boss http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/3154/all en-US The Absolute Worst Ways to Ask for a Raise http://www.wisebread.com/the-absolute-worst-ways-to-ask-for-a-raise <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/the-absolute-worst-ways-to-ask-for-a-raise" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/skeptical_interviewer_looking_at_interviewee.jpg" alt="Skeptical interviewer looking at interviewee" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Asking for a raise is not easy. You don't want to come across as greedy, or antagonize your employer. But at the same time, you've done your research, know what you deserve, and believe you are an asset that should be compensated accordingly.</p> <p>Before you talk to your boss, make sure you avoid the following traps. They could sink any chance of a bump in pay. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-times-you-should-demand-a-raise?rerf=seealso" target="_blank">5 Times You Should Demand a Raise</a>)</p> <h2>1. Saying you're having trouble making ends meet</h2> <p>There are a few truths that you must accept, and one of them is this &mdash; your personal money problems are your problems. You took the job, and you accepted the salary. Scraping by or falling behind on your bills is a reason to ask for a raise, but it's not the reason your employer ever needs to hear.</p> <p>You need to justify your raise for reasons that a boss can comfortably take to the payroll department, and the people he or she reports to. Saying &quot;Well, Jane's rent was just raised and she also owes on her taxes&quot; won't cut it. Instead, present your case in a well-researched and thought-out manner, explaining why you deserve a pay bump based on merit and hard work.</p> <h2>2. Criticizing any of your coworkers</h2> <p>There is a time and a place for pointing out problems with the team, and it is not when you want to get more money. If your boss is any good, he or she will already know the big problems with underperforming staff. Other issues can be brought up during your usual one-on-one sessions, or team meetings. If you use your coworkers' poor performance as a reason to get more money, you will come across as mercenary.</p> <p>Sure, you may have been picking up the slack for lazy coworkers, or correcting mistakes, but there is a way to mention this without throwing anyone under the bus. By all means, say that you have been taking on more responsibility, working longer hours, and saving the company money by catching errors. But do it without saying, &quot;John sucks at his job, he's always late, and I have to do everything!&quot;</p> <h2>3. Asking when the boss, and everyone else, is insanely busy</h2> <p>Timing is everything, and perhaps the worst time to bring this up is when everyone is scrambling to meet a deadline and deliver the goods. Whether it's behind the counter of a fast-food restaurant, or during a huge pitch for new business, asking for more money at this time will hurt you in several ways.</p> <p>First, it makes you look selfish; everyone is rushing around, and you want the boss to stop and focus on you. Second, it makes you look inconsiderate; now is not the time, can you not see how busy everyone is? Third, it makes you look like you're trying to take advantage of the situation. The boss is not going to appreciate you trying to hurriedly negotiate a raise during a crisis. So, back off, and bide your time. Things will calm down, and then you can strike.</p> <h2>4. Catching the boss off-guard</h2> <p>When you are initiating the subject of a raise and/or promotion, you are making a request that has consequences. Your boss has to examine the numbers, look at performance and salary averages, and consider the budget for the department. And the boss usually has to get the approval from other people in the company. This is all very official.</p> <p>So, casually having a one-on-one in the elevator, out of nowhere, is a huge mistake. Your boss will be taken by surprise, and may even feel threatened or trapped. They won't be able to give you an answer anyway. Schedule a time for a meeting, at least 30 minutes, and warn the boss in advance that you want to talk about your future at the company. You don't have to outright say &quot;I want to talk about a raise&quot; &mdash; if the boss is intuitive he or she will know just what this meeting is about.</p> <h2>5. Beating around the bush</h2> <p>A little friendly banter before you bring up the subject of your raise is OK. In fact, it's courteous and expected, and sets a friendly tone. However, if you meander off for 15 minutes on topics that are completely unrelated, you're only going to frustrate your boss. He or she has a pretty good idea of why you're in the room, and wants to start the conversation.</p> <p>Most likely, after five minutes of talk about the weather, the ballgame, the family, and plans for the weekend, you'll be asked to spit it out. But by that time, you've already shown yourself to be less than efficient, and that puts you in a position of weakness.</p> <h2>6. Storming in with ultimatums</h2> <p>&quot;If I don't get a raise, I'm quitting. Simple as that.&quot; How many times have people told you they are going to say that to the boss? How many times have you thought it yourself? Sure, it's human nature to want fair compensation, and we all hope to be so valued that people will do anything not to lose us. Sadly, life isn't like that.</p> <p>Ultimatums are not the answer, because one of three things will happen. First, you will get your raise, but you will be tarnished as difficult, selfish, and egotistic. Second, you will be told no, and realize you can't quit after all. Your bluff will have been called, and now they know you aren't going to quit if you don't get what you want. Third, you are told no, and have to quit to save face. Are you ready for that?</p> <p>One way to get around the ultimatum is to come to the boss with a higher paying job offer from another firm. Then, it's a business negotiation. You can say that you would much rather stay, but this offer gives you more money, and you may have to take it. In this case, most employers, if they value you, will match the offer. They see you as in demand, and that puts you in a positive light.</p> <h2>7. Getting way too emotional</h2> <p>Anger. Tears. Jealousy. Disbelief. The emotions can run high when you believe you are getting the short end of the stick. However, it's unprofessional to unload your emotional state onto your employer. You may feel you are not being recognized for all you've done for the company. Or you may be behind on your bills, with new expenses coming up in the future.</p> <p>It can be hard to mask these emotions when you are stressed. But it's important to get these under control before you ask for a raise. Get the emotions out first before coming to work. If you need to cry, do it. If you are angry, find a way to release the tension. You need to have a calm, clear head before you can talk money.</p> <h2>8. Acting entitled</h2> <p>Arms crossed. Eyebrows furrowed. Breathing hard through your nose. You're in the boss's office because enough is enough, and you should have had that raise months ago! From the moment you open your mouth, you are incredulous that you even had to call this meeting.</p> <p>Acting this way does you no favors. You'll come across as a spoiled brat, and unless you can back all of your claims up, you'll also look foolish. Don't go into the room feeling angry and cheated. Instead, calm down, and prepare. Write down all of the quantifiable reasons you deserve a raise, and give the boss the ammunition he or she needs to get that extra money for you. Be polite. Be yourself. And don't expect anything.</p> <h2>9. Making demands when the company is in trouble</h2> <p>There's an argument to be made that it's OK to ask for a raise if your company is facing some light financial difficulties (maybe they've laid a few people off), or if you know your specific department is still doing well. But that's about where you'll need to draw the line.</p> <p>If the business has fallen on <em>really</em> hard financial times, it's another story. Maybe executives have had to make significant cutbacks, or it's even possible that the company could be filing for bankruptcy. If you decide that this is the best time to ask for a raise, you are only showing upper management that you are utterly tone deaf. If you survived the cuts, you should probably be thankful you're still on the payroll at all.</p> <p>A company can encounter nonfinancial trouble, too &mdash; and you should also back away from any kind of salary negotiation until these stormy waters have calmed. A public relations scandal, for example, will have the company in a panic. No one will give your salary concerns a second thought when there are much bigger fish to fry. Or, maybe several key workers have left to form another company, or work for a rival. Again, the only thing management will be concerned about is keeping the ship afloat.</p> <p>You know when the company is not doing well. Do what you can to help, and do it with vigor. Then, when it's all worked out, you'll have more ammo for your salary discussion.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-absolute-worst-ways-to-ask-for-a-raise">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/is-this-job-worth-it">Is This Job Worth It?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-skills-that-helped-your-boss-get-ahead">6 Skills That Helped Your Boss Get Ahead</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-fired">How to Get Fired</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-keys-to-quitting-a-job-like-a-professional">8 Keys to Quitting a Job Like a Professional</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building asking for raise boss employer job manager promotions salary strategies working Fri, 02 Jun 2017 09:00:10 +0000 Paul Michael 1957904 at http://www.wisebread.com 10 Things You Should Never Say to Your Boss http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-you-should-never-say-to-your-boss <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/10-things-you-should-never-say-to-your-boss" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-528825285.jpg" alt="never say these things to your boss" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>We've all been there. The pressure of a stressful workday makes us say something we instantly regret. Or, we get a bit too comfortable in the break room and share a salacious detail about our personal lives. No matter what professional level you've achieved, it's important to remember that words can make or break a career &mdash; especially when those words are directed at a superior. So, in the interest of taming that wild tongue, here are 10 things you should never say to your boss.</p> <h2>1. &quot;That's Not My Job&quot;</h2> <p>Every job description is fluid. Trying to enforce roles and responsibilities achieves only one thing: It demonstrates to management that you're inflexible and uncooperative. When the moment calls for it, pitch in and help get the job done.</p> <h2>2. Any Question You Can Answer Via Google</h2> <p>Today's technology puts the world at our fingertips, and with it, the answer to nearly any question that might come up. Avoid bothering your boss with general how-to inquiries that you can solve with some initiative and an Internet connection.</p> <h2>3. &quot;That's Impossible&quot;</h2> <p>In your boss' mind, the talented group of people he or she has assembled can make anything possible. Have concerns about a particular project or due date? Share them, ask for direction, and request additional help. Shutting down the conversation with &quot;that's impossible&quot; only conveys that you're the primary roadblock.</p> <h2>4. &quot;I'll Quit&quot;</h2> <p>Threats never go over well in the workplace. You'll either end up without a job or develop a reputation for being a loose cannon &mdash; and then you might as well quit. Find more constructive ways to express your ideas, manage your workload, or improve processes where you work. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-questions-to-ask-before-you-quit-your-job?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Questions to Ask Before You Quit Your Job</a>)</p> <h2>5. &quot;I Wish I Had Your Job&quot;</h2> <p>While it's natural to envy your boss at times, this phrase implies two very negative things: First, it suggests that your boss has it easy &mdash; that compared to the daily struggles of the staff, management's job is a cakewalk. Second, it implies that you view career advancement as cut-throat competition instead of a mutually-beneficial arrangement between mentor and protégé.</p> <h2>6. &quot;I Refuse to Work With That Person&quot;</h2> <p>Being able to get along with different personality types is a skill that should have been locked down in grammar school. Your boss rightfully assumes that staff can rise above petty conflicts and work together to get the job done.</p> <h2>7. &quot;I Don't Know How&quot;</h2> <p>On its own, this phrase communicates passivity (a condition far worse than incompetence). While it's admirable to be honest and direct, make sure you follow up these four words with a proactive &quot;but I'll find out right now.&quot;</p> <h2>8. &quot;I Have to Tell You About My Wild Weekend!&quot;</h2> <p>In our increasingly casual culture, over-sharing is an epidemic. Even if you have a friendly and semi-social relationship with your boss, err on the side of discretion when it comes to personal matters. Sure, you may have closed down the bar on Friday night and it took you forever to remember where you parked your car the next day. Scrapbook those fond memories, but don't relive them with your boss. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-personal-issues-no-one-at-work-needs-to-hear?ref=seealso" target="_blank">10 Personal Issues No One at Work Needs to Hear</a>)</p> <h2>9. &quot;It'll Just Have to Wait&quot;</h2> <p>In most work environments, priorities are constantly in flux. If an urgent issue lands on your desk, ask your boss to clarify what's top priority and be flexible enough to change course without one drop of drama.</p> <h2>10. &quot;Things Really Need to Be Better Managed Around Here&quot;</h2> <p>It's no surprise that this comment would make any boss hot under the collar. The implication, of course, is that a change needs to be made and you just might be the person to lead a back-office revolt. Remember, mutineers only win management spots in the movies.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/kentin-waits">Kentin Waits</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-you-should-never-say-to-your-boss">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-small-gestures-that-go-a-long-way-at-work">10 Small Gestures That Go a Long Way at Work</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-your-boss-wishes-you-knew">10 Things Your Boss Wishes You Knew</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-times-you-should-never-feel-guilty-at-work">8 Times You Should Never Feel Guilty at Work</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-awkward-money-moments-everyone-has-at-work">8 Awkward Money Moments Everyone Has at Work</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-to-bring-up-with-your-boss-at-your-annual-review">10 Things to Bring Up With Your Boss at Your Annual Review</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income boss conversations job etiquette job tips manners things you should never say work etiquette Fri, 20 Jan 2017 10:00:14 +0000 Kentin Waits 1876782 at http://www.wisebread.com 10 Things Your Boss Wishes You Knew http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-your-boss-wishes-you-knew <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/10-things-your-boss-wishes-you-knew" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_000068400791_Large.jpg" alt="your boss wishes you knew these things" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Most of us have a boss. It would be great to know what was really going on inside his or her head, but sadly, the technology doesn't yet exist. However, after talking to bosses from my past jobs, I have discovered 10 commonalities that they would like you to know. Follow this advice, and you could give a well-earned boost to your career.</p> <h2>1. A Positive Attitude Is Really Important</h2> <p>Bosses don't expect their employees to be perfect shining rays of light, and happy every second of every day. In fact, that may actually get very irritating, or give the impression that you just don't care. However, being difficult, constantly complaining, nay-saying, gossiping, and generally being a grumpy curmudgeon is not going to be tolerated for long, regardless of the skills you have. Some people may say &quot;His attitude stinks, but his work is incredible,&quot; and while that may be true, it won't keep that guy employed forever.</p> <p>What's at stake here is greater than one person. Team morale suffers, the boss has to give more grease to the squeaky wheel, and it becomes more of a hassle than the employee is worth. Less talented, but more positive, individuals will outlast highly skilled killjoys.</p> <h2>2. Take the Initiative More Often</h2> <p>A good employee will do what is asked of him or her in a timely manner, and they'll do it well. A great employee won't wait to be asked, and will instead initiate the projects or create new ways to drive business. A boss has a lot of work to do, and when an employee steps up with a solution to a problem, rather than being asked to look into it, it's an absolute delight to a boss. It shows you care about the job, and the company, and are thinking about ways to improve it on your own time.</p> <p>If you have ideas that you think would improve business, do not be afraid to take 10 minutes out of the <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-skills-that-helped-your-boss-get-ahead">boss's schedule</a> to discuss them. Even if the idea isn't feasible, you will get props for the effort.</p> <h2>3. The Boss Is Not the Enemy</h2> <p>It's something regularly portrayed on TV and in the movies. The boss is the one everyone else can't stand. It's the boss who stops the fun, who demands you work late, or come in early, and it's the boss who has to deliver bad news. Well, the boss doesn't relish doing any of those things. There is so much going on behind the scenes that employees don't, and shouldn't, know about. From revenue issues, to staffing, and even stock prices &mdash; the boss has much more to deal with than you'd think, and it's hard work.</p> <p>But at the end of the day, the boss wants the company to do well, and therefore, wants you to do well. You won't always agree with the decisions, but that doesn't mean they were made to annoy you, or keep you from succeeding. And remember, many times your boss has a boss, who also has a boss. This all trickles down.</p> <h2>4. Asking for Help Is Not a Sign of Weakness</h2> <p>There's a great <em>Seinfeld</em> episode called &quot;The Bottle Deposit&quot; which features George being given a very important task to do. The boss thinks George has followed him into the bathroom, and briefs him there. When George comes in at the end, he's missed the entire briefing, but his boss thinks he's heard it all. The simple solution is to approach the boss and say, &quot;I actually didn't hear that. Could you please brief me on it again?&quot; But that wouldn't be funny in a sitcom.</p> <p>In real life, however, asking for help, or clarification, is a perfectly normal and accepted part of the job. In fact, by asking for help, you're showing that you care enough about the project to make sure it gets done correctly. Now, if you ask for help constantly, and cannot grasp the notion of the project after three or four explanations, that's not so good. You also don't want to be seen as offloading all your projects onto other people. But in general, if you have a question, ask it. Your boss will be happy to give you the best answer they can.</p> <h2>5. Promotions Have to Be Earned</h2> <p>You may have been at the company five years, and never had a promotion. And yet, someone down the hall has had two promotions in just four years. This isn't fair, right? Well, most of the time, it is. True, sometimes there is favoritism involved, and in those cases, there is very little you can do about it. Bosses promote their friends, it's a fact of life.</p> <p>However, most of the time, those promotions were earned by a go-getter who showed initiative and really went the extra mile. In fact, a promotion is usually given to someone who has been doing that job for months, or even years. Show that you can do it, and you'll get it&hellip; and the raise.</p> <h2>6. You Can't Expect Special Treatment</h2> <p>You may make the boss laugh more than anyone else. You may go golfing with him or her on a weekend. You may even be related. But you cannot expect that to have an impact on your job. You shouldn't expect a raise because you bring the boss homemade cookies every week. You shouldn't expect to work special hours, or telecommute, just because you're charming. Remember, if the boss lets you have something, then pretty soon everyone on the staff will hear about it, and want the same. Now, if you do something that earns you special treatment, like working overtime for three weeks without pay, then that's different. In that instance, it's fine to ask for some free time off to recuperate.</p> <h2>7. Don't Bring Problems Without Solutions</h2> <p>The boss has to know about problems. However, simply telling the boss something is wrong, without offering any kind of assistance or solution, is just lazy. If you don't have the expertise to address the problem, talk to someone who does, and find out what can be done to address that problem. Do it in a timely manner, and then bring both the problem and possible solutions to the boss. Now, you have not made his or her day worse by being the bearer of bad news. Instead, you have flagged a problem, but offered a fix. This is more appreciated by a boss than you could know, and it will be reflected in your next review. You are proactive, and that's something worth rewarding; either with more responsibility, and/or a promotion.</p> <h2>8. Criticism Is Not Personal</h2> <p>It seems that as the years go by, employees get more and more sensitive to criticism of any kind. Perhaps the entitlement culture is to blame, and parents who shelter their children all the way to adulthood. But whatever the reason, a boss should be able to critique your work and your ideas without you feeling attacked or hurt.</p> <p>Constructive criticism is how we all learn to grow in our roles, and advance in our careers. Some industries, such as advertising and marketing, cannot survive without tough feedback. Creative people have to learn to grow a thick skin, as they are told all 10 concepts for a pitch are awful. But the same should apply across the board. Whatever industry you're in, a critique of your work is not an attack on you as a person, and you should not take it personally. Brush it off, and learn from it.</p> <h2>9. Think Beyond Your Own Role</h2> <p>It's very easy to work in a silo, and focus on your own tasks and responsibilities. But a great employee will consider the whole business, not just one department or project. For instance, asking for an injection of capital to fund a project can have all kinds of implications. It's possible that money is tied up in another project or initiative, and that would have to be cut to fund your project. Is your project best for the company as a whole? Are you using funds in the best possible way? Some people treat the company's money like Monopoly money, spending because it's easy. However, if you spend the company's money as if it were your own, you'd find ways to save, or make better deals.