social security http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/3387/all en-US Here's How the Election Could Impact Your Wallet http://www.wisebread.com/heres-how-the-election-could-impact-your-wallet <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/heres-how-the-election-could-impact-your-wallet" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/voter_pins_money_72870711.jpg" alt="Learning how the election will impact your wallet" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>It's Clinton versus Trump, and the topic is money &mdash; because, more than anything else, that's what's on the minds of American voters. All told, 44% of Americans say the economy is their <a href="http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnn/2015/images/07/26/72715cnnorc.pdf?iid=EL">top campaign issue</a>. Read on for our roundup of how either candidate's presidency would impact your dollars and cents.</p> <h2>Donald Trump</h2> <p>First up, the presumptive Republican nominee and his ideas about taxes, wages, and more.</p> <h3>Taxes</h3> <p>Trump proposes a systemwide overhaul of the U.S. tax code aimed at simplifying it to the point where it would &quot;<a href="http://money.cnn.com/2015/08/11/news/companies/donald-trump-hr-block-tax-code/">put H&amp;R Block right out of business</a>.&quot; In addition to his pledge to make the tax filing process more intuitive for Americans, Trump has also said that he believes the wealthiest Americans should <a href="http://www.ctpost.com/news/article/Trump-close-hedge-fund-tax-loophole-6511995.php">pay higher taxes</a>.</p> <p>&quot;If you make $200 million a year and you pay 10%, you're paying very little relatively to somebody that's making $50,000 a year and has to hire H&amp;R Block because it's so complicated,&quot; Trump said during a Republican presidential debate last year. &quot;I know people that are making a tremendous amount of money and paying virtually no taxes, and I think it's unfair.&quot;</p> <p>Under Trump's plan, federal income taxes would be eliminated for Americans who earn less than $25,000 and married couples that earn less than $50,000.</p> <p>Corporations and the wealthy would pay a decreased corporate tax rate (15% rather than the current 35% rate). The highest income tax rate would drop down to 25% from 39.6%.</p> <p>Despite these cuts, Trump has said that his plan would ultimately raise taxes on the wealthy. That would be achieved, he said, through proposed measures such as the elimination of a hedge fund tax loophole and a one-time 10% tax on money brought back into the U.S. by corporations currently holding funds overseas.</p> <h3>Jobs</h3> <p>Trump has vowed to grow the economy, namely by bringing back jobs he says the U.S. has lost to countries including Japan, China, and Mexico. Tariffs on foreign goods and negotiating better trade deals are the two main ways Trump has said he would accomplish this goal.</p> <p>When it comes to bringing home foreign jobs, Trump has specifically criticized Apple's China-based manufacturing. If elected, he has said he would force the tech company to &quot;start building their damn computers and things in this country instead of in other countries.&quot;</p> <p>As a billionaire real estate developer, Trump has already directly <a href="http://money.cnn.com/2015/09/03/news/economy/donald-trump-jobs-created/">created about 34,000 jobs</a>, according to an analysis by CNNMoney.</p> <h3>Minimum Wage</h3> <p>Reversing a previous position, Trump has said he would <a href="http://money.cnn.com/2016/05/05/news/economy/candidates-minimum-wage/">raise the federal minimum wage</a> from its current rate of $7.25 an hour. He has not, however, revealed by how much.</p> <h3>Social Security</h3> <p>Trump pledges to <a href="http://fortune.com/2016/03/15/primary-elections-ohio-florida/">leave Social Security</a> &quot;the way it is,&quot; a position that has been called impractical by analysts. The reserve fund will be depleted soon after 2030, upon which, if the law is not changed, monthly benefits will have to be slashed by 21%, experts say. There is one change that he would make, however. Trump has said he would raise the age at which Americans are eligible to begin receiving Social Security benefits to 70. Trump has said that he would not support cutting benefits to those who already receive them.</p> <h3>Health Insurance</h3> <p>Trump has said that he would <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2016/03/02/politics/donald-trump-health-care-plan/">ax the Affordable Care Act</a>, also known as Obamacare, and replace it with his own medical care reform system, the details of which are fuzzy. Trump's plan would, however, allow the sale of health insurance across state borders and make health insurance premium payments for individuals fully tax deductible.</p> <h2>Hillary Clinton</h2> <p>Secretary Clinton's plans differ from Mr. Trump's, of course, especially in the areas of taxes and health care.</p> <h3>Taxes</h3> <p>Clinton's economic plan aims to <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2015/07/14/us/politics/hillary-clinton-offers-her-vision-of-a-fairness-economy-to-close-the-income-gap.html">close the wealth gap</a>, in part by raising taxes for the rich while encouraging the private sector to raise middle-class wages. Specifically, she has said she would close corporate loopholes, including those used by hedge funders to avoid paying millions in income taxes, in an attempt to reign in Wall Street.</p> <p>&quot;We must raise incomes for hardworking Americans so they can afford a middle-class life,&quot; she said at a campaign event last year where she debuted her economic recovery strategy. &quot;That will be my mission from the first day I'm president to the last.&quot;</p> <p>Under Clinton's plan, low and middle-class Americans would pay lower taxes &mdash; just how much lower, she hasn't yet revealed. Meanwhile, wealthy Americans would pay more.</p> <p>Analysts estimate that Clinton's plan would, on average, raise taxes for the top 1% of Americans by <a href="http://money.cnn.com/2016/03/03/pf/taxes/hillary-clinton-taxes/">more than $78,000</a>, reducing their after-tax income by 5%. Individuals with adjusted gross incomes topping $1 million would pay a minimum of 30% of their income in taxes.</p> <p>Experts say that while lower and middle-income Americans would pay less, most won't pay very much less.</p> <p>Overall, Clinton's plan is closer to the status quo than the plans proposed by Trump or any other major candidate.</p> <h3>Jobs</h3> <p>Clinton's plan for job growth includes measures that would incentivize corporations to invest in employees. It would also eliminate tax benefits to companies that outsource jobs to foreign countries. Companies that move their headquarters overseas would be hit with an exit tax.</p> <p>&quot;I'm not interested in condemning whole categories of businesses or the entire private sector,&quot; she has said. &quot;But I do want to send a clear message to every boardroom and every executive suite: If you desert America, you'll pay a price.&quot;</p> <p>Clinton has also pledged to expand overtime benefits and promote equal pay for women while also advancing fair scheduling, paid leave, and earned sick days.</p> <h3>Minimum Wage</h3> <p>Clinton has said she supports a <a href="http://www.slate.com/blogs/moneybox/2016/04/18/hillary_clinton_explains_her_position_on_a_15_minimum_wage.html">federal minimum wage increase</a> to $15 from the current rate of $7.25 an hour. She has also said that she supports a $12 federal minimum wage, with the caveat that states should feel encouraged to go higher, especially in cities and suburbs with high living costs. It's unclear which proposal she prefers.</p> <h3>Social Security</h3> <p>To preserve the quickly depleting Social Security reserve fund, Clinton's plan calls on the rich to contribute more via income tax. She opposes any benefits cuts and has said she would not raise the retirement age. Clinton has also said that she would expand Social Security to groups she says are <a href="https://www.hillaryclinton.com/issues/social-security-and-medicare/">treated unfairly by the system</a>, including widows and caretakers who have taken time off from work for the benefit of children, aging parents, or ailing family members.</p> <h3>Health Insurance</h3> <p>Clinton has embraced the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, while acknowledging that there are improvements she would like to make to the current system. Namely, she has said that she would like to <a href="http://www.latimes.com/business/hiltzik/la-fi-mh-hillary-clinton-reveals-her-plan-obamacare-20160223-column.html">add a public option</a>, make health coverage accessible to even more people &mdash; including undocumented immigrants &mdash; and cut its cost.</p> <p><em>Will the candidates' positions on bread and butter issues affect your choice this fall?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/brittany-lyte">Brittany Lyte</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/heres-how-the-election-could-impact-your-wallet">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/bushs-economic-stimulus-package-what-will-you-get-back">Bush&#039;s economic stimulus package; What will you get back?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/is-social-security-just-a-grand-ponzi-scheme">Is Social Security Just A Grand Ponzi Scheme?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-financial-moves-you-will-always-regret">9 Financial Moves You Will Always Regret</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-financial-reasons-to-keep-your-political-views-private">4 Financial Reasons to Keep Your Political Views Private</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/18-little-things-that-make-and-keep-america-great">18 Little Things That Make — and Keep — America Great</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance 2016 election donald trump Economy hillary clinton jobs minimum wage presidential election social security taxes united states Mon, 27 Jun 2016 09:30:25 +0000 Brittany Lyte 1738698 at http://www.wisebread.com Best Money Tips: How to Get Bigger Checks From Social Security http://www.wisebread.com/best-money-tips-how-to-get-bigger-checks-from-social-security <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/best-money-tips-how-to-get-bigger-checks-from-social-security" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_tablet_happy_000075989773.jpg" alt="Woman learning how to get bigger checks from social security" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Welcome to Wise Bread's <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/topic/best-money-tips">Best Money Tips</a> Roundup! Today we found articles on ways to get bigger checks from Social Security, cheats for waking yourself up during the week, and how to avoid leaving money on the table.</p> <h2>Top 5 Articles</h2> <p><a href="http://www.moneytalksnews.com/slideshows/16-ways-get-bigger-checks-from-social-security/">14 Ways to Get Bigger Checks From Social Security</a> &mdash; You can get a bigger payout from this old-age safety net by waiting until your full retirement age to claim benefits. Even better, wait until you're 70. [Money Talks News]</p> <p><a href="http://www.popsugar.com/smart-living/How-Wake-Up-Early-40240055">17 Cheats For Waking Yourself Up During the Workweek</a> &mdash; Using a loud, jarring sound as your alarm will wake you up in a jiffy! Change it every week so you don't get too used to it. [PopSugar Smart Living]</p> <p><a href="http://www.csmonitor.com/Business/Saving-Money/2016/0217/Ten-ways-you-could-be-leaving-money-on-the-table-and-how-to-avoid-it">Ten ways you could be leaving money on the table - and how to avoid it</a> &mdash; The average American wastes about $529 in food per year. Instead of letting food spoil, freeze your fruits and veggies or blend them into a breakfast smoothie to use them up quickly. [The Monitor]</p> <p><a href="http://www.freemoneywisdom.com/keep-more-money-in-your-pockets-with-9-easy-ways-to-save/">Keep More Money in Your Pockets with 9 Easy Ways to Save</a> &mdash; Shop at stores that offer price matching. Walmart, Target, and Amazon are a few big retailers that do! [Free Money Wisdom]</p> <p><a href="http://www.theorderexpert.com/6-ways-to-stop-losing-things/">6 Ways to Stop Losing Things</a> &mdash; Create a checklist of things you need on a regular basis, then schedule alerts throughout the day to remind you to make sure you have those items. [The Order Expert]</p> <h2>Other Essential Reading</h2> <p><a href="http://www.cheapism.com/blog/4137/finding-a-job-on-a-budget">10 Ways to Save While Finding Your Next Job</a> &mdash; If you would need to travel a good distance for an interview, request a virtual interview instead. [Cheapism]</p> <p><a href="http://makemoneyyourway.com/10-ways-to-ensure-that-you-reduce-your-energy-cost-and-waste/">10 Ways To Ensure That You Reduce Your Energy Cost And Waste</a> &mdash; Install and use dual flush toilets to reduce the amount of water you use. [Make Money Your Way]</p> <p><a href="http://www.lifeoptimizer.org/2016/02/16/traits-of-successful-people/">Lessons from Elon Musk: 4 Proven Traits of Successful People</a> &mdash; A successful person has determination, and to have determination you need to believe in your idea and have a strong &quot;why&quot; for pursuing it. [Life Optimizer]</p> <p><a href="http://www.healthyarea.org/top-10-healthy-veggies-that-you-need-to-know/">Top 10 Healthy Veggies That You Need to Know</a> &mdash; Broccoli has vitamin C, folate and beta carotene that will help strengthen the immune system. Avoid overcooking since this can leech the vitamins and minerals out of the florets. [HealthyArea.org]</p> <p><a href="http://parentingsquad.com/7-things-you-shouldnt-say-to-your-child">7 Things You Shouldn't Say to Your Child</a> &mdash; Encourage your child to work hard, but don't tell them &quot;Practice makes perfect.