retirees http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/3391/all en-US 3 Ways Retirees Can Build Credit http://www.wisebread.com/3-ways-retirees-can-build-credit <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/3-ways-retirees-can-build-credit" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-471849363.jpg" alt="Learning ways retirees can build credit" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>You might think that once you reach retirement, your credit score is just one of those things you get to stop worrying about. While it's true that most retirees won't be applying for mortgages, it's not true that you don't need to maintain a decent credit score. What if you want to apply for a car loan? What about credit cards? You certainly won't get the lowest interest rates and best rewards programs possible without a good credit score to back you up.</p> <p>A low credit score can also hurt you if you want to downsize to an apartment, or even move into a senior living facility. You might need a solid credit score to qualify.</p> <h2>Why it's hard for retirees to build credit</h2> <p>According to FICO, to have a credit score, you must have at least one credit account that is at least six months old. You must also have at least one account that has been updated by a creditor or lender during the last six months.</p> <p>If you aren't paying a mortgage, paying off an auto loan, or using credit cards, you might not meet any of these requirements. This might lead to you becoming what FICO calls an &quot;unscorable,&quot; a consumer who has no credit score at all.</p> <p>Fortunately, there are ways for retirees to continue building credit. They require the same good financial habits you've been practicing before retirement.</p> <h2>Use the credit cards you have</h2> <p>You might prefer paying for items in cash. Instead, make small purchases throughout the month with your credit card. If you pay off your entire card balance each month, you'll continue to boost your credit score. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-use-credit-cards-to-improve-your-credit-score" target="_blank">How to Use Credit Cards to Improve Your Credit Score</a></p> <p>Make sure that you don't charge more than you can pay off by the due date. If you do, you'll be stuck paying interest.</p> <p>Never pay late. If you pay your credit card 30 days or more late, your card provider will report your payment as late to the national credit bureaus of TransUnion, Experian, and Equifax. This will cause your credit score to plummet. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-simple-ways-to-never-make-a-late-credit-card-payment?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Simple Ways to Never Make a Late Credit Card Payment</a>)</p> <h2>Keep unused credit card accounts open</h2> <p>You might have a credit card that you never use, but don't close it. Having open credit card accounts helps your credit score, thanks to something called a <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/this-one-ratio-is-the-key-to-a-good-credit-score?ref=internal" target="_blank">credit utilization ratio</a>.</p> <p>This ratio measures your credit card balances against your total available credit limits, and it accounts for 30 percent of your score. Using too much of your available credit will cause your score to drop, while using a modest amount will help it rise. It's typically recommended that you not let debt tip this ratio beyond 30 percent. If you have a paid-off credit card that isn't getting much use, closing it will lower your overall available credit limit and your utilization ratio will then increase. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-ditch-a-credit-card-without-dinging-your-credit-score?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Close a Credit Card Without Dinging Your Credit Score</a>)</p> <p>So, keep those unused cards tucked in your wallet. Having that extra credit that you're not using will provide a boost to your score.</p> <h2>Apply for a secured credit card</h2> <p>If you no longer have any credit cards, and you've become an unscorable, you can still build your credit. Your first step should be applying for a <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-best-secured-credit-cards?ref=internal" target="_blank">secured credit card</a>.</p> <p>You don't need a credit score to qualify for one of these cards. Their line of credit is based on the amount of money you deposit into an account with the financial institution issuing the card. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/a-secured-credit-card-can-repair-your-credit-score-heres-how-to-pick-the-best?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Pick the Best Secured Credit Card</a>)</p> <p>If you deposit $1,000 into an account, you can then charge up to $1,000 on your secured credit card. Every time you use your secured card and pay off these charges on time, you'll get a boost to your credit score. Do this long enough, and you can build a score that's high enough to qualify for a traditional credit card.</p> <p>Again, take the same precautions you'd take with a traditional credit card. Pay your bill on time each month, and never charge more than you can afford to pay in full by your due date.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dan-rafter">Dan Rafter</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/3-ways-retirees-can-build-credit">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-ditch-a-credit-card-without-dinging-your-credit-score">How to Close a Credit Card Without Dinging Your Credit Score</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/building-a-credit-history">Building a Credit History</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-7-debt-payoffs-that-boost-your-credit-score-the-most">The 7 Debt Payoffs That Boost Your Credit Score the Most</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-myths-about-credit-cards-that-wont-go-away">5 Myths About Credit Cards That Won&#039;t Go Away</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-your-credit-score-matters-in-retirement">Why Your Credit Score Matters in Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Retirement building credit credit score credit utilization ratio debts fico retirees Wed, 26 Apr 2017 20:00:10 +0000 Dan Rafter 1934072 at http://www.wisebread.com 4 Reasons You Might Have a "Phased" Retirement http://www.wisebread.com/4-reasons-you-might-have-a-phased-retirement <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/4-reasons-you-might-have-a-phased-retirement" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-610450660.jpg" alt="Man learning why he might have a phased retirement" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="141" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>The prospect of working full-time one day and then heading into a complete retirement the next doesn't work for everyone. Some people don't want to work a full-time schedule as they get older, but they don't want to completely ditch the working life altogether.</p> <p>Instead, they prefer what is known as a &quot;phased&quot; retirement. Rather than leaving the working world completely, they work on a part-time basis for several years, or even pursue freelance or small business opportunities, until they are ready to retire permanently. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-great-retirement-jobs?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Great Retirement Jobs</a>)</p> <p>Some will embark on a phased retirement because they want to stay active. Others will do so because they have little other choice; they need the money from part-time work to supplement their retirement income.</p> <p>As you near your retirement age, a phased retirement might be in your future. Here are four reasons why you might choose this nontraditional retirement path.</p> <h2>Your current employer offers a version of phased retirement</h2> <p>A growing number of large employers are offering flexible retirement options for their workers. According to a 2015 report from WorldatWork, about 30 percent of large employers &mdash; those with 1,000 or more workers &mdash; offer flexible retirement plans, anything from allowing their employees to work on a part-time basis to letting them participate in job-sharing programs.</p> <p>If you're fortunate enough to work for a company that offers such a program, entering a phased retirement will be relatively easy. Instead of working full-time for your company, you'll shift to part-time or job-sharing duties. This could be a simple way for you to slow your work schedule while remaining active in the working world and bringing in extra funds each month.</p> <h2>You need the money</h2> <p>The most common reason why older workers choose a phased retirement is because they need the money. Not everyone enters their retirement years flush with cash. Even with Social Security benefits, savings, and, for the fortunate few, pensions, many retirees can't afford to maintain the lifestyle they want. Working on a part-time basis, or starting their own consulting services, can help these seniors afford the retirement they want.</p> <p>The key to deciding whether phased retirement is a smart move is to create a detailed budget that lists all of your retirement-year expenses. Depending on where you want to live and whether you want to boost your travel, the income from a phased retirement could make all the difference in how happy your retirement years might be. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-easy-ways-retirees-can-earn-extra-income?ref=seealso" target="_blank">9 Easy Ways Retirees Can Earn Extra Income</a>)</p> <h2>You'd be bored without working</h2> <p>Then there is the specter of boredom. Relaxing days spent reading books, golfing, binge-watching TV, and visiting your grandchildren might sound great when you're commuting to work every day. But in reality, retirement can be long and boring. You might find that you don't have enough to fill the hours of your suddenly emptier days. You can only travel so much, after all.</p> <p>A phased retirement might be the solution. You can still travel, visit your family, and spend relaxing afternoons catching up on your reading or pursuing favored hobbies. But you don't have to relax all the time. By working on a part-time basis, you'll retain some of the structure that many people need in their days.</p> <p>And if alleviating boredom is the issue and not a lack of retirement funds, you're free to pursue only that work which interests you the most.</p> <h2>You've always wanted to be your own boss</h2> <p>Maybe you won't spend your phased retirement working for your former employer. Maybe you won't spend it working with any company. You might spend your phased retirement working for yourself.</p> <p>Your retirement years might give you the opportunity to finally start that business you always dreamed of running. Maybe you've always loved animals and you want to start your own pet-sitting or dog-walking business. Maybe you're the inventive type who's created your own product. In your retirement years, you can devote more energy to building a business around this invention.</p> <p>If the entrepreneurial spirit has always burned inside you, a phased retirement might provide the perfect opportunity to unleash it. Freed from the chore of driving into work each day, sitting through meetings, and filing reports, your retirement years can provide you the time you've always lacked to finally build your own business.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dan-rafter">Dan Rafter</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-reasons-you-might-have-a-phased-retirement">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-millennial-money-habits-every-retiree-should-learn">6 Millennial Money Habits Every Retiree Should Learn</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-cool-jobs-for-retirees">6 Cool Jobs for Retirees</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/half-of-americans-are-wrong-about-their-retirement-savings">Half of Americans Are Wrong About Their Retirement Savings</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-single-parents-can-juggle-retirement-savings-too">How Single Parents Can Juggle Retirement Savings, Too</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-best-states-to-start-a-new-business-in">4 Best States to Start a New Business In</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Retirement extra income part time jobs phased retirement retirees saving money self employment small businesses Tue, 04 Apr 2017 18:21:50 +0000 Dan Rafter 1918287 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Millennial Money Habits Every Retiree Should Learn http://www.wisebread.com/6-millennial-money-habits-every-retiree-should-learn <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-millennial-money-habits-every-retiree-should-learn" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-589447046.jpg" alt="Learning millennial money habits retirees should strive for" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="141" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>When it comes to money matters, Millennials don't always get a good rap. These young adults are likely to view themselves in good financial health so long as they make the bills at the end of the month, let alone stow a little extra away for retirement. But don't mistake them as financial illiterates. In fact, there are some common ways Millennials handle their money that could benefit the older generations. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-millennials-have-changed-money-so-far?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Ways Millennials Have Changed Money So Far</a>)</p> <h2>1. Get Creative</h2> <p>As retirees age, their expenditures fall &mdash; but their <a href="https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2498185" target="_blank">income drops even faster</a>. Perhaps retirees, who are unlikely to jump back into the traditional workforce due to a suddenly trickling cash flow, can benefit from some Millennial-style money tactics. Indeed, Millennials know how to get creative when it comes to their earnings. The old rules simply didn't apply to this generation of '80s and '90s babies that entered adulthood during the uncertainty of the financial recession. So, they made their own rules. They found their own innovative ways to survive. And now, as they continue to develop a distinctly entrepreneurial spirit, many Millennials are beginning to thrive.</p> <p>More than any other generation, Millennials have embraced the <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-fun-ways-the-sharing-economy-helps-you-save-on-vacation?ref=internal" target="_blank">sharing economy</a>, in which a lawn mower, <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-make-more-money-as-an-uber-driver?ref=internal" target="_blank">their car</a>, or a <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-11-best-websites-for-renting-your-extra-space?ref=internal" target="_blank">spare bedroom</a> can become a valuable source of revenue. The average Airbnb host earns more than $20,000 a year renting out a full, two-bedroom apartment or house in a major city, and this is exactly the kind of peripheral revenue stream that Millennials have become accustomed to seeking out for themselves.</p> <p>When it comes to ride-sharing, 21% of Millennials have used user-powered programs like Lyft and Uber to save money while on vacation. Among other age groups, those numbers are much lower &mdash; 7% for Gen-Xers and 4% for Baby Boomers. For older retirees, the percentage is presumably even lower. Yet <a href="https://www.bls.gov/opub/btn/volume-5/spending-patterns-of-older-americans.htm" target="_blank">transportation is a significant expense</a> for most retirees, and it's one that could potentially be lowered through the use of ride-sharing &mdash; not only during a vacation, but on a daily basis. Older households spend about $8,000 a year on transportation, ranging from a high of $9,321 for the 55 to 64 age group, to a low of $5,091 for the 75-and-older group, according to federal data.</p> <h2>2. Don't Buy Stuff, Spend on Experiences Instead</h2> <p>Millennials highly value experiences &mdash; concerts, yoga festivals, French lessons, surf lessons, palm readings, trips to Italy &mdash; and they are increasingly willing to fork over more and more money to get them. All told, 78% of Millennials would choose to spend money on a <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-reasons-you-should-splurge-on-experiences-not-things?ref=internal" target="_blank">desirable experience</a> or event over buying something desirable, and 55% of Millennials say they're spending more on events and live experiences than ever before, according to a 2015 study by Eventbrite. What's more, nearly eight in 10 Millennials say some of their best memories are from an event or live experience they attended or participated in, while 69% say attending live events and experiences make them more connected to other people, the community, and the world.</p> <p>As it turns out, there's scientific evidence to support the idea that people of all ages who spend money on experiences rather than things have a greater shot at attaining happiness. More than stuff, experiential pursuits promote greater happiness, psychologists have found. Perhaps painting lessons, bowling clubs, and a little international travel might also hold the key to a happy retirement.</p> <h2>3. Save Like You Mean It</h2> <p>A recent survey by T. Rowe Price found that 67% of Millennials will save by any means necessary. One reason might be this: It's reassuring to have a stash of cash available for emergencies, and this fact very well may be a major motivator for young adults who came of age during the recession, when jobs were scarce and layoffs were commonplace.</p> <p>Older generations could benefit from that same mentality. Saving by any means necessary, as if the financial future was completely uncertain, will help build up a money cushion should the worst actually happen.</p> <h2>4. Embrace Technology</h2> <p>Millennials are famously tech-savvy, and they're using their familiarity with mobile apps to track their investments, as well as their spending and saving habits, in real time. Tools like <a href="https://www.mint.com/" target="_blank">Mint</a> and <a href="https://digit.co/" target="_blank">Digit</a> make financial planning quick and easy, while <a href="https://www.acorns.com/">Acorns</a> helps Millennials automatically invest their spare change into a diversified and customizable portfolio. There are money-saving apps specific for grocery shopping, <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-10-best-couponing-apps?ref=internal" target="_blank">couponing</a>, freelancing, and so much more. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-apps-that-make-budgeting-fun-no-really?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Apps That Make Budgeting Fun &mdash; No Really!</a>)</p> <p>While retirees generally lag in technological proficiency, there's been great improvement in recent years. All told, <a href="http://www.pewinternet.org/2015/06/26/americans-internet-access-2000-2015/" target="_blank">58% of people 65 and older</a> go online, according to the Pew Research Center, which marks an impressive increase from 14% in 2000. The app and website <a href="https://lifereimagined.aarp.org/" target="_blank">Life Reimagined</a> by AARP is one example of a highly-rated financial and social planning tool for retirees of all ages.