holder</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-tips-for-better-workplace-body-language">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-unmistakeable-signs-youre-slacking-at-work">5 Unmistakeable Signs You&#039;re Slacking at Work</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-bad-habits-that-are-ruining-your-career">6 Bad Habits That Are Ruining Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-signs-youre-working-for-an-impossible-boss">7 Signs You&#039;re Working for an Impossible Boss</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-times-you-should-speak-up-at-work">10 Times You Should Speak Up at Work</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/ace-your-next-performance-review-with-these-7-tricks">Ace Your Next Performance Review With These 7 Tricks</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building body language coworkers jobs Office work Mon, 08 Jun 2015 09:00:16 +0000 Jennifer Holder 1445027 at http://www.wisebread.com 5 Times You Should Avoid Confronting a Coworker http://www.wisebread.com/5-times-you-should-avoid-confronting-a-coworker <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-times-you-should-avoid-confronting-a-coworker" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/coworkers_disagreeing_000031094146_0.jpg" alt="Coworkers trying to avoid confrontation at work" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Even though many of us work in a so-called &quot;professional environment,&quot; conflicts in the workplace are inevitable. You're with these people 40 hours a week (sometimes longer), and it's only a matter of time before a <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-ways-youre-driving-your-coworkers-insane">coworker rubs you the wrong way</a>.</p> <p>Back-stabbing, a bad attitude, or a rude glance (fierce side-eye is all it takes to ruin a day) might encourage you to give a colleague a piece of your mind. But while there's no shame in sticking up for yourself and putting an office bully in his place, there are times when it's better to let things go. Here are five situations when you should avoid confronting a coworker (so you can also avoid confronting the unemployment line).</p> <h2>1. You're an Emotional Wreck</h2> <p>Confronting your coworker about an ongoing problem and discussing the issue like mature adults might squash some of the tension, but you shouldn't confront this person while you're still emotional or upset about the situation. You might lose your cool while explaining yourself, which can put your coworker on the defense. And when emotions run high, it becomes difficult to understand another person's point-of-view or recognize how your actions played a role in an argument.</p> <p>Give yourself time to calm down &mdash; whether it's a few hours or a few days &mdash; and confront your coworker when you're in a better state of mind. Besides, once you're able to look at the situation with a clear head, you might realize the entire issue was silly or a simple misunderstanding.</p> <h2>2. You Know It's Just a Bad Day</h2> <p>Everyone is entitled to a bad day. If your coworker is normally easygoing and great to work with but on this particular day he's on edge and getting on everybody's last nerve, chalk it up to a bad day and don't take it personally.</p> <p>Unless we ask, we really don't know what our coworkers go through. We all respond to problems differently and some people don't know the right ways to deal with their emotions when under stress. Maybe your coworker had a bad performance review and fears his job might be in jeopardy. Or maybe he's going through personal problems, such as a divorce or separation, money or health problems.</p> <p>Dealing with life and stress doesn't give anyone license to take their anxiety out on others. But if your coworker is usually in a better mood and this behavior is out of character, give him a break and let minor incidents roll off your shoulder. You might be in their shoes one day and need someone to give you the benefit of the doubt.</p> <h2>3. You Know the Person's Trying to Get a Rise Out of You</h2> <p>As I think back to different jobs I had before pursuing self-employment, there was always one person in every office who liked to get a rise out of people. Whether they were making snide comments underneath their breath or making a big deal out of small issues, they got a kick out of being irritating and getting others fired up.</p> <p>It's hard to walk away and ignore these attacks, but it might be the best method for dealing with this type of coworker. You might be able to confront other types of people and get them off your back. But if you're dealing with someone who's looking for a reaction or fight, exchanging words or a confrontation only adds fuel to their fire. You have to be the bigger person and not respond. Don't play their games, and eventually they'll get bored and move on.</p> <h2>4. You're Having a Good Day</h2> <p>Don't give others power over your emotions. If you're having a good day, one annoying comment by a coworker can jack up your entire mood &mdash; if you let it. You can't control what comes out of another person's mouth, but you can control your response. Confronting a coworker <em>might</em> resolve the issue, but it can also turn molehills into mountains. Learn how to pick your battles.</p> <h2>5. It's Not Your Place</h2> <p>If you observe rudeness or unfair treatment around the office, you might feel it's necessary to speak up for those who won't. But think twice before confronting a coworker about a situation that has nothing to do with you. Although you're trying to help, getting involved might do more harm than good. Bring serious issues to your supervisor's attention and let them broach the matter.</p> <p><em>Have you ever confronted a coworker? Have another reason why confronting a coworker is the best idea you</em><em>'</em><em>ve ever had? Let me know in the comments below.</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/mikey-rox">Mikey Rox</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-times-you-should-avoid-confronting-a-coworker">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-reasons-your-coworkers-think-youre-a-slacker">6 Reasons Your Coworkers Think You&#039;re a Slacker</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-office-politics-goofs-that-can-set-your-career-back-years">9 Office Politics Goofs That Can Set Your Career Back Years</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-tips-to-win-any-argument">6 Tips to Win Any Argument</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-psychology-of-salaries-do-you-want-to-know-how-much-your-coworkers-make">The Psychology of Salaries: Do You Want to Know How Much Your Coworkers Make?