salary http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/3149/all en-US 8 Great Jobs for the Next 10 Years http://www.wisebread.com/8-great-jobs-for-the-next-10-years <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/8-great-jobs-for-the-next-10-years" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/young_maintenance_engineer_team_working_in_wind_turbine_farm_at_sunset.jpg" alt="Young maintenance engineer team working in wind turbine farm at sunset" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>The working world is in upheaval, with technology changing the way we do pretty much everything. Some careers that used to be sure things aren't so sure anymore. How do you know which jobs are worth pursuing, and which aren't? We checked in with the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics to get the lowdown on fields that are projected to grow over the next decade.</p> <h2>1. Financial adviser</h2> <p>With life expectancy on the rise, more people are expected to be needing financial planning advice. The BLS gives this profession a solid <a href="https://www.bls.gov/ooh/business-and-financial/personal-financial-advisors.htm" target="_blank">projected growth rate</a> of 30 percent between 2014 and 2024, which it notes is &quot;much faster than average.&quot; The median salary for a personal financial adviser was just over $90,000 as of 2016.</p> <p>For this career, you'll need a bachelor's degree, but no advanced degrees are required. Becoming a Certified Financial Planner (CFP) is also helpful. Many financial advisers work for insurance or financial brokerage firms; others are self-employed.</p> <h2>2. Physical therapist</h2> <p>The demand for physical therapists is growing, too: There's an impressive <a href="https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/physical-therapists.htm" target="_blank">34 percent growth rate</a> predicted over the 2014&ndash;2024 period, with more than 70,000 new physical therapist positions being added to the workforce. To become a physical therapist, you'll need to get a Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) degree. A DPT degree is a post-baccalaureate degree that usually takes three years to complete. Worth the time? Probably. The median salary for physical therapists, as of 2016, was about $85,400.</p> <h2>3. Registered nurse</h2> <p>Becoming a registered nurse continues to be a great career choice for the next 10 years, and probably beyond. More than <a href="https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/registered-nurses.htm" target="_blank">439,000 registered nurse jobs</a> are expected to be added to the workforce by 2024. The median salary was just under $70,000 as of 2016. Approximately 60 percent of RNs work in hospitals, according to the BLS, with the remaining 40 percent working in clinics, doctors' offices, home health care roles, and other care facilities. To become a registered nurse, you'll need a degree in nursing. A four-year bachelor's degree is probably the best choice, as an associate degree may limit your career options and salary.</p> <h2>4. Physical or occupational therapy assistant</h2> <p>Assistants to therapists earn a lower wage than the therapists themselves, but it's still a good salary. The average annual pay for a physical therapy assistant was <a href="https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/physical-therapist-assistants-and-aides.htm" target="_blank">just over $56,000</a> as of 2016, while occupational therapy assistants <a href="https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/occupational-therapy-assistants-and-aides.htm" target="_blank">brought in an average $59,000</a>.</p> <p>Occupational therapy is focused on helping people improve their ability to handle daily life tasks, such as cooking, or even eating. Physical therapy focuses on helping patients recover from illness or injury and regain physical ability. To be a therapist's assistant, you'll need an associate degree and perhaps a license, but that's all. Both jobs have a projected growth rate of about 40 percent between 2014 and 2024.</p> <h2>5. Computer systems analyst</h2> <p>If computer systems, information technology, and business are your thing, this is a great career choice. Systems analysts work with business managers to understand business needs and come up with information systems solutions. You'll need a bachelor's degree in information technology to get a job in this field, which has a <a href="https://www.bls.gov/ooh/computer-and-information-technology/computer-systems-analysts.htm" target="_blank">21 percent projected growth rate</a>. A master's degree may open up more job opportunities and a higher entry-level salary. The median pay as of 2016 was more than $87,000 a year.</p> <h2>6. Industrial machinery mechanic</h2> <p>The <a href="https://www.bls.gov/ooh/installation-maintenance-and-repair/industrial-machinery-mechanics-and-maintenance-workers-and-millwrights.htm" target="_blank">projected growth rate</a> for this career in the 10 years up to 2024 is a bit lower than others on this list at only 16 percent, but that's still much faster than average. You don't need any college education for this job; a high school diploma or equivalent is enough, and, of course, some mechanical capability is needed. Beyond that, you'll need appropriate training for the specialization you choose; an apprenticeship or on-the-job training are two common options. The median salary for this career was just under $50,000 as of 2016.</p> <h2>7. Computer support specialist</h2> <p>The outlook for computer support specialists shows a <a href="https://www.bls.gov/ooh/computer-and-information-technology/computer-support-specialists.htm" target="_blank">12 percent growth rate</a>, with more than 88,000 jobs expected to be added by 2024. With a median annual salary of over $62,000 as of 2016, it's a great career choice. You need some computer prowess, of course, and the ability to patiently guide people through solving their computer problems. That's probably the most challenging part! A college degree isn't always necessary, though an associate degree, or at least some computer-related courses, will help. Positions with a larger company may require a bachelor's degree, but many other support positions provide on-the-job training.</p> <h2>8. App developer</h2> <p>If you're good with code and have the business savvy to see a hole in the app market, this could be a great career choice for you. Even if you're not so great at the business side, this could still be a good career if you get a job with any number of app development companies. Mobile technology is only continuing to grow, and this job is growing along with it at a rate of over 22 percent, according to Kiplinger. The median annual salary is one of the highest on this list, coming in at over $96,000. You'll typically need a bachelor's degree in computer science to get started in this field.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/8%20Great%20Jobs%20for%20the%20Next%2010%20Years.jpg" alt="8 Great Jobs for the Next 10 Years" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/annie-mueller">Annie Mueller</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-great-jobs-for-the-next-10-years">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/are-you-pursuing-an-overcrowded-career-field">Are You Pursuing an Overcrowded Career Field?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-careers-where-women-earn-more-than-men">5 Careers Where Women Earn More Than Men</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-use-the-holiday-quiet-time-to-boost-your-career">How to Use the Holiday Quiet Time to Boost Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-good-reasons-to-become-a-contractor">8 Good Reasons to Become a Contractor</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building career fields decade education fastest growing future growth rate job markets salary successful technology Mon, 04 Sep 2017 08:00:05 +0000 Annie Mueller 2013152 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Land the Job When You're Overqualified http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-land-the-job-when-youre-overqualified <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-land-the-job-when-youre-overqualified" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/more_than_qualified_for_the_job.jpg" alt="More than qualified for the job" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>For whatever reason, be it a career change or the need to pay the bills after a layoff, many people apply for jobs that require much less experience than they have. And far too often, it's considered a negative: &quot;Sorry, you're too overqualified.&quot;</p> <p>The employer sees a litany of reasons why you would be a bad fit. They think you'll be unhappy, or take a better job the second one comes along. You may even be gunning for the boss's position.</p> <p>To combat these perceptions, you need to find ways to convince the employer that you are right for the job, regardless of your experience. Here's how to approach it.</p> <h2>Edit your resume to fit the job you want</h2> <p>If your resume is three pages long, and filled with impressive titles and experience, it's a good time to start editing it. You are not lying; you are simply not putting down every single thing you have accomplished.</p> <p>You don't even have to list job titles if you don't want to. Just list the companies you worked for, and then the appropriate experience for each one. Sure, you may well have overseen the international distribution for a major multinational. But did that job also entail getting on the phone and delivering great customer service (regardless of who those customers were)?</p> <p>Find ways to temper some of your achievements. It will seem counterintuitive to everything you've done in your career, but if you want this job, you need to find ways to bring your resume down a peg or two.</p> <h2>Use your industry connections for introductions</h2> <p>A resume and a cover letter, even if they are exceptional and targeted, don't always do the job. You will want to tap into the many connections you have made over the years, and find people who can vouch for you.</p> <p>Ideally, you'll know someone at the company you want to work for. Or, you know someone who knows someone at the company. LinkedIn is an excellent place to find these kinds of connections. When you find the right person, ask them to make the first move for you. A recommendation from someone trusted and reliable is worth far more than any polished resume.</p> <p>They can also talk about what you bring to the table, and why you're a good fit. By the time your over-qualifications come up, you will already be seen as someone who could easily fit the role. And if the salary is right, why not you? They're getting more bang for their buck.</p> <h2>Talk about what you can do for them</h2> <p>Employers are selfish, and rightly so. They are ready to pay you a salary and benefits, so they want someone who will be a good return on that investment. And if you show them that your experience will benefit them, but won't cost them any more, then they'll be all in.</p> <p>One great example comes from the movie <em>The Wolf of Wall Street</em>. After Jordan Belfort loses his job on Wall Street, he can't find a new gig anywhere. Then, he sees an ad for a little brokerage selling penny stocks. When they first see Belfort, they think it's a joke. He's way too qualified. Why would he even set foot in this place? Then, he brings his experience (albeit morally bankrupt experience) to the firm, and before they know it, they're making more money than they ever dreamed of.</p> <p>So, highlight what you can do, not what titles you have earned. Explain how the experience you have is perfect for the job. And remember, only talk about the experience that is relevant to this employer. All your other accolades and achievements are best left out of the conversation.</p> <h2>Explain why you're excited for the position being offered</h2> <p>Money isn't everything. Titles aren't for everyone. Sometimes, people genuinely want to change the course of their careers, and if that's you, you have to find a way to make your potential new employer understand this. You may well have been part of the top brass at your last company, but you could also have become tired of the rat race. You want to take a job with less money and less responsibility, but one that gives you exciting new challenges.</p> <p>Many people in advertising, for instance, find that after they get to the top of the ladder, they are not doing the fun and creative work that they did early on in their careers. For this reason, a lot of creative directors will actually step back from the role, and apply for lower-paying jobs as copywriters and art directors. As long as you can make the case for why you are ready to work for less money and less power, the employer should have no reason not to take your application seriously.</p> <h2>Acknowledge that you know you're taking a step down</h2> <p>If you're the victim of corporate downsizing, you will usually have to find a job quickly to replace the lost income. And that usually means taking whatever is available, even if it's a considerable step down. Hiring managers are wary of candidates in this situation. They believe the overqualified candidate is simply taking the job as a stopgap, and will be looking for something better immediately. The last thing any hiring manager wants to do is be interviewing for that same role a few months down the line. But, this can be addressed early on.</p> <p>Acknowledge that this is a step down for you, in salary and experience. But let the employer know that you also see it as providing a wealth of benefits, including new experiences, new challenges, and perhaps better work-life balance. Assure the employer that this is not a temporary position, but one you are going to dig into and be successful at.</p> <h2>Do not let salary come into play until the last minute</h2> <p>One of the biggest problems that comes with being overqualified is your salary history. As you climbed the ladder of success, your income was right there rising with you. And in your last position, you may have had a most impressive salary. However, now that you're looking for a job that requires less (or different) skills, the money that goes with it will also be less.</p> <p>The easiest way for a human resources manager to sort through candidates is salary expectations, or previous salary. If the current role offers $60,000 a year, and your most recent salary was $100,000, you're going to be rejected in a heartbeat. Why would you even consider this role, they wonder. They don't know your current situation, your wants and needs, and why you're switching to a role that requires less experience.</p> <p>So, don't bring salary into it. If there's a space on the form that must be completed, put $1. If it comes up initially, tell HR that salary is not something you're concerned with right now. You want to focus on being the right person for the job, regardless of money.