</p> <h2>5. Volunteer in Exchange for Free Tickets</h2> <p>Americans 55 and older spend <a href="https://www.bls.gov/opub/btn/volume-5/spending-patterns-of-older-americans.htm" target="_blank">5.3% of their budget</a> on entertainment, which is slightly more than the entertainment spending of all Americans, according to U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Perhaps older Americans could benefit from this tip straight out of the Millennial playbook: A little volunteer work can go a long way to get you access to concerts, festivals, and sporting events. Many theaters, stadiums, and festival grounds offer volunteers free tickets to events in exchange for some time spent charitably directing parking or ushering the aisles.</p> <h2>6. Talk It Out</h2> <p>Millennials are markedly open when it comes to discussing their financial woes, worries, and successes. Not only are they quick to seek expert advice, but they are also undeterred from engaging in frank financial talks with friends, spouses, parents, co-workers, and others. Retirees who come from a generation that largely believed that it's rude to talk about money in public could learn from the younger generation's fiscal transparency. Experts say that open conversations about finances can help save relationships, <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-money-conversations-every-couple-should-have?ref=internal" target="_blank">especially intimate ones</a>. They can also lead to people to better address their financial concerns, which can help prevent financial crises from building up later on down the road.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/brittany-lyte">Brittany Lyte</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-millennial-money-habits-every-retiree-should-learn">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-millennials-can-learn-about-saving-money-from-gen-x">5 Things Millennials Can Learn About Saving Money From Gen-X</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/tiny-nestegg-retire-abroad">Tiny Nestegg? Retire abroad!</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-millennials-have-changed-money-so-far">6 Ways Millennials Have Changed Money (So Far)</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-travel-in-retirement-keeps-you-young">6 Ways Travel in Retirement Keeps You Young</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-unique-ways-millennials-are-dealing-with-student-loan-debt">7 Unique Ways Millennials Are Dealing With Student Loan Debt</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance Retirement apps baby boomers gen x generations millennials money habits retirees saving money sharing economy volunteering Tue, 14 Mar 2017 11:00:11 +0000 Brittany Lyte 1906388 at http://www.wisebread.com Don't Let These Expenses Spoil Your Retirement Abroad http://www.wisebread.com/dont-let-these-expenses-spoil-your-retirement-abroad <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/dont-let-these-expenses-spoil-your-retirement-abroad" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/globe_world_coins_80768379.jpg" alt="Learning how to keep expenses from spoiling retirement abroad" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>The relatively low cost of living in countries like Mexico, Thailand, and Spain makes them <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-incredible-places-to-retire-abroad-that-anyone-can-afford">popular destinations for retirement</a>. Your fixed retirement income goes further here, affording the possibility of a little luxury, as well as adventure in your later years.</p> <p>Standard of living, climate, and culture are all massive draws, but retiring abroad can also come with unexpected bills. Take, for example, medical costs, taxes, inheritance restrictions, and house buying fees which are completely different to home. While the everyday cost of living might be favorable, these &quot;one off' costs can stack up.</p> <p>Here are some specific (and perhaps unexpected) bills to watch out for.</p> <h2>Assets and Visas</h2> <p>In order to get a visa as a retiree, you will need to demonstrate that you have the income or assets to support your lifestyle. Because it is assumed you will not work (you're retired, after all), the visa type may prohibit you from taking on employment to supplement your income &mdash; making your pension or other assets absolutely crucial.</p> <p>The amount required to get a visa varies from location to location. For example, to retire to Thailand you must prove you have a monthly income of around $2,000. Although this might seem low to those of us living in Western Europe or North America, this income is double that of the average Thai.</p> <p>If retirement in Mexico floats your boat, you will need to prove you can afford it. A temporary visa which lasts for up to four years requires you to have an income of just over $1,500 a month, or just over $25,000 in the bank. A permanent visa, on the other hand, means you need over four times that in the bank, or a monthly income of over $2,500.</p> <h2>Exchange Rate Woes</h2> <p>Wherever you're headed, if you draw income or pension in one currency, and are planning on spending in another, then you need to understand and make allowances for exchange rate fluctuations. If not, you might find yourself with a hefty bill to pay.</p> <p>For example, if you are planning on buying a house in your new retirement location, and will have a mortgage outstanding on it in a local currency, your payment might change significantly because of the exchange rate. Add in the potential fluctuations in mortgage payments due to interest rate changes, and you might struggle to predict exactly what your housing bills will look like on an ongoing basis.</p> <p>If you own property in your home country, one option is to mortgage that property, and use the cash to buy outright in your adopted country. This means that the mortgage you will be paying is in the same currency that you draw income in, removing one source of worry.</p> <h2>The Cost of Good Health</h2> <p>For something that is truly priceless, keeping in great health can be pretty costly. Because a trip to the hospital can be relatively cheap in many popular retirement destinations, many expat retirees prefer to pay out of pocket for their health care as they need it.</p> <p>Paying for health care is a personal decision, and depends largely on your ease of access to funds, and your attitude to risk. Be warned, though, that in some countries such as Thailand, hospitals have been known to turn away people who cannot prove their ability to pay, either with ready cash or valid insurance. Carry a credit card on you if you choose not to invest in an insurance policy here!</p> <h2>Home Sweet Home</h2> <p>Buying a new home is seldom stress free &mdash; and doing it abroad is likely to create some unexpected bills and charges. Make sure you're very clear on the costs involved.</p> <p>Across Europe, for example, house buying comes with a whole range of fees which vary from country to country, and quickly mount up. Throw in the additional costs of having documents checked by a notary, or translated by an official translator, and buying somewhere to live can be especially pricey.</p> <p>It is well worth keeping up with the local news in the country you move to, as your liabilities don't necessarily end once the purchase is complete. Homebuyers in Spain have been pursued for tax the authorities deemed payable on property bought up to a decade ago, because of the high numbers of overseas buyers taking advantage of the massive slump in prices. You might not be able to change unexpected bills like these, but at least you can be forewarned.</p> <p>Part of what makes life overseas exciting is the opportunity to gather new experiences along the way. However, some of these differences can make life that little bit more challenging, too. Many of the costs associated with retiring abroad are unavoidable &mdash; but by being aware in advance, you can better manage the bills as they come in.</p> <p>There's no substitute for your own research. If you're thinking of building a life abroad for your retirement years, then get your finances prepared, so you can enjoy peace of mind.</p> <p><em>Are you planning to retire abroad? What do you think &mdash; does the lower cost of living outweigh the risk of financial surprises?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/claire-millard">Claire Millard</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dont-let-these-expenses-spoil-your-retirement-abroad">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-travel-in-retirement-keeps-you-young">6 Ways Travel in Retirement Keeps You Young</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-almost-anyone-can-afford-to-retire-in-mexico">How Almost Anyone Can Afford to Retire in Mexico</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-ways-to-avoid-bank-fees-while-traveling">11 Ways to Avoid Bank Fees While Traveling</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/retire-for-half-the-cost-in-these-5-countries">Retire for Half the Cost in These 5 Countries</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-your-financial-planner-isnt-telling-you-about-retirement">5 Things Your Financial Planner Isn&#039;t Telling You About Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Retirement Travel abroad exchange rates expats health care overseas retirees second homes unexpected bills visas Wed, 06 Jul 2016 09:00:11 +0000 Claire Millard 1745832 at http://www.wisebread.com 5 Downsides of a Reverse Mortgage http://www.wisebread.com/5-downsides-of-a-reverse-mortgage <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-downsides-of-a-reverse-mortgage" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/new_house_drawing_000024284350.jpg" alt="Learning about the downsides of a reverse mortgage" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>A Home Equity Conversion Reverse Mortgage (HECM), more commonly known as a <em>reverse mortgage</em>, is often used as a means of income for retirees. For those age 62 or older, these loans can provide guaranteed income during retirement (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-guarantee-income-in-retirement?ref=seealso">6 Ways to Guarantee Income in Retirement</a>).