&quot; Perfect doesn't always happen. [Parenting Squad]</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/amy-lu">Amy Lu</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/best-money-tips-how-to-get-bigger-checks-from-social-security">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/to-stay-on-financial-track-perfom-a-yearly-earnings-review">To Stay on Financial Track, Perform a Yearly Earnings Review</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/follow-these-5-steps-to-full-health-care-coverage-in-retirement">Follow These 5 Steps to Full Health Care Coverage in Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-plan-for-retirement-when-you-re-ready-to-retire">How to Plan for Retirement When You’re Ready to Retire</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-retirees-are-using-annuities-instead-of-early-social-security">Why Retirees Are Using Annuities Instead of Early Social Security</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/stop-making-these-10-bogus-retirement-savings-excuses">Stop Making These 10 Bogus Retirement Savings Excuses</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Retirement best money tips social security Mon, 22 Feb 2016 11:00:07 +0000 Amy Lu 1659817 at http://www.wisebread.com Stop Making These 10 Bogus Retirement Savings Excuses http://www.wisebread.com/stop-making-these-10-bogus-retirement-savings-excuses <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/stop-making-these-10-bogus-retirement-savings-excuses" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/000018814419.jpg" alt="Realizing it&#039;s time to stop making bogus retirement savings excuses" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Saving for retirement can often feel like a drag, and many of us come up with excuses for avoiding it. After all, who wants to think about finances at age 70 when you're decades away and enjoying life <em>now</em>?</p> <p>But no matter what excuse you come up with, there's no denying that putting as much money aside as you can &mdash; as early as you can &mdash; will help you maintain your lifestyle even after you stop working.</p> <p>Here are some of the top excuses people use to avoid saving for retirement, and why they're way off-base. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-steps-to-starting-a-retirement-plan-in-your-30s">8 Steps to Starting a Retirement Plan in Your 30s</a>)</p> <h2>1. &quot;I Have a Pension&quot;</h2> <p>If your company is one of the few remaining organizations that offers a defined benefit plan, that's great. But it should not be a reason to refrain from saving additional money for retirement. Having additional savings on top of your pension can make retirement that much sweeter. And pensions have been under assault in recent years, with companies and governments backing off of promises to retirees due to financial troubles. Protect against this uncertainty by opening an individual retirement account (otherwise known as an IRA).</p> <h2>2.&quot;I'm Self-Employed&quot; or &quot;My Company Doesn't Offer a Retirement Plan&quot;</h2> <p>You may not have access to an employer-sponsored retirement plan, but that does not mean you can't save a lot for retirement. Any individual can open a traditional IRA or Roth IRA and contribute up to $5,500 annually. With a traditional IRA, contributions are made from your pre-tax income. With a Roth IRA, you pay taxes up-front, so that you won't have to pay them when you withdraw the money at retirement age. In addition, the federal government now offers a &quot;<a href="https://myra.gov/">myIRA</a>&quot; plan, which works like a Roth IRA and allows anyone to invest in treasury securities with no startup costs or fees.</p> <h2>3. &quot;I Won't Be at This Company for Very Long&quot;</h2> <p>One of the key advantages to 401K plans offered by employers is that they are portable. This means that any money you contribute to a plan will follow you wherever you go. In some cases, contributions from your company need to &quot;vest&quot; for a certain amount of time before you get to keep the them, but usually only for a year or so. There's no real downside to contributing to a company retirement plan, even if you don't plan to be there for very long.</p> <h2>4. &quot;The Expenses Are High&quot;</h2> <p>It's very true that many investment products, including mutual funds, have high costs tied to them. It's annoying to buy funds and notice an expense ratio of more than 1%, thus reducing your potential profits. But fees are not a good enough reason to avoid investing, altogether. Over the long haul, your investments will easily rise in value and more than offset any costs. And if you direct your investments to low-cost mutual funds and ETFs, you'll likely find the fees aren't so objectionable. Look for mutual funds with expense ratios of less than 0.1%, and for those that trade without a commission.</p> <h2>5. &quot;I Need to Fund My Kids' College Education&quot;</h2> <p>Putting money aside to pay for college is a wonderful idea, but it should not be done at the expense of your own retirement. Your kids can always work to pay for college or even take out loans, if necessary. But you can't borrow for your own retirement, and you don't want to find yourself working into old age because you didn't save for yourself. In an ideal world, you can save for both college and your own retirement, but you should always think of your own retirement first.</p> <h2>6. &quot;My 401K Plan Isn't Very Good&quot; or &quot;My Company Doesn't Match Contributions&quot;</h2> <p>I'll occasionally hear someone say that they won't contribute to their retirement plan because it's a bad one. No employer match, bad investment options, or high fees can kill any motivation to save. But contributing to even a bad 401K is better than not saving at all. And if you're not thrilled with the offered 401K plan, you can take a look at traditional or Roth IRAs, or even stocks and mutual funds in taxable accounts. There are many bad retirement plans out there, but they are almost all better than nothing.</p> <h2>6. &quot;I Don't Understand Investing&quot;</h2> <p>There's no question that investing can be a very intimidating thing. It takes a while to grasp even the basics of how to invest, and the number of investment products can be bewildering. Don't let fear hold you back from achieving your dreams in retirement. These days, there's a lot of great free information about investing that can help you get started. And many discount brokerages, such as Fidelity, offer free advice if you have an account. Certified Financial Planners are also plentiful &mdash; and often reasonably priced &mdash; and can help you establish a plan to save for retirement and keep you on track.</p> <h2>7. &quot;I Don't Earn Enough&quot;</h2> <p>It's definitely hard to think about retirement when you're having trouble making ends meet now. But it's important to recognize setting aside even a modest amount of money each month can help you achieve financial freedom. Consider that even $25 a month into an index fund can grow to tens of thousands of dollars after 30 years.</p> <h2>8. &quot;I'm Young &mdash; I Have Plenty of Time&quot;</h2> <p>If you're not saving for retirement when you're young, you are costing your future self a lot of money. Thanks to the magic of compound interest and earnings, someone who begins saving in their early 20s can really see big gains over time. If you have $10,000 at age 20 and begin setting aside $200 a month until age 65, you'll have nearly a million dollars, based on an average market return. But if you wait until age 35, you'll end up with barely one-third of that.</p> <h2>9. &quot;It's Too Late for Me&quot;</h2> <p>It's true that the earlier you start investing, the more money you'll likely end up with. But hope is not entirely lost for those who are approaching retirement age but have not saved. Even five to 10 years of aggressive saving and the right investments can result in a nice nest egg. Older people can take advantage of higher limits on contributions to retirement plans including IRAs and 401Ks.</p> <h2>10. &quot;I'll Get Social Security&quot;</h2> <p>You've been contributing to Social Security all your life, but that doesn't mean it guarantees a comfortable retirement. A typical Social Security benefit these days is about $1,300 a month. That's enough to keep you from starving, but you won't be able to do much else. Moreover, concerns over federal budget deficits suggest there is no guarantee of Social Security funds being available when you retire. For certain, there is constant talk by lawmakers of entitlement reform, which could mean to lower benefits or other changes.</p> <p><em>What's your excuse for not saving for retirement?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/tim-lemke">Tim Lemke</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/stop-making-these-10-bogus-retirement-savings-excuses">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-signs-you-arent-saving-enough-for-retirement">10 Signs You Aren&#039;t Saving Enough for Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-steps-to-starting-a-retirement-plan-in-your-30s">8 Steps to Starting a Retirement Plan in Your 30s</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-to-strengthen-your-finances-before-retirement">5 Ways to Strengthen Your Finances Before Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-plan-for-retirement-when-you-re-ready-to-retire">How to Plan for Retirement When You’re Ready to Retire</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-guarantee-income-in-retirement">6 Ways to Guarantee Income in Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Retirement 401k compound interest excuses IRA pensions savings social security Mon, 08 Feb 2016 18:00:05 +0000 Tim Lemke 1649873 at http://www.wisebread.com How Much Can You Afford to Spend in Retirement? http://www.wisebread.com/how-much-can-you-afford-to-spend-in-retirement <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-much-can-you-afford-to-spend-in-retirement" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/retirement_fund_money_000049360888.jpg" alt="Figuring out how much you spend in retirement each year" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>You've finally reached retirement. Your days of fighting rush hour traffic to get to the office are over. But now you face a new challenge: How much of your retirement savings should you spend each year? It's a big question: Spend too much and you might find yourself out of money 10, 15, or 20 years into retirement.</p> <p>&quot;There are different ways to approach retirement spending,&quot; says Celandra Deane-Bess, chair of the national practice group on retirement for Philadelphia, Pennsylvania-based PNC Financial Services Group. &quot;As you get closer to retirement age, we recommend that you take a more detailed look at your income and your living situation. There are so many factors that can alter how much you can afford to spend each year in retirement.&quot;</p> <p>Planning your retirement spending isn't something you can do with a simple formula, though the following formulas can give you a starting point.</p> <h2>Inflation and the 60%&ndash;90% Rule</h2> <p>Deane-Bess says that many retirees plan for their annual cost of living, because of inflation, to rise 2% to 3% each year. That's a good starting point. But she also pointed to research showing that some costs of living are growing faster than the rate of inflation. This includes one of the major ones that impact retirees: health care costs.</p> <p>Retirees will need to adjust that annual cost-of-living increase upward to account for the rise in healthcare costs, including the rising costs of prescription medications.</p> <p>One rule of thumb that retirees have long followed is that they should spend from 60% to 90% of their after-tax annual income each year in retirement. So, if you were earning $50,000 each year before you retired and you had an effective tax rate of 15%, you were living on $42,500 after taxes each year.</p> <p>If you decide that you need to spend 85% of your most recent after-tax yearly income in retirement, you'd need to have $36,125 available to you each year after retirement. You can generate that yearly income from your savings, pensions, Social Security, and any other regular streams of income you might have.</p> <p>Again, though, this is only a general rule of thumb. You can change how much of your pre-retirement income you'll actually need during your retirement years, Deane-Bess said. If you move to a less expensive home or community, for example, you might need to spend 60% of your pre-retirement income each year. If you live in a higher-cost area, you might need to spend the full 90% each year.</p> <h2>The 4% Rule</h2> <p>Another rule of thumb? The 4% rule. This rule says that you should withdraw 4% of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-steps-to-starting-a-retirement-plan-in-your-30s">your retirement-savings</a> portfolio in the first year of retirement for your living expenses. You should then withdraw that same dollar amount, plus enough extra income to account for inflation, every other year of retirement.</p> <p>It's important to note, though, that this formula rests on the assumption that your retirement will last 30 years. If you're particularly healthy, and you might be retired for more than three decades, you might have to withdraw fewer dollars each year to make your money last.</p> <h2>Expect Some Expenses to Rise</h2> <p>&quot;People often forget that there are actually a few expenses in retirement that go up,&quot; Deane-Bess says. &quot;Everyone assumes that their expenses will go down in retirement. But not all of them do.