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fhow-to-land-the-job-when-youre-overqualified&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FHow%2520to%2520Land%2520the%2520Job%2520When%2520Youre%2520Overqualified.jpg&amp;description=How%20to%20Land%20the%20Job%20When%20Youre%20Overqualified"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/How%20to%20Land%20the%20Job%20When%20Youre%20Overqualified.jpg" alt="How to Land the Job When You're Overqualified" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-land-the-job-when-youre-overqualified">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-keep-your-job-hunt-from-busting-your-budget">How to Keep Your Job Hunt From Busting Your Budget</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-great-jobs-that-dont-pay-much">15 Great Jobs That Don&#039;t Pay Much</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-things-employers-care-about-more-than-your-degree">7 Things Employers Care About More Than Your Degree</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-proper-ways-to-discuss-salary-in-a-job-interview">The Proper Ways to Discuss Salary in a Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-keep-your-job-search-a-secret">How to Keep Your Job Search a Secret</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Job Hunting connections experience interviewing new job overqualified references resumes salary skills Thu, 24 Aug 2017 09:00:06 +0000 Paul Michael 2008287 at http://www.wisebread.com 5 Signs It's Time to Close Your Business http://www.wisebread.com/5-signs-its-time-to-close-your-business <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-signs-its-time-to-close-your-business" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/owner_closing_shop.jpg" alt="Owner Closing Shop" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Many people dream of launching their own business. Some start small, with a side gig or moonlighting on top of their full-time job. Others jump right into launching their own company. Regardless of the business type, surviving can be difficult. According to the Small Business Administration, 50 percent of new small businesses close within five years of opening.</p> <p>However, it's hard to know when to shut down when you've poured your heart and soul into a business. Making a smart, objective decision can be compromised by the passion you have for your company and the thought of the money and time you invested. Having a list of concrete indicators can help you make a wise choice.</p> <p>Here are five clear signs it's time to make the difficult decision to close.</p> <h2>1. There's no more profitability</h2> <p>It can take a while for a small business to break even, let alone turn a profit. But while you should expect some time to ramp up your clientele, your business should show progress and eventual profitability. Otherwise, you'll be unable to pay your bills, buy inventory, or afford basic essentials.</p> <p>If you've been working around the clock and cannot get in the black month after month, it may be time to reconsider your business model and sustainability.</p> <h2>2. You cannot take a large enough salary</h2> <p>Many entrepreneurs forgo paying themselves to help their business grow and succeed. The expectation is that after a year or two, they can start taking a salary. In the meantime, they have to live off their savings or rely on credit cards to fill the gap.</p> <p>That's a dangerous game to play for too long. Going without pay &mdash; or working for less than minimum wage with a side gig &mdash; can cause you to go into debt and give a false sense that your business is doing well.</p> <h2>3. The market changed</h2> <p>While your side hustle or business idea may have been successful for the first few months or even years, the market can change. What was a hot business can cool down quickly as time goes by.</p> <p>For example, driving for ride-share services was a great way to make extra money. Some drivers found it so lucrative they quit their jobs to drive full-time. However, there's been more competition in the industry, and companies like Uber and Lyft have cut drivers' rates to attract new customers. That can make it more difficult to make money, and many are making a fraction of what they used to.</p> <p>If you see your earnings decline continually, don't hold onto hope for a recovery for too long. It's better to cut your losses and pursue something else than to be overly optimistic about a return to form.</p> <h2>4. You no longer enjoy it</h2> <p>When you first started your business or side gig, it may have consumed and fulfilled you. But while working on a passion project on a part-time basis can be enjoyable, it can change when you devote more of your time to it or make it a full-time endeavor.</p> <p>Work can start feeling more like a drag than fun. If you go to work every day dreading what's to come, consider shutting down to give yourself the freedom to start elsewhere.</p> <h2>5. It's just not worth your time</h2> <p>Make sure to calculate how much you need to earn (and not just to pay your bills) for your small business to be worth your time. If you're working 20 hours a week, but making just a couple bucks an hour, it may be a better idea to invest your time in another business or just enjoy your hobbies.</p> <h2>Closing a business</h2> <p>Shutting down a business of any kind can be hard. Whether you invested $100,000 to launch a restaurant or just $500 to start an online craft store, you likely feel very passionately about your work. The idea of closing it and admitting defeat can be difficult. But doing so can save you thousands over time, and free you to pursue a new career or side business you enjoy.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F5-signs-its-time-to-close-your-business&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F5%2520Signs%2520It%2527s%2520Time%2520to%2520Close%2520Your%2520Business.jpg&amp;description=5%20Signs%20Its%20Time%20to%20Close%20Your%20Business"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/5%20Signs%20It%27s%20Time%20to%20Close%20Your%20Business.jpg" alt="5 Signs It's Time to Close Your Business" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/kat-tretina">Kat Tretina</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-signs-its-time-to-close-your-business">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-6"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-to-fund-your-new-business-without-borrowing-a-dime">4 Ways to Fund Your New Business Without Borrowing a Dime</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-fundamentals-of-naming-a-small-business">10 Fundamentals of Naming a Small Business</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/self-employed-heres-how-to-get-your-apartment-application-approved">Self-Employed? Here&#039;s How to Get Your Apartment Application Approved</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-moves-every-first-year-freelancer-should-make">6 Moves Every First Year Freelancer Should Make</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-strategies-for-paying-off-debt-when-living-on-a-variable-income">7 Strategies for Paying Off Debt When Living on a Variable Income</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Entrepreneurship business ownership closing freelance going out of business profits salary self employment side gigs small businesses Tue, 27 Jun 2017 08:30:14 +0000 Kat Tretina 1969825 at http://www.wisebread.com 5 Careers Where Women Earn More Than Men http://www.wisebread.com/5-careers-where-women-earn-more-than-men <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-careers-where-women-earn-more-than-men" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/female_architect_at_work.jpg" alt="Female Architect At Work" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Men in the workplace make more money than women. It's an unfortunate fact that's probably not earth-shattering to read. According to the most recently available government data, women <a href="https://www.bls.gov/cps/cpsaat39.htm" target="_blank">earned 82 cents for every dollar</a> men made in 2016.</p> <p>But there are career fields in which women are the top earners. If you're a woman looking to land on the winning side of the pay gap, these are the careers you should choose.</p> <h2>1. Architecture</h2> <p>According to a 2017 Glassdoor study, women with architecture degrees earn $7,000 more per year on average than men. From Denise Scott Brown to Zaha Hadid, women have made their mark in what is still a male-dominated field, erecting soaring towers, museums, college campuses, Olympic pools, and embassy buildings to much acclaim. All told, the gender pay gap in architecture is a rare 14 percent &mdash; <a href="https://www.glassdoor.com/blog/college-majors-gender-pay-gaps/" target="_blank">in favor of women</a>!</p> <p>Unfortunately, these giant gains for women in the field don't mean that female architects are immune to discrimination.</p> <p>&quot;It's still largely a white, male-dominated field, and seeing a woman at the job site or in a big meeting with developers is not that common,&quot; Yen Ha, a principal at an architecture firm in New York, recently told <em>The New York Times</em>. &quot;Every single day, I have to remind someone that I am, in fact, an architect. And sometimes not just an architect, but <em>the </em>architect.&quot;</p> <h2>2. Music</h2> <p>Taylor Swift is the top-earning female artist, with an estimate by Forbes putting her 2016 income at $170 million. But it's not just celebrity female musicians who are raking in the dough. Across the industry, women are out-earning men. The median base pay for a woman who is five years into a music career is $44,020 &mdash; that's more than $4,000 higher than the median base pay for a man, according to Glassdoor.</p> <p>A recent report by Berkeley College of Music stated that an orchestral musician can make up to $143,000 &mdash; or as little as $28,000. Other music fields with the potential to pay big bucks include music therapy (up to $135,000), music law (up to $150,000) and orchestral, opera, or choir conducting (up to $225,000).</p> <h2>3. Advertising</h2> <p>Women now make up nearly 60 percent of the advertising industry, earning a median salary of $46,500 at the five-year marker. Men, on the other hand, lag behind with a median income of $43,020, according to the Glassdoor study. This does not, however, mean that women dominate the field completely. According to The 3% Conference, a group that advocates for women to hold bigger roles in creative fields, when it comes to higher power positions, such as that of creative director, women make up just 11 percent.</p> <p>If you're looking to break into the advertising field, here are a few helpful tips: Start by interning at an ad agency, where you'll learn the ropes and collect contacts who may be willing to help you down the line. Take an entry level position, even if you believe it's beneath you, and work your way up the ladder. Do freelance work, and aim to either earn enough income to make freelance your full-time gig or wow a hiring agency with your talent.</p> <h2>4. Environmental science</h2> <p>The National Science Foundation reports that women comprise a little more than 40 percent of all U.S. graduate students in science and technology. When you tighten this focus onto the environmental sciences, however, the role of women gets even smaller. Women made up nearly 28 percent of all environmental scientists and geoscientists in the U.S. in 2015. Yet while there's plenty of room for women to claim a larger presence in the field, the women who do enter this field have been out-earning their male peers. Five years into their careers, women in environmental science make an average of $47,000, while men earn $44,000, according to the Glassdoor study.</p> <p>The good news is that green jobs are high in demand. Not only that, but it's now entirely possible to rake in a good deal of money as an environmental scientist. Your best bet is to go for a gig with the federal government. Environmental scientists working for the feds in 2016 earned <a href="https://www.bls.gov/ooh/life-physical-and-social-science/environmental-scientists-and-specialists.htm#tab-5" target="_blank">more than six figures</a> on average, according to data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.</p> <h2>5. Kinesiology</h2> <p>With a median base pay of $43,000, women are the top earners in the study of the mechanics of body movement. Men in kinesiology earn an average of $2,000 less than women in the field, according to Glassdoor.</p> <p>Students with a degree in kinesiology have plentiful employment opportunities: professional sports organizations, corporate fitness programs, sports clubs, spas, hospitals, and Olympic training programs, to name a few.</p> <p>A kinesiology degree can land you a gig in epidemiology, for example, which has a mean annual wage of nearly $78,000, although it's possible to earn <a href="https://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes191041.htm" target="_blank">more than six figures</a>. Other career routes for kinesiology degree holders include physical therapy (more than $87,000) and occupational therapy (more than $84,000).</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/brittany-lyte">Brittany Lyte</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-careers-where-women-earn-more-than-men">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/crime-scene-cleaner-and-4-other-trades-that-pay-surprisingly-well">Crime Scene Cleaner and 4 Other Trades That Pay Surprisingly Well</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-great-jobs-for-the-next-10-years">8 Great Jobs for the Next 10 Years</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-careers-that-pay-women-more-than-men">7 Careers That Pay Women More Than Men</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-essential-facts-women-should-know-before-asking-for-a-raise">5 Essential Facts Women Should Know Before Asking for a Raise</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building career fields college majors high earners pay reverse wage cap salary women Thu, 15 Jun 2017 08:00:14 +0000 Brittany Lyte 1961860 at http://www.wisebread.com The Absolute Worst Ways to Ask for a Raise http://www.wisebread.com/the-absolute-worst-ways-to-ask-for-a-raise <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/the-absolute-worst-ways-to-ask-for-a-raise" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/skeptical_interviewer_looking_at_interviewee.jpg" alt="Skeptical interviewer looking at interviewee" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Asking for a raise is not easy. You don't want to come across as greedy, or antagonize your employer. But at the same time, you've done your research, know what you deserve, and believe you are an asset that should be compensated accordingly.</p> <p>Before you talk to your boss, make sure you avoid the following traps. They could sink any chance of a bump in pay. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-times-you-should-demand-a-raise?rerf=seealso" target="_blank">5 Times You Should Demand a Raise</a>)</p> <h2>1. Saying you're having trouble making ends meet</h2> <p>There are a few truths that you must accept, and one of them is this &mdash; your personal money problems are your problems. You took the job, and you accepted the salary. Scraping by or falling behind on your bills is a reason to ask for a raise, but it's not the reason your employer ever needs to hear.</p> <p>You need to justify your raise for reasons that a boss can comfortably take to the payroll department, and the people he or she reports to. Saying &quot;Well, Jane's rent was just raised and she also owes on her taxes&quot; won't cut it. Instead, present your case in a well-researched and thought-out manner, explaining why you deserve a pay bump based on merit and hard work.</p> <h2>2. Criticizing any of your coworkers</h2> <p>There is a time and a place for pointing out problems with the team, and it is not when you want to get more money. If your boss is any good, he or she will already know the big problems with underperforming staff. Other issues can be brought up during your usual one-on-one sessions, or team meetings. If you use your coworkers' poor performance as a reason to get more money, you will come across as mercenary.</p> <p>Sure, you may have been picking up the slack for lazy coworkers, or correcting mistakes, but there is a way to mention this without throwing anyone under the bus. By all means, say that you have been taking on more responsibility, working longer hours, and saving the company money by catching errors. But do it without saying, &quot;John sucks at his job, he's always late, and I have to do everything!&quot;</p> <h2>3. Asking when the boss, and everyone else, is insanely busy</h2> <p>Timing is everything, and perhaps the worst time to bring this up is when everyone is scrambling to meet a deadline and deliver the goods. Whether it's behind the counter of a fast-food restaurant, or during a huge pitch for new business, asking for more money at this time will hurt you in several ways.</p> <p>First, it makes you look selfish; everyone is rushing around, and you want the boss to stop and focus on you. Second, it makes you look inconsiderate; now is not the time, can you not see how busy everyone is? Third, it makes you look like you're trying to take advantage of the situation. The boss is not going to appreciate you trying to hurriedly negotiate a raise during a crisis. So, back off, and bide your time. Things will calm down, and then you can strike.</p> <h2>4. Catching the boss off-guard</h2> <p>When you are initiating the subject of a raise and/or promotion, you are making a request that has consequences. Your boss has to examine the numbers, look at performance and salary averages, and consider the budget for the department. And the boss usually has to get the approval from other people in the company. This is all very official.</p> <p>So, casually having a one-on-one in the elevator, out of nowhere, is a huge mistake. Your boss will be taken by surprise, and may even feel threatened or trapped. They won't be able to give you an answer anyway. Schedule a time for a meeting, at least 30 minutes, and warn the boss in advance that you want to talk about your future at the company. You don't have to outright say &quot;I want to talk about a raise&quot; &mdash; if the boss is intuitive he or she will know just what this meeting is about.</p> <h2>5. Beating around the bush</h2> <p>A little friendly banter before you bring up the subject of your raise is OK. In fact, it's courteous and expected, and sets a friendly tone. However, if you meander off for 15 minutes on topics that are completely unrelated, you're only going to frustrate your boss. He or she has a pretty good idea of why you're in the room, and wants to start the conversation.</p> <p>Most likely, after five minutes of talk about the weather, the ballgame, the family, and plans for the weekend, you'll be asked to spit it out. But by that time, you've already shown yourself to be less than efficient, and that puts you in a position of weakness.</p> <h2>6. Storming in with ultimatums</h2> <p>&quot;If I don't get a raise, I'm quitting. Simple as that.&quot; How many times have people told you they are going to say that to the boss? How many times have you thought it yourself? Sure, it's human nature to want fair compensation, and we all hope to be so valued that people will do anything not to lose us. Sadly, life isn't like that.</p> <p>Ultimatums are not the answer, because one of three things will happen. First, you will get your raise, but you will be tarnished as difficult, selfish, and egotistic. Second, you will be told no, and realize you can't quit after all. Your bluff will have been called, and now they know you aren't going to quit if you don't get what you want. Third, you are told no, and have to quit to save face. Are you ready for that?</p> <p>One way to get around the ultimatum is to come to the boss with a higher paying job offer from another firm. Then, it's a business negotiation. You can say that you would much rather stay, but this offer gives you more money, and you may have to take it. In this case, most employers, if they value you, will match the offer. They see you as in demand, and that puts you in a positive light.</p> <h2>7. Getting way too emotional</h2> <p>Anger. Tears. Jealousy. Disbelief. The emotions can run high when you believe you are getting the short end of the stick. However, it's unprofessional to unload your emotional state onto your employer. You may feel you are not being recognized for all you've done for the company. Or you may be behind on your bills, with new expenses coming up in the future.</p> <p>It can be hard to mask these emotions when you are stressed. But it's important to get these under control before you ask for a raise. Get the emotions out first before coming to work. If you need to cry, do it. If you are angry, find a way to release the tension. You need to have a calm, clear head before you can talk money.</p> <h2>8. Acting entitled</h2> <p>Arms crossed. Eyebrows furrowed. Breathing hard through your nose. You're in the boss's office because enough is enough, and you should have had that raise months ago! From the moment you open your mouth, you are incredulous that you even had to call this meeting.</p> <p>Acting this way does you no favors. You'll come across as a spoiled brat, and unless you can back all of your claims up, you'll also look foolish. Don't go into the room feeling angry and cheated. Instead, calm down, and prepare. Write down all of the quantifiable reasons you deserve a raise, and give the boss the ammunition he or she needs to get that extra money for you. Be polite. Be yourself. And don't expect anything.</p> <h2>9. Making demands when the company is in trouble</h2> <p>There's an argument to be made that it's OK to ask for a raise if your company is facing some light financial difficulties (maybe they've laid a few people off), or if you know your specific department is still doing well. But that's about where you'll need to draw the line.</p> <p>If the business has fallen on <em>really</em> hard financial times, it's another story. Maybe executives have had to make significant cutbacks, or it's even possible that the company could be filing for bankruptcy. If you decide that this is the best time to ask for a raise, you are only showing upper management that you are utterly tone deaf. If you survived the cuts, you should probably be thankful you're still on the payroll at all.</p> <p>A company can encounter nonfinancial trouble, too &mdash; and you should also back away from any kind of salary negotiation until these stormy waters have calmed. A public relations scandal, for example, will have the company in a panic. No one will give your salary concerns a second thought when there are much bigger fish to fry. Or, maybe several key workers have left to form another company, or work for a rival. Again, the only thing management will be concerned about is keeping the ship afloat.</p> <p>You know when the company is not doing well. Do what you can to help, and do it with vigor. Then, when it's all worked out, you'll have more ammo for your salary discussion.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-absolute-worst-ways-to-ask-for-a-raise">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/is-this-job-worth-it">Is This Job Worth It?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-career-moves-that-prove-youre-finally-a-grown-up">8 Career Moves That Prove You&#039;re Finally a Grown-Up</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-skills-that-helped-your-boss-get-ahead">6 Skills That Helped Your Boss Get Ahead</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-fired">How to Get Fired</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building asking for raise boss employer job manager promotions salary strategies working Fri, 02 Jun 2017 09:00:10 +0000 Paul Michael 1957904 at http://www.wisebread.com The Proper Ways to Discuss Salary in a Job Interview http://www.wisebread.com/the-proper-ways-to-discuss-salary-in-a-job-interview <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/the-proper-ways-to-discuss-salary-in-a-job-interview" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/confident_young_job_applicant.jpg" alt="Confident young job applicant" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Interviewing for a new position can be stressful. It's also a balancing act that can take time, and practice, to perfect.</p> <p>When it comes to salary expectations, the pressure increases exponentially. How much will they pay you? How much dare you ask for? What about benefits, and other deciding factors? The way you play this game can put thousands of extra dollars in your paycheck. So how should you bring it up?</p> <h2>When to discuss salary</h2> <p>There are a few different schools of thought on this. Some people say that you should wait until the person asking the questions mentions it. If they don't bring it up, you stay silent and wait for the next interview (if there is one). Others say that you should bring it up yourself if the interviewer doesn't mention it or skates around the subject. And some people are of the firm belief that you should only discuss salary once you've been offered the job.</p> <p>The fact is, there's no right or wrong answer here. You have to get a feel for how the interview process is going, and also the demeanor of the person doing the interview. If you have an instant rapport with this interviewer, and the meeting is going exceptionally well, you can be fairly confident that bringing up the subject of salary without being prompted will be OK.</p> <p>However, if you have one of those interviews with a cold interviewer behind the desk and very little chitchat, asking about salary in an already tense atmosphere could just make things worse.</p> <p>If the interviewer starts talking about the subject, without actually mentioning salary directly (for instance, they discuss benefits packages, paid time off, sick leave, and so on) then you have a natural &quot;in&quot; to bring it up.</p> <h2>Salary research is imperative</h2> <p>Chances are you already know the salary range for this position. If you don't, be prepared. Before you go into the first interview, or even apply for the job, do your research. Look on sites like Salary.com and Glassdoor.com to find the salaries of people in the position for which you're applying. Get a good range. Then, look at what different companies are paying for that role, and how that salary differs from state to state (or even country to country).</p> <p>You need to understand what you are worth and what the market will pay for someone with your skills and expertise. When you have that information, you put yourself in a position of confidence. Knowledge is power, and you will have a much stronger negotiating position if you have the research to back you up.</p> <h2>Use the anchoring technique</h2> <p>It's a technique widely used by people in sales, advertising, and marketing, and it works. Contrary to popular opinion, <em>you</em> need to come out with the first number in the interview. Old school interviewers and interviewees will say this is risky because you could name a number so high it disqualifies you, or so low you'll miss out on more money. Actually, as long as you've done your research, it's good business, and puts you in control of the discussion. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/this-simple-negotiating-trick-puts-money-in-your-pocket?ref=seealso" target="_blank">This Simple Negotiating Trick Puts Money in Your Pocket</a>)</p> <p>Let's take a hypothetical: You know that this position is worth, say $95,000 a year plus benefits. You also know that you are highly-qualified, have a superb resume, impeccable references, and that the company in question has had trouble filling the role. Therefore, you ask for much more than $95,000. Start at $120,000, or more. You have good reason to want this much money. You are worth it, and every day the company does not have this role filled, they are wasting time and money looking for a candidate. If they really want you, they'll pay it. If they don't, they won't.</p> <p>By anchoring the interviewer to a higher figure, you can eventually haggle your way to a salary that you are comfortable taking &mdash; say $100,000, which may be $5,000 more than the company wanted to spend, but $20,000 less than your asking price. Everyone's a winner.</p> <h2>How to tackle some of the tricky salary questions</h2> <p>You are going to get asked about salary in a variety of ways. Remember, you're in a negotiation; you want the most money for the role and they want to pay as little as possible. Here are some typical questions, and how to handle them.</p> <h2>&quot;What kind of salary range are you looking for?&quot;</h2> <p>Think about that for a second. It's a ridiculous question. They're asking you, &quot;What is the least amount of money you would be willing to take for this role, and what is your high-end?&quot; Do you think they're going to give you the top end of your salary range? Of course not, you've already told them how cheaply they can get you.</p> <p>So, narrow the answer down to something that gives very little wiggle room. For example, &quot;I'm looking for a salary in the high $90s&quot; focuses on a salary that's at least $97,000 a year. If you say &quot;$90,000&ndash;$100,000,&quot; guess what &hellip; you're getting $90,000.</p> <h2>&quot;How much are you currently making?&quot;</h2> <p>This is another nasty question, although it may seem like a perfectly innocent one to ask. You may currently be earning $60,000 a year, but so what? After doing the research, paired with your experience, you know you should be getting at least $80,000 a year for the job to which you're applying.