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-best-free-gifts-for-business-colleagues">The Best Free Gifts for Business Colleagues</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income colleagues conflict confrontation coworkers fighting Fri, 22 May 2015 09:00:08 +0000 Mikey Rox 1429814 at http://www.wisebread.com 10 Ways to Act Like a Leader -- And Get Ahead at Work http://www.wisebread.com/10-ways-to-act-like-a-leader-and-get-ahead-at-work <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/10-ways-to-act-like-a-leader-and-get-ahead-at-work" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/teamwork_000020741550.jpg" alt="Two people working as a team at the office" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>I have worked for organizations with as few as four employees, and others with as many as a couple of thousand. In each of those companies, employees who were good &quot;team players&quot; were valued and rose quickly into leadership roles. If you want to move ahead in your workplace, here are 10 ways to become a better team player.</p> <h2>1. Get to Know Your Team</h2> <p>You may not think this is job #1, but it's really important. In order to accomplish your company's directives, it is helpful to better know and understand your coworkers. For example, employee &quot;A&quot; may love all things data-driven, but &quot;B&quot; might excel in social media and marketing, and hate crunching numbers. Meanwhile, &quot;C&quot; might be the organizer of the group, who will keep everyone on track. If you don't already know your team, you might ask them to take an <a href="http://www.tracomcorp.com/solutions/by-element/social-style/model/">interpersonal self-assessment</a> such as Social Style. If you are out to accomplish a common goal, understanding personalities is very helpful.</p> <h2>2. Share a Vision</h2> <p>What is it that you are all trying to accomplish? Has management shared its mission? A good team leader will map out and share goals and a timeline. Communicate! Weekly huddles, monthly meetings, emails, and texts keep the flow of information going. Be patient and do your best to be friendly. Keeping a positive outlook and sharing your enthusiasm will keep your team moving in the same direction.</p> <h2>3. Be Ready to Pitch In</h2> <p>This is one of my favorite &quot;teamwork&quot; quotes: &quot;Sympathizers are spectators; empathizers wear game shoes.&quot; &mdash; John Eyberg</p> <p>If you aren't pitching in on a project, this is going to be noted by your team, and it will result in gossip, resentment, and a &quot;Why should I?&quot; attitude. You will lose respect. So what if you're the big cheese? Get your hands dirty. File, copy, crunch numbers, make phone calls &mdash; whatever it takes.</p> <h2>4. Motivate the Team</h2> <p>If you are the team's leader, or eventually want to be that person, you need to motivate the team. What you need to do is to <em>figure out what motivates your team members.</em> Don't you have your own &quot;carrots?&quot; To motivate, you need to get to know them. Personally, I would rather have a bonus than a pizza party. Some team members will love being recognized at a meeting, but shy ones will be embarrassed. The point is, one size does not fit all. A strong team player knows their team, and knows what motivates them.</p> <h2>5. Take the Initiative</h2> <p>Somebody has to do it: Whether the project is cleaning out the office refrigerator, auditing the I-9's, changing the toner, or working on Saturday, there are going to be those take-one-for-the-team projects. Once in a while, that person needs to be you. Put your hand up. Everyone will be grateful.</p> <h2>6. Say Thanks</h2> <p>Don't just say it during reviews, or when something gets done. Unexpected thank-yous are a great morale-booster. Writing someone a heartfelt note is very meaningful. Pick up Starbucks coffees, grab McBreakfast for everyone, or thank your team publicly in a staff meeting. Say it, write it, or find creative ways to show that gratitude.</p> <h2>7. Make it FUN</h2> <p>By fun, I don't mean &quot;Let's go outside for team-building and build a team pyramid!&quot; I personally abhor team-building exercises, both physical and mental (remember the stranded plane exercise of the '80s?). Most people like potlucks, office &quot;pools,&quot; or silly games in the breakroom. You might join together on a food drive, or a fundraising walk to better the community. Several departments in my workplace have special t-shirts they wear on casual Fridays. Mix it up &mdash; while some will love Zumba in the conference room, others would rather do a craft.</p> <h2>8. Help Each Other</h2> <p>Isn't helping each other a huge part of teamwork? I really like knowing I can go to certain team members for IT assistance, navigating new software, or ordering a particular office supply. Everyone has their area of expertise and your work life is greatly simplified by knowing who can help you. Be the person that people can go to. Are you approachable and helpful? If not, then get to it.</p> <h2>9. Brainstorm</h2> <p>Stuck on a problem? Get together with the team, a lot of paper, and start throwing out possible solutions. The trick with this is to make sure everyone's voice is heard. A good leader will ask the quiet staff members, if they have not contributed, for their input. Be respectful of everyone's ideas. Type them up, prioritize, and move ahead.</p> <h2>10. Reward!</h2> <p>Most companies, no matter their size, have some sort of recognition. Some offer bonuses; many larger ones throw ceremonies. If your team member, or entire team, has done great work, make sure that information gets in front of management. Successes need to be celebrated. Everyone wants their efforts to be recognized and praised.</p> <p><em>How does your company promote and inspire teamwork?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/marla-walters">Marla Walters</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-ways-to-act-like-a-leader-and-get-ahead-at-work">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/is-this-job-worth-it">Is This Job Worth It?