&quot;</p> <p>For instance, if you are going to be home more often after retirement, your utility bills will typically rise. That's because your heat will be on all day and you'll be using more electricity because you'll be home more often.</p> <p>Some retirees also spend more on leisure, entertainment, or travel during their after-work years. Instead of taking one big trip a year, they might plan on taking two or three. They might take more frequent smaller trips to see their grandchildren.</p> <p>The takeaway? You need to look at your own retirement plans &mdash; where you'll be living, what you'll be doing &mdash; when deciding how much money you can afford to spend each year. Start with the rules of thumb, but tweak them to meet your needs.</p> <p>For instance, Deane-Bess said that retirees who want to travel frequently or live in a higher-cost community might need to withdraw just 2.5% to 3% of their savings portfolio every year.</p> <p>&quot;We are starting to see a pullback from some of the rules of thumb,&quot; Deane-Bess says. &quot;I have been in the industry for 18 years. When I started, there were lots of rules of thumb. But things are changing. Today, it's about taking a more detailed look at your individual retirement plans.&quot;</p> <p><em>How much do you plan to spend in retirement?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dan-rafter">Dan Rafter</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-much-can-you-afford-to-spend-in-retirement">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-4"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-states-with-the-lowest-taxes-for-retirees">7 States With the Lowest Taxes for Retirees</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-reasons-why-your-retirement-cost-calculations-may-be-wrong">8 Reasons Why Your Retirement Cost Calculations May Be Wrong</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/retire-for-half-the-cost-in-these-5-countries">Retire for Half the Cost in These 5 Countries</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-sites-and-apps-to-help-you-track-your-spending-and-stick-to-your-budget">10 Sites and Apps to Help You Track Your Spending and Stick to Your Budget</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-things-your-boomer-parents-could-afford-that-you-cant">8 Things Your Boomer Parents Could Afford That You Can&#039;t</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Retirement cost of living expenses inflation social security spending Thu, 05 Nov 2015 11:15:12 +0000 Dan Rafter 1605094 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Ways to Guarantee Income in Retirement http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-guarantee-income-in-retirement <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-ways-to-guarantee-income-in-retirement" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/roth_ira_401k_000008885505.jpg" alt="Learning how to guarantee income in retirement" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>There's nothing like having the peace of mind and security that comes from knowing you'll have steady income throughout retirement. Unless you're expecting a guaranteed pension, or know that your social security insurance (SSI) payments will be sufficient, there's little way of knowing you won't outlive your savings. Whether you're retirement age and have <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-enjoy-retirement-if-you-havent-saved-enough">not saved enough</a> or simply exploring your options, here are six ways that you can guarantee income in retirement.</p> <h2>1. Pensions</h2> <p>If you or someone you know works for the federal government, you're probably familiar with pension plans. Pensions are similar to <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-to-boost-your-401k-returns">401K plans</a> in that employers match up to 25% of your contributions in some cases, but pensions also offer <em>guaranteed</em> income after retirement. The two most common types of plans are defined benefit (DB) and defined contribution (DC) plans. DB plans pay out a fixed benefit while payouts from DC plans are determined based on the investment's performance. Both plans will require that your tenure is extended in the period before retiring.</p> <h2>2. Social Security Insurance</h2> <p>As long as you've worked for at least 10 years and earn 40 credits, you'll qualify for SSI benefits once you reach retirement age (age 66 for most). In 2015, the IRS says that for every $1,250 you earn, you <a href="http://www.ssa.gov/pubs/EN-05-10072.pdf">accumulate one credit</a> and can earn a maximum of four a year. Credits never disappear even if you take an extended leave of absence and return to work or change jobs. Per credit earnings will rise with wage increases. Estimated by today's calculations, you would need to have earned at least $5,000 per year for 10 years, or $50,000 in wages to qualify for SSI.</p> <h2>3. Retirement and Investment Accounts</h2> <p>Even if the assets within your retirement portfolio (stocks, bonds, CDs, ETFs, etc.) have accumulated enough wealth that your annual withdrawals will meet your income needs, you should still make certain that your yearly returns can outpace inflation (averaging 3% annually). If not, you could suddenly find yourself having to live drastically below your means. For example, if at age 65 you have a nest egg of $1,000,000 and start taking annual withdrawals of 5% (or $50,000), you'd need an annual return of over 8% in order to replenish your coffers.</p> <h2>4. Annuity</h2> <p>If you need the type of guaranteed income assurance that retirement accounts and investment portfolios cannot provide, then you need an annuity. Annuities guarantee a monthly or annual payout for as long as you're alive. There are two types of annuities: fixed income and variable income. With fixed annuities, the money you invest today is guaranteed a predefined payout. Variable annuity payouts are based on the performance of your investment (if gains are realized, payouts will be higher). Payouts can begin at whatever age you choose, and continue for the rest of your life, or for a predetermined term.</p> <h2>5. Reverse Mortgage</h2> <p>A reverse mortgage is a type of home equity loan which pays out an annuity-like cash stream based on your home's accumulated equity. Typically, reverse mortgages are reserved for borrowers age 62 or older. The money borrowed can be paid out as one lump sum payment, or issued in installments for the life of the loan. But reverse mortgages are known for their high fees and aren't always a good deal, especially if you wish to retain or pass-on ownership of your home.</p> <h2>6. Longevity Insurance</h2> <p>Longevity insurance is an insurance contract that guarantees the money invested today will generate payments in retirement. As with other forms of guaranteed income, the longer you wait to start taking payments, the higher annual payouts will be. These products allow investors to make a lump sum initial investment (or smaller amounts over time) in order to receive guaranteed payments later. For example, if a woman aged 45 invested $50,000 today, she could start taking payments at 65 and receive roughly $7,650 in annual income for the rest of her life.</p> <p>Of course, the best approach to retirement income is generally asset diversification. The more income streams you can draw on, the less likely you'll be to ever run out.</p> <p><em>What steps are you taking to guarantee retirement income?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/qiana-chavaia">Qiana Chavaia</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-guarantee-income-in-retirement">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-5"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/stop-making-these-10-bogus-retirement-savings-excuses">Stop Making These 10 Bogus Retirement Savings Excuses</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-plan-for-retirement-when-you-re-ready-to-retire">How to Plan for Retirement When You’re Ready to Retire</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-retirement-rules-you-should-be-breaking">6 Retirement Rules You Should Be Breaking</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-much-do-i-need-to-retire-how-much-can-i-spend">How much do I need to retire? How much can I spend?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-signs-you-arent-saving-enough-for-retirement">10 Signs You Aren&#039;t Saving Enough for Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Retirement 401k annuties longevity insurance pensions reverse mortgage social security Tue, 27 Oct 2015 13:16:59 +0000 Qiana Chavaia 1599240 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Plan for Retirement When You’re Ready to Retire http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-plan-for-retirement-when-you-re-ready-to-retire <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-plan-for-retirement-when-you-re-ready-to-retire" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/piggy_bank_wearing_glasses_000066017397.jpg" alt="Learning how to plan for retirement at the age of retirement" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Americans nearing retirement age are faced with challenges that can make saving for retirement doubly difficult. Though you ideally should've already accumulated most of your retirement assets by now, the majority of the middle-aged population have a significant retirement savings shortfall. In a survey conducted by the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, 19% of respondents aged 54 to 64 reported <a href="https://www.americanprogress.org/issues/economy/report/2015/01/26/105394/the-reality-of-the-retirement-crisis/">not having any retirement savings</a> at all.</p> <p><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5171/Screen%20Shot%202015-10-12%20at%203.18.12%20PM.png" width="605" height="288" alt="" /></p> <p>Many people in this age bracket find themselves in this position due to providing support for others. This is the stage in life where it's common to have kids in college or aging parents that you have to care for &mdash; typical setbacks for this chapter of life. But your retirement fund doesn't have to suffer. Here's how to beef it up in time for retirement.</p> <h2>1. Simplify and Live Like a Retiree</h2> <p>Retirees often have simpler lifestyles &mdash; they drive older cars, shop less often, and typically don't pay rent because their homes are paid off. And if you're approaching retirement, you should think of adopting this simpler lifestyle, too. If you don't already own your home or vehicle outright, then it's time to seriously cut discretionary expenditures and focus on paying off your core assets. Your home is perhaps your most valuable asset and biggest expense, so pay it off as soon as possible. Then, pay-off large ticket items you will need in retirement, like automobiles. The money you save after these are fully paid should be put into retirement accounts.</p> <p>Fortunately, simplifying gets easier as we age. Many of us naturally opt for a simpler lifestyle, anyhow. Some easy areas where you might simplify expenses in order to boost retirement savings include:</p> <ul> <li>Limiting expensive vacations or frequent eating out.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Cutting gym memberships and cable or magazine subscriptions.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Driving less often and eliminating unneeded car insurance.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Avoiding the purchase of unnecessary electronics or other big-ticket items.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Cutting back on costly hobbies.</li> </ul> <p>Remember, even a savings of $100&ndash;$200/month can make a significant impact on your retirement bottom line, so get frugal today in order to relax more comfortably into retirement.</p> <h2>2. Delay Retirement</h2> <p>Don't quit your day job, and wait an extra three to seven years before retiring. If you've already retired, consider going back to work and delaying Social Security benefits. The difference between retiring at age 65 instead of 70 can be hundreds of dollars per month in SSI savings and many thousands more in your retirement accounts. In fact, your yearly SSI benefits increase 8% for every year you delay retirement. Calculate the difference for yourself using the government's <a href="http://www.ssa.gov/oact/anypia/anypia.html">SSI benefits calculator</a>.</p> <p>Another way to boost retirement savings: Work while receiving partial SSI benefits (more on this below), allowing you to stash more cash away. In 2015, those 66 and over can earn up to $41, 880 per year without impacting SSI payments. Those under age 66 can earn a maximum of $15,720 while receiving SSI checks.</p> <h2>3. Make Catch-Up Contributions</h2> <p>Worried about a paltry retirement savings account? Individuals age 50 and over are entitled to make heartier <a href="http://www.irs.gov/Retirement-Plans/Plan-Participant,-Employee/Retirement-Topics-Catch-Up-Contributions">catch-up contributions</a> to their retirement accounts in order to more quickly bolster their savings. For IRAs, the 2015 catch-up limit is an additional $1,000 (for an annual total of $6,500), while 401K plan contributions are an additional $6,000 (total of $24,000). And don't forget to use bonuses, tax-returns, gifts, earned, and extra income to fund your accounts.</p> <h2>4. Purchase Income-Producing Assets</h2> <p>Common income-producing assets include stocks, bonds, CDs, and deferred annuities &mdash; but also side businesses or real estate. These investments can guarantee passive income in retirement, so setting these up now can help boost your cash flow during your golden years. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-retirees-are-using-annuities-instead-of-early-social-security?ref=seealso">Why Retirees Are Using Annuities Instead of Early Social Security</a>)</p> <p>Consider whether divesting some non income-producing assets in favor of income-producing ones is feasible in your situation. For example, could selling your extra vehicle enable you to put a down payment on a rental property? Or, do you own gold that could be put into income-producing stocks or bonds, instead? Finally, are there any side businesses which you can comfortably invest in for passive income?</p> <p>Preparing for retirement as you're approaching retirement age (or already there) can seem a daunting task, but a little ingenuity and frugality goes a long way.</p> <p><strong>Note: </strong>The Social Security Administration recommends that if you are going to delay retirement benefits you should <a href="http://www.ssa.gov/planners/retire/justmedicare.html">sign up for Medicare</a> at age 65.</p> <p><em>How robust is your retirement savings?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/qiana-chavaia">Qiana Chavaia</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-plan-for-retirement-when-you-re-ready-to-retire">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-6"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/stop-making-these-10-bogus-retirement-savings-excuses">Stop Making These 10 Bogus Retirement Savings Excuses</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-steps-to-starting-a-retirement-plan-in-your-30s">8 Steps to Starting a Retirement Plan in Your 30s</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-sep-ira-is-how-the-self-employed-do-retirement-like-a-boss">The SEP-IRA Is How the Self-Employed Do Retirement Like a BOSS</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-to-strengthen-your-finances-before-retirement">5 Ways to Strengthen Your Finances Before Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/delayed-gratification-and-the-secret-to-will-power">Delayed Gratification and the Secret to Will Power</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Retirement 401k benefits catch-up contributions savings social security ssi Fri, 16 Oct 2015 13:00:48 +0000 Qiana Chavaia 1589897 at http://www.wisebread.com 4 Reasons Early Retirement Might Be Financially Risky http://www.wisebread.com/4-reasons-early-retirement-might-be-financially-risky <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/4-reasons-early-retirement-might-be-financially-risky" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/000017275515.jpg" alt="Learning why early retirement might be a financial risk" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>&quot;The money's no better in retirement &mdash; but the hours are!&quot; So goes a popular saying.</p> <p>Maybe that's why many dream of retiring early. A March 2015 study of Americans with investible assets of $1 million or more found that that most of them planned to <a href="http://money.usnews.com/money/retirement/articles/2015/04/07/tales-of-early-retirement-the-path-3-people-took">retire by age 56</a>, and a whopping 20% of them by age 40.</p> <p>However, early retirement &mdash; even for those with a $1 million nest egg &mdash; might be financially risky. Here are four reasons why.</p> <h2>1. Reduced Social Security Benefits</h2> <p>Nine out of 10 Americans age 65 or older <a href="http://www.ssa.gov/news/press/basicfact.html">receive Social Security benefits</a>. For those that receive Social Security, they count on those payments to cover about 38% of their income during retirement.</p> <p>While you can start receiving your Social Security benefits as early as age 62, you should wait a couple more years. For those born in 1960 or later, you would <a href="http://www.ssa.gov/oact/ProgData/ar_drc.html">receive only 70%</a> of your full retirement benefit by retiring at age 62.</p> <p>To receive your full retirement benefit, you need to retire by your full retirement age (age 67 for those born 1960 or later) as determined by the Social Security Administration. However, by waiting until age 70 to retire, depending on your year of birth, you can receive up to 132.5% of your full retirement benefits. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-exciting-affordable-american-cities-to-retire-in?ref=seealso">4 Exciting, Affordable American Cities to Retire In</a>)</p> <h2>2. Early 401(k) Withdrawal Penalties</h2> <p>By socking away as much as possible and taking advantage of employer matches, you can build such a strong 401(k) plan, you'll be tempted to retire in your late 50s.</p> <p>Hold that thought.</p> <p>In 2014, 401(k) plans were <a href="https://www.ici.org/policy/retirement/plan/401k/faqs_401k">18% of the $24 trillion</a> in U.S. retirement assets. From 2004 to 2010, penalized 401(k) withdrawals increased from <a href="http://business.time.com/2013/01/23/cash-leaking-out-of-401k-plans-at-alarming-rate/">$36 billion to about $60 billion</a>. If this trend continues, then retirees may not receive the full share of their 401(k) plans.</p> <p>Taking early distributions from your 401(k) before you reach age 59&frac12; is a bad idea for several reasons:</p> <ul> <li>On top of applicable income taxes, you're liable for a 10% additional tax on those early distributions.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>To avoid that 10% tax penalty, you would have to take retirement payments under a <a href="http://www.irs.gov/Retirement-Plans/Retirement-Plans-FAQs-regarding-Substantially-Equal-Periodic-Payments">substantially equal periodic payments</a> program, which are not only very complicated to set up, but can also cause cash crunches.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>All of your outstanding loans from your 401(k) plan become taxable income and are also subject to the additional 10% early distribution tax.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Outstanding 401(k) loan balances can't be rolled into any eligible retirement plan.</li> </ul> <p>This is just one of the many <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-dumb-401k-mistakes-smart-people-make">dumb 401(k) mistakes</a> smart people make.</p> <h2>3. Subpar Nest Egg</h2> <p>By deciding to retire early, you can say goodbye to a bigger nest egg.</p> <p>Assuming you were contributing $400 every month to your 401(k) with a 5% rate of return compounded annually, here are some examples of how much you would forego by retiring early:</p> <ul> <li>One year earlier: $4,929.03</li> <li>Three years earlier: $15,538.77</li> <li>Five years earlier: $27,236.01</li> <li>Seven years earlier: $40,132.21</li> <li>10 years earlier: $61,996.82</li> </ul> <p>The bigger your monthly contribution and the higher your plan's rate of return, the larger your nest egg&hellip; could have been! And let's not forget that these calculations don't include additional contributions:</p> <ul> <li>Employer matches (average American foregoes $1,336 per year or extra 2.4% in retirement savings);<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Potential windfalls (e.g. commissions, end-of-year bonuses); and<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Catch-up contributions starting age 50 (<a href="http://www.irs.gov/Retirement-Plans/Plan-Participant,-Employee/Retirement-Topics-Catch-Up-Contributions">$6,000 per year</a> in 2015).</li> </ul> <h2>4. Higher Chance of Empty Retirement Fund</h2> <p>There's good news and bad news.</p> <p>First, the good news: Americans are living longer. In 1990, the life expectancy for men and women were age 71.8 and 78.8, respectively. Nowadays, those number are <a href="http://www.ssa.gov/planners/lifeexpectancy.html">age 84.3 and 86.6</a>, respectively. Our life expectancy is so good that about 10% of current 65-year old Americans will live past age 95!</p> <p>Now, the bad news: a longer life expectancy means that your nest egg may run out. For many years, $1 million used to be the goal for most retirement plans. If you make withdrawals from your nest egg using the suggested 4% annual rate, you will <a href="http://www.bankrate.com/finance/retirement/retirement-statistics-1.aspx">run out of retirement funds</a> within 25 years. Under this scenario, by retiring early by age 55, you could run out of retirement monies by age 80!</p> <p>Adapting to a very thrifty lifestyle (&quot;What? No summer cruise to the Bahamas!&quot;) may not be possible for some early retirees. Especially those who worked really hard to build up those $1 million nest eggs.</p> <p>The reality is that early retirement requires careful planning and persistent saving. To prevent such a retirement catastrophe, many registered investment advisors are recommending Millennials set a goal of <a href="http://money.usnews.com/money/retirement/articles/2011/09/15/gen-ys-2-million-retirement-price-tag">at least $2 million</a> for their retirement savings. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-facts-millennials-should-know-about-retirement-planning?ref=seealso">5 Facts Millennials Should Know About Retirement Planning</a>)</p> <p><em>Do you know any stories about people who successfully retired early? Please share them in the comments below</em><strong><em>.</em></strong></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/damian-davila">Damian Davila</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-reasons-early-retirement-might-be-financially-risky">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-7"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/follow-these-5-steps-to-full-health-care-coverage-in-retirement">Follow These 5 Steps to Full Health Care Coverage in Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-facts-millennials-should-know-about-retirement-planning">5 Facts Millennials Should Know About Retirement Planning</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-states-with-the-lowest-taxes-for-retirees">7 States With the Lowest Taxes for Retirees</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-retirement-rules-you-should-be-breaking">6 Retirement Rules You Should Be Breaking</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-taking-social-security-could-cost-you-thousands">Why Taking Social Security Could Cost You Thousands</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Retirement 401(k) early retirement millennials nest egg social security Mon, 24 Aug 2015 13:00:26 +0000 Damian Davila 1531825 at http://www.wisebread.com 7 States With the Lowest Taxes for Retirees http://www.wisebread.com/7-states-with-the-lowest-taxes-for-retirees <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/7-states-with-the-lowest-taxes-for-retirees" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/island_beach_000022850516.jpg" alt="States with lowest taxes for retirees" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>For retirees living on fixed incomes, taxes can be burdensome and impact quality of life during retirement. Many <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-retirement-rules-you-should-be-breaking">financially savvy retirees</a> move to states like Florida, not just for the sunshine, but to reap the economic benefits of low taxation. Florida is one of seven no-income tax states and makes the list of states with a marginal federal and state tax rate of under 25%.</p> <p>Consider these seven states with the lowest retirement tax burden.</p> <h2>1. Alaska</h2> <p><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5171/bear_alaska_000034056692.jpg" width="605" height="340" alt="" /></p> <p>Sure, Alaska is a little lacking in the sun and warm weather many retirees seem to favor, but the state's lenient tax policies might make you want to pick up and move there, anyhow. State residents are exempt from retirement income tax, and only 24 of its 164 municipalities levy a property tax. And it gets better: Those 65 years and older residing within one of these 24 communities are exempt from property taxes on the first $150,000 of their home's assessed value. To top it all off, there is either no or low sales tax. Of the 107 municipalities reporting sales tax, the rate ranges from a low 1%&ndash;7% (typically 2%&ndash;5%).</p> <h2>2. Florida</h2> <p><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5171/miami_beach_florida_000037761516.jpg" width="605" height="340" alt="" /></p> <p>While Florida residents enjoy no tax on retirement income, they can't escape the burden of property taxes. Florida ranks 23 out of 50 of states with the highest property tax rates. Miami Dade County, with it's sprawling luxury oceanfront condos that attract wealthy foreign investors, ranks highest with an average 1.02% of median home value, while property taxes in densely populated Dixie County (population: 16,422) are the lowest at .51% of median home value. Residents 65 years and older qualify for a $50,000 property tax exemption on their properties. Sales taxes in Florida aren't astronomical &mdash; at 6% since 1988, but they can swing as high as 7.5%.</p> <h2>3. Nevada</h2> <p><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5171/nevada_000025827739.jpg" width="605" height="340" alt="" /></p> <p>Far removed in spirit from the glitz and glamor of the Las Vegas Strip, many retirees set their sights on the city's quieter suburbs. The state's tax burden ranks second-lowest in the nation. Nevada has no income or inheritance tax and the cost of living is relatively low compared to neighboring states. Plus, the Nevada housing market has not fully rebounded from the 2008 crisis, which means home buyers can still get a good deals.