</p> <p>Don't fall into this trap, because you are selling yourself short. Simply answer with something like, &quot;It's an apples to oranges comparison to compare my current salary to this role. If you supply me with more information about the role, the benefits package, the hours, the workload, and so on, I can let you know what salary I am looking for.&quot;</p> <h2>&quot;What are your salary expectations?&quot;</h2> <p>&quot;Ummm &hellip; I'd like as much money as possible please!&quot; Clearly, that's not the right answer, but that's what you're thinking. Again, you need to be realistic based on the research you've done, your current level of experience, and what you can bring to this new firm. There is no harm in saying &quot;That's not a question I can answer until I have a much better grasp on the requirements of the position, and what benefits come with it.&quot;</p> <h2>&quot;We really want you, but can't afford you. Would you take a pay cut?&quot;</h2> <p>If you've already named your price and they ask you this question, don't give up. If they really want you, they should be willing to pay. This is a sly way of setting your expectations low. They're saying &quot;We're cheap, we want to pay the minimum.&quot;</p> <p>Well, until you know what that minimum is, you cannot possibly answer this question. Never say, &quot;I'd consider it,&quot; or, &quot;Sure, if that's what it takes to get my foot in the door.&quot; That's just rolling over for them. Instead, make them put the entire offer on the table first, including benefits, travel allowances, vacation time, sick time, and so on. It's possible that you could take less money than you're earning now if they give you other concessions, like working only four days a week, working remotely, or getting six weeks of paid time off.</p> <p>Remember, salary negotiation is a crucial part of the interview process, but you should not be chastised for wanting a good living wage. Good luck out there.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-proper-ways-to-discuss-salary-in-a-job-interview">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-9"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-hired-by-your-dream-company">How to Get Hired by Your Dream Company</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-keep-your-job-search-a-secret">How to Keep Your Job Search a Secret</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-ways-college-grads-can-get-ahead-in-the-job-hunt">11 Ways College Grads Can Get Ahead in the Job Hunt</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-things-you-should-never-include-in-your-cover-letter">7 Things You Should Never Include in Your Cover Letter</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-land-the-job-when-youre-overqualified">How to Land the Job When You&#039;re Overqualified</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Job Hunting advice anchoring technique interviewing negotiations new jobs pay questions research salary strategies wages Tue, 23 May 2017 09:00:11 +0000 Paul Michael 1951908 at http://www.wisebread.com 8 Money Moments That Should Be On Everyone's Bucket List http://www.wisebread.com/8-money-moments-that-should-be-on-everyones-bucket-list <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/8-money-moments-that-should-be-on-everyones-bucket-list" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/money_happy_woman_161954601.jpg" alt="Woman celebrating money moments on her bucket list" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>The big house. The fancy car. The 'round-the-world vacation. When you think of a bucket list, and mention money, it's easy to start daydreaming about things that cost a fortune.</p> <p>However, you don't have to have your head in the clouds to achieve a bucket list of money moments. Here are eight of the big ones. Many of them are already within your reach.</p> <h2>1. Becoming Debt Free</h2> <p>Let's start with the most obvious money moment we should all be striving for &mdash; <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/fastest-way-to-pay-off-10000-in-credit-card-debt?ref=internal">eliminating our debt</a>. It's certainly not easy, and it's not something that can be done quickly. This requires careful planning, a lot of willpower, and the willingness to forgo the little luxuries we all like to have in our daily lives. But, it can be done.</p> <p>One way to do this is by <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/a-comprehensive-guide-to-the-debt-snowball-method-0" target="_blank">snowballing your debt</a>. You take the smallest debt you have, perhaps a store card or a loan, and you figure out a way to pay as much off that balance as you can each month. While you're doing this, you pay the minimum on your other debts. When that small debt has been paid off, you apply that to the next debt on your list, and just keep going. Eventually, you'll have everything paid off, including the car and the mortgage. What does &quot;eventually&quot; actually mean? It might be a few years, but if you stick to it, you'll achieve your goal.&nbsp;</p> <h2>2. Putting Work That You Love Ahead of Salary</h2> <p>All too often, we do work that doesn't really fulfill us, but gives us the money to pay the bills, save for a college fund, and go away on vacation every year. However, as we spend most of our lives working, it makes sense that the job should be one that really brings us happiness.</p> <p>By&nbsp;following some of the advice mentioned earlier, it is possible to put salary and benefits second to job satisfaction. And when you don't need the money, the job market looks very different. Suddenly, your options are wide open. If you love working with animals, you can leave the rat race to care for dogs and cats. If you love working with children, or the elderly, you can find careers in those fields. They don't pay as much, but the rewards to your soul are much greater.</p> <h2>3. Building a Solid Emergency Fund</h2> <p>Some 50 years ago, you could start a job at a company in your youth, and with hard work and dedication, retire from that same company 40 years later. That time has passed. These days, corporations are constantly looking for ways to cut costs and give greater value to their shareholders. That means mergers, streamlining, and of course, layoffs.</p> <p>When the worst happens (and it will probably happen more than once in your lifetime), you need to be adequately prepared. Experts say your emergency fund should have three to six months' living expenses in it. Some say more, especially when the economy tanks and jobs are scarce.</p> <p>How do you do that, especially when you're trying to pay down debt? You need to first set a target &mdash; how much will be in the fund? Then, you need to take advantage of great interest rates, low or no-fee accounts, and apps like <a href="https://www.acorns.com/" target="_blank">Acorns</a> that invest the change from every transaction. Put a dedicated amount to one side each month, and stick to it. If that means no eating out, or no trips to the cinema, so be it. Once your fund is established, you can loosen the reins a little.</p> <h2>4. Creating a Last Will and Testament</h2> <p>Very few people like the idea of creating a will. The whole idea of planning for a life that does not have you in it is morbid to say the least. But, it's essential, especially if you have family and have specific ideas about who gets your possessions.</p> <p>With a will, you can ensure that your last wishes are met. You can name an executor, who will take on the task of wrapping up your affairs. You can be very specific about who gets what, and how it is all divided. You can name a guardian for your children and pets, and a property manager. This is all very important. If you do die without a will in place, it can lead to a lot of infighting and malice. And in some cases, it can split families apart. The state will decide how to distribute your belongings, and it will not be done with the delicacy or care that you would like.</p> <h2>5. Earning Passive Income</h2> <p>Passive income is a way to earn money using little-to-no effort, usually from a business or venture you have set up yourself. Examples of passive income include earnings from rental properties, royalties from intellectual property (books, songs, software, etc.), investment portfolios, renting out tools and equipment, and even interest from lottery winnings. The latter is not something you have much control over, but everything else is achievable.</p> <p>Look for ideas on ways to <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-ways-to-make-money-outside-your-day-job" target="_blank">make lucrative money on the side</a> without the need for a lot of regular work. It may take some serious elbow grease on the front end, but once that's established, you can sit back and watch the money come rolling in.</p> <h2>6. Buying Something Big With Cold, Hard Cash</h2> <p>This one is certainly not as important as the money moments preceding it, but it's worth aiming for. When you can buy something big (a car, a house, a boat, an RV) with cash, you have so much more power to negotiate. And you will save a staggering amount of money because you are not paying compound interest.</p> <p>Let's look at a home. Cash buyers usually get a discount, and even if it's only 3%, that can mean $6,000 on a $200,000 home. So let's say the cash price is $194,000, versus the $200,000 mortgage price, and the mortgage buyer puts down 10%. Over 30 years at 4%, that $180,000 loan has become around $310,000! By paying cash up front, you are literally saving the cost of another smaller home. It's not easy, but once you pay off your debts, you can quickly accumulate income. With some savvy investing, you could one day feel the satisfaction of saying &quot;And how much if I pay cash&hellip; right now?&quot;</p> <h2>7. Negotiating a Higher Salary&nbsp;</h2> <p>Some people work hard, put in the hours, and accept the 3% raise they get each year, which&nbsp;barely covers the rising cost of living. Other people grab life by the throat, and get a bump in pay simply by asking for it. Before you do it, you'll need some good data on your side.</p> <p>First, look at the position you are in on Salary.com and Glassdoor. What are people being paid at other companies in your area? Are you earning a competitive salary, or are you underpaid? (If you're overpaid, you may want to hold off on asking for even more&hellip;that could backfire).</p> <p>Next, assemble all the reasons that you believe you are owed more money. Did you save the company a lot of money? Did you bring in new accounts? Did you work 70-hour weeks all year long? Just like buying a car, you want to do your homework. Then, call a meeting with the boss, and lay it all on the line, politely but assertively.</p> <h2>8. No Longer Living Paycheck to Paycheck&nbsp;</h2> <p>The number of people living paycheck-to-paycheck in America may surprise you. It's not one in four, or even half of us. No. Three out of every four Americans are <a href="http://money.cnn.com/2013/06/24/pf/emergency-savings/index.html" target="_blank">struggling to make ends meet</a>.</p> <p>For many, it's a case of not being paid enough, or having crippling debt repayments. For others, it's more about bad budgeting and excessive spending. Whatever the reason, you should have a plan to get beyond living paycheck to paycheck. Have a big enough cushion in the bank to make life more comfortable. And, cut out the expenses that are dragging you down. With dedication, you could be&nbsp;one of those people who&nbsp;doesn't&nbsp;count the days to the next check going in the bank.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-money-moments-that-should-be-on-everyones-bucket-list">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dont-start-a-family-before-reaching-these-5-money-goals">Don&#039;t Start a Family Before Reaching These 5 Money Goals</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-financial-decisions-youll-never-regret">8 Financial Decisions You&#039;ll Never Regret</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-critical-money-mistakes-people-make-in-their-40s">7 Critical Money Mistakes People Make in Their 40s</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-personal-finance-resolutions-anyone-can-master">8 Personal Finance Resolutions Anyone Can Master</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/13-financial-gifts-to-give-yourself-this-holiday-season">13 Financial Gifts to Give Yourself This Holiday Season</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance bucket lists cash debt free emergency funds estate planning goals jobs passive income salary saving money Mon, 02 Jan 2017 10:00:07 +0000 Paul Michael 1865345 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Use Glassdoor to Earn More Money http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-use-glassdoor-to-earn-more-money <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-use-glassdoor-to-earn-more-money" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_work_computer_516895794.jpg" alt="Woman learning how to use Glassdoor to earn more money" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Ever get the feeling that your company isn't paying you enough? Job search and employer-review site Glassdoor is ready to give you the evidence.</p> <p>The site recently released the beta version of <a href="https://www.glassdoor.com/Salaries/know-your-worth.htm">Know Your Worth</a>, an online tool designed to help employees determine if they are indeed being underpaid. Glassdoor officials say that workers can use this tool not only to determine whether they are being paid fairly for their work, but as inspiration to <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-questions-to-ask-before-you-take-a-job-offer">ask for raises or hunt for better jobs</a>.</p> <p><span style="color: rgb(17, 17, 17); font-family: georgia; font-size: 1.5em; font-weight: normal;">How Does It Work?</span></p> <p>The service is free, though you do need an account with Glassdoor. Fortunately, this is free, too. Once you've created your account, Know Your Worth will ask for some basic information: your job title, the name of your employer, your salary, and the location of your office. You'll also have to provide your education level, the college from which you graduated, and your birth date.</p> <p>Once you plug in these numbers, Know Your Worth will tell you whether you are being underpaid based on your value in today's jobs market. The tool will also tell you by how much you are being underpaid.</p> <p>In a news release, Glassdoor said that it relies on the millions of salary reports that the site has collected over the years. The site also analyzes real-time supply and demand trends in specific job markets.</p> <h2>How Accurate Is the Site?</h2> <p>That's hard to say, as it's still in beta mode. In a test run, Know Your Worth reported that a hypothetical editor of a trade magazine in Chicago making $50,000 was about $5,900 underpaid.</p> <p>Know Your Worth, though, is a good starting point for employees who are wondering if they are underpaid. In its news release, Glassdoor reported that 65% of employees wish that they had a better grasp of whether they are being paid fairly.