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/13-great-reasons-to-quit-your-job">13 Great Reasons to Quit Your Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-to-actually-take-all-your-vacation-days-this-year">7 Ways to Actually Take All Your Vacation Days This Year</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-money-moves-to-make-after-a-promotion">10 Money Moves to Make After a Promotion</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building coworkers job office morale team building teamwork Thu, 26 Mar 2015 09:00:03 +0000 Marla Walters 1354183 at http://www.wisebread.com 9 Office Politics Goofs That Can Set Your Career Back Years http://www.wisebread.com/9-office-politics-goofs-that-can-set-your-career-back-years <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/9-office-politics-goofs-that-can-set-your-career-back-years" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_000063846129_Large.jpg" alt="women gossip office" title="women gossip office" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Shows like <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00LTO342M/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B00LTO342M&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=MTFKORW7RXBIGZGW">The Office</a>, <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00HDX0JRG/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B00HDX0JRG&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=B45XYH2CPZ4KLXN3">30 Rock</a>, and <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00EY89MWG/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=B00EY89MWG&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=E5E7UHVJ3SSBTCXE">Parks and Recreation</a> cast a very humorous light on office politics. But the reality is that office politics are a very real threat to your job. If you engage in them, you are playing a game (and I use that word with its darkest interpretation) that has winners and losers. And sadly, the losers are usually the ones who are naïve, honest, or easily manipulated. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-new-ways-to-hack-your-boss-without-a-machete?ref=seealso">5 Ways to Make Your Boss Love You</a>)</p> <p>You don't have to be on the losing side though. Avoid the following nine office politics faux pas, and gain some more control over your working destiny.</p> <h2>1. Engaging in Gossip</h2> <p>This crosses every level, from the new employee in the lowest department to the bigwings in the executive suite. It's something both men and women do equally. And if you fall into the gossip trap, you may find yourself on the receiving end of some nasty blowback. Gossip is never good. Whether it's about the company, the people, or situations, it can only lead to trouble. No one knows for sure that what they are saying about someone else is 100% accurate. And any sentence that starts with &quot;You know what I heard&hellip;&quot; is speculation at best. If you get sucked into a conversation about someone, or something very gossipy, make your excuses and walk away. You do not want to be associated with this, and it can destroy reputations and office morale.</p> <h2>2. Doing Only What Is in Your Job Description</h2> <p>If you become a person obsessed with the fine print of your contract, and the rules of the office, you will not show yourself in the best light. Okay, so maybe you were not hired to help with certain tasks. But if someone is asking for your help because they think you can be useful, and you have the time, then go ahead and help out. Going above and beyond will often lead to a promotion and a raise. Playing everything by the book will make you seem like a troublemaker, and you could find yourself of the losing end of the game you're playing.</p> <h2>3. Using Sex to Get Promoted</h2> <p>If at all possible, you want to avoid office romances. Of course, that's easier said than done, especially as you spend over 40 hours a week in the company of your coworkers. Some people, however, will use sex and sexual advances as a way to propel their careers. This is a huge faux pas. Male or female, if you are using sex as a way to get ahead in the company, it will only end in tears. Your career should be based on achievements and recognition, not the shortcuts that come from office trysts. Don't fall into this trap.</p> <h2>4. Making Inappropriate Comments on Social Media</h2> <p>In the past you could share your workplace frustrations with trusted friends and family. These days, you have to be really careful. Social media sites like Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram are places where your coworkers, and upper management, all hang out, too. If you air your grievances on Facebook, or show yourself getting drunk and rambunctious at a party, it could come back to haunt you. If you decide to engage in a popularity contest on Twitter, this could also hurt you. Consider using Facebook settings that show who can see your posts (only close friends and family for instance), but even then, they could easily share a post and get you into hot water. If in doubt, don't send it out.</p> <h2>5. Burning a Bridge</h2> <p>You just cannot afford to throw caution to the wind and burn a bridge. This comes from personal experience, and from the stories of many friends and coworkers. Sure, you are working with someone who is a complete pain. They seem to go out of their way to make your life miserable. They impede your career at every turn. But do not react. Never let the anger bottle up inside you until it explodes and puts you in a bad light. Simply smile, walk away, and find a way to vent your frustrations outside of the office. A good workout can do wonders.</p> <h2>6. Being a Quiet Loner</h2> <p>It may seem like a straightforward way to avoid the office politics, but this is actually a way to become part of the very political silliness you hate. By being the quiet loner, and avoiding contact with people as much as possible, you become a target for office gossip. You can also be seen as unlikeable, unfriendly, and aloof. When the time comes to make layoffs (and it always happens &mdash; no job is for life any more) it's easy to target someone who keeps to themselves. By all means stay out of the gossipy conversations and the BS, but be friendly, engage in a little harmless chit-chat in the break room, and be known as someone likeable.</p> <h2>7. Acting Like the Boss</h2> <p>Showing leadership skills is great; taking complete control and undermining the boss is a recipe for disaster. If you are looking for a promotion, you cannot just jump into the role you want. By all means ask for additional responsibilities. If colleagues need help, dive in. But if you act like you're the boss, you will antagonize both your fellow employees, and the person who should be doing what you have decided to do. This will always end badly for you.