</p> <h2>10. You Don't Have to Agree With Everything</h2> <p>Good bosses hire people who are ready to challenge the status quo &mdash; <em>if</em> they bring better ideas to the table, and go about it in a respectful way. There is absolutely nothing wrong with having the dissenting opinion, and your boss will actually think more of you for bringing up the topic. Someone who says yes to every single idea their boss has is not only seen as irritating, but also lazy. It takes work, and bravery, to speak up about an idea that's different. But it also shows you're thinking, and most importantly, that you care. While a boss has every right to shoot down those ideas, or overrule you, they are not going to think negatively of you if you show genuine passion for a different idea. Of course, saying no to every idea, that's a whole different story.</p> <p><em>Are you a boss? What do you wish your employees knew? Share with us!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-your-boss-wishes-you-knew">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-you-should-never-say-to-your-boss">10 Things You Should Never Say to Your Boss</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/whats-an-employee-to-do-part-2">What&#039;s an employee to do? Part 2</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-great-retirement-jobs">6 Great Retirement Jobs</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-times-youre-better-off-without-a-promotion">12 Times You&#039;re Better Off Without a Promotion</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-absolute-worst-ways-to-ask-for-a-raise">The Absolute Worst Ways to Ask for a Raise</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income boss career building employer job etiquette jobs office politics wishes you knew Wed, 01 Jun 2016 10:00:06 +0000 Paul Michael 1721380 at http://www.wisebread.com 7 Questions a Potential Employer Cannot Ask You http://www.wisebread.com/7-questions-a-potential-employer-cannot-ask-you <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/7-questions-a-potential-employer-cannot-ask-you" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_job_interview_000061752264.jpg" alt="Woman being asked questions a potential employer cannot ask" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>It's taking U.S. companies longer and longer to hire new employees. In June 2014, it took an <a href="http://www.wsj.com/articles/companies-are-taking-longer-to-hire-1409612937">average of 24.9 work days</a> for employers to fill vacant positions. The average hiring time for companies with 5,000 or more employees is even longer at 58.1 work days.</p> <p>In the rush to fill vacancies faster, some employers are making some bad judgment calls. According to a 2014 poll conducted by Harris Poll, one in five U.S. employers has unknowingly asked an interview question that ran afoul of the law. Here are seven questions a prospective employer cannot ask you during an interview.</p> <h2>1. What Is Your Religious Affiliation?</h2> <p>Being concerned about whether or not you can meet the required work schedule for a position, some employers go the wrong way about finding out about your availability. While the <a href="http://finduslaw.com/civil-rights-act-1964-cra-title-vii-equal-employment-opportunities-42-us-code-chapter-21#3">Title VII Equal Employment Opportunities chapter</a> of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 doesn't provide a specific list of questions that &quot;thou shalt not ask,&quot; it certainly provides clear guidelines as to what is off the negotiation table. So, it is illegal for an employer to ask you about your religion. While an employer can legally ask you if you can work on a required work schedule or select from a choice of work days, he can't inquire about your willingness to work any particular religious holiday.</p> <h2>2. Are You Pregnant?</h2> <p>Before hiring you, an employer can't ask you if you're pregnant, plan to have kids, or plan to have more kids. Any of these matters can directly or indirectly result in limitation of a job opportunity in any way, so that's why the Civil Rights Act takes them off the table as well. After hiring you, your employer or HR department rep can inquire on your status for qualified reasons, such as health insurance, retirement accounts, or tax withholding.</p> <h2>3. What Is Your Political Affiliation?</h2> <p>With the U.S. presidential election coming up in November, some interviewers may drop this one on you. Under the <a href="https://archive.opm.gov/biographyofanideal/PU_CSreform.htm">Civil Service Reform Act of 1978</a>, federal employers are prohibited from asking political party preference questions of federal employees and job applicants. This is to guarantee that all employees and job applicants receive fair and equitable treatment in all aspects of personnel management without regard to political affiliation.</p> <p>While there are no federal laws that prohibit employers in the private sector from asking about political affiliation, they should refrain from asking such questions anyway. Some states, including Mississippi and the District of Columbia, have specific <a href="http://www.ncsl.org/research/labor-and-employment/discrimination-employment.aspx">laws on employment-related discrimination</a> that include political affiliation.</p> <h2>4. What Is Your Nationality?</h2> <p>Immigration is one of the key issues being discussed by candidates from both parties of this election. While an employer has every right to check that you can legally work for them, they can't ask any questions regarding your nationality.</p> <p>During a prospective job interview, it's illegal to inquire where you were born, whether you were born a U.S. citizen or naturalized, your national origin, and what is your first language. Only when it's relevant to the job can you be asked about your language proficiency. After employment, you can be asked to submit a birth certificate, proof of U.S. citizenship, or other proof of the legal right to work in the U.S.</p> <h2>5. How Old Are You?</h2> <p>The <a href="https://www.eeoc.gov/laws/statutes/adea.cfm">Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967</a> protects job applicants who are age 40 and older against ageism, which is discrimination against individuals on the basis of their age. Any sneaky questions to try identifying persons between 40 and 60 years are illegal.</p> <p>For those age 18 and over, some state employment laws, including those from Oregon, provide some protection with a few exceptions. Still, it's legal to inquire before hiring if you could furnish proof of age if hired, and to request such proof after hiring.</p> <h2>6. Are You Disabled?</h2> <p>The <a href="https://www.disability.gov/rehabilitation-act-1973/">Rehabilitation Act of 1973</a> prohibits discrimination on the basis of disability in all types of federal employment. Since 1990, <a href="https://www.eeoc.gov/eeoc/publications/fs-ada.cfm">Title I of the Americans with Disabilities Act</a> (ADA) prohibits private employers, state and local governments, employment agencies, and labor unions from discriminating against qualified individuals with disabilities in all job application and employment processes.</p> <p>The definition of disabilities is quite extensive. For example, an employer can't legally ask you whether or not you socially drink. Under the ADA, a recovering alcoholic is protected and doesn't have to disclose any disability information before landing an official job offer.</p> <h2>7. What is Your Credit Rating?</h2> <p>You may have heard that your credit history may affect your employment options. However, there are limitations for employers to use credit information in employment decisions.</p> <p>First, the <a href="https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/articles/pdf-0096-fair-credit-reporting-act.pdf">Fair Credit Reporting Act</a> outlines that employers require your written consent to get access to your credit report. The one exception is the trucking industry. Your potential employer must have a valid reason to request for your credit data and she can't disqualify you from employment unless the data directly affects your ability to perform the position you're interviewing for. In the event that she denies you employment, she must release the credit report to you and provide an explanation.</p> <p>Second, <a href="http://www.ncsl.org/research/financial-services-and-commerce/use-of-credit-info-in-employ-2013-legis.aspx">10 states</a>, including California, Colorado, Connecticut, Hawaii, Illinois, Maryland, Nevada, Oregon, Vermont, and Washington, have enacted legislation that bans employers from using credit information in employment decisions. If you're seeking employment in one of those states, potential employers <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-money-questions-you-never-have-to-answer">can't ask for your credit history or score</a>.</p> <p><em>What are other questions that a prospective employer can't ask you? Share with us in the comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/damian-davila">Damian Davila</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-questions-a-potential-employer-cannot-ask-you">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-questions-you-should-always-ask-at-the-end-of-a-job-interview">15 Questions You Should Always Ask at the End of a Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-questions-you-should-ask-at-every-job-interview">5 Questions You Should Ask at Every Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-answer-23-of-the-most-common-interview-questions">How to Answer 23 of the Most Common Interview Questions</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-proper-ways-to-discuss-salary-in-a-job-interview">The Proper Ways to Discuss Salary in a Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-interviewers-really-want-to-know-when-they-ask-these-questions">10 Things Interviewers Really Want to Know When They Ask These Questions</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Job Hunting boss harassment interview questions off limits personal questions potential employer questions Wed, 04 May 2016 10:00:08 +0000 Damian Davila 1700128 at http://www.wisebread.com Ace Your Next Performance Review With These 7 Tricks http://www.wisebread.com/ace-your-next-performance-review-with-these-7-tricks <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/ace-your-next-performance-review-with-these-7-tricks" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_working_happy_000022817538_0.jpg" alt="Woman learning ways to ace her performance review" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>An upcoming performance review can certainly mess with your emotions. On one hand, you may be ready to hear what your employer has to say, especially if a positive review might result in a salary increase. On the other, you may be nervous at the possibility that you're not meeting your employer's expectations. And that sucks. But there's plenty you can do beforehand to maximize your performance review. Consider these seven tips to help ensure you get those gold stars.</p> <h2>1. Go in With an Open Mind</h2> <p>Prior to meeting with your boss for a performance review, you need to prepare your mind for the possibility of hearing something negative. Overall, your boss may be satisfied with your performance. But there's always room for growth, so she might also highlight areas that need improving.</p> <p>It's natural to become defensive, but don't immediately jump in and offer an explanation or justify your actions. Let your boss finish and listen to her concerns. There may be some truth to those claims. Besides, any negative feedback you receive likely comes from a good place. Your employer wants you to succeed and reach your potential. If she didn't, she wouldn't bother providing feedback.</p> <h2>2. Ask for Clarification</h2> <p>You're not the only one nervous during a performance review. Your employer may also be a little anxious, especially if he's bringing up items you need to work on. If he's nervous or has to meet with many of your coworkers in a short amount of time, he may rush the review or not express himself clearly. This can result in vague statements and misunderstandings. You shouldn't leave the meeting confused or puzzled, so don't be afraid to ask for clarification or specific examples. You can't improve your work performance when you don't fully understand the issue.