promotion http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/3573/all en-US 5 Ways a Side Hustle Can Further Your Career http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-a-side-hustle-can-further-your-career <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-ways-a-side-hustle-can-further-your-career" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_side_job_000020816287.jpg" alt="Woman using her side hustle to further her career" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Do you feel stuck in a career rut but not sure what needs to change? Your job likely pays the bills and quitting a steady paycheck just because you're bored or unchallenged doesn't seem like a smart option. You still have to pay the rent, after all.</p> <p>This is where a side hustle can be both financially rewarding and creatively stimulating. But balancing a full time job and a side hustle is not always easy.</p> <p>Here are five ways a side hustle can expand your career and give you more options.</p> <h2>1. Learn New Career Skills</h2> <p>One of the main benefits to starting a side hustle is that you can expand your knowledge by acquiring new skills. This can include learning how to start a website, optimizing social media channels, seeking out new clients, and even taking courses on copywriting, SEO, bookkeeping, and the like.</p> <p>You always have the opportunity to learn something new. Even after four years of having a side-hustle turned full-time gig, I still find new programs, books, and courses that help me learn new skills and increase my knowledge about certain subjects.</p> <h2>2. Manage Multiple Projects</h2> <p>When you work as a traditional employee, you generally only have a certain amount of tasks each day, and you're often doing the same things each month. But when you have a side hustle, things are lot less consistent. You're not only an employee but also the boss, the bookkeeper, the receptionist, the manager &mdash; and everybody else.</p> <p>As a side hustler, you wear a lot more hats and are able to balance many types of projects. Not only are you working for clients, but you're also managing multiple deadlines, and perhaps even outsourcing to other contractors. All of these things will help you learn to balance lots of priorities while still getting things done on time.</p> <h2>3. Streamline Your Workflow</h2> <p>If you don't have a side hustle yet, you may not understand the importance of managing your time wisely. When you have a full time job, family, household chores, errands, and a side hustle, you have to be <em>very efficient </em>with where you spend your time and energy.</p> <p>When I started my side hustle alongside my day job, I began noticing holes in my workday productivity routine. I was able to streamline the processes at my job, in order to get more done in less time.</p> <p>This allowed me to reduce my workload overall, so I could make room for other personal and professional tasks. My employer appreciated this too, as I helped them save money and increase productivity in the office.</p> <h2>4. Diversify Your Income and Career Path</h2> <p>Your career and income are tightly woven together and we all need to make a living to support our families. So what happens when your boss needs to cut costs, or you're handed a pink slip? A side hustle alleviates some of this risk by diversifying the types of income streams you have.</p> <p>Finding another job can take a lot of time and effort, not to mention the additional time it takes to get paid from when you were first hired. This period of stress can be eased by having some money coming in from your side hustle, and a side gig can be a viable second career option, should you need it. It can also take off the pressure while giving you the chance to take your time in pursuing the best opportunity.</p> <h2>5. Broaden Your Network</h2> <p>Working in a traditional office setting means you see the same people day in and day out, which doesn't leave much room for expanding your network. With a side hustle though, specifically one that's online based, you're able to broaden your network everyday.</p> <p>Whether it's meeting up at a local coffee shop, or connecting with new people at an industry conference, a side hustle offers the chance for you to broaden your list of contacts and like-minded individuals. This list of contacts could come in very handy in the future if you get laid off, need to switch jobs, or even take your side hustle full-time.</p> <p><em>Do you have a side hustle? How has it helped expand your career?