</p> <h2>8. Deliberately Sabotaging Projects</h2> <p>It seems like an easy way to get one over on a colleague who is making your life hell. Or even worse, to get credit for something whilst dropping someone else in it. This will always backfire. At the end of the day, you are all working toward the same goal. By sabotaging a project, you are being disloyal to the company that pays your salary and benefits. Just do the very best you can, every time, and let the chips fall where they may.</p> <h2>9. Constantly Complaining to Management</h2> <p>Legitimate gripes are one thing; a constant stream of complaints and bad reports about people (or one particular person) is not going to do you any favors at all. You need to learn which battles are worth fighting and which should be left well alone. If one person decides to focus on you in a negative way, you cannot fight back with complaint after complaint. They will be gaming the system, probably well enough to keep the upper echelons happy, and you will definitely look like the squeaky wheel. Only use official complaints for serious allegations, and let the system handle the rest. If this person really is being mean to you, they will eventually be mean to the wrong person.</p> <p><em>Have you ever committed an embarrassing faux pas at work? How did you recover?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-office-politics-goofs-that-can-set-your-career-back-years">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-4"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-ways-youre-driving-your-coworkers-insane">12 Ways You&#039;re Driving Your Coworkers Insane</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/heres-how-spending-3-on-you-will-advance-your-career">Here&#039;s How Spending 3% On You Will Advance Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-good-manners-make-you-wealthier">5 Ways Good Manners Make You Wealthier</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-jobs-proven-to-make-you-live-longer">5 Jobs Proven to Make You Live Longer</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-reasons-your-coworkers-think-youre-a-slacker">6 Reasons Your Coworkers Think You&#039;re a Slacker</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income Personal Development coworkers etiquette office politics work life Fri, 16 Jan 2015 16:00:10 +0000 Paul Michael 1280352 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Get Along With Someone You Don't Get Along With http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-along-with-someone-you-dont-get-along-with <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-get-along-with-someone-you-dont-get-along-with" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/annoyed-4526056-small.jpg" alt="annoyed" title="annoyed" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="167" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Whether it's someone in your office or a family member, there may be someone in your life that you don't gel with. Perhaps she has one of these&nbsp;<a href="http://www.savvysugar.com/How-Deal-Difficult-Co-Workers-30103939">difficult personalities</a>, or maybe the both of you are just too different. Of course, every situation is different, but here are some techniques that you can try out that may help your relationship with the other person.</p> <p><a href="http://www.savvysugar.com/Happiness-Studies-30444303">RELATED:&nbsp;9 Things You&nbsp;Can Do to Live a Happier Life, According to&nbsp;Science</a></p> <h2>Keep Your Distance</h2> <p>Sometimes it's better to start mending your relationship from afar. You'll have more control over your reactions, and you'll be able to be more objective about the situation without being subject to emotional triggers. Learn to separate reality from your own bias. Perhaps you're the one who is overreacting.&nbsp;</p> <h2>Disarming Technique</h2> <p>The disarming technique was first popularized by renowned cognitive behavioral psychologist&nbsp;<a href="http://www.feelinggood.com/Dr_Burns.htm" target="_blank">Dr. David Burns</a>. What you do is find a kernel of truth in her statement and agree with her. Being defensive tends to make the situation worse, so using the disarming technique will help diffuse the tension. By using this technique, you're improving your listening skills and learning to be more empathetic. Remember, people who tend to lash out can be really unhappy, so try to be understanding. It's hard to pick fights with replies like, &quot;I can see how this is frustrating for you,&quot; or &quot;You're right, it is important to be more organized.&quot; How can you further an argument with someone who is telling you you're right?&nbsp;</p> <h2>Create New Positive Experiences</h2> <p>If the majority of your recent interactions with the person are tinged with negativity, strive to create new positive experiences on neutral ground. It could be that the place where you interact the most with this person triggers strong counteractive feelings, so establish new&nbsp;positive ones.</p> <h2>Switch Topics</h2> <p>If the conversation is going downhill, switch gears and bring up a happy or neutral topic. This will give you both time to cool down and perhaps even end the conversation on a high note.</p> <h2>Think Proactive, Not Reactive</h2> <p>Given that you know you don't get along, you need to make the effort to turn that around. This means being on guard and making a concerted effort to improve the situation. Don't get complacent and let yourself react naturally, because that probably hasn't worked in the past. React with logic, not your emotions.&nbsp;</p> <h2>Observe Your Own Emotions</h2> <p>Note how you're feeling when you're dealing with the person. If you find yourself getting upset, take a breather and perhaps come back to the topic later on. If the issue you bring up is highly sensitive, give it a few days before approaching the topic. You'll be more calm and collected after some time.