</p> <h2>4. South Dakota</h2> <p><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5171/south_dakota_000012547520.jpg" width="605" height="340" alt="" /></p> <p>The tax structure in the Midwestern state of South Dakota is one of the most favorable in the country. South Dakota does not levy a tax on retirement income, inheritances, and estates. Sales taxes are relatively low compared to other areas in the region at 4%, but it can swing as high as 6% in some municipalities. The median home price is roughly $126,000. The only downside to retiring in South Dakota is it's inclement winter weather, but it's great in the summer, especially if you love the outdoors.</p> <h2>5. Texas</h2> <p><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5171/texas_scenery_000038884690.jpg" width="605" height="340" alt="" /></p> <p>Good ole' Texas, the Lone Star State &mdash; and my hometown state. Texas is a great place to live for a number of reasons. But the number one is that there's no tax on personal income. The sales and use tax is a bit on the high-end at roughly 8.25%. Property taxes vary by county and range from $0.24 to $0.50 per $100 valuation with median home prices at $160,000 in Dallas and $158,000 in Houston. Persons 65 and older qualify for a $10,000 homestead exemption for school taxes, in addition to a $15,000 exemption for all homeowners.</p> <h2>6. Washington</h2> <p><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u11/washington_000006960866.jpg" width="605" height="341" alt="" /></p> <p>Washington, with its vast terrain and beautiful landscapes, has no income tax. The sales tax rate is 6.5% &mdash; as high as 9.5% in some areas. Property taxes vary by county with King County residents paying the most &mdash; around $4,507 per year and Lewis County residents paying the least &mdash;around $474 per year. The median home value is $270,400. If you decide to make Washington your primary residence, as a person 65 and up, you could qualify for <a href="http://www.dor.wa.gov/Content/FindTaxesAndRates/PropertyTax/IncentivePrograms.aspx">additional property tax exemptions</a>.&nbsp;</p> <h2>7. Wyoming</h2> <p><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u11/wyoming_000026149821.jpg" width="605" height="340" alt="" /></p> <p>Wyoming ranks first on the Tax Foundation's 2015 Business Tax Climate Index because of no tax on personal or corporate income, low sales tax of 4%, and low property tax. Median home prices are $103,000. And though the cost of living is already low, the state of Wyoming has no excise tax, which means you won't pay an additional levy on items like food and gasoline.</p> <p>Two other states worth considering are New Hampshire and Tennessee. The state of New Hampshire has no income tax and 0% sales tax, but there's a 5% tax on dividend and interest income and property taxes are the third highest in the nation. Tennessee does not impose income tax but has what's called a &quot;hall tax&quot; of 6% on dividend and interest income. And its sales tax of 7%, as high as 9.75% in some municipalities, ranks highest in the nation due to the complexity of local and special purpose taxes that are levied in addition to the sales and use tax.</p> <p><em>What low-tax retirement destinations are you considering?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/qiana-chavaia">Qiana Chavaia</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-states-with-the-lowest-taxes-for-retirees">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-8"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/follow-these-5-steps-to-full-health-care-coverage-in-retirement">Follow These 5 Steps to Full Health Care Coverage in Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-reasons-early-retirement-might-be-financially-risky">4 Reasons Early Retirement Might Be Financially Risky</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/if-you-want-your-401k-to-grow-stop-doing-these-6-things">If You Want Your 401K to Grow, Stop Doing These 6 Things</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-much-can-you-afford-to-spend-in-retirement">How Much Can You Afford to Spend in Retirement?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-retirement-rules-you-should-be-breaking">6 Retirement Rules You Should Be Breaking</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Retirement 401(k) cost of living fixed incomes moving social security taxes Tue, 23 Jun 2015 13:00:18 +0000 Qiana Chavaia 1460740 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Retirement Rules You Should Be Breaking http://www.wisebread.com/6-retirement-rules-you-should-be-breaking <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-retirement-rules-you-should-be-breaking" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_gardening_000022104123.jpg" alt="Woman breaking common retirement rules" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Are there right and wrong ways to retire? While that's a relative question, there are retirement rules that are in your best interest to follow &mdash; and those you might want to break. Consider these six <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-reasons-why-your-retirement-cost-calculations-may-be-wrong">retirement rules</a> you might be better off ignoring.</p> <h2>1. Depending on a Pension or Social Security</h2> <p>Counting on a pension or Social Security to help you ride out your retirement years? That's probably not the best strategy to have, considering that very few companies still offer pensions (though you'd know if yours does) and Social Security is still in crisis (so much so that it might be bankrupt and not even exist by the time you retire). That's not to mention that inflation is likely to outpace your per-month payouts in the off chance that you do receive these income sources.</p> <p>You may need to think of other ways to fund your retirement &mdash; and it's in your best interest to start planning for it now (or better yet, <em>yesterday</em>).</p> <p>Brent Cumberford, founder of the personal-finance blog&nbsp;<a href="http://www.vosa.com">VOSA</a>, offers a few suggestions.</p> <p>&quot;Start your own retirement accounts; invest in business to generate a second &mdash; and third and fourth &mdash; stream of income; and hustle to make some extra money on the side to kick start your retirement savings,&quot; he says.</p> <p>Putting in the extra time and effort early on to pad your retirement account for later means you might actually be able to enjoy those golden years.</p> <h2>2. Withdrawing From Your Retirement Fund or Social Security Right Away</h2> <p>Even if you have plenty of money in your retirement fund (or think you do, as is the likelier scenario), that doesn't mean you should start withdrawing from it the day after your retirement party. Proceed with caution in this case and remember that you still have a long life ahead of you.</p> <p>&quot;One retirement rule that no longer makes sense is the one that suggests a 4% annual withdrawal rate on your retirement portfolio,&quot; observes personal finance expert David Bakke of MoneyCrashers. &quot;Americans are living longer these days, and if you go by that rule you might outlive your money. Your best bet is to withdraw as little as possible in the beginning and adjust your strategy as you see how things are progressing as you get acclimated to living off of your retirement money.&quot;</p> <p>Bakke says that waiting to withdrawal money from Social Security has its benefits too, as you may receive a larger annual Social Security benefit when you wait.</p> <h2>3. Going Full Retirement Because You Think You Have To</h2> <p>Just because the government says you can retire at age 65 doesn't mean that you have to resign the rest of your life to whiling away the hours. Instead &mdash; if you're still willing and able &mdash; consider semi-retirement. It's the best of both worlds really: You can still contribute to society as a part-time member of the workforce, and you can enjoy more leisure time as a result of your shorter work schedule.</p> <p>More and more older Americans are opting for semi-retirement, in fact. Some are even opting for a new career path altogether. Continuing to work at least part-time past retirement age will not only help you feel like you still have something to offer the world, but it also helps you to continue to actively build your retirement fund &mdash; or at least maintain it at its current level.</p> <p>Elle Kaplan, CEO and founder of an asset management firm, touches a bit more on the financial benefits of semi-retirement.</p> <p>&quot;How would a semi-retirement change your financial reality?&quot; she asks. &quot;Take two months and track the money coming in and going out. Keep track of what you spend and all your bills. This will give you a clear sense of where you stand. Next, figure out what your Social Security payment is going to be each month in retirement. The Social Security Administration will provide this information and tell you how much you'll get based on what age you retire. Working even a few more years can have a huge impact.&quot;</p> <h2>4. Waiting Until You're 65 to Retire</h2> <p>Retirement age is typically specified at 65 years old in the United States. But to heck with that! Wouldn't you like to retire earlier?</p> <p>Of course, you'll probably need to strike it rich &mdash; or live <em>very</em> meagerly &mdash; in order to hang up your work boots in advance of the government-issued go-ahead. But maybe not. Have you ever thought about short-term mini-retirements? Ever even heard of the concept?</p> <p>&quot;Obviously it would be awesome if everyone could earn a fortune, retire young, and travel the world, but it's not going to happen for everyone,&quot; Cumberford says. &quot;What can happen for almost everyone is short-term mini-retirements, a concept spoken about in greater detail by Tim Ferriss in&nbsp;<a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0307465357/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=0307465357&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=YIR4QCCLJFO4ATW3">The 4-Hour Workweek</a>. Saving money specifically for a short sabbatical, or even just an extended vacation while keeping your current employment can typically be negotiated. Think five weeks in Southeast Asia, or a summer backpacking across Europe. With the virtually endless amount of airline and hotel points that can be earned through travel hacking, even far away places can be very affordable.&quot;</p> <p>As someone who has hosted lots of Australian guests who are allotted at least six weeks vacation every year, I'm not only envious, but also in favor of the idea of short-term mini-retirements. While they're working to live, we Americans are living to work (well into our golden years), and that's an outlook that could use some rethinking. Shouldn't we enjoy a high-quality lifestyle throughout our lifetime instead of when we're darn near dead?</p> <h2>5. Clinging to the Family Home</h2> <p>For many of us, our homes hold a lot of memories that make it hard to part with the house &mdash; even after the kids are grown and gone. But as you enter retirement, it's not a great idea to hang on to a large space with high utilities or even a mortgage that will become more and more difficult to manage as you age. The alternative is to downsize, of course, such as a smaller house or apartment, or even alternative-living situations that may suit you even more &mdash; like an RV, for instance.</p> <p>Janet Groene, author of&nbsp;<a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/007178473X/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=007178473X&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=P2WLK6WDV5V7MKUB">Living Aboard Your RV, 4th Edition</a>, lived in an RV for 10 years before settling in Florida, and she's a staunch advocate for the nomad lifestyle.</p> <p>&quot;By selling out and moving into an RV, retirees fulfill their dreams of travel and at the same time live comfortably in a fully equipped home on wheels while scouting for the right place to settle down in retirement,&quot; she encourages.</p> <h2>6. Heading South for the Winter</h2> <p>Snowbirding &mdash; the practice of northerners spending the winter in warmer climates and summers at home &mdash; is common among retirees. But isn't that just a little too passé for today's generation of leisure seekers? Mark Koep, founder of CampgroundViews.com, thinks so. Like Groene, he wants retirees to think about their living options and arrangements more in depth so they don't automatically relegate themselves to a lifestyle that isn't necessarily fulfilling.</p> <p>&quot;The old idea of snowbirding ignores the freedom and adventure that modern retirees seek,&quot; he says. &quot;Instead retirees should consider boondocking &mdash; camping in Bureau of Land Management and Forest Service lands for free &mdash; and discount membership clubs to travel and explore more destinations.&quot;</p> <p><em>Do you have other retirement rules we should be breaking? Let us know in the comments below.</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/mikey-rox">Mikey Rox</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-retirement-rules-you-should-be-breaking">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-9"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-to-boost-your-odds-of-retiring-early">5 Ways to Boost Your Odds of Retiring Early</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/stop-making-these-10-bogus-retirement-savings-excuses">Stop Making These 10 Bogus Retirement Savings Excuses</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-reasons-why-your-retirement-cost-calculations-may-be-wrong">8 Reasons Why Your Retirement Cost Calculations May Be Wrong</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-surprising-things-women-should-know-about-retirement-planning">12 Surprising Things Women Should Know About Retirement Planning</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/follow-these-5-steps-to-full-health-care-coverage-in-retirement">Follow These 5 Steps to Full Health Care Coverage in Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Retirement 401(k) pensions rules savings social security Wed, 17 Jun 2015 11:00:11 +0000 Mikey Rox 1454606 at http://www.wisebread.com 8 Reasons Why Your Retirement Cost Calculations May Be Wrong http://www.wisebread.com/8-reasons-why-your-retirement-cost-calculations-may-be-wrong <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/8-reasons-why-your-retirement-cost-calculations-may-be-wrong" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/retirement_piggy_bank_000018686866.jpg" alt="retirement cost calculations that might be wrong" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Saving for retirement is tricky, in part because you don't really have a clear idea of how much money you'll need when you stop working. There are many variables to consider, and a lot of our assumptions about the <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-surprising-things-women-should-know-about-retirement-planning">cost of retired life</a> may also be incorrect.