</p> <p>Though there are some similarities, reverse mortgages are not to be confused with home equity loans. Here, borrowers have to meet a minimum age restriction, hold the deed to their home, or have a relatively low balance that can be paid-off with a new loan. The home is then used as collateral for a new mortgage loan, up to $625,500 (or the lesser of the appraised value). But, instead of making monthly payments to the lender, the lender makes monthly payments to <em>you</em>, drawing on your home equity. It's a bit like purchasing an annuity using your home's value.</p> <p>Sounds good, right? Not so fast. Reverse mortgages come with some significant drawbacks for certain borrowers. Consider these negatives before taking out a reverse mortgage.</p> <h2>Downsides&nbsp;of Reverse Mortgages</h2> <p>On the surface, reverse mortgages probably sound like a pretty decent idea since the bank pays you, right? Well, in a report published by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), between December 2011 to December 2014, the agency processed approximately <a href="http://files.consumerfinance.gov/f/201502_cfpb_report_snapshot-reverse-mortgage-complaints-december-2011-2014.pdf">1,200 consumer complaints</a> arising from reverse mortgages. Borrowers reported &quot;confusion and frustration over the terms&quot; and &quot;problems with loans servicing&quot; as culprits causing them to face foreclosure.</p> <h3>1. Unable to Refinance and Misleading Terms</h3> <p>It appears many borrowers enter into loan agreements without fully understanding the terms of the loan. Among the complaints received by the CFPB from borrowers and their family members was not being able to renegotiate. Borrowers felt they were paying a high interest rate and were being overcharged. Others said they did not realize their adjustable interest rate would increase so quickly.</p> <h3>2. High Upfront Costs and Interest Rates</h3> <p>In comparison to the costs for obtaining a regular home loan, reverse mortgage costs are higher due to the way loans are structured. They also have higher interest charges. Interest rates on reverse mortgages tend to be 1.5% higher than regular home loans. Final costs include closing costs, lender fees, mortgage insurance premiums, and finance charges.</p> <h3>3. A Burden on Heirs</h3> <p>Home equity loans aren't a great choice if you intend on leaving your home as part of an inheritance. That's because these loans not only draw on the value of your home equity, but they're also due immediately upon your death. If your plan is to leave the property to your heirs, they will have the option of paying the loan in full or paying 95% of the balance (if they wish for it to remain in the family). If they're unable to settle the debt with their own funds, the asset must be sold in order to repay the lender. Once the debt is settled, any remaining proceeds will go to the estate.</p> <p>But reverse mortgages are also due whenever you decide to sell the home &mdash; so if your retirement plans involve living anywhere other than your current residence, you'll have to fork over the balance of the loan as soon as you sell.</p> <h3>4. Facing Foreclosure When an Older Spouse Dies</h3> <p>When determining a borrower's eligibility for a reverse mortgage, age is crucial for two reasons:</p> <ol> <li>The borrower must be 62 or older, and<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>The older a borrower is, the greater the loan amount he or she qualifies for.</li> </ol> <p>For this reason, many couples agree to only include the name of the older spouse on closing documents, not aware that the surviving spouse could face foreclosure if the other dies. According to CFPB, consumers reported that loan originators falsely assured them they would be able to add the younger spouse to the loan at a future date. Make sure you read the fine print and clarify this concern before signing on the dotted line.</p> <h3>5. Difficulty Qualifying for Other Loan Types</h3> <p>Borrowers cannot refinance a reverse mortgage. Reverse mortgages may also have a negative impact on a borrower's ability to qualify for other types of loans. Over time, the accrued interest on reverse mortgages drain any remaining equity in your home. Worse, some homeowners complained that they were unaware of the terms of these types of loans. Before entering into an agreement, seek the counsel of a trusted third-party reverse mortgage professional. Hud.gov offers a directory of HECM counseling agencies, however turning to members of your community to find a referral is recommended.</p> <p>Additionally, the CFPB report mentioned consumer concerns of encountering difficulty when attempting to repay loans. This included lenders failing to keep accurate records, and obstacles when attempting to prevent foreclosure &mdash; such as slow response times (critical during foreclosure), unresponsiveness, and receiving erroneous information or instructions.</p> <p>While a reverse mortgage can be a good source of cash flow during retirement, it nonetheless requires careful consideration for the critical reasons listed above. If you're still interested in a reverse mortgage, do your homework, and understand the resources at your disposal. (For example, on March 2, 2015, The Federal Housing Authority implemented <a href="http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/documents/huddoc?id=SFH_FHA_INFO_14-66.pdf">new policies to its HECM</a> Financial Assessment to address consumer complaints.)</p> <p><em>Have you considered a reverse mortgage? Why or why not?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/qiana-chavaia">Qiana Chavaia</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-downsides-of-a-reverse-mortgage">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-avoid-getting-scammed-with-a-reverse-mortgage">How to Avoid Getting Scammed With a Reverse Mortgage</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/should-we-all-just-stop-paying-the-mortgage">Should We All Just Stop Paying the Mortgage?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-things-you-should-know-before-buying-a-foreclosed-home">7 Things You Should Know Before Buying a Foreclosed Home</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/home-reverse-mortgaged-heres-how-to-sell-it">Home Reverse Mortgaged? Here&#039;s How to Sell It</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-long-can-you-stay-in-your-home-after-you-stop-paying-the-mortgage">How Long Can You Stay in Your Home After You Stop Paying the Mortgage?</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Real Estate and Housing downsides foreclosure HECM retirees reverse mortgages Fri, 15 Jan 2016 14:00:03 +0000 Qiana Chavaia 1638136 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Cool Jobs for Retirees http://www.wisebread.com/6-cool-jobs-for-retirees <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-cool-jobs-for-retirees" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/000036819180.jpg" alt="Finding cool jobs as retirees to make extra money" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>While some of us will be lucky enough to have neither the need nor the desire to <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-reasons-early-retirement-might-be-financially-risky">work through retirement</a>, the truth is that a lot of retirees find themselves searching for employment.</p> <p>Whether you're thinking about your own future, or helping an older relative think about theirs, retirees can live and work outside the box. Here are some fun ideas for working in retirement.</p> <h2>1. Work in a National Park</h2> <p>National parks need all sorts of seasonal help, from gift shop workers to cooks and managers. If you love to travel and adore seeing the best that the United States has to offer, consider taking one of these jobs. Not only do you get to work in some of the most spectacular places on earth, but you'd most likely end up living nearby, too. Depending on the park and the job, you may even have housing provided or subsidized within the park itself.</p> <p>If this interests you, check out sites like <a href="http://www.coolworks.com/">Cool Works</a>. They don't just list jobs for retirees, but they have a lot of interesting jobs in a lot of interesting places.</p> <h2>2. Housesit</h2> <p>So many retirees want to travel, but a lot of people find that the cost is just too much once they are actually living off their retirement income. If you're willing to be flexible and do a bit of work in addition to your travel, housesitting could be the job for you.</p> <p>Housesitting isn't just limited to looking after the homes of people you know. Sites like <a href="http://www.trustedhousesitters.com/us/">Trusted Housesitters</a> help connect people who want to do this work with those who want it done. Many housesitting gigs are unpaid, but retirees who do this work often value accommodation savings while traveling.