</p> <h2>What Next?</h2> <p>What happens if you run Know Your Worth only for it to say that you are being underpaid by $10,000? First, know that the tool is just an estimate, and that it might not accurately reflect your exact situation. Secondly, don't just get angry or depressed by the numbers that Glassdoor's tool spits back at you. Resolve to do something about it.</p> <p>Your first step might be to ask your current employer for a raise. To increase your odds of success, though, do this right. Don't just march into your boss' office. Instead, set up an appointment with the people who actually have the power to boost your salary. And prepare for this meeting.</p> <p>You can reference the Glassdoor numbers, and you should bring a copy of them to your meeting. But don't rely on those figures entirely. You also need to create a compelling argument for why you deserve a raise.</p> <p>Have any of your initiatives or projects that you spearheaded resulted in a boost in your company's bottom line? That's important information to bring up. Are you doing the work of several people because your company has yet to fill open positions it created way back during the country's economic downturn? Mention that, too.</p> <p>The key to negotiating a higher salary is to provide concrete examples of your worth to the company. If you've led successful rollouts of new products or services, this is important to highlight. If you've built the top-producing sales team in your company, share that knowledge.</p> <h2>What If Your Negotiations Fail?</h2> <p>What if, after presenting Glassdoor's numbers and the concrete evidence of your worth to the company, your employer refuses your request for a raise anyway? It can happen. Your bosses are not under any obligation to pay you more, even if you clearly deserve a pay bump.</p> <p>You then have only two options: You can remain at your job, without sulking about what you feel is a salary that is too low, or you can hunt for a new, better-paying one. This last option? It might be better for your mental health.</p> <p>People don't want to work in an environment in which they feel underappreciated. If you feel that you deserve a better salary, and it's clear that you won't earn it at your current job, the time is right to start searching for a more fulfilling position.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dan-rafter">Dan Rafter</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-use-glassdoor-to-earn-more-money">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-signs-your-company-is-going-under">10 Signs Your Company Is Going Under</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-ace-your-next-coffee-interview">How to Ace Your Next Coffee Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-high-paying-jobs-that-didnt-exist-10-years-ago">9 High-Paying Jobs That Didn&#039;t Exist 10 Years Ago</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-not-to-answer-10-of-the-most-common-interview-questions">How NOT TO Answer 10 of the Most Common Interview Questions</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-words-to-never-use-in-a-job-interview">10 Words to Never Use in a Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Job Hunting finding a new job glassdoor job board job hunt job review site job search make more money salary Thu, 08 Dec 2016 12:00:06 +0000 Dan Rafter 1849885 at http://www.wisebread.com 9 Careers You Don't Need a Ton of Experience to Start http://www.wisebread.com/9-careers-you-dont-need-a-ton-of-experience-to-start <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/9-careers-you-dont-need-a-ton-of-experience-to-start" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_police_officer_92304699.jpg" alt="Woman finding career that doesn&#039;t need experience to start" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>So, you don't have a lot of experience, but you don't want to settle for a terrible job. What are your options? Well, you may be surprised to learn that there are careers out there <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-great-side-jobs-you-can-do-on-your-bicycle">offering decent salaries</a> that don't even require a high school diploma, let alone a degree. And since the cost of college these days is so high, continuing education may not even be an option for you. If you're looking for a career that doesn't need any real experience to start, here are nine options worth considering.</p> <h2>1. Private Investigator</h2> <p>You'll see <a href="http://www.bls.gov/ooh/protective-service/private-detectives-and-investigators.htm">private investigators</a> popping up in movies and TV shows all the time, and they seem to live the lifestyle of an action hero crossed with Sherlock Holmes. In reality, a P.I. does not spend his or her time jumping off buildings, embroiled in car chases, and saving the day. Instead, the job involves a lot of research and background checking, and 80% of the work will be done in front of a computer and on the phone. Cases usually revolve around personal disputes, legal issues, or financial troubles &mdash; although sometimes a P.I. will be brought in to help look for a missing person, deliver a subpoena, or track down a relative. Although a background in either law enforcement of the military is the usual path of getting into the business, all you really need is a skill for uncovering information and, in some states, a P.I. license.</p> <p><strong>Average Annual Salary</strong>: $45,610</p> <h2>2. Real Estate Broker</h2> <p>With good people skills and the ability to convince someone to buy something, you could do well in real estate. To get started, you will need to get a license to become an agent, and that requires you to take a 60-hour course. Once you have that, you can either go out on your own, or get a job with a local real estate firm. And after you've tucked a little experience under your belt (usually 1-3 years), you can take another test to become a broker. Then, you can build a network of clients and referrals, and start making some serious money. Although the median salary is just over $70k, top real estate brokers can earn well over $300k per year.</p> <p><strong>Average Annual Salary</strong>: $72,500</p> <h2>3. Delivery Driver</h2> <p>If you have a license to drive an automobile, you can become a delivery driver. You do not need a Commercial Driver's License unless the job you're applying for states it specifically. Delivery driver jobs can range from part-time work at the local pizza place, to handling dangerous substances (known as Hazmat). Once upon a time, you needed a good working knowledge of the local, or sometimes national, roads and highways, but smartphones with built-in GPS and map apps have changed all that. The hours can be long, and not always 9-5, but if you're looking for a job with no experience, this is a good bet.</p> <p><strong>Average Annual Salary</strong>: $38,326</p> <h2>4. Deckhand</h2> <p>If you like the ocean and want to do some free traveling, a <a href="http://www.indeed.com/salary/Deckhand.html">deckhand</a> could be just the job you're looking for. The deckhands on a cruise ship don't get to do a lot of fun work, but they do get to see a little of the world as part of the job. Duties include monitoring gangways, running ship drills, mopping, sweeping, cleaning, making minor repairs, painting, helping to dock the boat, solving small problems, and basically being a jack-of-all-trades. Deckhands are also needed on dredges, riverboats, fishing vessels, and scows. No experience is needed to start this job, and contracts are usually for six months or longer. After you gain some experience on the ship, you can move up to deck officer, mate, or even captain.</p> <p><strong>Average Annual Salary</strong>: $38,000</p> <h2>5. Police Officer</h2> <p>&quot;To protect and to serve.&quot; It's the motto of many police departments, and if you have what it takes to do it, you could make a fine police officer. All you need is a high school diploma, and to be in good physical shape. Police expert Neal C. Griffin says that great officers exhibit the <a href="http://www.how-to-become-a-police-officer.com/">Five I's: integrity, intellect, industry, initiative, and impact.</a> Therefore, you should also exhibit excellent moral character, have a knack for solving problems, and work well under duress. If this sounds like something you are interested in, you will need to submit an application, complete a written test (called a civil service exam), and take a physical fitness test. After that, you'll undergo a background check before being accepted to an academy for training. This takes six months, after which you'll do 3-6 months of field training.</p> <p><strong>Average Annual Salary</strong>: $48,815</p> <h2>6. Oil Field Worker</h2> <p>When asked about the experience needed in an interview for <a href="http://www.jobshadow.com/interview-with-a-roughneck/">JobShdaow.com</a>, the &quot;roughneck&quot; replied, &quot;You don't even have to have a GED to do this job. In fact a lot of the industry never finished high school, or middle school. There is no educational boundaries for drilling. All you need is a strong back and a lot of common sense.&quot;</p> <p>This 22-year-old who was interviewed is already making over $100K a year, but does warn that it is hard, sometimes backbreaking work, and the 84-hour workweek can be grueling (you work two weeks on, two weeks off). If you can take direction well, don't mind getting your hands dirty, and can manage the schedule, you'll do well in this business, and make a lot of money. Of course, it can also be dangerous work; <a href="http://www.npr.org/2013/12/27/250807226/on-the-job-deaths-spiking-as-oil-drilling-quickly-expands">in 2012,</a> 138 workers died on the job, with the fatality rate eight times higher than the all-industry rate of 3.2 deaths per 100,000 workers.</p> <p><strong>Average Annual Salary</strong>: $69,000</p> <h2>7. Administrative Assistant</h2> <p>Although many companies will look for at least a high school diploma on your resume, there is no experience required to be an administrative assistant. You should have good typing and organization skills, and familiarity with some of the most common software programs (Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint). Admin assistants are usually tasked with filing, making and receiving calls, managing visitors, typing letters, organizing business meetings, and doing other odd jobs around the office. If you excel in the position, you can quickly rise to senior administrative assistant, executive assistant, and even senior executive assistant. The higher up the ladder you go, the greater the perks and the pay. You may get to do a lot of traveling, and attend some pretty fancy industry events, too.</p> <p><strong>Average Annual Salary</strong>: $37,006</p> <h2>8. Security Guard</h2> <p>Don't think that all security guards are strapping six-foot bodybuilders with former military experience. While some positions do require someone with good physical fitness and self-defense training, many are simply asked to report suspicious activity. In fact, many retirees go into security work, and they are in their sixties and seventies.</p> <p>Duties can include sitting in a room watching CCTV monitors, crowd control, and doing regular patrols of the building. It's possible you will have to confront people, but that will be outlined in the job description. If you're young and fit, you could easily get promoted to head up a team of guards, and may eventually get a job at the head office.</p> <p><strong>Average Annual Salary: </strong>$29,083</p> <h2>9. Car Sales Consultant</h2> <p>No experience is needed to sell automobiles, but how much you earn in a year will vary greatly depending on the kind of salesperson you are. Now, the profession gets a bad rap, but the industry has definitely cleaned up its image over the last decade. And with the Internet helping people do a lot more research, sales consultants are much less likely to force bad deals and excessive pricing on customers. Instead, the job is more about selling the great features and benefits of the car, and closing the sale. Interestingly enough, only 20% of a dealership's revenue comes from new car sales; the majority comes from buying and selling used cars for a profit, servicing cars, and financing. Selling cars can be hard work, especially during the weekdays when few people come onto the lots. But if you're good at it, you can easily make over $300K a year selling higher-end cars like BMWs and Audis.</p> <p><strong>Average Annual Salary</strong>: $31,000 + Commission</p> <p><em>Salary information found on </em><a href="http://www.indeed.com/"><em>Indeed</em></a><em>, </em><a href="http://www.payscale.com/"><em>Payscale</em></a><em>, and </em><a href="https://www.glassdoor.com/index.htm"><em>Glassdoor</em></a><em>. </em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-careers-you-dont-need-a-ton-of-experience-to-start">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-the-job-without-saying-a-word">How to Get the Job Without Saying a Word</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/your-guide-to-getting-a-job-right-out-of-college">Your Guide to Getting a Job Right Out of College</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/make-guerrilla-job-hunting-work-for-you">Make Guerrilla Job Hunting Work for You</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-terrible-work-from-home-jobs-you-should-avoid">8 Terrible Work-From-Home &quot;Jobs&quot; You Should Avoid</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-great-jobs-that-dont-pay-much">15 Great Jobs That Don&#039;t Pay Much</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Education & Training Job Hunting careers job application job experience job hunting job search job training resume salary Tue, 20 Sep 2016 10:00:09 +0000 Paul Michael 1796100 at http://www.wisebread.com 4 Foolproof Ways to Protect Your Money From Inflation http://www.wisebread.com/4-foolproof-ways-to-protect-your-money-from-inflation <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/4-foolproof-ways-to-protect-your-money-from-inflation" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_clock_money_94923537.jpg" alt="Woman finding ways to protect her money from inflation" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Back in January 1980, when Jimmy Carter was President and Michael Jackson led the music charts with &quot;Rock with You,&quot; Americans were experiencing one of the periods of highest inflation in modern history. In January 1980, inflation was over 13.9% per year and peaked in April 1980 at 14.76%.</p> <p>With the consumer price index (CPI) at <a href="http://www.bls.gov/news.release/cpi.nr0.htm">0.8% in July 2016</a>, many Americans have never experienced the dramatic increase in prices that other generations have. But even though inflation is low these days, it still eats away at your savings and investments. Let's review four (nearly) foolproof strategies and investments that will reduce the hit.