</p> <p>The best way to deal with this uncertainty is to simply save and invest as early and as much as you can. But in the meantime, be aware of these reasons why your retirement cost calculations may be off.</p> <h2>1. Your Overall Expenses May Be Less Than You Think</h2> <p>There's a common assumption that people should save enough to &quot;maintain their current lifestyle.&quot; But the reality is that most people start to spend less as they get older. The Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that a <a href="http://www.bls.gov/cex/22014/midyear/age.pdf">person's expenses</a> peak between ages 45 and 54 at about $62,000 annually. Then, expenses start to decline. Those older than 65 spend about $42,000 a year, on average. And those older than 75 spend just $35,000 annually.</p> <h2>2. Your Might Pay Off Your Mortgage</h2> <p>When calculating your future living expenses, are you assuming that you'll eventually own your home free and clear? BLS statistics show that while only 19% of homeowners between ages 45 and 54 live mortgage-free, that figure jumps to 35% among people aged 55 to 64. Meanwhile, two-thirds of all homeowners over 75 are living free of house debt.</p> <h2>3. You Eat Less as You Age</h2> <p>While it's nice to assume that you'll be dining on lobster tail and caviar in retirement, the truth is that older Americans decrease their food expenditure as they age. A typical person at age 50 spends roughly $8,000 annually on food, according to BLS, dropping to $5,400 by age 65. Older people also dine out less. An average 50-year old will spend $3,279 on food away from home. That will drop to just over $1,300 by age 75.</p> <h2>4. You'll Drive Less</h2> <p>Think you'll be going on a plethora of road trips in retirement? Statistics show that older people actually drive less over time and spend far less on car purchases and automotive maintenance. An American's average expenditure on transportation peaks between ages 35&ndash;44 at just under $11,000 annually. That drops to $6,700 by age 65 and $4,800 by age 75.</p> <h2>5. You're Calculating Your Social Security Payments Incorrectly</h2> <p>When you use the Social Security calculator provided by the Social Security Administration's website, you will usually receive three numbers. The first is based on age 62, or early retirement. Another is based on age 66 (full retirement), and a third number is based on age 70 (maximum benefit.) To calculate your payments correctly, you must be honest about when you think you'll need to begin collecting. It's also worth noting that some observers don't even <a href="http://www.forbes.com/sites/johnwasik/2014/06/11/why-you-shouldnt-trust-social-securitys-lowball-estimate/">trust the government's calculations</a> in the first place.</p> <h2>6. Social Security Payments May Be Adjusted in the Future</h2> <p>Younger Americans may be faced with the reality that Social Security benefits may change by the time they reach retirement age. The government openly states that by 2033, payroll taxes will only cover 77 cents for every dollar of scheduled benefits. Rest assured that whatever we <em>think</em> we'll be getting in benefits by the time we retire, the reality will change between now and then.</p> <h2>7. Your Investment Returns Won't Be as High as You Assume</h2> <p>Younger investors tend to assume that the stock market will grow at an average of about 9% per year, but may forget that investment returns could be less in later years as they move to more conservative investments. As you approach retirement age, it makes sense to put more of your money in bonds, cash, and other stable vehicles. But it's important to remember that this may impact the total amount you save.</p> <h2>8. You Are Not Calculating the Correct Length of Retirement</h2> <p>There's a rule of thumb that assumes each person should plan for a 30-year retirement. But this number is based on an average, not each individual. If you have many family members that lived into their late 90s, you may need to save more to make your money last. It's also important to extend the length of your retirement if you retire at a relatively young age. Someone who retires at age 50, for instance, could see a retirement of 40 years or more.</p> <p><em>How are you calculating your retirement needs?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/tim-lemke">Tim Lemke</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-reasons-why-your-retirement-cost-calculations-may-be-wrong">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-10"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-retirement-rules-you-should-be-breaking">6 Retirement Rules You Should Be Breaking</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dont-despair-over-small-retirement-savings">Don&#039;t Despair Over Small Retirement Savings</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-surprising-things-women-should-know-about-retirement-planning">12 Surprising Things Women Should Know About Retirement Planning</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-to-boost-your-odds-of-retiring-early">5 Ways to Boost Your Odds of Retiring Early</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/follow-these-5-steps-to-full-health-care-coverage-in-retirement">Follow These 5 Steps to Full Health Care Coverage in Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Retirement 401(k) expenses savings social security Mon, 08 Jun 2015 11:00:12 +0000 Tim Lemke 1444656 at http://www.wisebread.com Follow These 5 Steps to Full Health Care Coverage in Retirement http://www.wisebread.com/follow-these-5-steps-to-full-health-care-coverage-in-retirement <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/follow-these-5-steps-to-full-health-care-coverage-in-retirement" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/money_medicine_000044118320.jpg" alt="How to avoid healthcare shortage in retirement" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Are you sure you'll be able to afford healthcare in retirement? Positive?</p> <p>Consider this: A recent report analyzing the rising <a href="http://www.hvsfinancial.com/PublicFiles/Data_Release.pdf">out-of-pocket Medicare costs</a> estimated that people retiring 10 years from now will spend $9 of every $10 they receive from Social Security on health care, in the form of copays, supplemental insurance premiums, prescription drugs, and things not covered by Medicare such as visits to the dentist.</p> <p>This means that the cost of medical care is something everyone should factor into their <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-surprising-things-women-should-know-about-retirement-planning">retirement saving plan</a>. But this is no ordinary expense &mdash; there are specific strategies for saving for health care that can put you in a much better position in your golden years.</p> <h2>1. Maximize Your Social Security Benefits</h2> <p>&quot;The number one thing people should do &mdash; most people aren't aware of this &mdash; is optimize Social Security,&quot; says Ron Mastrogiovanni, founder of HealthView Services, which issued the alarming report.</p> <p>The main way to maximize benefits is to wait as long as possible to start receiving Social Security. A couple retiring 10 years from now at age 65 will receive $142,000 less in lifetime benefits than they would if they worked until age 67, he said.</p> <p>&quot;If you're capable of working, why would you throw away $142,000?&quot; Mastrogiovanni says.</p> <h2>2. Start a Roth IRA</h2> <p>&quot;Under Medicare, they have something called means testing; the more you earn, the more you pay,&quot; Mastrogiovanni says. &quot;Here's the kicker: Those income brackets are not indexed to inflation.&quot; That means that if the government doesn't adjust the income at which retirees are considered affluent, many middle earners of today will end up paying more once they retire.</p> <p>But not all retirement income is counted in this calculation. Money drawn from a traditional 401(k) counts, but money drawn from a Roth IRA or a Roth 401(k) doesn't. So if your regular 401(k) is building up towards a high income in retirement, you might want to divert some of your contributions to a Roth, or convert the account to a Roth, to keep your income below the level where you'll be considered an affluent retiree.</p> <h2>3. Consider a Health Savings Account</h2> <p>Health savings accounts are not generally considered a retirement savings vehicle &mdash; they are meant to help people pay high medical care deductibles with certain insurance plans. But Medicare expert Katy Votava advocates saving excess contributions to HSAs for retirement health care needs.</p> <p>&quot;You can put in significant money and it grows tax free. Most people don't need to spend their full health savings account every year to meet their full health insurance needs,&quot; Votava says.</p> <h2>4. Consider Long-Term Care Insurance</h2> <p>The high out-of-pocket costs outlined in the HealthView report do not include the cost of nursing homes or other long-term care, but those are obviously a major concern when looking at lifetime health care costs. Some advisors recommend purchasing insurance that would protect your savings if you go to a nursing home, while others warn against it. This Wall Street Journal report explores both sides of the <a href="http://www.wsj.com/articles/SB10001424052702303425504577352031401783756">long-term care insurance issue</a>.</p> <h2>5. Purchase the Right Supplemental Plan</h2> <p>Your parents or grandparents may not have had to pay anything out of pocket once they qualified for Medicare, but people retiring now and in the future need <a href="http://www.medicare.gov/supplement-other-insurance/medigap/whats-medigap.html">supplemental insurance</a> to cover the copayments, coinsurance, and deductibles that Medicare doesn't cover. You'll also have to pay for a <a href="http://www.medicare.gov/supplement-other-insurance/medigap/medigap-and-part-d/medigap-plans-and-part-d.html">prescription drug plan</a>. Choosing the right plan can be so complicated that many people turn to consultants like Votava to help them figure out which to pick. Before signing up for a plan, make sure it covers your doctors and your medications, because not all plans cover everything, Votava warns.</p> <p><em>What are you doing to ensure sufficient health care coverage in retirement?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/carrie-kirby">Carrie Kirby</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/follow-these-5-steps-to-full-health-care-coverage-in-retirement">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-states-with-the-lowest-taxes-for-retirees">7 States With the Lowest Taxes for Retirees</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-reasons-early-retirement-might-be-financially-risky">4 Reasons Early Retirement Might Be Financially Risky</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-about-a-price-list-at-the-hospital-or-doctor-s-office">How About a Price List at the Hospital or Doctor’s Office?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-reasons-why-your-retirement-cost-calculations-may-be-wrong">8 Reasons Why Your Retirement Cost Calculations May Be Wrong</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-things-you-didnt-know-about-retirement">12 Things You Didn&#039;t Know About Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Insurance Retirement 401(k) healthcare HSA medical social security Thu, 14 May 2015 15:00:09 +0000 Carrie Kirby 1416618 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Enjoy Retirement If You Haven't Saved Enough http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-enjoy-retirement-if-you-havent-saved-enough <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-enjoy-retirement-if-you-havent-saved-enough" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/retired_couple_vacation_000038250840.jpg" alt="Retired couple taking cheap vacation" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Are you ready to retire, but haven't managed to save enough yet?</p> <p>In fact, the U.S. Census Bureau of Labor Statistics says that although the average retirement age is 62, many seniors are retiring at age 65 or older, and a large percentage &mdash; roughly 80% &mdash; still will not have saved enough by then. Of them, about a third will depend entirely on Social Security benefits. If you're within five years of calling it quits but haven't saved enough to retire, here are a few steps that may bring retirement closer within reach.</p> <h2>1. Wait Until You're 65</h2> <p>Wait until you're age 65 or older before you start collecting Social Security benefits, as the longer you wait, the larger your benefit. Use Bankrate's Social Security <a href="http://www.bankrate.com/calculators/retirement/social-security-benefits-calculator.aspx">benefit calculator</a> to estimate your future payments.