</p> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-blog-teaser"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> When you don&#039;t like someone, it can be difficult to spend time around that person — let alone work together. Follow these suggestions to make things easier. </div> </div> </div> <div class="field field-type-text field-field-guestpost-blurb"> <div class="field-label">Guest Post Blurb:&nbsp;</div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p style="text-align:center;"><a style="border:none;" href="http://www.savvysugar.com"><img width="300" height="95" src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u921/POPSUGARrgb.jpg" alt="" /></a></p> <p><em>This is a guest contribution from our friends at </em><a href="http://www.savvysugar.com/"><em>POPSUGAR Smart Living</em></a><em>. Check out more useful articles from this partner:</em></p> <ul> <li><a href="http://www.savvysugar.com/Tips-Having-More-Patience-28495875">Compose Yourself: 10 Tips for Having More Patience</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.savvysugar.com/Tips-De-Stress-Work-22310420">13 Ways to Destress During the Workday</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.savvysugar.com/How-Deal-Difficult-Co-Workers-30103939">How to Deal With These 6 Difficult Work Possibilities</a></li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;</p> </div> </div> </div> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/popsugar-smart-living">POPSUGAR Smart Living</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-along-with-someone-you-dont-get-along-with">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-things-people-with-good-communication-skills-never-do">12 Things People With Good Communication Skills Never Do</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-tips-for-remembering-names">5 Tips for Remembering Names</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/51-uses-for-coca-cola-the-ultimate-list">51 Uses for Coca-Cola – the Ultimate List</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-really-easy-ways-to-unclog-drains">10 Really Easy Ways to Unclog Drains</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-wonderful-uses-for-witch-hazel">15 Wonderful Uses for Witch Hazel</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> General Tips communication skills coworkers personal relationships Fri, 28 Jun 2013 09:48:33 +0000 POPSUGAR Smart Living 980217 at http://www.wisebread.com Starting a New Job: 3 Rules to Live By http://www.wisebread.com/starting-a-new-job-3-rules-to-live-by <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/starting-a-new-job-3-rules-to-live-by" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/3873593395_f9a6e1334b_z.jpg" alt="people talking" title="people talking" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="186" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Being the new guy at work is like moving to a new school. You&rsquo;re hesitant and unsure of how things work, but you know you want everyone to like you. I distinctly remember starting my first real, salaried job just 24 short months ago: My boss handed me the Loan Review &ldquo;Manual&rdquo; that contained all the minutiae of how to correctly do my job. I was to read it for the first two full days. I remember desperately trying to stay awake amidst the sea of words and phrases &mdash; most of which I didn&rsquo;t even understand yet &mdash; and nearly having a caffeine-induced heart attack from too much coffee and Diet Dr. Pepper. After all, this was mind-numbingly boring, but I couldn&rsquo;t possibly fall asleep my first few days on the job! (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/must-have-qualities-to-ensure-long-term-job-security">Must-Have Qualities to Ensure Long-Term Job Security</a>)</p> <p>What led me to think about my first days at work recently was the hiring of a new employee in our department. Aside from not falling asleep on the job, our department is fairly flexible. That being said, there are a few rules that he (and every new employee) should be aware of when starting a new job:</p> <h3>Know that you&rsquo;re probably going to hate your first day on the job. Or week. Or month.</h3> <p>Sure, you might love the company, the people, and even the thought of working there, but you&rsquo;re probably going to dislike learning the basics of a new job. The reason is simple: People generally don&rsquo;t like change. It is uncomfortable to not be in-the-know about what to do, when to do it, who to tell, and all of those basics. My department often gets a laugh when we tell the story of a new girl who obtained a job through her family&rsquo;s connections to the family that owns our company. Three days later, our president called to congratulate her and to wish her well on the job, but she wasn&rsquo;t there. She had disappeared after only her first day. I mean, how do you even know whether you like or <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/i-hate-my-job">dislike a job</a> after one day? Silly girl.</p> <h3>Ask questions in a friendly way.</h3> <p>All workplaces have a host of unspoken rules and procedures that they might forget to tell you. In our department, for example, we forgot to tell New Guy that our work retreat was casual dress. Luckily, he asked, or it would have been an uncomfortable two days for him. By simply asking, you&rsquo;ll also learn a wealth of things that your co-workers and boss simply forgot to tell you or assumed you already knew. After all, remember what happens when you assume&hellip; (Don&rsquo;t laugh. You know it&rsquo;s true.) And think about it: Your boss and co-workers have been doing their jobs for a long time, and certain things are second nature to them, so they don&rsquo;t even think to tell you. This also leads me into my next point...</p> <h3>Don&rsquo;t assume your new organization is skilled at training new employees.</h3> <p>When you&rsquo;re a small organization (like my department), there may be no formal training regimen to indoctrinate you. Perhaps there should be, but in some cases you&rsquo;re expected to figure things out on your own. Like point #2 says, ask an insane amount of questions (in a non-obnoxious way, please). Also write down what you do know (I made a cheat sheet of all the silly acronyms we use in my first days on the job so I wouldn&rsquo;t have to keep asking) and update that list as you learn more. That way, you&rsquo;ll be able to refer back to it when you inevitably forget, and you&rsquo;ll be able to pull it out at an opportune moment (like when a new employee is hired) and shine like a star because you&rsquo;ll be the first to be so well-organized.</p> <p>So that&rsquo;s the long and short of it: New jobs are more work in the beginning. Just know the basics on how to get up-to-speed quickly, and you&rsquo;ll be loving it in no time. Oh, and you won&rsquo;t be stuck wearing suits to the company retreat while everyone else is in jeans.