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/carrie-smith">Carrie Smith</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-a-side-hustle-can-further-your-career">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-to-say-to-your-boss-to-get-a-promotion-or-raise">5 Things to Say to Your Boss to Get a Promotion or Raise</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-job-perks-that-can-lead-to-a-dream-career">6 Job Perks That Can Lead to a Dream Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-money-moves-to-make-after-a-promotion">10 Money Moves to Make After a Promotion</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-times-you-should-demand-a-raise">5 Times You Should Demand a Raise</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Extra Income career career skills promotion raise side hustle Fri, 24 Apr 2015 13:00:05 +0000 Carrie Smith 1400450 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Times a Higher Salary Isn't Worth It http://www.wisebread.com/6-times-a-higher-salary-isnt-worth-it <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-times-a-higher-salary-isnt-worth-it" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/man_stressed_office_000043549226.jpg" alt="Man stressed out at the office" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="141" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Money isn't everything. Having the extra funds for foreign travel and designer shopping splurges can be nice &mdash; to say the least &mdash; but not when the tradeoffs include scientifically backed side effects such as insomnia, death, and divorce. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-times-youre-better-off-without-a-promotion?ref=seealso">12 Times You're Better Off Without a Promotion</a>)</p> <p>So if you're facing a job offer that comes with an attractive salary bump, be sure the new gig won't catapult you into any of the following problems.</p> <h2>1. The Commute Would Kill You</h2> <p>Americans spend more time commuting (100+ hours per year) than they do vacationing (80 hours). According to reserach out of Sweden, long commutes also cause a wealth of <a href="http://www.slate.com/articles/business/moneybox/2011/05/your_commute_is_killing_you.html">horrible side effects</a>, including&nbsp;neck pain, obesity, loneliness, divorce, stress, and insomnia. So if the twice daily traffic jam you'd have to endure to get to your higher paying gig seems likely to drive you mad, then it's probably best to stick with the job you've already got. Sure, the extra money would be nice. But research shows you very well may end up spending a good portion of that salary increase on your newfound needs for physical therapy, sleep doctors, and a divorce attorney.</p> <h2>2. The Office Culture is Toxic</h2> <p>If you've ever said, &quot;My job is killing me!&quot; &mdash; you could be right. Research shows that people in&nbsp;<a href="http://healthland.time.com/2011/08/10/study-your-hostile-workplace-may-be-killing-you/">hostile work environments</a> are more likely to die sooner than those who work in atmospheres that are more favorable. Death aside, toxic work environments are also known to provoke aches, stress, and signs of depression. So before accepting a new job offer with a dazzling salary, do your homework.</p> <h2>3. Your Work-Life Balance Would Be Out of Whack</h2> <p>Work has a way of getting in the way of what matters most: family time. These numbers offer a glimpse at the epidemic: 55% of all employees say they don't have enough time for themselves, 67% of employed parents say they don't have enough time with their kids, and 63% of married employees say they don't have enough time with their spouse, according to Families and Work Institute's <a href="http://www.familiesandwork.org/context-matters-insights-about-older-workers-from-the-national-study-of-the-changing-workforce/"><em>National Study of the Changing Workforce</em></a>. If a higher paying gig would mean severely under-serving yourself or your loved ones, it may be best to stick with a lower paying job that offers more flexibility.</p> <h2>4. You Don't Believe in the Work</h2> <p>All the money in the world can't make you feel pride in the job you're doing unless you truly believe in the work. And if you're being offered a better-paying gig at a company whose ideals are in conflict with your beliefs, be they religious, social, or otherwise, your time would be well spent to figure out how to reconcile that &mdash; which could mean declining the job. You'll never reach your potential if you're doing something you don't stand behind 100%.</p> <h2>5. You Don't See Eye to Eye With Your Boss</h2> <p>If the person who's supposed to be raising you up seems set on bringing you down, it might be time to skedaddle. Studies show that <a href="http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10869-011-9253-2">unsupportive bosses</a> affect how your whole family relates to one another, your physical health, and your morale while in the office. They also raise your risk for heart disease. No job is worth putting up with woes like that &mdash; no matter how many zeros are included in the salary.</p> <h2>6. The Company is on the Fritz</h2> <p>There's no need to go down with a sinking ship. If the company trying to pad your pockets is on its way out, it may be wise to stay in control and decline the job offer rather than suffer a layoff in the future.