</p> <h2>3. Understand Your Employer's Expectations</h2> <p>If you don't receive a good performance review, the problem may have nothing to do with lack of effort, but rather different expectations. In your mind, you're hitting the mark and helping the company succeed, yet your boss thinks otherwise. For example, maybe you put a lot of time and energy into meeting deadlines, but your boss feels you don't take the initiative or contribute to the team in other ways. To maximize the takeaways from a performance review, ask your boss to clarify her expectations. Based on this information, you can set short and long-term goals to improve your performance.</p> <h2>4. Take Notes During the Review</h2> <p>Your employer may have a lot to say during a performance review, and you may forget some of the important points. Therefore, come prepared to take notes. You can jot down your weaknesses, as well as your strengths. This way you'll get a clear picture of how you're performing as a whole. Taking notes also leaves a good impression with your employer. This shows that you're committed to improving and growing as an employee and giving 100% to the job.</p> <h2>5. Don't Slack After a Positive Review</h2> <p>Performance reviews aren't always negative. Your employer may have nothing but good things to say about your work performance. You might meet all his expectations, and you might be the best worker on the job. It's okay to give yourself a pat on the back, but don't let a perfect review go to your head. Let this be your motivation to continue on the right path. This isn't the time to slack off or think you don't have to work as hard. You want to continue to impress your employer so that your next review will be equally positive.</p> <h2>6. Summarize Key Points</h2> <p>To show your boss you were listening during the review, end the meeting by summarizing in your own words his <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-certifications-that-add-big-to-your-salary">suggestions for improvement</a>. Briefly explain how you plan to address these issues moving forward.</p> <h2>7. Schedule a Mid-Year Review</h2> <p>If possible, don't wait until your next performance review to track your progress. During the initial meeting, discuss goals with your employer and then see if you can schedule another meeting in the upcoming months to evaluate your progress thus far. If your employer conducts annual performance reviews, maybe you can schedule another meeting in six months. Or if your employer conducts reviews every six months, perhaps he can schedule a follow-up review in three months.</p> <p><em>What do you do to maximize your performance review? I'd love to hear some of your tips in the comments below.</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/mikey-rox">Mikey Rox</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/ace-your-next-performance-review-with-these-7-tricks">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-ways-to-improve-your-performance-at-work">12 Ways to Improve Your Performance at Work</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-times-you-should-speak-up-at-work">10 Times You Should Speak Up at Work</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-tips-for-better-workplace-body-language">7 Tips for Better Workplace Body Language</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-7-best-free-tools-to-improve-your-work-performance">The 7 Best Free Tools to Improve Your Work Performance</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building boss employee Office performance review work work performance Mon, 16 Nov 2015 09:15:53 +0000 Mikey Rox 1612346 at http://www.wisebread.com 9 Ways to Job Hunt Without Getting Caught http://www.wisebread.com/9-ways-to-job-hunt-without-getting-caught <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/9-ways-to-job-hunt-without-getting-caught" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_hiding_desk_000052944964.jpg" alt="Woman learning ways to job hunt without getting caught" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Applying for a new job is often a Catch-22: You've got to put yourself out there as a candidate, but you don't want to get caught by your current employer for fear of being prematurely fired. Yes, it's a fine line to walk for career advancement, but you can totally perfect this skill with these nine ways to conduct a stealthy job search.</p> <h2>1. Keep Your Social Media Profiles Current at All Times</h2> <p>If you're active on social media in general, your various profiles are probably up-to-date on the regular. If they're not, and you update them out of the blue, it could raise suspicions, particularly on LinkedIn and if you're connected to coworkers &mdash; which you probably are.</p> <p><a href="http://alexandermannsolutions.com/about-alexander-mann-solutions/our-talent/key-person/ian-cluroe">Ian Cluroe</a>, director of global brand and marketing for Alexander Mann Solutions, warns against this sudden attention to your social media profiles.</p> <p>&quot;Keeping your social profiles up-to-date ensures that you don't raise flags when you're the one actively searching, and enables you to be found by sources who may have an opportunity that you're the perfect person for but you would have otherwise known nothing about because your outdated profile made you impossible to find,&quot; he says.</p> <h2>2. Don't Send Resumes to Blind Ads Online</h2> <p>If you don't know who the recipient of your resume is, do not send it. I repeat, DO NOT SEND IT. You don't know who is on the other end, and serendipity has a way of biting you in the butt for not being careful.</p> <p>&quot;A woman once told me that her coworker responded to a blind ad and then was confronted a short while later by someone in the company from Human Resources,&quot; reveals certified career coach <a href="http://www.calltocareer.com/about/">Cheryl E. Palmer</a>. &quot;The HR professional asked her if she was looking for another job. The woman lied and said no. The HR professional responded, &quot;I got your resume.&quot; It turned out that the job that this woman had unwittingly applied for was at her own company.&quot;</p> <h2>3. Be Cautious When You're Networking</h2> <p>Of course you have to network when you're searching for a new position &mdash; just be smart about it. Be very careful to whom you're telling your <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-low-key-jobs-for-people-who-hate-stress">plans to switch jobs</a>, because you never know who you're talking to. As a rule, don't go to networking events at a bar where you're going to have a couple drinks and become less inhibited. That's a recipe for certain disaster.</p> <h2>4. Don't Let Your Attire Give It Away</h2> <p>Here's a prime example of amateur tactics that absolutely raise red flags: When your everyday work attire is chinos and a button-down and you all of a sudden show up to work in a suit and tie. The jig will be up immediately, and you're better than that, bro.</p> <p>&quot;Dressing up more than normal can be a real giveaway that you are interviewing for another position,&quot; says Palmer. &quot;To avoid suspicion, put your interview clothes in your car and change in a discreet location before the interview. It's also a good idea to schedule interview appointments during times when your absence won't raise questions. Taking too much time off from work can signal that you are interviewing at other companies.&quot;</p> <h2>5. Don't Tell Your Coworkers That You're Looking</h2> <p>I'm sure there are coworkers you trust to keep the secret that you're looking for a new job, but my life motto has fared me well so far &mdash; trust no one, and fear everyone. Besides, you don't know what plans they have in mind for their own career advancement. They may view your undercover search as an opportunity to swoop in and take your job right out from under you. And if that happens, you'll kick yourself for being so loose-lipped. Ruthless comes in all shapes, sizes, and smiles.</p> <h2>6. Consider Having an Executive Recruiter on Your Side</h2> <p>If you're afraid of getting caught searching for a job (and you should be), there are ways to ease your anxiety. Hiring an executive recruiter is one such solution, and it won't even cost you. Recruiters are paid by employers, and their fees are usually based on your starting salary. Depending on the type of job you're seeking &mdash; like CEO or VP of Somethingorother &mdash; working with a recruiter is often the only way to go.</p> <p>Zach Brown, a senior sourcing recruiter for David Brown International, details a few of the benefits of using a recruiter.</p> <p>&quot;A skilled recruiter can leverage their network and industry connections to get your resume and portfolio in front of employers in your field that are looking for top talent,&quot; he explains. &quot;Going this route will get you exposure with the right companies without having to post your resume everywhere for all to see. Look for an established recruiter that specializes in your career field and has worked with the types of organizations that you are interested in working for.&quot;</p> <h2>7. Keep Your Search Quiet, Especially on Social Media</h2> <p>As a professional, you should be mindful of what you're posting to social media, in general &mdash; no more drama! &ndash; but you should particularly be conscious to keep your job search updates off Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and other sites. Even if you're not connected to your boss or coworkers online, what you post has a mysterious way of popping up in places you don't want it to be seen &mdash; security settings, be damned.</p> <h2>8. Don't Use Anyone at Your Current Job as a Reference</h2> <p>If you don't want to raise a red flag that you're looking for a new job, WHY would you use one of your coworkers as a reference? Surely you have three other people with whom you're not currently working who can vouch for you, no?</p> <h2>9. Search for Your New Job on Your Own Time and Equipment</h2> <p>And, finally, don't be sketchy and use company time to search for a position with another company. That's not only dumb, but also disloyal and rude. Use your own computer and other resources on your own time. Get caught and you're likely to get fired on the spot. The only silver lining is that it will seriously speed up your job search. You don't want it to go down like that.</p> <p>Palmer says, &quot;You should never put your work email or work phone number on your resume. Also, you should use a personal email address that sounds professional &mdash; i.e., ralph.smith@[emailservice].com, not wonderboy@[emailservice].com &mdash; and list your cell phone number so that communication with potential employers will remain private. In addition, you should use your computer at home to send emails to hiring managers. Using the computer at work is risky since many companies monitor their employees' computer use.&quot;</p> <p><em>Do you have tips on how employees can search for a new job without raising a red flag? Let me know in the comments below.