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/janey-osterlind">Janey Osterlind</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/starting-a-new-job-3-rules-to-live-by">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-5"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-career-mistakes-to-stop-making-by-30">8 Career Mistakes to Stop Making by 30</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-tips-for-better-workplace-body-language">7 Tips for Better Workplace Body Language</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-ways-to-act-like-a-leader-and-get-ahead-at-work">10 Ways to Act Like a Leader -- And Get Ahead at Work</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-reasons-you-deserve-to-get-fired">12 Reasons You Deserve to Get Fired</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-to-discover-your-dream-career">5 Ways to Discover Your Dream Career</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building coworkers new job starting a new job Fri, 19 Nov 2010 13:00:08 +0000 Janey Osterlind 311411 at http://www.wisebread.com 3 Easy Steps to Take for a Better 401k http://www.wisebread.com/three-easy-steps-to-take-for-a-better-401k <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/three-easy-steps-to-take-for-a-better-401k" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_000002478555XSmall_0.jpg" alt="" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="166" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>I was recently invited to a small business 401k checkup meeting, where we talked about how the company's employees were participating in its plan, the overall performance, and fund allocations.</p> <p>When the representative suggested to hold a seminar on asset allocation, I asked whether she could separate the sessions into different age groups. She said &quot;Oh, that's not a problem. I think that's a very clever idea, but no one has ever asked me to do it this way.&quot; The right mix of stocks and bonds is different for someone early in their career versus someone who's about to retire. I'm sure you know this, but it seems like no one else in your company does.</p> <p>Not the person sitting beside you, not your boss, and not HR. No one knows much about asset allocation other than you. Yikes...</p> <p>The response was rather surprising. You'd think that everyone would know about asset allocation by now, but that's simply a false assumption. Being immense in personal finance literature has its disadvantages, <strong>as we often overlook the fact that most of the general public knows very little about basic personal finance and investing principles</strong>.</p> <p>As a savvy investor who has a much better chance of achieving financial freedom, here's how you can help everyone around you.</p> <h2>Ask</h2> <p>All 401k plans are required to be looked at and discussed on a regular basis. Chances are good that representatives from the company managing your plan comes regularly too. Ask your plan administrators to have the representatives (or bring in experts) give seminars about your plan, the benefits of saving and investing for the long term.</p> <p>Most of the information they give may be familiar to you, but a refresher is always good even if you already know every tip there is to know. If anything, reminders will make you think about your retirement plan more, which can only help.</p> <h2>Suggest</h2> <p>Offer suggestions to others on how they can contribute to their plan, and perhaps even come up with a step by step plan to navigating the 401k plan web interface. The more comfortable your fellow workers are with the plan, the more likely they will commit more of their salary into it. The benefit to you may not be immediate, but bigger size 401k plans tend to have better expense ratios, which helps everybody in your company.</p> <h2>Monitor</h2> <p>The reality is that most 401k plan administrators have many other more pressing jobs than thinking about the company's 401k plan. As a result, the 401k plan is usually an afterthought of an afterthought. If you think about how important even a fraction of a percent makes in your plan over the years, the likely neglect of your primary retirement vehicle sounds ludicrous. By having more people talk about the plans at work and showing interest, it's that much more likely that your plan administrators will keep a closer tab of what could be done to improve the overall function and performance.</p> <p>It's not what you expect, but what you inspect. Help keep the plan in the forefront of your plan administrator's minds, and good things will follow. Having said that, I have got to ask: Have you maxed out your IRA yet?</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/david-ning">David Ning</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/three-easy-steps-to-take-for-a-better-401k">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-6"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-important-things-to-know-about-your-401k-and-ira-in-2016">5 Important Things to Know About Your 401K and IRA in 2016</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-reasons-why-a-roth-ira-may-be-better-than-your-401k">4 Reasons Why a Roth IRA May be Better Than Your 401(k)</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/should-you-choose-a-roth-401k-or-a-regular-401k">Should You Choose a Roth 401k or a Regular 401k?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-warning-signs-youre-sabotaging-your-nest-egg">6 Warning Signs You&#039;re Sabotaging Your Nest Egg</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-questions-to-ask-before-you-borrow-from-your-retirement-account">5 Questions to Ask Before You Borrow From Your Retirement Account</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Investment Retirement 401k benefits coworkers IRA work Tue, 08 Jun 2010 11:00:09 +0000 David Ning 120636 at http://www.wisebread.com The Psychology of Salaries: Do You Want to Know How Much Your Coworkers Make? http://www.wisebread.com/the-psychology-of-salaries-do-you-want-to-know-how-much-your-coworkers-make <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/the-psychology-of-salaries-do-you-want-to-know-how-much-your-coworkers-make" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/salaries.jpg" alt="" title="Office Drama" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="188" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Let's face it: our salaries are very important. They define how much our employer thinks we are worth, what we can afford to do in our lives, and even our self worth. I've <a href="http://www.thewriterscoin.com/2008/12/09/on-salaries-you-are-what-you-make/">said it before</a> and I'll say it again: we are what you make.