</p> <p><em>Have you ever taken the higher salaried job only to regret it later? Tell us about it in comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/brittany-lyte">Brittany Lyte</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-times-a-higher-salary-isnt-worth-it">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-to-say-to-your-boss-to-get-a-promotion-or-raise">5 Things to Say to Your Boss to Get a Promotion or Raise</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-simple-steps-to-discovering-your-true-salary-potential">6 Simple Steps to Discovering Your True Salary Potential</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-a-side-hustle-can-further-your-career">5 Ways a Side Hustle Can Further Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/didnt-get-the-raise-ask-for-this-instead">Didn&#039;t Get the Raise? Ask for This, Instead</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building promotion raise salary Fri, 13 Mar 2015 08:00:09 +0000 Brittany Lyte 1334919 at http://www.wisebread.com 5 Career Tactics That Are Actually Holding You Back http://www.wisebread.com/5-career-tactics-that-are-actually-holding-you-back <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-career-tactics-that-are-actually-holding-you-back" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/career_000026674434.jpg" alt="Coworkers using career tactics that are holding them back" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>What if all your efforts to become the shining star of your organization were having the opposite effect? Sometimes even our best-intentioned ploys to climb the ladder higher and faster can result in an unfortuitous fall down to the lower rungs. Just like over-exercising can harm your body rather than help it, there are repercussions to trying too hard to get ahead at work. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/25-career-changes-you-can-make-today?ref=seealso">25 Career Changes You Can Make Today</a>)</p> <p>Sometimes our career advancement tactics may be causing you more harm than good.</p> <h2>1. Volunteering for Every Assignment</h2> <p>If you're volunteering for every assignment in hopes of projecting yourself as the tireless, tenacious worker you think your boss wants you to be, you're at risk of stretching yourself too thin. You're right, your boss probably <em>does</em> want a go-getter. But not a burnt out one.</p> <p>Research shows that we actually need rest to not only perform at our peak, but to perform well, period. A 2010 LexisNexis survey of 1,700 white collar workers from the U.S., China, South Africa, the U.K., and Australia revealed that employees spend more than half their workdays receiving and managing information. What's more, half of those surveyed workers confessed that they were <a href="http://www.lexisnexis.com/en-us/about-us/media/press-release.page?id=128751276114739">reaching a breaking point</a> after which they would not be able to accommodate the deluge of data. The takeaway is this: Man is not machine, and if you keep pushing yourself to act like the Energizer Bunny, it's only a matter of time before you crash and burn.</p> <h2>2. Personal Websites That Highlight Your Lack of Experience</h2> <p>If you've got it, flaunt it, as the saying goes. But when it comes to all things ranging from your physique to your personal website, it's best not to accentuate what you're lacking.</p> <p>Yes, a resume site can help advance your career by showcasing your skills and accomplishments. But it can also ward off potential job and networking opportunities if it merely serves as a cyber billboard promoting the fact that you haven't got much experience under your belt. So if you're having trouble compiling a list of your work-related talents, it's probably best to hold off on building that website and instead bide your time trying to gain more experience. Then, once you've got something to boast about, get back to creating that website and shout it from the virtual mountaintops.</p> <h2>3. Unabashedly Trying to Be the Best</h2> <p>In professional team sports like soccer and football, <a href="http://www8.gsb.columbia.edu/cbs-directory/sites/cbs-directory/files/publications/Too%20much%20talent%20PS.pdf">too many elite players</a> can hinder a&nbsp;team's overall performance, according to a recent study by researchers at Columbia University. The same is true in the workplace. When teams of any sort need to come together, the study authors concluded, a deluge of talent can tear them apart. Infighting over dominance is just one of many negative outcomes of what researchers dubbed the &quot;too-much-talent-effect.&quot; So if you're currently on a mission to assert yourself at the head of the office talent pool, it might be beneficial to take a step back, gain some perspective, and consider whether you'd be better off branding yourself instead as the all-star team player.