</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/mikey-rox">Mikey Rox</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-ways-to-job-hunt-without-getting-caught">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-4"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-questions-to-ask-before-you-take-a-job-offer">12 Questions to Ask Before You Take a Job Offer</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-best-times-of-year-to-start-a-job-search">The Best Times of Year to Start a Job Search</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-great-jobs-that-dont-pay-much">15 Great Jobs That Don&#039;t Pay Much</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-extreme-job-interview-tactics-that-worked">6 Extreme Job Interview Tactics That Worked</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-calm-your-nerves-and-ace-your-interview">6 Ways to Calm Your Nerves and Ace Your Interview</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income Job Hunting boss Job Interview job search new job resume Thu, 12 Nov 2015 11:15:12 +0000 Mikey Rox 1606587 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Skills That Helped Your Boss Get Ahead http://www.wisebread.com/6-skills-that-helped-your-boss-get-ahead <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-skills-that-helped-your-boss-get-ahead" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/man_triumphant_000038262530.jpg" alt="Man using skills to help him get ahead like his boss" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Do you ever look at your boss and wish you had his or her job? Or maybe you wonder how in the world they got to where they are, given the fact that you are struggling with your own position.</p> <p>The fact of the matter is, somehow your boss got ahead. They stood out from the rest. Here are some of the <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-life-skills-every-freelancer-needs">skills</a> that helped them land that big promotion &mdash; and that can help you, too!</p> <h2>1. Cut the Negativity</h2> <p>No one likes being around someone who is always negative. It's hard, and eventually you either get dragged into their negativity, or you have to put distance between the negative person and yourself. So don't be that person!</p> <p>Yes, every workplace probably has something to be negative about. Maybe it's a rough time of year, or you're currently being asked to do someone else's job on top of your own. But keep the negativity to yourself.</p> <p>Being negative drags everyone down, and companies don't promote people who are going to make teamwork harder. When your boss got promoted, it's likely that he or she was known for being positive or, at least, for keeping negative comments in. Do the same if you want to get ahead.</p> <h2>2. Line Up the Right Support</h2> <p>Most of us can't be the lone wolf at work. We need some sort of support to be able to do our jobs successfully. When we aren't getting that, we won't perform as well and, therefore, will be less likely to get ahead.</p> <p>In today's work environment, it often falls to the individual to find the support he or she needs to get the job done. Be proactive and ask your boss for a meeting. Go over expectations, especially if you feel like these aren't clear. Ask your boss how they prefer to manage and work from there. For instance, a boss who prefers weekly check-in meetings may be willing to let you have two weeks between meetings, especially if you've proven yourself trustworthy and can show how the extra time would help you do your job better.</p> <p>Getting the support they need is something your boss most likely excels at, and one of the skills they used to do their job well enough to get ahead. Figure out what you need in order to exceed expectations and ask for it.</p> <h2>3. Take on Challenges</h2> <p>Taking on something that is new, different, or difficult is scary, especially when you feel like your livelihood may depend on it. However, being willing to take on a challenge, being the person who steps forward and says &quot;I'll do it!&quot; makes a huge difference when it comes to getting ahead.</p> <p>Think about it this way: When you are considering who you want to lead something, do you want a person in charge who isn't daunted, who can outthink and outmaneuver obstacles, or do you want someone who is afraid, stuck in an old way of doing things, and who can't think outside the box? Most of us want the first kind of person.</p> <p>Even if your boss seems stuck in her ways now, it's likely she was once willing to innovate and take risks. Be the person who steps up to the challenge, and you can be the one who gets ahead, too.</p> <h2>4. Understand the Current Goals</h2> <p>If you want to get ahead, make sure you understand your organization's current goals and how your job fits into those. See your work as part of the whole and make sure you are doing your best to make the whole function well.</p> <p>It's easy to get lost in the details of your job and to forget about the role you are playing in the overall company. It's also easy to misunderstand where your company is currently focused. For instance, you may think that your company is trying to land new accounts, when the current focus is actually on giving existing clients a better experience.</p> <p>Most people who get ahead in a company do so because someone thinks they will be able to help the company achieve their current goals. You boss probably focused on these when he was working to get ahead, and doing the same should help you, too.</p> <h2>5. Take Responsibility for Your Mistakes</h2> <p>It may seem counterintuitive to think that owning your mistakes will help you get ahead. However, taking full responsibility for yourself and your actions generates trust, and so it helps you build stronger relationships with both your coworkers and your clients/customers.</p> <p>Before you can take responsibility for any errors, you need to know your own role. Make sure you really know it, inside and out, so that you can honestly tell someone whether a mistake was yours or whether it occurred elsewhere. If you did make a mistake, be sure to apologize and, if necessary, change the way you do things so that it doesn't happen again.</p> <p>Most managers have, at some point in their career, demonstrated their ability to own their role, including any mistakes that are made. If it helped your boss get to where she is today, it can help you get ahead, too.</p> <h2>6. Find the Right Communication Style</h2> <p>Different people communicate in different ways. We use different words, different tones, and even different body language when we talk to one another. When you use your boss's communication style, you are more likely to get ahead because you'll be more likely to persuade him of the points you try to make and because he will see you as compatible with the overall company.</p> <p>Before you do this, you have to determine how your boss communicates. Listen to the words he says, whether he speaks quietly or loudly, quickly or slowly, and how he uses his hands, face, and body when he is speaking. Then try to do some of these same things when you are communicating with him and with your team.</p> <p>Matching communication styles probably helped your boss get ahead, and working to do it will help you, too. Don't worry about being false, because the ideas you want to communicate will be the same as they would be if you were using your natural communication style.</p> <p><em>How are you trying to get ahead at work? Is it helping you?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/sarah-winfrey">Sarah Winfrey</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-skills-that-helped-your-boss-get-ahead">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-5"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-tips-for-better-workplace-body-language">7 Tips for Better Workplace Body Language</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-transition-to-a-new-career-after-30">6 Ways to Transition to a New Career After 30</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-absolute-worst-ways-to-ask-for-a-raise">The Absolute Worst Ways to Ask for a Raise</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-to-bug-your-boss-for-more-money-and-get-it">4 Ways to Bug Your Boss for More Money – and Get It!</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/ace-your-next-performance-review-with-these-7-tricks">Ace Your Next Performance Review With These 7 Tricks</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building boss jobs Office promotions skills success Thu, 09 Jul 2015 17:00:11 +0000 Sarah Winfrey 1478349 at http://www.wisebread.com The 8 Worst Things Good Employees Do http://www.wisebread.com/the-8-worst-things-good-employees-do <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/the-8-worst-things-good-employees-do" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_work_000020741145.jpg" alt="Woman at work contemplating" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Most of us like to think of ourselves as good employees. We show up for work on time, do our jobs to the best of our abilities, are team players, and put in more than enough hours. But, even good employees can commit career sins &mdash; and most of the time we don't even know we're doing it. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-reasons-you-deserve-to-get-fired?ref=seealso">12 Reasons You Deserve to Get Fired</a>)</p> <p>Read on to learn the eight worst things good employees do.</p> <h2>1. Buckle Under Pressure</h2> <p>Some jobs are super high stress &mdash; and that can take a toll on an employee after an extended period of time. But as a professional, it's your duty to take these situations in stride and weather the storm to the best of your ability. The last thing you want to do is send the impression that you're just not cut out for your position.</p> <p>&quot;There are times when the environment of the workplace, company culture, or pressure from coworkers, peers, and upper management may influence [good employees] to act outside of their normal behavioral pattern,&quot; says Michael Lan, senior resume consultant at Resume Writer Direct. &quot;Being pressured to meet a quota within a certain deadline, or accomplishing a number of set goals and tasks increases an employee's stress level. Some employees will consequentially buckle under this pressure and make questionable or 'bad' decisions in order to keep up with demands.&quot;</p> <p>You should always strive to handle yourself with poise, but if you think your work demands are consistently unreasonable, schedule a meeting with your boss to discuss.</p> <h2>2. Make Too Many Excuses or Apologize Too Much</h2> <p>&quot;Over-justifying or over-communicating why something isn't ready is a horrible habit I've seen employees fall into,&quot; explains Michelle Brammer, marketing manager for eZanga. &quot;When employees over-justify or give too much communication as to why a task isn't complete, I'm left questioning their judgment or dedication to their job.&quot;</p> <p>As a result, Brammer says, the barrage of apologies may come off like you can't manage multiple tasks or responsibilities &mdash; and that's never a good look. Instead, simply reaffirm your commitment to completing the over-due task ASAP and deliver. If there's something meaningful preventing you from timely completion, by all means do discuss it with your boss.</p> <h2>3. Blend Into the Crowd</h2> <p>Know what happens to the rank-and-file? They get lost in a sea of nobodies just doing their jobs. Is that who you want to be? Let's hope not.</p> <p>&quot;Between being a showy braggart and muffling your hard work, there's a comfortable middle road that you must find in order to claim the benefits of your labor,&quot; offers Constance Dunn, communication and manners expert and author of <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0978761022/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=0978761022&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=FNSTO6IUTD6ATBA4">Practical Glamour: Presenting Your Most Beautiful &amp; Polished Self</a>. &quot;Otherwise, you might find yourself plodding about in the same role, year after year, while others &mdash; perhaps less talented others &mdash; sprint ahead with promotions and raises.&quot;</p> <p>In an effort to avoid this trap, Dunn suggests making it your business to socially congregate with co-workers, even if it's standing around the coffee machine or going for a coffee run with the pack.</p> <p>&quot;Don't wait for them to ask you what you're working on; go ahead and offer interesting tidbits about your current projects in a conversational way,&quot; she says. &quot;This is one strategy to increase your visibility and communicate your competency in the workplace.