</p> <p>Some housesitting gigs come with extra work, like keeping up a small farm or caring for the home in particular ways. These are more likely to be paid, and will require you to have at least a minimum level of fitness to complete the tasks.</p> <h2>3. Consult</h2> <p>If you have an in-demand area of expertise, you might make a good consultant. Many observant people learn a lot about corporate structure, streamlining, finding good employees, and more during their working years. With some time and some focused effort, you can turn these observations into a thriving consulting business. Simply show people what you know, prove that it works and that it will help them, and you will be in great shape as a consultant.</p> <h2>4. Drive a Limo</h2> <p>Do you like to drive? If you're okay spending long hours in the car and have the physical capacity to help people with heavy luggage, you might have fun driving a limo in your retirement. You can choose to purchase your own vehicle, though many retirees find that it's easier to work for a company so that you don't have responsibility for the car and you don't have to get your own gigs.</p> <h2>5. Become a Tour Guide</h2> <p>Is there a place you love, or one you'd love to learn more about? Consider applying as a tour guide for that location. All sorts of places need tour guides: stadiums, factories, wineries, historical sites, and museums are only a few places to consider.</p> <p>Guiding requires you to spend quite a bit of time on your feet, and it can also require a lot from your voice. As long as you're comfortable in those two areas, and don't mind interacting with a lot of people, this could be a fun job for you when you retire.</p> <h2>6. Teach Fitness</h2> <p>There is a huge push right now to get seniors to exercise more. If you are fit and like working out, why not lead a class of your peers at the local gym? Teach other seniors athletic skills, like how to lift weights safely, do yoga, or have fun getting aerobic exercise, and make some money at the same time. It will help if you are already familiar with the discipline you want to teach and have any necessary certifications, though you can always pick these up along the way, too.</p> <p><em>Are you retired with a cool job? What do you do and how did you get into it?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/sarah-winfrey">Sarah Winfrey</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-cool-jobs-for-retirees">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-reasons-you-might-have-a-phased-retirement">4 Reasons You Might Have a &quot;Phased&quot; Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-millennial-money-habits-every-retiree-should-learn">6 Millennial Money Habits Every Retiree Should Learn</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/3-ways-retirees-can-build-credit">3 Ways Retirees Can Build Credit</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-earn-extra-income-as-a-courthouse-researcher">How to Earn Extra Income as a Courthouse Researcher</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dont-let-these-expenses-spoil-your-retirement-abroad">Don&#039;t Let These Expenses Spoil Your Retirement Abroad</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Job Hunting Retirement jobs for retirees part time jobs retirees seasonal jobs working seniors Wed, 26 Aug 2015 21:00:28 +0000 Sarah Winfrey 1533295 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Earn Extra Income as a Courthouse Researcher http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-earn-extra-income-as-a-courthouse-researcher <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-earn-extra-income-as-a-courthouse-researcher" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/male_female_employees_000021487391.jpg" alt="Man and woman making money as courthouse researchers" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Are you someone who has always been intrigued by a challenge or finding the needle in the haystack? A courthouse or title researcher does just that. This little-known job is popular among <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-financial-pitfalls-stay-at-home-parents-should-avoid">stay-at-home moms</a> and retirees. Getting started takes time, but the business is steady.</p> <h2>What Is a Title or Courthouse Researcher?</h2> <p>A courthouse researcher is an independent contractor who researches public records to gather information for their client. You could be researching anything from genealogy, property records, titles, probate cases, tax liens, or even criminal records.</p> <p>While a courthouse or title researcher is considered a work-at-home job, sometimes it might be necessary to actually go into the county courthouse to conduct the research, while other times you might be able to find the online version of the records you're looking for. If you have to do research in a courthouse, you are governed by their hours, which are usually between the hours of 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. and on weekdays only. The good thing is that you're able to be flexible with your own hours, especially when you're able to work from your home.</p> <p>No specific degree or education is required to become a courthouse researcher, which can make it appealing to anyone who is looking for supplemental income. Some companies will help to train you, but you'll want to be familiar with a courthouse setting and where they keep their records. You can always ask for assistance within the courthouse, too.</p> <h2>Average Salary for Courthouse Researchers</h2> <p>The income you can expect for being a courthouse researcher varies greatly by the companies you work for and your speed. Speed and accuracy are incredibly important in this field, and the faster you're able to find and collect a record, the faster you're able to move onto the next one. As an entry level researcher, you might be making about $0.25&ndash;$0.30 a record. Once you're able to get comfortable in the position and have learned how to quickly locate records, you can expect earnings to increase. As of April 2015, the <a href="http://www.simplyhired.com/salaries-k-court-researcher-jobs.html">average annual salary</a> of a courthouse researcher is $48,000.</p> <p>Some jobs might require that you travel to neighboring county courthouses, which will add additional costs in the way of mileage and fuel fees. If you keep track of your mileage, it makes a good deduction when you file your taxes.</p> <h2>Where to Find Jobs</h2> <p>Keep in mind that some companies have a non-compete policy, so that you are only able to work for them. The most common companies that hire for this type of job are listed below. (Some may not be hiring in your area right now, but keep checking with them if you're unable to find something that works for you.)</p> <ul> <li><a href="http://ameristarusa.com/careers.aspx?nset=0401&amp;hdr=3&amp;tpl=careers">Ameristar</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.deltadocument.com/">Delta Document</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.wolfgangresearch.com/Pages/default.aspx">Wolfgang Research</a></li> <li><a href="http://sunlark.com/">Sunlark Research</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.findanheir.com/Employment.aspx">Find an Heir</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.courthousedirect.com/">CourthouseDirect.com</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.work4jbs.com/">Jellybean Services</a></li> </ul> <p>Seasoned researchers have also found it useful to get to know the employees at the local courthouse, network, and leave a business card. According to one researcher with years of experience, it's not uncommon to get work in this field by <a href="http://www.1099mom.com/2011/09/i-want-to-be-courthouse-researcher.html">checking the bulletin boards</a> found at the entrances and common areas of the courthouse itself.</p> <p><em>Does becoming a courthouse researcher interest you?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/linsey-knerl">Linsey Knerl</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-earn-extra-income-as-a-courthouse-researcher">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/17-part-time-jobs-to-do-while-your-kids-are-at-school">17 Part-Time Jobs to Do While Your Kids Are at School</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-terrible-work-from-home-jobs-you-should-avoid">8 Terrible Work-From-Home &quot;Jobs&quot; You Should Avoid</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/22-websites-that-will-pay-you-to-write-for-them">22 Websites That Will Pay You to Write for Them</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-make-more-money-as-an-uber-driver">How to Get a High Rating and Make More Money as an Uber Driver</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-freelance-jobs-that-pay-surprisingly-well">11 Freelance Jobs That Pay Surprisingly Well</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Extra Income Job Hunting courthouse researcher retirees side job work-from-home Fri, 29 May 2015 13:00:10 +0000 Linsey Knerl 1433907 at http://www.wisebread.com Best Money Tips: Income Ideas for Seniors http://www.wisebread.com/best-money-tips-income-ideas-for-seniors <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/best-money-tips-income-ideas-for-seniors" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/senior-5149897-small.jpg" alt="senior" title="senior" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="167" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Welcome to Wise Bread's <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/topic/best-money-tips">Best Money Tips</a> Roundup! Today we found some fantastic articles on income ideas for seniors, frugal gifts for Mother's Day, and signs it's time to look for a new job.