</p> <h2>1. Invest in an S&amp;P 500 Index Fund</h2> <p>The average annual inflation rate since the U.S. government began tracking it in 1913 is <a href="http://inflationdata.com/Inflation/Inflation_Rate/Long_Term_Inflation.asp">about 3%</a>. To combat inflation's effect on your money, you need investments that provide greater average returns than the inflation rate.</p> <p>Since its inception in 1928, the S&amp;P 500 has provided an <a href="http://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/datafile/histretSP.html">average annual return of 11.25%</a> until 2015, making this stock market index a leading choice to protect yourself from inflation. For the greatest ease and cost-efficiency, invest in a mutual fund or exchange-traded fund that mirrors the S&amp;P 500's performance.</p> <p>Not only are the average returns of passively-managed S&amp;P 500 index funds higher than those of actively managed funds, but also the expense ratios of S&amp;P 500 index funds are lower than those of actively managed funds. For example, the Vanguard 500 Index Investor Shares fund [Nasdaq: <a href="https://finance.yahoo.com/quote/VFINX?p=VFINX">VFINX</a>] has an annual expense ratio of 0.16%, which is 84% lower than the average expense ratio of funds with similar holdings.</p> <p>Of course, this approach isn't actually foolproof, since both the rate of inflation and market returns vary from year to year. But when considering long-term averages, it's a fairly safe bet.</p> <h2>2. Increase Annual Contributions to Saving Accounts</h2> <p>Even when you leverage <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-best-online-savings-accounts?ref=internal">high-yield online savings accounts</a>, you'll only make between 0.75% and 1.05% per year, according to data from August 2016. With a July 2016 CPI of 0.8%, you're actually losing 0.05% and gaining only 0.25% per year. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/capital-one-360-review?ref=seealso">Capital One 360: A Competitive Banking Option</a>)</p> <p>Setting up automatic transfers from your paycheck or main checking account to your investment and saving accounts is a smart idea, but adjusting those contributions for inflation is an even better one. A good practice is to make an adjustment for inflation once a year. Check with your financial institution to find out if it offers the option of automatic adjustments for inflation to your contributions.</p> <h2>3. Seek Real Estate Income</h2> <p>While gold has a great reputation as an investment hedge against inflation, real estate income has proved to be a better hedge tool. A study from financial company Fidelity back-tested the performance of several assets against inflation on an annual basis during a 40-year period and found that gold and real estate income beat inflation 54% and 71% of the time, respectively. &quot;Real estate is regarded consistently as a <a href="https://www.reit.com/news/videos/wharton-professor-discusses-reits-inflation-hedging-benefits">good inflation hedge</a>, and it is&quot;, asserts Susan Wachter, professor at the University of Pennsylvania Wharton School of Business. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-reasons-millenials-should-invest-in-a-home?ref=seealso">4 Reasons Millennials Should Invest in a Home</a>)</p> <p>While most individual investors can only afford to buy their own home, all individual investors can gain exposure to real estate income from a wide variety of properties through real estate investment trusts (REITS). Some advantages of REITs are their requirement to maintain a dividend payout ratio of at least 90% and their liquidity because they trade on major stock exchanges.</p> <p>For example, the 10-year annual average return of the Vanguard REIT Index Fund Investor Shares [Nasdaq: <a href="http://finance.yahoo.com/quote/VGSIX?ltr=1">VGSIX</a>] is 7.46%, as of June 30, 2016. In comparison, the 10-year annual average return of the S&amp;P 500 was 7.42% for the same period.</p> <p>Adding REITs provides you access to assets with inflation resistance and helps you protect against the negative of higher inflation. Still, REITs should only be a part of a well-diversified portfolio. Depending on your tolerance to risk, financial advisers suggest allocating from 5% up to 20% of your investment in portfolio in REITs. And of course, past performance is no guarantee of future success.</p> <h2>4. Negotiate Your Salary</h2> <p>If your salary were to consistently go up every year, you would not to worry about inflation to begin with! However, <a href="http://time.com/money/3657524/odds-of-getting-raise/">less than half of working Americans</a> ever even ask for a raise, and about 30% of them are uncomfortable negotiating salary.</p> <p>Start your career on the right foot by successfully negotiating the salary offer of your very first job. Three out of four U.S. employers typically have room to increase their first salary offers by 5% to 10% during negotiations, but only 38% of applicants negotiate those first salary offers. Let's imagine that your first salary offer was $38,000, that would mean that you have the potential of increasing that offer from $39,900 to $41,800. Given the historical inflation average of 3% per year, you have the potential of covering inflation for 40 months just by negotiating your first salary offer.</p> <p>And things only get better after that.</p> <p>By bumping up your salary from the start, you're increasing your chances of future raises. As your salary grows over time, so does your probability of getting a raise. For example, people making $40,000 to $50,000 have about a 40% chance of receiving that raise they requested and people making $60,000 to $70,000 have about a 50% chance.</p> <p>While there are other factors that may influence pay raises, the main one is the decision to request better compensation. From U.S. workers asking for a raise, 75% of them get something: 44% of them get what they asked for and 31% of them receive a smaller amount. Getting at least a small raise is a very smart strategy to protect yourself from inflation because inflation erodes the value of your dollars year after year.</p> <p><em>What are other ways to protect yourself from inflation?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/damian-davila">Damian Davila</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-foolproof-ways-to-protect-your-money-from-inflation">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-4"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dont-be-fooled-by-an-investments-rate-of-return">Don&#039;t Be Fooled by an Investment&#039;s Rate of Return</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/a-simple-guide-to-series-i-savings-bonds-i-bonds">A Simple Guide to Series I Savings Bonds (I-Bonds)</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/this-post-really-suk-kuks-examining-islamic-finance">This Post Really Suk-kuks: Examining Islamic Finance</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/think-outside-the-index-when-you-rebalance-your-investment-portfolio">Think Outside the Index When You Rebalance Your Investment Portfolio</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-3-rules-every-mediocre-investor-must-know">The 3 Rules Every Mediocre Investor Must Know</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance Banking Investment consumer price index Economy hedging inflation negotiating real estate REITs returns s&p 500 salary savings stocks Fri, 02 Sep 2016 09:00:14 +0000 Damian Davila 1784422 at http://www.wisebread.com 9 High-Paying Jobs That Didn't Exist 10 Years Ago http://www.wisebread.com/9-high-paying-jobs-that-didnt-exist-10-years-ago <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/9-high-paying-jobs-that-didnt-exist-10-years-ago" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_90052683_MEDIUM.jpg" alt="technology has created some great high-paying jobs" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Is your 9-to-5 job suffocating you? Tired of working a low-paying, high stress job? Have you been watching in horror as your industry slowly dies around you? Now might be the time to replace your dead-end job with a shiny, new, and potentially lucrative career.</p> <p>While you can certainly dive into a traditional career (doctor, lawyer, teacher), why not check out a newer job prospect? Over the last decade, advances in technology, changes in government policy, and shifts in social norms have gradually led to the birth of new careers. Here are nine jobs that didn't exist 10 years ago. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/escape-your-dying-industry-with-one-of-these-8-careers-instead?ref=seealso">Escape Your Dying Industry With One of These 8 Careers, Instead</a>)</p> <h2>1. App Developer</h2> <p>In 2008, software developers created&nbsp;<a href="http://www.statista.com/statistics/263795/number-of-available-apps-in-the-apple-app-store/">800 applications for the Apple app store</a>. In less than 10 years, the number of apps available on the Apple App store has ballooned to 2,000,000. The popularity of applications created the need for a new specialization within the software development community: the app developer. App developers are responsible for developing, creating, and modifying the application software. In May of 2015, the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) estimated that there were&nbsp;<a href="http://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes151132.htm">747,730 app developer jobs</a>. And the mean hourly wage for the position is $49.12.</p> <h2>2. Data Scientist</h2> <p>Businesses utilize free store Wi-Fi and cameras to track customer movements, information received from credit card purchases, and mobile payments to delve into <a href="http://onlinemasters.ohio.edu/how-your-data-is-being-used/">customer behavior and patterns</a>. Information gained from the data can help businesses determine what to stock, how often to send out coupons, what to set the price to, and how product placement will influence customers. Data scientists are the people that collect data from individual sources, analyze the data for patterns, and make recommendations based on that data to managers and executives.</p> <p>Data scientists make a <a href="http://www.payscale.com/research/US/Job=Data_Scientist,_IT/Salary">median salary of $91,146</a>. And individuals who aren't lucky enough to make the median salary make at least $63,000 a year.</p> <h2>3. Ebook Editor</h2> <p>In 2007, the first major e-reading devices hit the shelves. For the first time, readers could have an entire library of books at their fingertips anywhere they went. The creation of ebooks not only changed how people could read, but it also made it easier for writers to self-publish their work. Amazon's Direct Publishing program, for example, will publish an author's work for free and provide royalties based on how many people purchase the book.</p> <p>The increase in writers self-publishing led to a new career and freelance opportunity: ebook formatting and editing. Formatters set up the backend HTML of the ebooks to ensure that the author has a professional ebook as they go through the publication process. Professionals within this field tend to charge anywhere from $50 to $200 dollars per book.</p> <h2>4. Geriatric Care Managers</h2> <p>Over the last decade, a large number of the United States population have reached the stage where they can no longer live entirely alone without help. This has left a large number of families with the difficult task of ensuring that their elderly loved ones have all the care that they need. The job entails analyzing what type of care and services are required, making a care plan, dealing with the technical details of setting up required services, and continuing to monitor the quality of the current care plan provided.</p> <p>This profession requires at least a Bachelor's degree in a field related to care management (nursing, mental health, counseling, etc.). Once you have the degree, you can become&nbsp;<a href="http://www.aginglifecare.org/ALCA/About_Aging_Life_Care/Certification_and_Professional_Conduct/ALCA/About_Aging_Life_Care/Certification_and_Professional_Conduct.aspx">certified in care management</a>. According to PayScale, the median salary for&nbsp;<a href="http://www.payscale.com/research/US/Job=Geriatric_Care_Manager/Salary">geriatric care managers</a> is $47,693.</p> <h2>5. Genetic Counselor</h2> <p>Health care has gradually moved toward a patient-centered care format. In a nutshell, this focus tries to foresee, prevent, and manage illnesses to prevent costly hospitalization. Genetic counselors are a new addition to the health care field in the wake of this industry philosophy change. They dive into an individual's personal history to assess the potential for genetic disorders or birth defects in future offspring, as well as the development of genetic diseases in adults.</p> <p>The job requires a Master's degree in genetic counseling or genetics. According to the BLS, genetic counselors can&nbsp;<a href="http://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/genetic-counselors.htm">make up to $72,090</a>. The current pool of available jobs as of 2014 was only 2,400, but the career is prospected to grow by 29% by 2024.</p> <h2>6. Information Security Analyst</h2> <p>Implementing good cyber security plans is a vital aspect of any business plan. The Internet has made the potential for cyber criminals to steal vital business or patient information incredibly high. Information security analysts protect companies from cyber threats by conducting security threat assessments, planning how to protect the company from threats, and implementing the new security measures to protect the company's network.</p> <p>The median salary, according to the BLS,&nbsp;<a href="http://www.bls.gov/ooh/computer-and-information-technology/information-security-analysts.htm">as of 2015 was $90,120</a>. There are currently 82,900 information security analyst jobs. That number is projected to grow 18% by 2024.</p> <h2>7. Medical Records and Health Informatics Technician (HIT)</h2> <p>Technology has radically changed the health care field in the last few years. One of the major changes is the implementation of electronic health records to track patient care and patient history to improve the quality and safety of care.</p> <p>Health informatics professionals are the people who plan, implement, and maintain EHR systems. On top of their <a href="http://healthinformatics.uic.edu/resources/infographics/the-intersection-of-healthcare-and-it/">EHR duties</a>, professionals often deal with billing, create multimedia projects to educate patients, securely exchange electronic health information between care providers, and research health care trends.</p> <p>According to the BLS, median pay for&nbsp;<a href="http://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/medical-records-and-health-information-technicians.htm">HIT professionals</a> is $37,110. As of 2014, there were 188,600 jobs. There is expected to be a 15% growth which will result in 29,000 more jobs by 2024.