&quot;</p> <h2>4. Rest on Their Laurels</h2> <p>Becoming a sheep is one thing, but giving up on career advancement altogether is a whole other ballgame &mdash; and one in which you ought not be participating. You don't want to be just a good employee; you should get up every morning to be the best employee. That's the only way you'll see the kind of promotion you dream of &mdash; but you have to work for it.</p> <p>&quot;The worst things good employees do is to not tactfully push to advance their careers,&quot; says David T. Waring, editor of FitSmallBusiness. &quot;Often times good employees trust that good work will be rewarded automatically. Especially in larger companies, this is not always the case, and often times it's the squeaky wheel that gets the grease. While good employees do not want to turn into whiners, making sure that you keep yourself top of mind with those that have the power to advance your career is simply good business.&quot;</p> <h2>5. Allow a Lack of Self-Confidence to Hinder Success</h2> <p>Ever had an idea in a meeting, but were too afraid to lay it out there for fear of sounding stupid or getting that condescending &quot;Really?&quot; look from the boss? I have, so I feel your pain. But keeping mum on a creative or productive idea is never going to help your cause &mdash; ever.</p> <p>Jason M. Schulz, benefits consultant and retired U.S. Army Captain, agrees.</p> <p>&quot;[Some employees are] afraid to speak up when appropriate to do so for fear that they will be ostracized, but then complain later around the water cooler,&quot; he says. &quot;Truth is, most of those employees that think their idea is great when they hear it at the water cooler, really want them to voice their opinion when asked by the boss. And managers aren't just asking for ideas for their health; they genuinely want to see things from the workers' perspective.&quot;</p> <h2>6. Micromanage</h2> <p>I quit a job because I was being micromanaged; it's bad news for a control freak like me (who also has a tendency to micromanage; I'll admit it). The people with whom <em>you</em> work don't like it either &mdash; trust me. So if you have a propensity to be this kind of pest &mdash; yes, I said a <em>pest</em> &mdash; stop it immediately.</p> <p>John J. Brady, executive director and principal of Protem Partners, reminds us that if you can't identify the micromanager in the office, it might just be you.</p> <p>&quot;Most micromanagers do not realize that this label applies to them. They get great feedback as they hold themselves and members of their team to a very high level,&quot; he says. &quot;The problem is, they fear anything less than perfection will hurt their hard-earned credibility, and their very image of perfection gets distorted such that they fail to see the inefficiencies they create and, in most cases, the errors they create by sending a message that only they are competent. Dysfunction and burnout are the usual results.&quot;</p> <h2>7. Work More Than They Contribute</h2> <p>Brady also details the fine line between working and contributing &mdash; two very different things &mdash; that could be holding you back.</p> <p>&quot;Many employees feel insecure about their station at work and, as such, never take vacations, send emails at crazy hours and, in an effort to make sure their commitment is known, talk about it [incessantly],&quot; he says. &quot;Every major study shows that quality and productivity falls after a certain number of hours and without proper breaks from work. The result is that they do good work instead of great work, and they come off as a martyr to management and to colleagues. It doesn't help their career, let alone anyone else's, and isolation is a frequent result.&quot;</p> <p>The takeaway? Relax, boo, you got this. Strive for success, but not <em>too</em> hard, and enjoy a day (maybe a week even) to yourself once in a while.</p> <h2>8. Fail to Think About the Boss's Objectives</h2> <p>Most of us are so busy at work concentrating on our own tasks that we don't give a second thought to what may be on other people's plates, particularly the boss's. It's in your best interest to squash this bad habit today.</p> <p>&quot;Many excellent employees get nothing but stellar feedback, but wonder why they never get promoted,&quot; Brady explains. &quot;At a minimum, you need to think about the business from at least one level up, and then frame your work to fit that set of objectives. Doing a great job at one level doesn't lead management to presume you could excel at the next level, unless you are consistently showing that you know how your current work fits into a larger framework.&quot;</p> <p>Something to consider the next time you're up for review.</p> <p><em>Are any of these habits yours? Or are there other worst things you've seen your good coworkers do?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/mikey-rox">Mikey Rox</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-8-worst-things-good-employees-do">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-first-5-things-you-must-do-after-getting-laid-off">The First 5 Things You Must Do After Getting Laid Off</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-signs-you-should-quit-your-job">8 Signs You Should Quit Your Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-simple-steps-to-discovering-your-true-salary-potential">6 Simple Steps to Discovering Your True Salary Potential</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-people-who-have-their-dream-jobs-do">5 Things People Who Have Their Dream Jobs Do</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/3-weird-ways-people-get-promoted">3 Weird Ways People Get Promoted</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income boss fired layoff promotion raise success Fri, 27 Feb 2015 10:00:12 +0000 Mikey Rox 1309035 at http://www.wisebread.com Best Money Tips: How to Ask Your Boss for a Raise http://www.wisebread.com/best-money-tips-how-to-ask-your-boss-for-a-raise <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/best-money-tips-how-to-ask-your-boss-for-a-raise" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/cash-1901096-small.jpg" alt="cash" title="cash" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="160" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Welcome to Wise Bread's <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/topic/best-money-tips">Best Money Tips</a> Roundup! Today we found some stellar articles on how to ask your boss for a raise, frugal ways to move, and getting the best price when selling back textbooks.</p> <h2>Top 5 Articles</h2> <p><a href="http://www.learnvest.com/2014/05/how-to-ask-for-a-raise/">The Right Way to Ask for a Raise&hellip; and Get What You Deserve</a> &mdash; If you want a raise, develop a persausive argument that details your accomplishments and be straightforward. [LearnVest]</p> <p><a href="http://www.bargaineering.com/articles/4-frugal-ways-move.html">4 Frugal Ways to Move</a> &mdash; Taking less stuff with you can make it cheaper for you to move. [Bargaineering]</p> <p><a href="http://www.kiplinger.com/article/college/T042-C011-S001-get-the-best-price-when-selling-back-textbooks.html">Get the Best Price When Selling Back Textbooks</a> &mdash; Students should use sites like CampusBooks.com to help them get the most when selling their textbooks. [Kiplinger]</p> <p><a href="http://www.moneytalksnews.com/2013/05/07/4-ridiculous-international-travel-fees/">4 Ridiculous International Travel Fees</a> &mdash; Did you know if you are traveling internationally, you can get charged for booking travel over the phone? [Money Talks News]</p> <p><a href="http://sweatingthebigstuff.com/why-saving-your-20s-so-important/">Why Saving In Your 20s Is Easier Than Waiting</a> &mdash; It is easier to save in your 20s because you have fewer financial responsibilities. [Sweating The Big Stuff]</p> <h2>Other Essential Reading</h2> <p><a href="http://www.savvysugar.com/How-Sell-TV-30457345">The Definitive Guide to Selling a TV</a> &mdash; To get a starting price for a TV you want to sell, check out GadgetValue. [PopSugar Smart Living]</p> <p><a href="http://www.creditsesame.com/blog/why-mortgage-lenders-are-turning-you-down/">Why Mortgage Lenders are Turning You Down</a> &mdash; Mortgage lenders may be turning you down because of your debt-to-income ratio. [Credit Sesame]</p> <p><a href="http://parentingsquad.com/out-of-the-box-baby-shower-gifts-that-mom-might-actually-like">23 Out-of-the-Box Baby Shower Gifts for New Moms</a> &mdash; If you have a baby shower coming up, consider getting the mom-to-be a maternity massage. [Parenting Squad]</p> <p><a href="http://www.freemoneyfinance.com/2013/05/monopoly-makes-you-think-about-money.html">Monopoly Makes You Think About Money</a> &mdash; Monopoly shows you how to budget by making you maintain a balance between cash, properties, and buildings. [Free Money Finance]</p> <p><a href="http://money.msn.com/saving-money-tips/post.aspx?post=e75ef057-a792-4ae8-8858-ceab1aa83abc&amp;ref=bfv">Why we buy clothes we don't wear</a> &mdash; Avoid buying clothes you won't wear by shopping for your real life, not the &quot;fantasy version.&quot; [MSN Money]</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/ashley-jacobs">Ashley Jacobs</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/best-money-tips-how-to-ask-your-boss-for-a-raise">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-8-worst-things-good-employees-do">The 8 Worst Things Good Employees Do</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-you-should-never-do-after-getting-a-raise">10 Things You Should Never Do After Getting a Raise</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-you-should-never-say-to-your-boss">10 Things You Should Never Say to Your Boss</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-downsides-to-a-bigger-paycheck">5 Downsides to a Bigger Paycheck</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income asking for a raise best money tips boss raise Mon, 13 May 2013 10:00:31 +0000 Ashley Jacobs 974031 at http://www.wisebread.com 4 Ways to Bug Your Boss for More Money – and Get It! http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-to-bug-your-boss-for-more-money-and-get-it <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/4-ways-to-bug-your-boss-for-more-money-and-get-it" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/4894730690_e65d4d655a_b.jpg" alt="demonstration" title="demonstration" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="141" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Everyone knows we're in a recession, but let's face it: You may deserve to get paid much more than what you're getting now! Before you blow off the idea that your work is worth a bump in the pay scale, check out these four clever tips for putting in a good word about your worth. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/underpaid-here-s-how-to-fix-it" title="Underpaid? Here's How to Fix It.">Underpaid? Here's How to Fix It.</a>)</p> <h2>Wrangle References</h2> <p>This is an area where having an <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/effective-networking-in-a-one-horse-town">effective networking</a> style can really pay off. Asking your current customers, co-workers, and colleagues for a few kind words about your performance isn't just useful during a hunt for new work. It can be a powerful tool in moving up your current career ladder, as well. You don't have to be transparent in your reason for asking; a simple &quot;Would you mind sending an email with your thoughts on our working relationship?&quot; will do. Save the best in a file to arm yourself with at your next performance review or compensation discussion.</p> <h2>Research Rates</h2> <p>Some companies are large enough to set their own industry rates &mdash; and get them. Others are completely oblivious to what someone in your position <em>should</em> be making. If you've caught wind that your job tasks are on par for the course of a higher-ranking (and higher-paying) position, bring this up to your boss. Explain that you realize that they may not have the cash to pay the going rate for someone with your expertise, but would they meet you halfway?