</p> <h2>4. Branding Yourself as Someone You're Not</h2> <p>If you're lying, or even just slightly embellishing, to qualify yourself for a raise, promotion, or new gig, you're running the risk of setting yourself back five steps rather than one ahead. Whether it's saying you're an expert at using a computer program you're actually unfamiliar with or asserting that you speak fluent Spanish when you really don't, you're probably going to suffer some serious repercussions when it comes time to perform on those skills and you fall short. Half of all employers said they would automatically <a href="http://www.careerbuilder.com/share/aboutus/pressreleasesdetail.aspx?sd=8%2F7%2F2014&amp;id=pr837&amp;ed=12%2F31%2F2014">dismiss a job candidate</a> if they caught a lie on his or her resume, according to a nationwide survey by CareerBuilder.</p> <h2>5. Over-Extending Yourself Financially</h2> <p>Maybe you broke your budget by self-funding a flight to Colorado for a meet-and-greet with company executives that very well may not hire you. Or you joined the ritzy golf club you can't really afford because your boss belongs there and you're hoping to get some more face time. Perhaps it was a new business suit you splurged on in hopes that it might improve the outcome of your annual performance evaluation meeting. If you're spending money you don't have on things that very well may do nothing to advance your career, stop. Long shots aimed at making gains in the office aren't worth the risk of financial ruin.</p> <p><em>What career tactics have you tried &mdash; only to have them backfire? Please warn others in comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/brittany-lyte">Brittany Lyte</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-career-tactics-that-are-actually-holding-you-back">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-to-say-to-your-boss-to-get-a-promotion-or-raise">5 Things to Say to Your Boss to Get a Promotion or Raise</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-a-side-hustle-can-further-your-career">5 Ways a Side Hustle Can Further Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/these-10-words-and-phrases-are-keeping-you-from-getting-a-raise">These 10 Words and Phrases Are Keeping You From Getting a Raise</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-times-a-higher-salary-isnt-worth-it">6 Times a Higher Salary Isn&#039;t Worth It</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building career growth promotion raise Tue, 03 Mar 2015 10:00:06 +0000 Brittany Lyte 1316589 at http://www.wisebread.com The 8 Worst Things Good Employees Do http://www.wisebread.com/the-8-worst-things-good-employees-do <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/the-8-worst-things-good-employees-do" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_work_000020741145.jpg" alt="Woman at work contemplating" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Most of us like to think of ourselves as good employees. We show up for work on time, do our jobs to the best of our abilities, are team players, and put in more than enough hours. But, even good employees can commit career sins &mdash; and most of the time we don't even know we're doing it. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-reasons-you-deserve-to-get-fired?ref=seealso">12 Reasons You Deserve to Get Fired</a>)</p> <p>Read on to learn the eight worst things good employees do.</p> <h2>1. Buckle Under Pressure</h2> <p>Some jobs are super high stress &mdash; and that can take a toll on an employee after an extended period of time. But as a professional, it's your duty to take these situations in stride and weather the storm to the best of your ability. The last thing you want to do is send the impression that you're just not cut out for your position.</p> <p>&quot;There are times when the environment of the workplace, company culture, or pressure from coworkers, peers, and upper management may influence [good employees] to act outside of their normal behavioral pattern,&quot; says Michael Lan, senior resume consultant at Resume Writer Direct. &quot;Being pressured to meet a quota within a certain deadline, or accomplishing a number of set goals and tasks increases an employee's stress level. Some employees will consequentially buckle under this pressure and make questionable or 'bad' decisions in order to keep up with demands.&quot;</p> <p>You should always strive to handle yourself with poise, but if you think your work demands are consistently unreasonable, schedule a meeting with your boss to discuss.</p> <h2>2. Make Too Many Excuses or Apologize Too Much</h2> <p>&quot;Over-justifying or over-communicating why something isn't ready is a horrible habit I've seen employees fall into,&quot; explains Michelle Brammer, marketing manager for eZanga. &quot;When employees over-justify or give too much communication as to why a task isn't complete, I'm left questioning their judgment or dedication to their job.