</p> <h2>8. Social Media Specialist</h2> <p>The major social media platforms like Facebook and Twitter hit the scene in the early 2000s. As more people started using them, businesses began to realize that they could be an easy way to connect with the public. Thus, the need for social media specialists were born.</p> <p>Social media specialists are responsible for maintaining all of a company's social media platforms, interacting with potential customers online, crafting a social media strategy to attract more customers or clients, and analyzing social media data metrics. According to PayScale, median <a href="http://www.payscale.com/research/US/Job=Social_Media_Specialist/Salary">salary for social media specialists</a> is $40,821.</p> <h2>9. YouTubers</h2> <p>YouTube was founded in 2005. But It wasn't until the last 10 years that individuals with YouTube channels started making their video creation efforts a profitable endeavor.</p> <p>There are various strategies that YouTubers utilize to monetize their videos. YouTube allows video creators to monetize their videos with ads, or engage in affiliate marketing with companies within the video. Individual gets paid when viewers sign up for the product or make a purchase.</p> <p><em>What other jobs didn't exist 10 years ago? Share with us!</em></p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F9-high-paying-jobs-that-didnt-exist-10-years-ago&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F9%2520High-Paying%2520Jobs%2520That%2520Didnt%2520Exist%252010%2520Years%2520Ago.jpg&amp;description=9%20High-Paying%20Jobs%20That%20Didnt%20Exist%2010%20Years%20Ago"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/9%20High-Paying%20Jobs%20That%20Didnt%20Exist%2010%20Years%20Ago.jpg" alt="9 High-Paying Jobs That Didn't Exist 10 Years Ago" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/samantha-stauf">Samantha Stauf</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-high-paying-jobs-that-didnt-exist-10-years-ago">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-5"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-jobs-that-robots-cant-do-yet">10 Jobs That Robots Can&#039;t Do, Yet</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-great-jobs-that-dont-pay-much">15 Great Jobs That Don&#039;t Pay Much</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-use-glassdoor-to-earn-more-money">How to Use Glassdoor to Earn More Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-earn-extra-income-with-twitter">How to Earn Extra Income With Twitter</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/escape-your-dying-industry-with-one-of-these-8-careers-instead">Escape Your Dying Industry With One of These 8 Careers, Instead</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Technology high-paying jobs job search jobs modern jobs modern technology salary side job social media Mon, 15 Aug 2016 09:00:08 +0000 Samantha Stauf 1770723 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Celebrities With Shockingly Low Net Worths http://www.wisebread.com/6-celebrities-with-shockingly-low-net-worths <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-celebrities-with-shockingly-low-net-worths" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_39050928_LARGE.jpg" alt="Mike Tyson has low net worth" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Being rich and famous isn't all it's cracked up to be. Just ask the famous people who made it big, and then squandered their riches to earn the dubious distinction of being celebs who have struggled financially. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-most-money-savvy-rap-stars?ref=seealso">The 5 Most Money-Savvy Rap Stars</a>)</p> <h2>1. Mike Tyson</h2> <p>The former heavyweight champion of the world (and sometimes ear biter) was once <a href="http://www.celebritynetworth.com/richest-athletes/richest-boxers/mike-tyson-net-worth/">worth about $300 million</a> at the height of his career, according to Celebrity Networth. A series of unfortunate events beginning in the late 1980s &mdash; including a divorce from actress Robin Givens, giving his longtime trainer Kevin Rooney the boot, and going to prison for an alleged rape &mdash; contributed to his fortune's decline, which today is estimated at around $3 million.</p> <h2>2. Lindsay Lohan</h2> <p>Lindsay Lohan's career took off after <em>Mean Girls</em> debuted in 2004, but it wasn't long after that personal and professional troubles began to chip away at her budding bank account. Her hard-partying ways and unreliable reputation led to a decline in mainstream acting roles. In 2012, the IRS had seized control of the scarlet-haired star's funds to pay off over <a href="http://www.celebritynetworth.com/richest-celebrities/actors/lindsay-lohan-net-worth/">$200,000 in back taxes</a>. In 2013, Lohan did a series of interviews for Oprah that reportedly netted her a cool $2 million, but most of the money was earmarked for taxes, rehab fees, and further IRS debts, leaving her with a paltry $500,000 today.</p> <h2>3. Chris Tucker</h2> <p>Talk about money mismanagement. Chris Tucker, who everybody knows as Jackie Chan's high-pitched, fast-talking sidekick in the <em>Rush Hour</em> movies, was paid $20 million for the first sequel in that series, and then negotiated a $40 million two-movie contract with New Line Cinema. But despite such robust paydays, Tucker is currently $11.5 million in the negative as a result of foreclosed homes and several years of back taxes, according to The Motley Fool. The still-viable actor hopes to get out of the red in another <em>Friday</em> sequel alongside Ice Cube soon.</p> <h2>4. Teresa Giudice</h2> <p>If you're a fan of guilty-pleasure reality TV, then you might know table-flipping Teresa Giudice from Bravo's <em>The Real Housewives of New Jersey</em> (<em>RHONJ</em>). The recently released jailbird, who enjoyed a lavish lifestyle with her husband Joe Giudice and their four children, filed for bankruptcy in 2011, claiming to be more than <a href="http://www.bustle.com/articles/89126-what-is-teresa-giudices-net-worth-the-real-housewives-of-new-jersey-star-has-gone-through">$11 million in debt</a>. In 2013, the couple was indicted on 39 counts of conspiracy to commit mail fraud, bank fraud, wire fraud, bankruptcy fraud, and making false statements on loan applications. Teresa returned for the seventh season of <em>RHONJ</em> following her release from prison.</p> <h2>5. Pamela Anderson</h2> <p>While $5 million isn't anything to balk at, you'd think that <a href="http://www.therichest.com/celebnetworth/celeb/actress/pamela-anderson-net-worth/">Pamela Anderson</a>, one of the most popular Playboy Playmates to ever grace the publication's pages, would have stashed away a heftier rainy-day fund. Even today, the former <em>Baywatch</em> star is still considered a pop-culture icon.</p> <h2>6. Gary Busey</h2> <p>Eccentric actor Gary Busey, known for films like <em>The Buddy Holly Story</em> and <em>Point Break</em>, devolved into a reality-show staple in the 2000s, appearing on such illustrious programs as <em>Celebrity Apprentice</em> and <em>Celebrity Rehab with Dr. Drew</em>. In 2012, he filed for Chapter 7 bankruptcy protection, stating that he had <a href="http://www.celebritynetworth.com/richest-celebrities/actors/gary-busey-net-worth/">less than $50,000 in real assets</a> while owing up to a million dollars to various creditors.</p> <p><em>Any other celebs with surprisingly low net worths? Share with us!</em></p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F6-celebrities-with-shockingly-low-net-worths&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F6%2520Celebrities%2520With%2520Shockingly%2520Low%2520Net%2520Worths.jpg&amp;description=6%20Celebrities%20With%20Shockingly%20Low%20Net%20Worths"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/6%20Celebrities%20With%20Shockingly%20Low%20Net%20Worths.jpg" alt="6 Celebrities With Shockingly Low Net Worths" width="212" height="605" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/mikey-rox">Mikey Rox</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-celebrities-with-shockingly-low-net-worths">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-audiobooks-about-money-you-need-to-hear">5 Audiobooks About Money You Need to Hear</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-money-lessons-we-could-all-learn-from-dwayne-the-rock-johnson">6 Money Lessons We Could All Learn From Dwayne &quot;The Rock&quot; Johnson</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-surprising-sources-of-celeb-income">6 Surprising Sources of Celeb Income</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-inspiring-quotes-about-money-from-successful-women">6 Inspiring Quotes About Money From Successful Women</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/these-13-numbers-are-the-keys-to-understanding-your-finances">These 13 Numbers Are the Keys to Understanding Your Finances</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance Entertainment actor celeb celebrity entertainment industry income millionaire money net worth salary Tue, 19 Jul 2016 10:30:06 +0000 Mikey Rox 1754819 at http://www.wisebread.com Didn't Get the Raise? Ask for This, Instead http://www.wisebread.com/didnt-get-the-raise-ask-for-this-instead <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/didnt-get-the-raise-ask-for-this-instead" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_strong_work_71194917.jpg" alt="Woman doing something after getting denied for a pay raise" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Getting knocked back when you've built up the courage to ask for a pay raise at work can feel like a real blow. It can seem as if your hard work has gone unnoticed, and will quickly sour working relationships if you let it. But with some segments of the economy still decidedly wobbly, every pay bump is hard-fought, and more of us than ever are getting turned down when we ask for more cash.</p> <p>If this is your situation, don't get disheartened. Instead, think about the different negotiating angles you can work, like requesting a deferred raise, extra pension or benefits, increased vacation time, a personal development payment, or even the opportunity to work from home.</p> <p>All of these can effectively put money back in your pocket, even if your boss says no to a raise.</p> <h2>Deferred or Conditional Raise</h2> <p>If you asked for a straight raise and your boss was not able (or willing) to offer it, then asking for a conditional or deferred raise is an option. A deferred raise simply means a pay raise that is delayed until an agreed date &mdash; and might be worth asking for if your company has specific short-term cash issues, or if the issue is linked to the financial year. If there is no stretch in the budget for right now, that does not necessarily mean that there won't be in future, and getting an agreement in advance is a head start.</p> <p>A conditional raise, on the other hand, is linked to your achievement on a certain task or project. This might mean that you are to receive a raise if you secure a new contract, or pass a professional qualification. You might link it to the company profits or your team performance, depending on the sort of business you work for. This gives you the opportunity to show, not only why you deserve a raise, but also how your boss can find the cash.</p> <p>But for these options to work, they should be agreed in writing, and with as much specific details as possible to back them up.</p> <h2>Boost Your Benefits</h2> <p>Depending on the type of company you work for, it might be possible to effectively boost your overall remuneration by addressing other fringe benefits instead of the salary. This is often an appealing option for bosses if the financial pots for salary and benefits are separate. Even if the one pot dries up, there might still be some wriggle room in the other!</p> <p>You should look at the benefits your company offers, and make a specific request for improvement. For example, if your business has a grading system which is linked to benefits, you might ask to be bumped up a grade &mdash; especially if this allows you access to perks like a company car or share options. If this is hard to swallow for your HR team or boss, then consider agreeing that the grade improvement now could be set off against any future entitlement.</p> <p>Think broadly when you negotiate this one. You might request company pension contributions, share options or grants, reward cards, discounts on products you actually use, or even increased vacation time. All these routes effectively boost your package and leave you with more cash in your pocket overall.</p> <h2>Invest in Yourself</h2> <p>Sometimes, investing in yourself through personal development or improved qualifications is really worthwhile. If you are struggling to get a raise at work, then why not ask for support in achieving this development or qualifications instead? Some qualifications can <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-certifications-that-add-big-to-your-salary">give your salary a huge boost</a> over the long term.</p> <p>If you have courses in mind which would give you transferable skills, and also improve your performance at work, then see if your boss will pay for them. Even better, maybe you can get some study time off to reflect the extra work you are doing. These cash investments tend to be relatively small for the company, but the end result is that you have more skills with which to negotiate a better role or raise later down the line.</p> <h2>Flex</h2> <p>Ask for improved flexibility in your work schedule. This can be an equivalent to a pay raise if you can negotiate some time working from home, and therefore cut the costs of commuting or parking. If this is not possible, then perhaps working a more flexible shift would allow you to do some longer days in return for more time off.</p> <p>The benefits here are felt in reducing the cost of commuting, but also the peripheral costs of things like buying lunch at work or stocking up on gourmet coffees. On the other hand, by reducing your travel, you win back time that can be used to boost your income if you wish. To get the biggest return from this approach, use the time you save to <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-unexpected-side-benefits-of-your-side-hustle">set up a side hustle</a>, and suddenly it's like you're being paid double time.</p> <h2>Try Again</h2> <p>When you're asking for a pay or benefits rise, how you ask is at least as important as what you're requesting. If you've already been knocked back for a straight raise and are going in for a second pass, then it's especially important to get your message straight.</p> <p>Here are some hints to make sure you're making your case effectively.</p> <h3>Pick the Right Moment</h3> <p>If you were refused because the business is genuinely struggling, then putting the request on ice for a few months might be best. Use the time to sharpen your skills and, if necessary, start applying elsewhere.