</p> <h2>Top 5 Articles</h2> <p><a href="http://onecentatatime.com/income-ideas-for-senior-retired-elderly/">21 Income Ideas for Senior and Retired Persons</a> &mdash; To make some extra income, seniors and retired persons can register with temporary employment agencies. [One Cent At A Time]</p> <p><a href="http://bargainbabe.com/frugal-gifts-for-mothers-day-may-2013/">Frugal Gifts For Mother's Day</a>&nbsp;&mdash; This Mother's Day, consider giving your mom a mix cd or homemade photo coasters. [Bargain Babe]</p> <p><a href="http://financialhighway.com/5-signs-its-time-to-look-for-a-new-job/">5 Signs It's Time to Look for a New Job</a> &mdash; It may be time to look for a new job if you have no hope of advancement. [Financial Highway]</p> <p><a href="http://www.consumerismcommentary.com/8-scientifically-proven-principles-of-happiness/">8 Scientifically Proven Principles of Happiness</a> &mdash; Buying experiences instead of things and thinking about what you aren't thinking about can help make you happy. [Consumerism Commentary]</p> <p><a href="http://www.thesimpledollar.com/2013/05/07/the-frugal-childs-birthday/">The Frugal Child's Birthday</a> &mdash; It is possible for your child to have a cheap but fun birthday party. Consider buying some inexpensive water guns and having a water gun party! [The Simple Dollar]</p> <h2>Other Essential Reading</h2> <p><a href="http://www.savvysugar.com/Uses-Club-Soda-30394321">10 Extraordinary Uses For Ordinary Club Soda</a> &mdash; Did you know club soda can be used to remove rust? [PopSugar Smart Living]</p> <p><a href="http://www.freemoneywisdom.com/what-can-you-do-if-you-cant-keep-up-with-the-rent/">What can You do if You can't Keep up with the Rent?</a> &mdash; If you can't make the rent for the month, ask your landlord for an extension or ask for an advance on your paycheck. [Free Money Wisdom]</p> <p><a href="http://parentingsquad.com/19-loving-gifts-of-service-for-mom">19 Loving Gifts of Service for Mom</a> &mdash; If you need something to do for your mom this Mother's Day, prepare dinner or schedule a spa day for her. [Parenting Squad]</p> <p><a href="http://www.stretcher.com/stories/12/12may07m.cfm?slider">Preventing Summer Crime</a> &mdash; To prevent summer crime, put your lights on timers or get a &quot;Beware of Dog&quot; sign. [The Dollar Stretcher]</p> <p><a href="http://www.freemoneyfinance.com/2013/05/our-communication-and-entertainment-changes.html">Our Communication and Entertainment Changes</a> &mdash; It is often best for your wallet to go with bundled services. [Free Money Finance]</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/ashley-jacobs">Ashley Jacobs</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/best-money-tips-income-ideas-for-seniors">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-4"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-reasons-its-never-too-late-for-a-career-change">6 Reasons It&#039;s Never Too Late for a Career Change</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-surprising-ways-social-media-stars-make-money">5 Surprising Ways Social Media Stars Make Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/you-got-a-raise-now-what">You Got a Raise! Now What?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/getting-by-without-a-job-part-2-boost-income">Getting by without a job, part 2--boost income</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/are-you-underpaid-how-to-figure-out-what-salary-you-deserve">Are You Underpaid? How to Figure Out What Salary You Deserve</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income best money tips income retired retirees seniors Wed, 08 May 2013 10:00:35 +0000 Ashley Jacobs 973945 at http://www.wisebread.com Book review: Cash-Rich Retirement http://www.wisebread.com/book-review-cash-rich-retirement <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/book-review-cash-rich-retirement" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/cash-rich-retirement-cover.jpg" alt="Cover of Cash-Rich Retirement" title="Cover of Cash-Rich Retirement" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="105" height="160" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0312377401?ie=UTF8&amp;tag=wisbre08-20&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=0312377401">Cash-Rich Retirement: Use the Investing Techniques of the Mega-Wealthy to Secure Your Retirement Future</a>&nbsp;by Jim Schlagheck.</p> <p>Do you need a kick in the pants to get you saving for retirement?&nbsp; Do you need someone to wave their arms and run around screaming that your whole future is at risk, in order to motivate you to put some serious money aside and take the time to learn how your 401(k) works?&nbsp; If so, this is the book for you.</p> <p>It's fascinating to read this book in conjunction with <a href="/book-review-work-less-live-more"><em>Work Less, Live More</em></a>, which I checked out of the library the same day.</p> <p>Where that book goes way beyond the classic notion of retirement at age 65, suggesting that not just retirement, but <em>early</em> retirement, is readily available to almost anyone--if they're willing to live frugally and maybe keep on doing a bit of work on the side--this book is the complete opposite. &nbsp;</p> <p>Schlagheck scarcely talks about early retirement, and it doesn't even seem to imagine that anyone might do any work to earn money after they retire.&nbsp; It's all about straight-up retirement:&nbsp; You work to retirement age, and then you quit.&nbsp; And, it warns, if that's your plan, you may be in for an unpleasant surprise.&nbsp; Not only is your retirement in &quot;grave danger,&quot; the <em>whole system</em> of retirement is on the verge of being a failed experiment.</p> <p>Schlagheck sees two sources of danger.</p> <p>The first is the &quot;coming demographic storm&quot; of baby boomers all getting set to retire at once.&nbsp;&nbsp; Not only are they all going to want to get their social security payments at once, they're also going to be taking their pensions (from old-line businesses and from state and local governments) at once.&nbsp; Plus, they're all going to stop accumulating investments, and switch to selling them instead.&nbsp; With everyone trying to get their money at once, Schlagheck sees a real danger that they won't all succeed.</p> <p>The second is a set of foolish ideas about investing.&nbsp; You cannot, he says, safely rely on capital gains for your investment returns; reliable long-term returns are largely going to come from income:&nbsp; dividends, interest, and rents.&nbsp; In addition, you can't&nbsp; get adequate diversification simply by dividing your investments among American companies of different sizes (a generous helping of S&amp;P 500 seasoned with some mid-cap and small-cap funds).&nbsp; You need to diversify both internationally and among asset classes (stocks, bonds, REITs, etc.).</p> <p>I actually agree with most of what Schlagheck says, especially about his focus on income in your investment portfolio and on the kinds of investments you ought to be focusing on.&nbsp; In addition to the excellent chapters on investing, he's got a good chapter on health insurance, some interesting thoughts on long-term care insurance, and lots of good detail about complicated subjects like annuities (that aren't so well covered other places).</p> <p>Where I have a problem is in the way he's trying to work the reader up into a tizzy.&nbsp; The book could not have been printed before the digital age, because in the days of metal type the printer would have used up his entire supply of exclamation points before getting halfway through the manuscript.&nbsp; Every page is splashed with italics warning you of a threat or urging you to action.&nbsp; The repeated exhortations to &quot;save, save, save&quot; become wearisome, and the drumbeat warning that your retirement is in danger don't become more compelling with repetition.</p> <p>Still, if you or someone you know is just blithely assuming that retirement will take care of itself, a wake-up call like this may be just what you (or they) need.&nbsp; The information is right on, even if I got an unusually vigorous workout for my eye-rolling muscles as I plowed through the cautions, dangers, perils, warnings, and urgent urgings. &nbsp;</p> <p>For the right person, though&nbsp;<a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0312377401?ie=UTF8&amp;tag=wisbre08-20&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=0312377401">Cash-Rich Retirement</a> by Jim Schlagheck is a fine book.&nbsp; Excellent content.&nbsp; Just a little strident for my tastes.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/philip-brewer">Philip Brewer</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/book-review-cash-rich-retirement">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-5"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/book-review-retire-on-less-than-you-think">Book review: Retire on Less Than You Think</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/book-review-work-less-live-more">Book review: Work Less, Live More</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/book-review-the-only-investment-guide-youll-ever-need">Book review: The Only Investment Guide You&#039;ll Ever Need</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/book-review-the-little-book-of-common-sense-investing">Book review: The Little Book of Common Sense Investing</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-much-do-i-need-to-retire-how-much-can-i-spend">How much do I need to retire? How much can I spend?