</p> <h2>2. Don't Wait to Downsize</h2> <p>Consider selling your home and investing the profits. Downsize to a lower-cost senior living community or condominium in an area where your property taxes will be affordable. You can also inquire about school parcel tax exemptions that allow seniors to apply for tax exemption from taxes imposed by local school districts.</p> <h2>3. Move to a No Tax State</h2> <p>Move to a state with no income tax on pension, Social Security, or dividend income. Florida, Nevada, New Hampshire, Pennsylvania, Washington, and Wyoming are among the states that do not tax that income.</p> <h2>4. Accept Government-Sponsored Medical Insurance</h2> <p>Medicare provides adequate health insurance coverage for doctor's visits, emergency care, assisted living, etc., but does not cover prescription drugs, dental, or vision care. For this, you will need add-on coverage like those offered by Medicare Advantage and Supplemental Insurance (Medigap). Consult with your insurance provider prior to retirement to ensure you can afford proper health insurance coverage. If you can't, inquire about government subsidies or senior plans offered by the likes of <a href="http://www.aarp.org/">AARP</a>.</p> <h2>5. Max-Out Retirement Accounts</h2> <p>By now you should be fully funding all of your retirement accounts and making any catch-up contributions. The 2015 catch-up contributions for IRAs total an additional $1,000 ($6,500) and $6,000 ($24,000) for your 401(k). As they are the most tax advantageous, make sure you are fully funding these accounts over the next few years preceding your retirement.</p> <h2>6. Diversify Using Bonds and ETFs</h2> <p>As you are nearing retirement age, you will want to gradually rebalance your portfolio so that it has less of volatile investments like stocks, and more of safer investments such as bonds and exchange-traded funds, or ETFs.</p> <h2>7. Join AARP</h2> <p>The benefits of joining AARP are endless. For those unfamiliar, AARP is the popular senior citizens advocacy group. The annual membership fee is only $16 and is discounted even further when years are bought in bulk. Members receive invaluable discounts on dining, travel, roadside assistance, auto insurance, health benefits, and more. This is a program that's definitely well worth signing up for.</p> <p><em>Are you prepared for retirement? What are you doing to get ready?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/qiana-chavaia">Qiana Chavaia</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-enjoy-retirement-if-you-havent-saved-enough">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/follow-these-5-steps-to-full-health-care-coverage-in-retirement">Follow These 5 Steps to Full Health Care Coverage in Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-states-with-the-lowest-taxes-for-retirees">7 States With the Lowest Taxes for Retirees</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/retirement-planning-if-you-re-under-30">Retirement Planning If You’re Under 30</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-reasons-early-retirement-might-be-financially-risky">4 Reasons Early Retirement Might Be Financially Risky</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/choosing-a-retirement-account-whats-available-and-what-s-best-for-you">Choosing a Retirement Account: What&#039;s Available, and What’s Best for You?</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Retirement 401(k) aarp investments IRAs saving money social security Fri, 01 May 2015 15:00:25 +0000 Qiana Chavaia 1400950 at http://www.wisebread.com 4 More Exciting, Affordable American Cities to Retire In http://www.wisebread.com/4-more-exciting-affordable-american-cities-to-retire-in <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/4-more-exciting-affordable-american-cities-to-retire-in" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/retired_couple_beach_000038686710.jpg" alt="Happy retired couple settling in affordable American city" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>As of February 2015, the average <a href="http://www.ssa.gov/policy/docs/quickfacts/stat_snapshot/#table2">monthly Social Security benefit</a> of a retired American worker was $1,331.44.</p> <p>This means that a couple of retirees would have about $31,954 available in annual Social Security benefits. While some people have additional savings, 26% of Americans are planning to <a href="https://www.transamericacenter.org/docs/default-source/resources/center-research/tcrs2014_sr_15th_annual_compendium.pdf">rely on Social Security</a> as their primary source of income during retirement.</p> <p>Savvy folks know that they need to plan ahead and find affordable cities to make the most out of their nest eggs. Here are four more exciting, affordable U.S. cities to retire in. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-exciting-affordable-american-cities-to-retire-in?ref=seealso">4 Exciting Affordable American Cities to Retire In</a>)</p> <h2>1. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania</h2> <p>Financial advice website Nerdwallet put Pittsburgh at the top of its 2013 list of best places for baby boomers. Since over 25% of the city's population is between the ages of 50 and 70, and 13.8% is 65 years or older, retirees can enjoy an active social life.</p> <p>Senior citizens can find affordable housing options in Pittsburgh, as the <a href="http://money.usnews.com/money/retirement/slideshows/10-best-places-to-retire-on-social-security-alone/8">median monthly mortgage payment</a> is $1,023 and the median monthly rent is $614. Getting around the city by bus, light rail (The T), or Mon Incline is free at all times for senior citizens age 65 or over that present a Pennsylvania Senior Citizen ID Card or a Medicare card at the time of fare payment.</p> <p>Pittsburgh is a great retirement destination for sports fans, because the city is home to the Pittsburgh Panthers (college athletics), Pittsburgh Penguins (hockey), and Pittsburgh Pirates (baseball), and of course, the Pittsburgh Steelers. If sports isn't your thing, you still have the 14-block Cultural District, which offers opera, theater, ballet, and live music events.</p> <h2>2. Tucson, Arizona</h2> <p>If you're part of the 26% of U.S. retirees planning to rely primarily on your Social Security check, then take a good look at the state of Arizona. The Grand Canyon State doesn't tax Social Security income.</p> <p>And it gets even better. Up to $2,500 total of military, civil-service, and Arizona state and local government pensions are also <a href="http://www.kiplinger.com/tool/retirement/T055-S001-state-by-state-guide-to-taxes-on-retirees/index.php?map=&amp;state_id=3&amp;state=Arizona">exempt from taxes</a>. Plus, Arizona has no inheritance or estate taxes. Combine these tax breaks with the fact that Tucson's <a href="http://www.forbes.com/pictures/mjf45hfje/tucson-az/">cost of living</a> is 4% below the national average and you can quickly see how Tucson is one of the most affordable American cities to retire in.</p> <p>But it isn't just about the tax savings, since there's also plenty of local fun year-round. Since 1986, this city has been home to the Tucson Folk Festival, which attracts more than 10,000 folk music lovers every year with more than 20 hours of free, live bluegrass, Irish, and old country and western music. Other popular annual events are the Tucson Rodeo (a 90-year old rodeo, also known as La Fiesta de los Vaqueros), the Tucson Meet Yourself (a celebration of folk and ethnic communities of the multinational Arizona-Sonora region), and the 4th Avenue Street Fair (taking place twice a year).</p> <p>But I think it's all about the <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2009/08/26/dining/26unit.html?_r=0">Sonoran hot dog</a>, which people believe to have been invented in Tucson.</p> <h2>3. St. Louis, Missouri</h2> <p>In St. Louis, retirees with an annual adjusted gross income of less than $85,000 (less than $100,000 for married couples) enjoy a <a href="http://www.kiplinger.com/tool/retirement/T055-S001-state-by-state-guide-to-taxes-on-retirees/index.php?map=&amp;state_id=26&amp;state=Missouri">tax exemption</a> on their Social Security benefits. For tax purposes, residential property is assessed at 19% of fair market value, and some retirees may qualify for a property tax credit. There is no inheritance tax or estate tax.</p> <p>Baby boomers comprise about 28% of the St. Louis population for three reasons. First, the city has a low cost of living &mdash; about 16.30% lower than that of the U.S. average. Second, <a href="http://money.usnews.com/money/retirement/articles/2012/10/15/best-places-to-retire-for-under-40000?page=2">housing costs for retirees</a> are affordable, at a median of $1,186 per month for those with a mortgage, $442 for seniors with a paid-off house, and $657 monthly for senior renters. Third, St. Louis is home to the Barnes-Jewish Hospital/Washington University, a <a href="http://health.usnews.com/best-hospitals/area/mo/barnes-jewish-hospitalwashington-university-6630930">nationally-ranked hospital</a> by U.S. News in several specialities.</p> <p>But St. Louis is an exciting city for several other reasons:</p> <ul> <li>Bud Selig, baseball's outgoing commish, proclaimed St. Louis as the <a href="http://sports.yahoo.com/blogs/mlb-big-league-stew/bud-selig-proclaims-st--louis--the-best-baseball-city-193010313.html">best baseball city</a> in 2015.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>With the highest concentration of sports bars in the country, St. Louis stands at #6 in the list of <a href="http://www.bestplaces.net/docs/studies/manliest_cities.aspx">manliest U.S. cities</a>.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>St. Louis ranks #4 in a list of America's <a href="http://www.bestplaces.net/docs/studies/blockparties.aspx">best places for block parties</a>.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>The city operates more than 100 parks, including the Citygarden, the Tower Grove Park, and the Carondelet Park.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>The city is within driving distance of more than 100 wineries and more than 6,000 caves.</li> </ul> <h2>4. Cleveland, Ohio</h2> <p>Located in the Buckeye State, Cleveland provides four tax breaks to retirees:</p> <ul> <li>No state taxes on Social Security benefits;</li> <li>No inheritance tax or estate tax;</li> <li>Four tax credits for retirees; and</li> <li>Homestead exemption for qualifying homeowners at least 65 years old.</li> </ul> <p>A big draw for Cleveland retirees is the state-of-the-art Cleveland Clinic, which ranks within the <a href="http://health.usnews.com/best-hospitals/area/oh/cleveland-clinic-6410670">top 10 U.S. hospitals</a> for several specialties, including geriatrics, cardiology, rheumatology, and urology. According to the latest U.S. Census, Cleveland has 476 physicians per 100,000 residents, a number much higher than the national average.</p> <p>Playhouse Square Center is the second largest performing arts center in the country, housing four theaters and attracting over one million guests every year to its more than 1,000 annual events. The Cleveland Orchestra is considered among the &quot;Big Five&quot; symphony orchestras leading the field in musical excellence and calibre of musicianship.</p> <p>Due to all these reasons (and more), Cleveland often ranks among one of the best <a href="http://www.cleveland.com/business/index.ssf/2013/06/cleveland_ranks_no_2_as_one_of.html">U.S. cities to retire in</a>.</p> <p>Planning for retirement is a two-step process. Not only do you have to maximize your nest egg, but also you have to minimize your living expenses during your golden years. In order to achieve both objectives, consider these four American cities when you're looking at retirement destinations. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-simple-ways-to-boost-an-underperforming-401k?ref=seealso">5 Simple Ways to Boost an Underperforming 401(k)</a>)</p> <p><em>In what U.S. city are you planning to retire &mdash; and why?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/damian-davila">Damian Davila</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-more-exciting-affordable-american-cities-to-retire-in">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-11"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/33-places-to-retire-if-you-love-the-rain">33 Places to Retire If You Love the Rain</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/social-security-is-not-a-ponzi-scheme">Social Security Is Not a Ponzi Scheme</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/tiny-nestegg-retire-abroad">Tiny Nestegg? Retire abroad!</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/follow-these-5-steps-to-full-health-care-coverage-in-retirement">Follow These 5 Steps to Full Health Care Coverage in Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/to-stay-on-financial-track-perfom-a-yearly-earnings-review">To Stay on Financial Track, Perform a Yearly Earnings Review</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Retirement affordable living baby boomers social security tax exemptions u.s. cities Mon, 20 Apr 2015 13:00:09 +0000 Damian Davila 1392146 at http://www.wisebread.com Why Taking Social Security Could Cost You Thousands http://www.wisebread.com/why-taking-social-security-could-cost-you-thousands <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/why-taking-social-security-could-cost-you-thousands" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/social-security-finance-Dollarphotoclub_37675746.jpg" alt="social security" title="social security" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>I recently attended a weekend barbecue with some neighbors, and at one point the conversation shifted from the usual topics &mdash; family updates, local news, sports, and politics &mdash; to retirement. Strangely enough, it was raised by a friend's daughter, Barbara, who is in her early 30s. I was a little surprised (but encouraged) that she was already doing some retirement planning at that age.