</p> <p>Our salaries are also a way to measure how our career is going (is it steadily climbing or has it stagnated?) and what kind of future we may or may not have at our jobs.</p> <p>At my old job, for example, getting a raise was like pulling teeth. Even if you went above and beyond your duties to help the company, it didn't matter a whole lot. Salaries were kept low because that was just the way business was done. To most people there, being underpaid was simply a fact of life. It's one of the reasons I left and the main reason turnover was so high.</p> <p>So I'm definitely one of those people that thinks you should pay attention to your salary and make sure it reflects how hard (hopefully you're all working hard out there) you're working.</p> <p>But there's a limit:<strong> </strong>it's worth it to compare yourself to the people around you.</p> <h3>I Can't Believe He's Making More Than Me!</h3> <p>This is the kind of thing that will drive you insane. Let's say that someone you work with who is at the same level you are drives you nuts. For whatever reason, you see yourself as being WAY&nbsp;smarter, WAY&nbsp;more efficient, and WAY more hardworking than that person.</p> <p>And then let's say you find out they make just as much as you do. Or&mdash;gulp&mdash;more than you. It'll drive you crazy if you let it get to you. Here's where you can refer to an old maxim that will help you through a lot of issues in your life (not just at work): <strong>Life isn't fair.</strong></p> <p>Get used to it. The only thing comparing salaries will get you is some tense moments in the office. Maybe you'll feel unconsciously hostile towards some people if you disagree with what they're making. Maybe it'll just wear you down after a tough day at work. Maybe it'll make you bitter. Either way, it won't help you in any way. All it will do is hurt.</p> <p>After all, there's a reason most employers discourage (or straight up forbid) the discussion of salaries among employees. It's just not healthy.</p> <h3>Worry About What You Can Control</h3> <p>Can you control what your coworkers make? Nope.</p> <p>Can you walk into your boss's office and say, &quot;I&nbsp;want a raise because X&nbsp;is making this much and I am 15% better than her&quot;? Nope.</p> <p>Here's what you can control: your own salary. Nothing else.</p> <p>How?&nbsp;Well, there are lots of ways. But in my mind, the best thing you can do is focus on becoming a <a href="http://www.thewriterscoin.com/2008/11/12/being-a-better-employee-series-show-up-early/">better employee</a>. That means doing things like showing up early, helping your boss out, and going beyond the scope of your job.</p> <p><strong>If you feel you deserve more money, make a rational case for it. </strong>Check out <a href="http://www.salary.com">Salary.com</a> or <a href="http://www.payscale.com/">Payscale.com</a> to see how you compare to other people doing your job (comparing your salary to averages or to people outside your company is fair game). If you are below the averages, then you may have a case. And if you aren't but still want a raise, force one by showing your boss the great work you're doing.</p> <p>I&nbsp;don't mean sending emails from home at 10:59pm just to show you're &quot;working,&quot; but real, quantifiable work that no one can argue with.</p> <p>Make it easy for y our boss and for everyone to see that you deserve a raise.</p> <p>Just stay away from the comparison game. All it will do is frustrate you and make your time at work that much more unpleasant.</p> <p><em>This post was included in the <a href="http://pecuniarities.com/carnival-of-pecuniary-delights-no-1-the-madoline-hatter-pecuniary-art-edition/3669">Carnival of Pecuniary Delights</a></em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/carlos-portocarrero">Carlos Portocarrero</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-psychology-of-salaries-do-you-want-to-know-how-much-your-coworkers-make">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-7"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-entry-level-jobs-with-surprisingly-high-salaries">12 Entry Level Jobs With Surprisingly High Salaries</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-reasons-your-coworkers-think-youre-a-slacker">6 Reasons Your Coworkers Think You&#039;re a Slacker</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/seven-tips-for-the-newly-unemployed">Seven Tips for the Newly Unemployed</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/protect-future-earnings-by-negotiating-the-right-starting-salary">Protect Future Earnings by Negotiating the Right Starting Salary</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-you-must-do-before-you-quit-your-job">5 Things You Must Do Before You Quit Your Job</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance Career and Income coworkers salary Mon, 30 Mar 2009 22:34:56 +0000 Carlos Portocarrero 2989 at http://www.wisebread.com Is This Job Worth It? http://www.wisebread.com/is-this-job-worth-it <p><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/wisebread_imce/flair.jpg" alt=" " width="252" height="174" /></p> <p>This post technically isn&#39;t about me. It&#39;s about a friend, a lousy job situation, and soliciting feedback from our readers for a friend of mine.</p> <p>Tiffany is an engineer who works for a small start-up. She makes a very good salary, has benefits, and doesn&#39;t have a particularly heavy workload at the moment (her company is building a product, so the work comes in fits and starts, so she&#39;s been chilling for a couple of months while the hardware is being built). Anyway, Tiff is kind of bored right now, but otherwise OK. She&#39;s the only female in her office, and works with about 12 men who are much older than she is (she&#39;s 27, they&#39;re all about 45-57). </p> <p>She feels well-respected and knows that she has plenty to offer the company. The CEO seems to like her, she gets long well with everyone.</p> <p>Tiff recently became close with a coworker named Mike. Not close-close in a here-comes-the-lawsuit kind of way, but so that they discussed their lives with each other. Mike could complain about his college-age daughters to Tiffany, and she would assure him that they would turn out fine. They both discussed their concerns over the direction of their company, which was erratic, to say the least.</p> <p>Mike&#39;s job was to coordinate several engineering projects, although he wasn&#39;t technically a manager. Mike got along well with the CEO, and idea-man who is big on vision and short on business plans. He was one of the few people who could tell the CEO when he was getting off-track.