</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance Retirement book review books dividends interest investing investments rents retire retirees retirement benefits retirement funding retirement planning review Mon, 28 Apr 2008 13:08:05 +0000 Philip Brewer 2046 at http://www.wisebread.com Book review: Work Less, Live More http://www.wisebread.com/book-review-work-less-live-more <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/book-review-work-less-live-more" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/work-less-cover.jpg" alt="Cover of Work Less, Live More" title="Cover of Work Less, Live More" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="124" height="160" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1413307051?ie=UTF8&amp;tag=wisbre08-20&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=1413307051">Work Less, Live More: The Way to Semi-Retirement</a> by Bob Clyatt.</p> <p>Early retirement is a topic I've always been interested in.&nbsp; The particular version of it that this book deals with--living well on less money, as a means to getting by without having to work at a regular job--is not only interesting, it's the life I'm living.&nbsp; Allowing for the fact that it's aimed right at my own personal sweet spot, I liked it even better than I expected.&nbsp; It reads like the author started following me around a year ago, figured out exactly what questions I needed answered, then carefully and thoughtfully wrote a book to answer them. &nbsp;</p> <p>The book is aimed at people interested in &quot;semi-retirement,&quot; by which he means people who want to (or have to) work less, but who aren't in a position to (or don't care to) stop working altogether.&nbsp; There are an increasing number of people in that situation:</p> <ul> <li>people who are burned out on their old careers</li> <li>people whose skills no longer match the job market</li> <li>people who want to spend more time with their families</li> <li>people who want to focus on interests (art, music, writing) that don't pay enough to support them</li> </ul> <p>About half the book is about money, because for most people, money is the limiting factor in making the sort of lifestyle choices the book is talking about. &nbsp;</p> <p>There's a chapter on frugality (which is necessary before semi-retirement, to free up cash for saving and investing, and then necessary after semi-retirement, to make that modest portfolio last).&nbsp; It's got some good information on how to include less-than-annual expenses (like major home repairs, replacing a car, and so on) in your planning.</p> <p>There's a chapter on investing, with a focus on asset allocation and setting up a portfolio that will earn a good return without too much volatility.&nbsp; It starts with basics, like low-cost index funds, then expands on it just a bit (adding investments whose values aren't strongly correlated with those, to help stabilize your portfolio's value).</p> <p>There's a really good chapter on figuring out how much of your investment portfolio you can safely spend each year.&nbsp; It covers a lot of the same information I cover in my article on <a href="/how-much-do-you-need-to-retire-how-much-can-you-spend">How much you can spend in retirement</a>, and ends up in about the same place, but he's got an interesting twist that I think is really valuable.</p> <p>Others who have looked at this have concluded that you can probably spend about 4% of your capital the first year, and then increase the amount you spend each year by enough to keep you even with inflation--and expect that the return on your investments will add up to enough to maintain your portfolio indefinitely.</p> <p>There are several negatives with this strategy.&nbsp; If you have a bit of good luck in the market--especially good luck early--your portfolio might grow quite substantially.&nbsp; In that case, just growing your spending to match inflation might seem a little meager.&nbsp; On the other hand, if you have some serious bad luck in the market, continuing to take the inflation-adjusted draw could burn through your capital very quickly.</p> <p>The intuitive solution is to go ahead and step up your withdrawals in good years, while cutting back slightly in bad years.&nbsp; (Cutting back drastically might be even better, but most semi-retirees are already living frugally enough that it might not be practical to cut back to just 4% of a portfolio that was sharply reduced after a severe downturn in the market.)</p> <p>What Clyatt has done is put some numbers to that intuitive solution.&nbsp; He proposes that you feel free to spend 4% of your portfolio each year:</p> <ul> <li>In a good year, you get the full benefit of your portfolio growth. &nbsp;</li> <li>In a so-so year your 4% might just barely (or not quite) match inflation, but a semi-retiree can probably deal with that.</li> <li>In a poor year, your 4% might shrink so much as to produce an actual decline in the amount of money you can spend.&nbsp; In that case, Clyatt says, you can go ahead and spend 95% of what you spent last year, putting a floor under the amount your available cash can shrink from one year to the next.</li> </ul> <p>And here's where Clyatt provides some real value.&nbsp; That 95% value isn't arbitrary.&nbsp; He tested it.&nbsp; If you'd started following this strategy for any 40-year period since 1927, you'd not only <strong>not</strong> have run out of money, your portfolio would have at least maintained its value.&nbsp; Over 10, 20, and 30 year periods you'd sometimes see a decline in value, but no instance when the portfolio ran dry.</p> <p>For me, just that analysis is worth the price of the book.&nbsp; The stuff on taxes is just a bonus.</p> <p>The rest of the book is about other aspects of being a semi-retiree.&nbsp; There's stuff on finding the right work--meaningful, remunerative, and not as stressful as the full-time work you're semi-retiring from.&nbsp; There's stuff on dealing with no longer being part of the work-a-day world.&nbsp; There's stuff for couples, if one or both of you is suddenly spending a lot more time at home.</p> <p>It's worth comparing this book to Timothy Ferriss's <a href="/book-review-the-4-hour-workweek">The 4-Hour Workweek</a>.&nbsp; The &quot;work less&quot; theme runs through both of them, but Ferriss focuses on making a bit of money from something other than a regular job, and then on convincing your regular employer to let you turn your regular job into one where you don't need to show up all day every day.&nbsp; Clyatt doesn't have anything about that second&nbsp; part (dealing with your boss), and a different focus on the first (work that's meaningful and low-stress, rather than maximum return for minimum hours).</p> <p>I've also previously reviewed <a href="/book-review-retire-on-less-than-you-think">Retire on Less Than You Think</a>.&nbsp; It's a good book, but it's focus is largely on how a retiree can live cheaply without much loss in standard of living--and I was a little underwhelmed by the insight that you can retire on less money through the magic of spending less.&nbsp; (If you--or perhaps your spouse--needs to internalize that message, it's a great book.)</p> <p>If you've already got that part down, then <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1413307051?ie=UTF8&amp;tag=wisbre08-20&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=1413307051">Work Less, Live More</a> may be a better choice for you.&nbsp; It doesn't skimp on the frugal living part, but it assumes you can figure a lot of that stuff out for yourself.&nbsp; (It does have a good section on health insurance for early retirees.)&nbsp; If you've ready to deal with the details of being a semi-retiree--or planning to be one--this is a great book.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/philip-brewer">Philip Brewer</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/book-review-work-less-live-more">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-5"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/book-review-retire-on-less-than-you-think">Book review: Retire on Less Than You Think</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/book-review-cash-rich-retirement">Book review: Cash-Rich Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/book-review-reinventing-collapse">Book review: Reinventing Collapse</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/book-review-the-only-investment-guide-youll-ever-need">Book review: The Only Investment Guide You&#039;ll Ever Need</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/book-review-the-4-hour-workweek">Book Review: The 4-Hour Workweek</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Frugal Living Career and Income Retirement balance book review books frugality retire retirees review Tue, 22 Apr 2008 13:12:46 +0000 Philip Brewer 2031 at http://www.wisebread.com Book review: Retire on Less Than You Think http://www.wisebread.com/book-review-retire-on-less-than-you-think <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/book-review-retire-on-less-than-you-think" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/retire-on-less-cover.jpg" alt="Cover of Retire on Less Than You Think" title="Cover of Retire on Less Than You Think" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="92" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Halfway through Fred Brock's book <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0805073744?ie=UTF8&amp;tag=wisbre08-20&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=0805073744"><cite>Retire on Less Than You Think: The New York Times Guide to Planning Your Financial Future</cite></a>, I was mentally drafting a review that would call it good but kind of basic for most Wise Bread readers. Then it clued me in to an oddity of federal law that could make the difference between keeping or losing my health insurance. That one bit is not only worth the price of the book, it could easily be worth my entire life savings. Actually writing the review, I realized the book is full of bits like that. I happened to know most of them already, but I've been studying this stuff for years. I have to say this is a must-read book for anyone who hopes to retire before they're 65.