</p> <h2>Value Added</h2> <p>Often, it's not about what they hire you to do that matters. If you are especially well-connected, possess a task or skill that puts you at a unique advantage, or have a willingness to perform beyond your peers (24/7 availability, maybe?), it's something that you should be paid well for. Demand that you get compensated for this value by letting management know how much they are getting!</p> <h2>Show Them the Money</h2> <p>For many companies, it's really just about dollars and cents. Did you save the company $X over last year? Would a process you helped to develop bring in extra money over time? What's the bottom line of your individual worth to the company? If it's well over what they are paying you, now's the time to document and sell your potential <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/small-business/the-real-roi-of-social-media">return on investment (ROI)</a> with examples of how you can continue to grow in value.</p> <p>Once you've gotten the OK to discuss a pay raise with your boss (in the form of a performance review or other scheduled meeting), come prepared with facts for each of the four methods above, and be sure that there are no outside distractions that could derail your attempts. Be confident, make positive forward-thinking statements, and never apologize for your request for more cash. Remember, you're worth it &mdash; now it's time that your boss knew, too!</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/linsey-knerl">Linsey Knerl</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-to-bug-your-boss-for-more-money-and-get-it">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-answer-23-of-the-most-common-interview-questions">How to Answer 23 of the Most Common Interview Questions</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/you-re-fired-20-signs-that-a-pink-slip-is-coming">You’re Fired! 20 Signs That a Pink Slip is Coming</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/flashback-friday-the-65-best-career-tips-weve-ever-shared">Flashback Friday: The 65 Best Career Tips We&#039;ve Ever Shared</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-use-technology-to-upgrade-your-career">6 Ways to Use Technology to Upgrade Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building asking for a raise boss career jobs more money Tue, 31 Aug 2010 14:00:08 +0000 Linsey Knerl 222606 at http://www.wisebread.com 10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/job_sucks_386940218_fe07dcbc9f.jpg" alt="my job sucks" title="my job sucks" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="333" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>I appreciated Sarah's <a href="/10-important-signs-your-job-might-be-worth-staying-at">post today</a> about determining the positive aspects of a work environment. You should read that post before you read this one.</p> <p>As someone who has had to make the decision to leave more than one <a title="&quot;I Hate My Job&quot; Guide" href="http://www.wisebread.com/i-hate-my-job">lousy job</a>, here's my counterpoint top 10: how to know when to leave. I don't take the decision to quit lightly, and I don't think anyone should. See if the problems can be fixed first.</p> <p>Some of my advice here involves big ideas (Ask for a raise!) that should not be undertaken lightly. Research tactics first before acting.</p> <p><strong>1. You dread coming to work in the morning. </strong></p> <p>You wake up and want to cry yourself back to sleep. This ONLY happens on the days you work, and didn't happen with other jobs you've held.</p> <p><strong>Fix?:</strong> Ask yourself if there was anything else that you could be doing at the same company that wouldn't suck so much. Staying with one company can be good for your career, but sometimes you need to change responsibilities to alleviate boredom.</p> <p><strong>2. You are putting lots of energy into the job, but not making the kind of project and/or overall progress that you feel is reasonable. </strong></p> <p><strong>Fix?:</strong> Ask yourself if you are putting energy into the right areas. Are you spending all of your time arranging meetings and conference calls and not able to put your all into the actual work? Unless you are a project manager, arranging people-to-people face time can take up lot precious work time. Can someone else handle that for you? If your company can't provide reasonable support, you might want to look for one that can.</p> <p><strong>3. You are putting no energy into the job because doing so makes you want to stab your eyes out with a sharpened number 2 pencil. </strong></p> <p><strong>Fix?:</strong> Put down the pencil. If you hate the job with the passion of a thousand burning suns, ask yourself why, honestly answer yourself, and find a job in which the same problem can not occur.</p> <p><strong>4. Your lunch break is spent bitching to your coworkers about how much you hate being where you are. </strong></p> <p>This is a really bad sign, even if you are being goaded into disliking the work even more by listening to other department's woes.</p> <p><strong>Fix?:</strong> Stop bitching to your coworkers. Change the subject, talk about positive things. Listen to people, but give NOTHING away, especially when it comes to criticizing your boss or peers. Word gets around. Shut yer trap.</p> <p><strong>5. Your boss irrationally hates you. </strong></p> <p>This happens sometimes - some people feel that their bosses hate them when their bosses are merely being, you know, bossy.</p> <p>My first job straight out of college was for a company that did a lot of field sales and merchandising. It so happened that the head of my department was out on maternity leave when I was hired. I was in charge of managing dozens of sales accounts from around the country. The system that was in place was really archaic, and I was working weekends just to keep up with the demands of the sales people.</p> <p>When the department head returned to work after about 3 months, I could tell from the second we met that she had it in for me. Nothing I did was right, no amount of work was enough. While receiving rave reviews from coworkers and other supervisors, I could tell that this particular boss was going to wear them down with her constant complaining about my work.</p> <p>I gave my two weeks notice 48 hours after she returned to work, paving the way for her to hire her nephew for my position. She was elated. Such is life.</p> <p><strong>Fix?:</strong> Politely quit, or if you have the time, let them fire you and sue the pants off of them.</p> <p><strong>6. You've bounced laterally around the company for years without a promotion. </strong></p> <p><strong>Fix?:</strong> Have you gained any skills during your career mambo around the corporation? Think about it - do you really bring valuable skills to the table? Are you unfairly being denied a promotion, or do you work for an industry (government, civil service) in which it's damn near impossible to fire you? If you think you're worth it, you often have to ask for a promotion. Make a list of everything that you have done to make your workplace better. If it's not much of a list, put your nose to the grindstone.</p> <p><strong>7. You're not being given what you were promised. </strong></p> <p>When you first started working, did they tell you that they had an educational fund for employees that seems to have disappeared? Did that 401K never materialize? Are other employees sensing that they were sold a fantasy job, too? During the dotcom boom, it was really common for companies to more or less offer to pay for your MBA as long as you kept working with them - then they blew their cash on limo trips to the vineyards and off-site gatherings for the sales team in Vail.</p> <p><strong>Fix?:</strong> If you had a goal in mind for this job, but the job is keeping you from the goal, consider finding something better. If you can achieve the goals on your own, such as taking night classes to earn that extra degree or certificate, then do it on your own and find a better job with your newfound skills.</p> <p><strong>8. You've slept with one, or more, of your coworkers and things ended badly. </strong></p> <p>First of all, don't do this. But if you do, get out while the gettin's good.</p> <p><strong>Fix?:</strong> Apologize if you can. Try to set things right if you've wronged them.</p> <p><strong>9. There's this exiled Nigerian businessman's widow who's wiring you a bunch of money, and you get to keep a few hundred thousand. </strong></p> <p>Seriously, you should quit your job and <em>move to Canada if this happens</em>.</p> <p><strong>10. You're making the same amount of money that you were when you first started working for the company. Five years ago.</strong></p> <p><strong>Fix?:</strong> Ask for a raise. Even if you are doing the same work, as long as you are a valuable employee, you should be eligible for some kind of raise.</p> <p><strong>11. You've just found a better deal.</strong></p> <p>Better pay is nice, but really fun jobs don't always pay well. The <a title="Job hunting tips" href="http://www.wisebread.com/lost-my-job-tips-for-the-recently-laid-off">high-paying jobs</a> are often the most tedious, so money alone isn't everything. My buddy Richard finally left his little non-profit job because he wanted to make some real money, but it was an all-around good decision. And I mean, for everyone. Richard wanted to be the manager of his team, and his team hated his pushy leadership style. So finding another position was a win-win - he gets more money and more leadership potential, and his old team can breathe a sigh of relief and go back to smoking pot on their lunch breaks.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <p>&nbsp;</p> <div align="center"><a href="//www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F10%20Important%20Signs%20That%20Your%20Job%20Sucks.png&amp;description=10%20Important%20Signs%20That%20Your%20Job%20Sucks" data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-config="above" data-pin-color="red" data-pin-height="28"><img src="//assets.pinterest.com/images/pidgets/pinit_fg_en_rect_red_28.png" alt="" /></a> </p> <!-- Please call pinit.js only once per page --><!-- Please call pinit.js only once per page --><script type="text/javascript" async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <h2 style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</h2> <h2 style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/10%20Important%20Signs%20That%20Your%20Job%20Sucks.png" alt="10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks" width="250" height="374" /></h2> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/troy-hadley">Troy Hadley</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-5"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/is-this-job-worth-it">Is This Job Worth It?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-times-you-should-demand-a-raise">5 Times You Should Demand a Raise</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-absolute-worst-ways-to-ask-for-a-raise">The Absolute Worst Ways to Ask for a Raise</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-unexpected-costs-of-a-higher-paying-job-offer">4 Unexpected Costs of a Higher-Paying Job Offer</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/earn-more-money-by-demanding-it">Earn More Money by Demanding It</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building 401k boss career education goals job leave pay quit raise salary work Wed, 02 May 2007 01:18:57 +0000 Troy Hadley 585 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Get Fired http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-fired <p><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/wisebread_imce/fire_0.jpg" alt=" " width="266" height="230" /></p> <p>In honor of the recent end of my employment, I thought I&#39;d find some good tips on how to... well, to end your employment! Here are some of my favorites from around the interwebs:</p> <p><a href="http://careerplanning.about.com/od/workplacesurvival/a/get_fired.htm">Arrive late for work</a>. Being on time is for wimps. Drag yourself out of bed whenever you feel like it. Stop to run an errand on your way to the office. </p> <p>Don&#39;t forget the coffee. No not for your boss -- for yourself! You&#39;re already late so why not stop for a cup of coffee on the way to work?