&quot;</p> <p>As a result, Brammer says, the barrage of apologies may come off like you can't manage multiple tasks or responsibilities &mdash; and that's never a good look. Instead, simply reaffirm your commitment to completing the over-due task ASAP and deliver. If there's something meaningful preventing you from timely completion, by all means do discuss it with your boss.</p> <h2>3. Blend Into the Crowd</h2> <p>Know what happens to the rank-and-file? They get lost in a sea of nobodies just doing their jobs. Is that who you want to be? Let's hope not.</p> <p>&quot;Between being a showy braggart and muffling your hard work, there's a comfortable middle road that you must find in order to claim the benefits of your labor,&quot; offers Constance Dunn, communication and manners expert and author of <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0978761022/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=0978761022&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=FNSTO6IUTD6ATBA4">Practical Glamour: Presenting Your Most Beautiful &amp; Polished Self</a>. &quot;Otherwise, you might find yourself plodding about in the same role, year after year, while others &mdash; perhaps less talented others &mdash; sprint ahead with promotions and raises.&quot;</p> <p>In an effort to avoid this trap, Dunn suggests making it your business to socially congregate with co-workers, even if it's standing around the coffee machine or going for a coffee run with the pack.</p> <p>&quot;Don't wait for them to ask you what you're working on; go ahead and offer interesting tidbits about your current projects in a conversational way,&quot; she says. &quot;This is one strategy to increase your visibility and communicate your competency in the workplace.&quot;</p> <h2>4. Rest on Their Laurels</h2> <p>Becoming a sheep is one thing, but giving up on career advancement altogether is a whole other ballgame &mdash; and one in which you ought not be participating. You don't want to be just a good employee; you should get up every morning to be the best employee. That's the only way you'll see the kind of promotion you dream of &mdash; but you have to work for it.</p> <p>&quot;The worst things good employees do is to not tactfully push to advance their careers,&quot; says David T. Waring, editor of FitSmallBusiness. &quot;Often times good employees trust that good work will be rewarded automatically. Especially in larger companies, this is not always the case, and often times it's the squeaky wheel that gets the grease. While good employees do not want to turn into whiners, making sure that you keep yourself top of mind with those that have the power to advance your career is simply good business.&quot;</p> <h2>5. Allow a Lack of Self-Confidence to Hinder Success</h2> <p>Ever had an idea in a meeting, but were too afraid to lay it out there for fear of sounding stupid or getting that condescending &quot;Really?&quot; look from the boss? I have, so I feel your pain. But keeping mum on a creative or productive idea is never going to help your cause &mdash; ever.</p> <p>Jason M. Schulz, benefits consultant and retired U.S. Army Captain, agrees.</p> <p>&quot;[Some employees are] afraid to speak up when appropriate to do so for fear that they will be ostracized, but then complain later around the water cooler,&quot; he says. &quot;Truth is, most of those employees that think their idea is great when they hear it at the water cooler, really want them to voice their opinion when asked by the boss. And managers aren't just asking for ideas for their health; they genuinely want to see things from the workers' perspective.&quot;</p> <h2>6. Micromanage</h2> <p>I quit a job because I was being micromanaged; it's bad news for a control freak like me (who also has a tendency to micromanage; I'll admit it). The people with whom <em>you</em> work don't like it either &mdash; trust me. So if you have a propensity to be this kind of pest &mdash; yes, I said a <em>pest</em> &mdash; stop it immediately.</p> <p>John J. Brady, executive director and principal of Protem Partners, reminds us that if you can't identify the micromanager in the office, it might just be you.</p> <p>&quot;Most micromanagers do not realize that this label applies to them. They get great feedback as they hold themselves and members of their team to a very high level,&quot; he says. &quot;The problem is, they fear anything less than perfection will hurt their hard-earned credibility, and their very image of perfection gets distorted such that they fail to see the inefficiencies they create and, in most cases, the errors they create by sending a message that only they are competent. Dysfunction and burnout are the usual results.&quot;</p> <h2>7. Work More Than They Contribute</h2> <p>Brady also details the fine line between working and contributing &mdash; two very different things &mdash; that could be holding you back.