</p> <p>[Updated to add: A revised version of this book has come out since I wrote this review. Check out <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0805087303?ie=UTF8&amp;tag=wisbre08-20&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=0805087303"><cite>Retire on Less Than You Think, Revised Edition: The New York Times Guide to Planning Your Financial Future</cite></a>.]</p> <p>Brock spends nearly a third of the book on one rather obvious idea: You can retire on less <em>if you spend less money! </em>This will, perhaps, not be a great revelation to the average Wise Bread reader. To be fair, though, the book is aimed at affluent New Yorkers (and affluent folks from other east and west coast cities) who would be shocked at the notion that they might live anywhere other than where they do. Perhaps it is important for those readers that he so patiently makes the case that you can spend less money without reducing your standard of living at all--and that you can spend <em>a lot </em>less money if you're willing to make only slightly more drastic changes in the way you live.</p> <p>In fact, the best parts of this book are in this area, because Brock talks about actual people who have retired on less money than some people might consider possible. He covers a pretty wide range from barely frugal at all to pretty darned frugal (such as Elton Pasea who saves enough of his $1200 a month from social security and a pension to take annual bicycling vacations in Europe).</p> <p>Brock goes to quite a bit of effort to debunk the notion that you'll need to be able to replace 70% or 80% of your pre-retirement income from savings or your pension in order to retire. Rather, you need to replace that fraction of your <em>spending</em> (which had better be less than your income, if you're hoping to retire early).</p> <p>After making the case that early retirement is within the reach of almost anyone who lives on less than they earn, he gets into the good stuff. There's a chapter on simplifying your life that's good, if a bit basic. A chapter on deciding where to retire with some good resources for finding someplace affordable and some sound advice on choosing to live near family and with access to things you want to do. There's a section on analyzing your assets, with some good info about <a href="/reverse-mortgages-the-best-way-to-eat-your-home">reverse mortgages</a> for people who own a house. There's a chapter on health insurance that had that great tidbit for me. It rounds things out with a chapter on social security and then some worksheets, suggested resources, and an excellent index.</p> <p>(The tidbit for me, by the way, had to do with the the federal law HIPAA. That's the law that prompted all of your doctors and pharmacies to start giving you privacy notices. It also assures that, if you change employers and go from one group plan straight to another, the new plan can't exclude coverage for preexisting conditions. (I knew that part.) It also (and this was news to me) requires insurers to offer coverage to anyone who has left a job, continued their coverage under COBRA, and then exhausted the COBRA coverage. I'm still covered under my employer's insurance as part of my severance package, but I hadn't been planning on exhausting the COBRA coverage--I'd been planning to use that only as a back-up in case I had trouble finding insurance. I didn't understand that by getting an individual policy earlier, I'd lose access to guaranteed, non-cancelable insurance! That one point is probably of interest to only a small number of people, but it's critically important to anyone leaving a job and not yet eligible for Medicare.)</p> <p><a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0805073744?ie=UTF8&amp;tag=wisbre08-20&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=9325&amp;creativeASIN=0805073744"><cite>Retire on Less Than You Think</cite></a> by Fred Brock. It's a short book--you could read it in an afternoon. But in addition to advocating for the idea that a simplier life lets you follow your bliss--to retirement or where ever else it might lead you--there are dozens of bits of information that could spell the difference between a happy retirement and having to go back to work in your old age.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/philip-brewer">Philip Brewer</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/book-review-retire-on-less-than-you-think">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-6"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/book-review-work-less-live-more">Book review: Work Less, Live More</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/book-review-cash-rich-retirement">Book review: Cash-Rich Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/book-review-the-only-investment-guide-youll-ever-need">Book review: The Only Investment Guide You&#039;ll Ever Need</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/book-review-reinventing-collapse">Book review: Reinventing Collapse</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/tiny-nestegg-retire-abroad">Tiny Nestegg? Retire abroad!</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance Frugal Living Retirement book review books frugal life frugality retire retirees retirement planning review Wed, 03 Oct 2007 12:15:10 +0000 Philip Brewer 1243 at http://www.wisebread.com Tiny Nestegg? Retire abroad! http://www.wisebread.com/tiny-nestegg-retire-abroad <p><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/wisebread_imce/china_flag_large.jpg" alt=" " width="224" height="150" /></p> <p>Can&#39;t afford to live on your pension or Social Security in the U.S.? Why not find a cheaper place to live? No, not Canada - the other communist mecca... that&#39;s right, China!</p> <p>Ha ha! I know I&#39;ll get all kinds of flack for that one. I&#39;m just kidding, Comrade, don&#39;t take me seriously! I know China isn&#39;t communist anymore.</p> <p>NPR, my favorite news source, <a href="http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=9348962">offered up a story yesterday</a> filed by Keva Rosenfeld, whose mother-in-law (I&#39;m not sure if it is mother-in-law per se so much as his partner, Karen Murphy&#39;s, mother) has chosen to retire in China, finding it much too difficult to live off of $400 a month in the United States. Interestingly enough, the old gal (she&#39;s 75) has chosed Shanghai, arguably the most expensive city in China, to spend out her remaining days.</p> <p>Although the story promises some amusing tales of generational misunderstandings, it&#39;s much shorter than it should be, told from Keva&#39;s viewpoint, as he goes to Shanghai with his wife for a visit with his mother-in-law. There is a short discussion about how small a dingy the Shanghai apartment is, but little about how and where she shops for groceries, if she has learned to barter for her gorceries, if she has made any friends, or what it&#39;s like to live in Shanghai knowing absolutely no Mandarin AT ALL. Where does she go for health care? How does she explain what she needs in an emergency?</p> <p>China is a place you can&#39;t really avoid hearing about these days, so I hate to add to the hullabaloo. Slate featured a couple installments about traveling to China for <a href="http://www.slate.com/id/2131601/">medical treatments</a> a while back. </p> <p>Having lived in China, I can attest that unless you live in a big city like Shanghai or Beijing or Shenzhen, you&#39;re likely to have a hard time adjusting as an American. Not that the big cities are easy, either. Things are made immeasurably more difficult if you don&#39;t have any language skills. However, although Keva can be heard in the NPR story suggesting that no one in Shanghai speaks English, this is most certainly not the case.</p> <p>I&#39;d be really curious to know if this will be a trend among the Baby Boomers (Murphy&#39;s mother is not a boomer, but I can see boomers doing this), or if living in China is really more for people like Ms. Murphy&#39;s mother, who is described as a &quot;bohemian&quot;. And if Westerners start moving en masse to China, will it still be a viable place to live on less than $500 a month?</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/andrea-karim">Andrea Karim</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/tiny-nestegg-retire-abroad">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-millennial-money-habits-every-retiree-should-learn">6 Millennial Money Habits Every Retiree Should Learn</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/stop-falling-for-these-6-social-security-myths">Stop Falling for These 6 Social Security Myths</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/book-review-retire-on-less-than-you-think">Book review: Retire on Less Than You Think</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/book-review-cash-rich-retirement">Book review: Cash-Rich Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-much-do-i-need-to-retire-how-much-can-i-spend">How much do I need to retire? How much can I spend?</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance Retirement baby boomers China elderly nestegg pension retire retirees Shanghai social security Thu, 05 Apr 2007 15:20:25 +0000 Andrea Karim 459 at http://www.wisebread.com