</p> <h3>Don't Whine or Give Ultimatums</h3> <p>Avoid comparing yourself to others. Don't say, &quot;I do way more than the rest of the team!&quot; As tempting as it might be, it's not going to help your case.</p> <h3>Don't Highlight Personal Financial Problems</h3> <p>If this is a real challenge, then be honest with your boss, but don't try to use your cash flow as leverage.</p> <h3>Remember You Are Not Entitled to It</h3> <p>You won't get one because you did everything asked of you, or just because the cost of living has gone up. Assume you're making a business case for the raise and present it as such, not a demand.</p> <p>As uncomfortable as it might be, asking for a raise is part of working life. And if necessary, bouncing back from rejection should be, too. Think of it as an ongoing project to market yourself and your skills and ensure that you are paid fairly, and consider different angles to make your requests so good they can't be refused.</p> <p><em>What is your experience in asking for a pay rise? Let us know in the comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/claire-millard">Claire Millard</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/didnt-get-the-raise-ask-for-this-instead">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-6"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-times-you-should-demand-a-raise">5 Times You Should Demand a Raise</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-money-moves-to-make-after-a-promotion">10 Money Moves to Make After a Promotion</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/is-this-job-worth-it">Is This Job Worth It?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-unexpected-costs-of-a-higher-paying-job-offer">4 Unexpected Costs of a Higher-Paying Job Offer</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Extra Income ask for a raise benefits income job promotion pay increase raise salary work Fri, 01 Jul 2016 09:00:03 +0000 Claire Millard 1742408 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Signs You Aren't Making Enough Money http://www.wisebread.com/6-signs-you-arent-making-enough-money <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-signs-you-arent-making-enough-money" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_stressed_computer_000044901658.jpg" alt="Woman learning signs she isn&#039;t making enough money" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Living paycheck to paycheck can take a toll on your stress levels and emotional wellbeing. It can also greatly impact your financial wellbeing both in the present and in the future. If you aren't confident about your financial future, then it's time to make a change. Here are a few signs that you need to spend less &mdash; or make more.</p> <h2>1. Your Bills Are Overwhelming</h2> <p>If you don't make enough to pay your bills every month, then you need to make more. Even paying the minimum amount on your bills is not enough. You should be working to pay off your debt, without having to worry about making enough to buy food every month.</p> <p>Overdrawing your checking account, paying your bills late every month, or ignoring your financial obligations altogether can make the problem much worse. If you commit any of these bad habits, then you'll have to worry about overdraft fees, bounced check fees, and may even be sent to collections. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-late-payments-affect-your-credit?ref=seealso">How Late Payments Affect Your Credit</a>)</p> <h2>2. Your Budgeting Isn't Enough</h2> <p>The best way to get more out of every paycheck is to simply spend less. Creating a budget can be the right step towards making lasting changes that will pay off big in the end. However, what do you do if you have already created a budget and cut out all the unnecessary spending you can, but still aren't making enough? You'll need to find a way to make more money.</p> <h2>3. You Have No Savings</h2> <p>If you aren't able to pay down your debt and set aside money for your savings and retirement accounts, then you simply need to make more. In the event that there is a large unexpected expense coming your way, you should have some savings to cover it. It is crucial that you set aside money for your future, and if you aren't, then you need to do something to change the present.</p> <p>It's important to keep your money goals and future finances in mind. It's essential that you are saving for your future, in the event that you experience a pay cut or layoff. Saving for retirement is also one of the most important things you can do for your future self. If you aren't reaching your short and long-term financial goals, then you aren't making enough money.</p> <h2>4. You Keep Relying On Credit Cards</h2> <p>If you find that you are relying on your credit cards just to make ends meet, and are only paying the minimum on your credit cards month after month, you're heading towards prolonged debt and a host of other problems. This can result in a <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-to-increase-your-credit-score-quickly" target="_blank">lower credit score</a> and less money available for your savings account. In the long run, you'll also be responsible for higher interest charges and credit card payments.</p> <h2>5. Your Paycheck Disappears in No Time</h2> <p>If you spend the bulk of your paycheck in the first couple of days, then there's a problem. You should have more than just enough to pay your bills. There should be money left to save and invest towards retirement. Everyone has a bad month from time to time, but if you find that your paycheck runs out within the first week of every month, then you may be overspending or simply not making enough.</p> <p>Special occasions occur for most people several times per year. During these times, you'll want to have a little money set aside (for holidays, anniversaries, birthdays, and other occasions that can cut into your pay). The last thing you want to worry about is breaking out the credit cards just because you need to buy gifts for the kids.</p> <h2>6. You Feel Undervalued</h2> <p>If you feel you aren't being paid enough at your current job, then you may get resentful and less productive. Consider speaking with your manager about what you bring to the table and ask for a raise. The worst they can say is &quot;No.&quot;</p> <p>If you decide to ask for a raise, then you need to first determine <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/are-you-underpaid-how-to-figure-out-what-salary-you-deserve">what your time is worth</a>. Use a salary calculator or salary comparison site, and find out what the average salary is for your career so that you have that information on your side when you speak with management. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/getting-the-most-out-of-salary-comparison-sites?ref=seealso">Getting the Most Out of Salary Comparison Sites</a>)</p> <h2>Is It Time to Make a Move?</h2> <p>If you realize it's time to make a move, then there are several steps you can take. If you haven't <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/build-your-first-budget-in-5-easy-steps">worked on a budget</a> yet, then it's time to do so. You can also take steps to reduce your rent, find alternate forms of transportation, or simply spend less. You may also need to consider changing employment or taking on a weekend or side job.</p> <p><em>Do you know of other signs that a person just isn't making enough? Please share your thoughts in the comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/andrea-cannon">Andrea Cannon</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-signs-you-arent-making-enough-money">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-7"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-good-reasons-to-become-a-contractor">8 Good Reasons to Become a Contractor</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/are-your-financial-habits-just-bad">Are Your Financial Habits Just Bad?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-keep-holiday-spending-from-blowing-debt-repayment">6 Ways to Keep Holiday Spending From Blowing Debt Repayment</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-easy-ways-to-build-an-emergency-fund-from-0">7 Easy Ways to Build an Emergency Fund From $0</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Budgeting Career Building Debt Management asking for a raise bills paycheck to paycheck salary underpaid wages Mon, 23 May 2016 09:30:20 +0000 Andrea Cannon 1714251 at http://www.wisebread.com Protect Future Earnings by Negotiating the Right Starting Salary http://www.wisebread.com/protect-future-earnings-by-negotiating-the-right-starting-salary <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/protect-future-earnings-by-negotiating-the-right-starting-salary" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_000057902276_Large.jpg" alt="negotiating the right starting salary" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="126" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Money is how we all survive, and hopefully, also thrive. So it's no surprise that your starting salary can have a huge impact on your future salary and wellbeing. A small difference in pay now can mean a big difference later. Set yourself up for success down the road by getting a fair starting salary now.</p> <h2>A Small Increase Makes a Big Difference</h2> <p>Earning a little bit more now can mean a big difference in your future savings and accumulated income. Thanks to compound interest, investing or saving money earlier on will result in more gains later.</p> <p>Every year that we face inflation, each dollar you earn is worth less. That means your overall salary will be worth less every year that you don't receive a raise over the inflation rate. Starting with a higher salary can help provide a cushion from inflation and the risk of not receiving raises.</p> <h2>Effects on Future Salaries</h2> <p>Your starting salary now will serve as the foundation for your future salary. In fact, Forbes declared that your first starting salary is the most crucial of them all. Your starting salary now will become what you expect to be earning later.</p> <p>If you decide to start a job elsewhere, you can request a higher starting salary than you currently have. Your new employer will also want to know what your starting and ending salaries were at your last position to begin negotiations. If you had a high salary before, chances are you can expect to make that same amount at the new company (or more). They will also want to know about your previous raises, so having higher raises now can also mean a higher starting salary later.</p> <h2>Effects on Future Raises</h2> <p>Raises are never guaranteed, so starting at a higher salary can help protect you in the event that you don't receive a raise anytime soon. If you do receive a raise, they are often awarded on a percentage basis, so having a higher starting salary will result in a higher raise.</p> <p>For instance, if you accept a position at $40,000 and receive a 5% raise every year, you'll receive a $2,000 raise in the first year. If you had negotiated the starting salary to $45,000, your first-year raise would be $2,250. After 20 years, your salary will be $106,131.91 if you had accepted the initial $40,000 offer (with a 5% increase every year); it would be $119,398.40 if you had negotiated to $45,000 in the beginning. Just imagine what you could do with all the extra money.</p> <h2>Effects on Benefits</h2> <p>Benefits are often based on a percentage of your compensation. Starting with a higher salary means you will likely receive a better benefits package as well. For instance, if you have employer-sponsored retirement benefits, they will be investing more money into your future retirement if it is based on a percentage of your salary.</p> <h2>Negotiating Is Key</h2> <p>Your employer is likely going to negotiate your salary anyways, so it is better to start high. This way, even if they negotiate your pay downwards, you will still probably be happy. You may not get <em>exactly </em>what you ask for, so starting higher means that when the company negotiates lower, you will still make out well.</p> <p>The key to success is in finding the perfect negotiation amount. Go in equipped with the average pay in your field, your starting and ending salaries at your last position, and information on your raises over time. Make sure to sell yourself and your abilities so that you have greater negotiating power.</p> <p>It's also important that you choose the right timing to negotiate. The best time is during the final rounds of interviews after you've been offered the job, but before you sign any contracts. At this time, the employer will already be impressed and want to sign you on.</p> <p>Don't feel nervous about negotiating &mdash; your future employer is most likely expecting it. If you don't negotiate, you may be turning your back on money that was there for the taking. Remember, the worst thing they can say is &quot;no.&quot; (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-negotiate-higher-pay-at-your-next-new-job?ref=seealso">How to Negotiate Higher Pay at Your Next New Job</a>)</p> <h2>The Potential Risks</h2> <p>While there are a variety of benefits associated with having a higher salary, there are also a few potential risks. Having a higher salary than your colleagues can make you more vulnerable at layoff time. It can also make it more difficult for you to land a future job because they may consider you overqualified &mdash; or overcompensated. Unusual factors like your high school grades, previous employer references, and even your credit report can affect your starting salary, so the best thing you can do is prepare an impressive resume, ace your interviews, and go in prepared with the right information.</p> <p><em>Have you felt the effects of negotiating for a higher salary? Please share your thoughts in the comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/andrea-cannon">Andrea Cannon</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/protect-future-earnings-by-negotiating-the-right-starting-salary">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-8"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-celebrities-with-shockingly-low-net-worths">6 Celebrities With Shockingly Low Net Worths</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-certifications-that-add-big-to-your-salary">7 Certifications That Add Big $$ to Your Salary</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-reasons-its-never-too-late-for-a-career-change">6 Reasons It&#039;s Never Too Late for a Career Change</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-earn-more-money-without-working-more-hours">6 Ways to Earn More Money — Without Working More Hours</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/seven-tips-for-the-newly-unemployed">Seven Tips for the Newly Unemployed</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income income jobs making money money negotiating salary salary negotiation starting salary Mon, 11 Apr 2016 09:00:05 +0000 Andrea Cannon 1687441 at http://www.wisebread.com