</p> <p>A few weeks back, the company almost went under. Funding wasn&#39;t coming in as expected, and paychecks were delayed. Tiffany and everyone else started sending their resumes out to old coworkers and recruiters, but kept working for the company with the CEO&#39;s reassurance that the checks were in the mail. </p> <p>When Tiff and Mike were having lunch one day, and talking about where they were going, Tiff expressed some of her concerns about the proprietary nature of the job. Because everything that they are developing is very hush-hush, Tiff isn&#39;t able to say much on her resume beyond &quot;I coded some things that I have to kill you over if you knew about them.&quot; She told Mike that she was worried about continuing to work for a company that wouldn&#39;t put a product out for two years, and she&#39;d have nothing to show for it on her resume in the meantime, should she need to find a new job.</p> <p>Mike started discussing the company&#39;s non-compete contract, something that all employees are required to sign. The non-compete had been written and rewritten, with several rounds being rejected by the employees because they were far too strict. The final had not yet been drafted, and thus, no one had signed it. Mike stressed that if Tiffany were to leave, she would need to sign it.</p> <p>&quot;Mike,&quot; said Tiffany, &quot;I&#39;m not signing that. I&#39;d never get hired anywhere else if they knew I signed that thing. You know that. I know that. That&#39;s why no one signed it.&quot;</p> <p>Mike shrugged and kept eating his hotdog. He later said something about wanting to ensure that Tiffany stayed onboard, which Tiff thought was nice. Then they discussed his job prospects at his old employer, and the positions that Tiffany was interviewing for, just in case the company went under.</p> <p>A couple of days later, Tiffany was called into the CEO&#39;s office. The CEO, Jim, was red in the face. He told Tiffany not to take what he was about to say in the wrong way, and then launched into a rambling lecture about the importance of focusing on one&#39;s job. When Tiffany tried to assess what he was talking about, he said something like &quot;I can&#39;t have you looking sideways, looking for other jobs, always looking around for a better position.&quot; Tiffany explained that she wasn&#39;t always looking around, but that she had sent out her resume like everyone else when the paychecks stopped coming.</p> <p>Tiffany was understandably upset, realizing that Mike had ratted her out. Technically, she hadn&#39;t done anything wrong, and since everyone, including Mike, was putting out employment feelers, she didn&#39;t see the need for all the blustering. The CEO then said, &quot;Now, going forward, this isn&#39;t going to affect your job here at all. We like you, and we want you here,&quot; which Tiffany immediately realized was code for &quot;This is definitely something that we will hold against you for a long time.&quot; When she got up to leave, feeling like she would either cry or scream at any minute, Jim added, &quot;We need to you to be 100% on-board. We need enthusiasm. We can&#39;t have anyone half-assing this.&quot; </p> <p>Now, engineers are not an enthusiastic bunch. Tiffany felt like she was being given the &quot;You need to wear more flair&quot; speech. Half-ass? She worked as hard as anyone else at the company.</p> <p>That&#39;s when Mike came to her desk and asked if he could talk to her. Slightly pissed at him, she followed him to the conference room, where Mike proceeded to explain that not only had he told the CEO that Tiff was looking for a new job, but that she was refusing to sign the non-compete. Basically, Mike had told her boss that she was leaving the company, and was taking the technology with her.</p> <p>Tiffany didn&#39;t know what to say, so she got up and left. </p> <p>An hour and a half later, a company meeting was called, and it was announced that Mike was now in charge of Tiff&#39;s projects. Basically, Tiffany was demoted, and Mike was put in charge of her.</p> <p>Now, Tiffany is in a rough place. She hates Mike with all of her heart, and knows that what he did, he did for the purposes of climbing the corporate ladder, which is kind of odd in an office of less than 15 people. Although she has since clarified her position and intentions to the CEO, and signed the new non-compete along with the rest of her coworkers, she can&#39;t help but want to stab Mike through the eyeball with a sharpened #2 pencil.</p> <p>I&#39;ve listened to Tiff&#39;s woes over a beer or two, and I can&#39;t think of a single good bit of advice to give her. She could retaliate against Mike and casually mention the times that he commented on the CEO&#39;s wife&#39;s ass. She could quit and do some contracting, because permanent jobs are hard to come by. Or she could just suck it up and work with Mike, reporting to Mike, and simply never speak to him about anything personal again.</p> <p>What would you do in this situation? Me, all I can think of is a good punch to the jaw, but Tiff isn&#39;t known for her skills left hook. Also, I&#39;m not sure I&#39;d even be in the same position, because I prefer to hold my cards close to my chest and discuss next to nothing with coworkers. So I&#39;m stuck between telling her that it&#39;s her fault for being so trusting, and helping her let the air out of the guy&#39;s tires.</p> <p>Any advice? </p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/troy-hadley">Troy Hadley</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/is-this-job-worth-it">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-8"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/earn-more-money-by-demanding-it">Earn More Money by Demanding It</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-to-actually-take-all-your-vacation-days-this-year">7 Ways to Actually Take All Your Vacation Days This Year</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-good-reasons-to-become-a-contractor">8 Good Reasons to Become a Contractor</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-tips-for-better-workplace-body-language">7 Tips for Better Workplace Body Language</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Insurance benefits betrayal boss business contracting coworkers independence job NDA non-compete peers salary work Tue, 03 Apr 2007 18:15:34 +0000 Troy Hadley 445 at http://www.wisebread.com