</p> <p>Don&#39;t forget to get a muffin or a roll too (crumbs on your tie look really good). </p> <p>Eat at your desk. I mean your coffee and roll, not your lunch silly. Why would you want to work through lunch anyway? And take your time — you&#39;re in no hurry to start working. </p> <p>Take a long lunch. An hour for lunch? Are they nuts? That can&#39;t possibly be enough time to get together with an old friend and run a few more errands. </p> <p>Have a drink. What&#39;s lunch without a couple of beers? It&#39;ll relax you. So what if you smell like a brewery? </p> <p>Make personal phone calls. If you can&#39;t make your phone calls from the office, when else will you find the time? Don&#39;t make those calls short and sweet -- chat away. </p> <p><a href="http://www.geocities.com/CollegePark/6174/10_fired.htm">Whenever</a> a co-worker asks if you want coffee, say, &quot;No thanks, it doesn&#39;t mix well with thorazine.&quot;</p> <p>Bring several large mason jars to work and fill them part way with water and yellow food coloring; display them conspicuously around your work space. Tell anyone who asks about them that you are just taking part in an efficiency study that your boss came up with to cut down on the time employees spend away from their desks.</p> <p>Tell your boss that you intend to spread out your vacation time by taking off one minute out of every 25. Spend all your time &#39;planning&#39; your vacations.</p> <p>Secretly replace the coffee your boss usually drinks with new Folger&#39;s Crystals.</p> <p>Keep a tally of what your boss wears on &#39;casual&#39; Friday. when you see a pattern develop, distribute the tally to co-workers and start a weekly pool.</p> <p>Dress like a pirate for the office halloween party. Dress like a pirate every other day of the year as well.</p> <p>Set everyone&#39;s desk and PC clock ahead one hour and go home early.</p> <p>Some more <a href="http://www.simplyfired.com/category/all">good firing stories to be found here</a>.</p> <p>Forbes actually has some really helpful information on <a href="http://www.forbes.com/leadership/2006/09/06/leadership-pink-fired-cx_ag_0906fired.html">how to negotiate a decent severance package here</a>. It&#39;s actually aimed at women, because much like negotiating a good salary, women aren&#39;t always that good at negotiating their golden parachute.</p> <p>Who knew?</p> <p class="blockquote">The best way to get fired like a man is to get hired like one. That means knowing the market value of the position so that you can position yourself from the start. Packing your parachute entails negotiating the best severance package possible. This should happen as salary and benefits are negotiated too, ideally before you even take the job.</p> <p><em>(Picture by </em><a href="http://www.flickr.com/people/mozzercork/"><em>mozzercork</em></a><em>)</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/andrea-karim">Andrea Karim</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-fired">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-write-a-resume-12-steps-to-your-next-job">How To Write A Resume: 12 Steps To Your Next Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-absolute-worst-ways-to-ask-for-a-raise">The Absolute Worst Ways to Ask for a Raise</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/when-to-splurge-resume-writer">When to Splurge: Resume Writer</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/is-this-job-worth-it">Is This Job Worth It?</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building boss employment fired job termination Thu, 26 Apr 2007 14:59:29 +0000 Andrea Karim 566 at http://www.wisebread.com Is This Job Worth It? http://www.wisebread.com/is-this-job-worth-it <p><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/wisebread_imce/flair.jpg" alt=" " width="252" height="174" /></p> <p>This post technically isn&#39;t about me. It&#39;s about a friend, a lousy job situation, and soliciting feedback from our readers for a friend of mine.</p> <p>Tiffany is an engineer who works for a small start-up. She makes a very good salary, has benefits, and doesn&#39;t have a particularly heavy workload at the moment (her company is building a product, so the work comes in fits and starts, so she&#39;s been chilling for a couple of months while the hardware is being built). Anyway, Tiff is kind of bored right now, but otherwise OK. She&#39;s the only female in her office, and works with about 12 men who are much older than she is (she&#39;s 27, they&#39;re all about 45-57). </p> <p>She feels well-respected and knows that she has plenty to offer the company. The CEO seems to like her, she gets long well with everyone.</p> <p>Tiff recently became close with a coworker named Mike. Not close-close in a here-comes-the-lawsuit kind of way, but so that they discussed their lives with each other. Mike could complain about his college-age daughters to Tiffany, and she would assure him that they would turn out fine. They both discussed their concerns over the direction of their company, which was erratic, to say the least.</p> <p>Mike&#39;s job was to coordinate several engineering projects, although he wasn&#39;t technically a manager. Mike got along well with the CEO, and idea-man who is big on vision and short on business plans. He was one of the few people who could tell the CEO when he was getting off-track.</p> <p>A few weeks back, the company almost went under. Funding wasn&#39;t coming in as expected, and paychecks were delayed. Tiffany and everyone else started sending their resumes out to old coworkers and recruiters, but kept working for the company with the CEO&#39;s reassurance that the checks were in the mail. </p> <p>When Tiff and Mike were having lunch one day, and talking about where they were going, Tiff expressed some of her concerns about the proprietary nature of the job. Because everything that they are developing is very hush-hush, Tiff isn&#39;t able to say much on her resume beyond &quot;I coded some things that I have to kill you over if you knew about them.&quot; She told Mike that she was worried about continuing to work for a company that wouldn&#39;t put a product out for two years, and she&#39;d have nothing to show for it on her resume in the meantime, should she need to find a new job.</p> <p>Mike started discussing the company&#39;s non-compete contract, something that all employees are required to sign. The non-compete had been written and rewritten, with several rounds being rejected by the employees because they were far too strict. The final had not yet been drafted, and thus, no one had signed it. Mike stressed that if Tiffany were to leave, she would need to sign it.</p> <p>&quot;Mike,&quot; said Tiffany, &quot;I&#39;m not signing that. I&#39;d never get hired anywhere else if they knew I signed that thing. You know that. I know that. That&#39;s why no one signed it.&quot;</p> <p>Mike shrugged and kept eating his hotdog. He later said something about wanting to ensure that Tiffany stayed onboard, which Tiff thought was nice. Then they discussed his job prospects at his old employer, and the positions that Tiffany was interviewing for, just in case the company went under.</p> <p>A couple of days later, Tiffany was called into the CEO&#39;s office. The CEO, Jim, was red in the face. He told Tiffany not to take what he was about to say in the wrong way, and then launched into a rambling lecture about the importance of focusing on one&#39;s job. When Tiffany tried to assess what he was talking about, he said something like &quot;I can&#39;t have you looking sideways, looking for other jobs, always looking around for a better position.&quot; Tiffany explained that she wasn&#39;t always looking around, but that she had sent out her resume like everyone else when the paychecks stopped coming.</p> <p>Tiffany was understandably upset, realizing that Mike had ratted her out. Technically, she hadn&#39;t done anything wrong, and since everyone, including Mike, was putting out employment feelers, she didn&#39;t see the need for all the blustering. The CEO then said, &quot;Now, going forward, this isn&#39;t going to affect your job here at all. We like you, and we want you here,&quot; which Tiffany immediately realized was code for &quot;This is definitely something that we will hold against you for a long time.&quot; When she got up to leave, feeling like she would either cry or scream at any minute, Jim added, &quot;We need to you to be 100% on-board. We need enthusiasm. We can&#39;t have anyone half-assing this.&quot; </p> <p>Now, engineers are not an enthusiastic bunch. Tiffany felt like she was being given the &quot;You need to wear more flair&quot; speech. Half-ass? She worked as hard as anyone else at the company.</p> <p>That&#39;s when Mike came to her desk and asked if he could talk to her. Slightly pissed at him, she followed him to the conference room, where Mike proceeded to explain that not only had he told the CEO that Tiff was looking for a new job, but that she was refusing to sign the non-compete. Basically, Mike had told her boss that she was leaving the company, and was taking the technology with her.</p> <p>Tiffany didn&#39;t know what to say, so she got up and left. </p> <p>An hour and a half later, a company meeting was called, and it was announced that Mike was now in charge of Tiff&#39;s projects. Basically, Tiffany was demoted, and Mike was put in charge of her.</p> <p>Now, Tiffany is in a rough place. She hates Mike with all of her heart, and knows that what he did, he did for the purposes of climbing the corporate ladder, which is kind of odd in an office of less than 15 people. Although she has since clarified her position and intentions to the CEO, and signed the new non-compete along with the rest of her coworkers, she can&#39;t help but want to stab Mike through the eyeball with a sharpened #2 pencil.</p> <p>I&#39;ve listened to Tiff&#39;s woes over a beer or two, and I can&#39;t think of a single good bit of advice to give her. She could retaliate against Mike and casually mention the times that he commented on the CEO&#39;s wife&#39;s ass. She could quit and do some contracting, because permanent jobs are hard to come by. Or she could just suck it up and work with Mike, reporting to Mike, and simply never speak to him about anything personal again.</p> <p>What would you do in this situation? Me, all I can think of is a good punch to the jaw, but Tiff isn&#39;t known for her skills left hook. Also, I&#39;m not sure I&#39;d even be in the same position, because I prefer to hold my cards close to my chest and discuss next to nothing with coworkers. So I&#39;m stuck between telling her that it&#39;s her fault for being so trusting, and helping her let the air out of the guy&#39;s tires.</p> <p>Any advice? </p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/troy-hadley">Troy Hadley</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/is-this-job-worth-it">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-absolute-worst-ways-to-ask-for-a-raise">The Absolute Worst Ways to Ask for a Raise</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/earn-more-money-by-demanding-it">Earn More Money by Demanding It</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/didnt-get-the-raise-ask-for-this-instead">Didn&#039;t Get the Raise? Ask for This, Instead</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-good-reasons-to-become-a-contractor">8 Good Reasons to Become a Contractor</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Insurance benefits betrayal boss business contracting coworkers independence job NDA non-compete peers salary work Tue, 03 Apr 2007 18:15:34 +0000 Troy Hadley 445 at http://www.wisebread.com