</p> <p>Barbara is a bright, hard-working human resources manager with a promising future, but after 10 years in a challenging work environment, she said she was beginning to feel a little fatigued. That's certainly understandable. She and another 80 million Millennials have had the misfortune of joining a workforce that's experiencing some major disruptions. For most workers, America's recent economic restructuring has led to less job security, lower wages, fewer benefits, and longer hours. That's not exactly a recipe for long-term optimism if you're a thirty-something.</p> <p>With this in mind, it didn't take long for me to realize that Barbara raised the issue of retirement not because she was interested in long term financial planning, but instead out of sheer frustration. Barbara's question was, &quot;What is the earliest age I can begin receiving my Social Security retirement benefit?&quot; Age 62 was the answer. &quot;Then that's when I'll take it,&quot; she said.</p> <p><a href="http://www.socialsecurity.gov/planners/benefitcalculators.htm"><img width="605" height="340" src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5123/Whelan%20Blog%20Table%20-%20Social%20Security%20Benefit%20Reductions.jpg" alt="" /></a></p> <p>What Barbara didn't realize is that by doing so, she'd forfeit 30% of her full benefit amount. If her full amount was, say, $2,000 per month, then she would be giving up $600. So I said to her, &quot;What if you needed $2,000 a month from Social Security just to break even financially? And what if, by taking your Social Security benefit at age 62 instead of age 67, your benefit amount is reduced by $600 a month, to $1,400?&quot; Barbara's reply: &quot;I'd still take the lower amount.&quot;</p> <p>Of course I couldn't just let the issue end there, so I asked a follow-up question: &quot;But that would put you $7,200 in the hole each year. By your mid 70s your debt would add up to $100,000. How would you pay for it?&quot; &quot;I don't care,&quot; she said. &quot;I just want to stop working the moment I first qualify for a monthly retirement check.&quot;</p> <p>At that point I sensed I was stepping on a nerve, so I let it go. But, I'm glad she raised the topic and I give her credit for starting the conversation. Now that the issue has been framed with real numbers and dates, she is in a better position to make a sound decision when the time comes.</p> <p>For some, the loss of $600 each month for the duration of their retirement would be difficult to absorb. For others, it would be less of an issue. And for others still, there might be health-related concerns or other extenuating circumstances that make early distribution a reasonable choice.</p> <p>The point is, before choosing to give away so much of what you earned and accumulated over many decades, be sure to consider the trade-offs. Let reason, not emotion, drive your decision.</p> <p><em>At what age are you planning on taking Social Security?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/keith-whelan">Keith Whelan</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-taking-social-security-could-cost-you-thousands">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-12"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-reasons-early-retirement-might-be-financially-risky">4 Reasons Early Retirement Might Be Financially Risky</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/tiny-nestegg-retire-abroad">Tiny Nestegg? Retire abroad!</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-much-do-i-need-to-retire-how-much-can-i-spend">How much do I need to retire? How much can I spend?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-to-handle-a-forced-early-retirement">5 Ways to Handle a Forced Early Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-sep-ira-is-how-the-self-employed-do-retirement-like-a-boss">The SEP-IRA Is How the Self-Employed Do Retirement Like a BOSS</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Retirement early retirement pension social security Fri, 23 Jan 2015 14:00:06 +0000 Keith Whelan 1282530 at http://www.wisebread.com 12 Things You Didn't Know About Retirement http://www.wisebread.com/12-things-you-didnt-know-about-retirement <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/12-things-you-didnt-know-about-retirement" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/retirement-86490853-small.jpg" alt="retirement" title="retirement" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="145" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>It's nice to get out of the rat race.</p> <p>However, once you hit retirement you have to learn to get along with way less &quot;cheese.&quot; With <a href="http://www.ebri.org/pdf/FF.276.Ests.10Apr14.pdf">less than half of Americans</a> having ever thought about how much money they need for retirement, it is clear that several people are still clueless about retirement. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/this-is-the-basic-intro-to-having-a-retirement-fund-that-everyone-needs-to-read?ref=seealso">This Is the Basic Intro to Having a Retirement Fund That Everyone Needs to Read</a>)</p> <p>If you consider yourself a know-it-all in retirement matters, here is a list of 12 things about retirement that may shock you.</p> <h2>1. Some May Not Retire At All</h2> <p>If you think that most people retire at age 65, think again. Back in 1991, only about 11% of workers expected to retire after age 65. Fast forward to 2014 and 33% of workers expect to retire after age 65 and <a href="http://www.ebri.org/pdf/FF.273.RetAge.20Mar14.pdf">10% don't plan to retire at all</a>. Attitudes are changing and more Americans are considering semi-retirement during their golden years.</p> <h2>2. $1 Million Is Not Enough</h2> <p>For several years, financial advisors have used $1 million as a rule of thumb for your target retirement fund. As life expectancy improves, this target may be too low. With men and women reaching ages <a href="http://www.ssa.gov/planners/lifeexpectancy.htm">84 and 86</a> respectively, $1 million nest eggs may run out. Considering a 4% annual withdrawal, a $1 million retirement fund may last you only <a href="http://www.bankrate.com/finance/retirement/retirement-statistics-1.aspx">about 25 years</a>. The Social Security Administration projects that about 10% of 65 year olds will even live beyond 95.</p> <h2>3. Gen Y Needs to Save $2 Million</h2> <p>Here is some bad news for those born in the early 1980's and later. <a href="http://money.usnews.com/money/retirement/articles/2011/09/15/gen-ys-2-million-retirement-price-tag">Many registered investment advisors</a> recommend members of Gen Y have a retirement savings goal of at least $2 million. Inflation, higher student debt, more expensive health care, and longer life expectancy are major causes for this radical increase. The key to saving $2 million for retirement is starting early. Assuming a 7% average annual return, you'll need to save $510 per month if you start at age 20. If you start age 40, you'll need to put away $2,270 every month. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/retirement-planning-if-you-re-under-30?ref=seealso">Retirement Planning If You're Under 30</a>)</p> <h2>4. Full Retirement Age Is 67</h2> <p>When reading the fine print from your retirement accounts, an age that appears a lot is 59 &frac12;. This is the age at which most retirement accounts allow you to start taking withdrawals without any penalty. This is not the case for social security benefits. The <a href="http://www.ssa.gov/retire2/retirechart.htm">full retirement age</a> for those born 1960 and later is 67.</p> <p>This means that if you decide to retire before age 67, you are entitled to reduced social security retirement benefits. For example, if you retire at 65, you get about 13.3% less than you would at age 67. On the other hand, if you decide to retire past age 67 you are entitled to <a href="http://www.ssa.gov/retire2/delayret.htm">delayed retirement credits</a>, which boost your benefits slightly. Delayed retirement credits reach a cap at age 70.</p> <h2>5. Almost Half of Americans Have Less Than $10,000 Saved for Retirement</h2> <p><a href="http://www.ebri.org/files/Final-FS.RCS-13.FS_3.Saving.FINAL.pdf">46% of all American workers</a> have less than $10,000 saved for retirement and 29% of all American workers have less than $1,000 saved for retirement. If you fall under either of these categories, get your retirement strategy together. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-easy-ways-to-supercharge-your-retirement?ref=seealso">10 Easy Ways to Supercharge Your Retirement</a>)</p> <h2>6. Employer-Sponsored Plans Increase the Likelihood You'll Save</h2> <p>Here is some good news: Those workers that participate in retirement plans at work are 45% more likely to save than those that don't. According to data from the Employee Benefit Research Institute, those saving for retirement at work are more likely to have saved at least $50,000.</p> <h2>7. Self-Employed Can Save for Retirement</h2> <p>Freelancers, independent contractors, and small business owners can save for retirement, too. The best options are <a href="http://www.irs.gov/Retirement-Plans/One-Participant-401(k)-Plans">one participant 401(k)'s</a> and <a href="http://www.irs.gov/Retirement-Plans/Plan-Sponsor/Simplified-Employee-Pension-Plan-(SEP)">Simplified Employee Pensions</a> (SEP's), which both have higher caps than Roth or Traditional IRAs. Under both retirement accounts, you can put away up to 20% of your net self-employment earnings with a cap at $51,000, as of 2013. Most financial firms can offer a SEP, but fewer can offer a one participant 401(k). Contact your financial institution for more details for eligibility requirements and rules.</p> <h2>8. Older Workers Can Save $5,500 Extra for Retirement</h2> <p>It is never too late to start saving for retirement. The IRS gives all workers age 50 or older the chance to make catch-up contributions of <a href="http://www.irs.gov/Retirement-Plans/Plan-Participant,-Employee/Retirement-Topics-Catch-Up-Contributions">$5,500 every year</a> to their retirement accounts. These catch-up contributions are the best way to give your nest egg a much needed boost.</p> <h2>9. Married Couples Save More</h2> <p>When it comes to retirement planning, married couples are doing better than singles. Unmarried men and women are just as likely to have ever saved for retirement and to be currently contributing to a retirement account. However, those <a href="http://www.ebri.org/pdf/FF.275.Svrs.3Apr141.pdf">probabilities double for married workers</a> and their spouses. Nearly 75% of married of married couples are currently saving for retirement. These statistics prove that two heads think better than one.</p> <h2>10. Children Can Contribute to an IRA</h2> <p>That's not a typo. Little Jimmy can start putting away that lemonade stand money into a traditional IRA, even if he's just age 10. You can open a traditional IRA, a Roth IRA, or an Education IRA for your children and they can <a href="http://www.fool.com/money/investingforkids/investingforkids03.htm">contribute up to $2,000 per year</a> from their income. While you will have custodial control over your kid's account until she reaches legal age, you have to eventually turn over the rights to her. Make sure to discuss with her the implications of early withdrawals.</p> <h2>11. Non-Working Spouses Can Have Retirement Funds, Too</h2> <p>If you file taxes jointly with your spouse and have non-working spouse, you can fund your spouse's traditional or Roth IRA. The working spouse can contribute up to $5,500 per year to the non-working spouse's account, and up to $6,500 when over age 50.</p> <h2>12. IRAs Are Protected From Bankruptcy Proceedings</h2> <p>Under the <a href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/PLAW-109publ8/html/PLAW-109publ8.htm">Bankruptcy Abuse Prevention and Consumer Protection Act</a> (BAPCPA) of 2005, the first $1 million of traditional IRAs and Roth IRAs are protected in case of bankruptcy. The amount protected is adjusted every 3 years to current cost of livings standards and, as of 2013, it stands at $1,245,475. There is no protection cap for employer-sponsored retirement plans, such as 401(k)s, 403(b) profit sharing plans, and 457(b) deferred compensation plans.</p> <p><em>Did anything here surprise you? Please share in comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/damian-davila">Damian Davila</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-things-you-didnt-know-about-retirement">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-13"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/follow-these-5-steps-to-full-health-care-coverage-in-retirement">Follow These 5 Steps to Full Health Care Coverage in Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/if-you-want-your-401k-to-grow-stop-doing-these-6-things">If You Want Your 401K to Grow, Stop Doing These 6 Things</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/stop-making-these-10-bogus-retirement-savings-excuses">Stop Making These 10 Bogus Retirement Savings Excuses</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-reasons-early-retirement-might-be-financially-risky">4 Reasons Early Retirement Might Be Financially Risky</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-step-by-step-guide-to-rolling-over-your-401k">The Step-by-Step Guide to Rolling Over Your 401(k)</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Retirement 401(k) IRA retirement facts social security Wed, 25 Jun 2014 21:00:04 +0000 Damian Davila 1147194 at http://www.wisebread.com