</p> <p>&quot;Many employees feel insecure about their station at work and, as such, never take vacations, send emails at crazy hours and, in an effort to make sure their commitment is known, talk about it [incessantly],&quot; he says. &quot;Every major study shows that quality and productivity falls after a certain number of hours and without proper breaks from work. The result is that they do good work instead of great work, and they come off as a martyr to management and to colleagues. It doesn't help their career, let alone anyone else's, and isolation is a frequent result.&quot;</p> <p>The takeaway? Relax, boo, you got this. Strive for success, but not <em>too</em> hard, and enjoy a day (maybe a week even) to yourself once in a while.</p> <h2>8. Fail to Think About the Boss's Objectives</h2> <p>Most of us are so busy at work concentrating on our own tasks that we don't give a second thought to what may be on other people's plates, particularly the boss's. It's in your best interest to squash this bad habit today.</p> <p>&quot;Many excellent employees get nothing but stellar feedback, but wonder why they never get promoted,&quot; Brady explains. &quot;At a minimum, you need to think about the business from at least one level up, and then frame your work to fit that set of objectives. Doing a great job at one level doesn't lead management to presume you could excel at the next level, unless you are consistently showing that you know how your current work fits into a larger framework.&quot;</p> <p>Something to consider the next time you're up for review.</p> <p><em>Are any of these habits yours? Or are there other worst things you've seen your good coworkers do?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/mikey-rox">Mikey Rox</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-8-worst-things-good-employees-do">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-first-5-things-you-must-do-after-getting-laid-off">The First 5 Things You Must Do After Getting Laid Off</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-signs-you-should-quit-your-job">8 Signs You Should Quit Your Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-simple-steps-to-discovering-your-true-salary-potential">6 Simple Steps to Discovering Your True Salary Potential</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-people-who-have-their-dream-jobs-do">5 Things People Who Have Their Dream Jobs Do</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/3-weird-ways-people-get-promoted">3 Weird Ways People Get Promoted</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income boss fired layoff promotion raise success Fri, 27 Feb 2015 10:00:12 +0000 Mikey Rox 1309035 at http://www.wisebread.com 5 Things People Who Have Their Dream Jobs Do http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-people-who-have-their-dream-jobs-do <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-things-people-who-have-their-dream-jobs-do" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_000055419322_Large.jpg" alt="businessman computer desk" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>While there are no hard and fast rules on how to get your dream job, there <em>are</em> some amazing consistencies among people who have their ideal careers. Some of these are arguably personality traits common to &quot;A types&quot; or high achievers. Other commonalities, however, are actionable habits that the rest of us can put into practice to reach our goals. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/make-your-dream-career-a-reality-for-less-than-100?ref=seealso">Make Your Dream Career a Reality With Less Than $100</a>)</p> <p>Consider these five things you could be doing to have your dream job.</p> <h2>1. Get Up Early</h2> <p>So many people who are enjoying their dream job insist on getting up before the crack of dawn to demolish goals while the rest of the world is in bed. For the nine to fiver, this makes sense, but not all jobs are cut from the same cloth.</p> <p>If you enjoy a career in a niche that operates on a different work schedule (restaurant work or athletics, for instance), getting up &quot;early&quot; may not be enough. It may involve setting the alarm for an hour before the accepted standard start time for your industry and busting down barriers at 8:00 a.m., 8:00 p.m., or anytime in between. The point is to be motivated enough to get a headstart on the day and take advantage of the extra time and energy in order to excel.</p> <h2>2. Do It Better</h2> <p>Being first to market with a solution isn't as important as it used to be. Now that technology creates a level playing field for everyone with a good idea, it's near impossible to take your brilliant &quot;a-ha&quot; moment to market before anyone else thinks of it. Instead, it's now more important to be the &quot;best&quot; rather than simply being &quot;first.&quot;</p> <p>Many technology services are proof of this phenomenon: Just look at how <a href="http://www.businessinsider.com/10-first-to-market-companies-that-lost-out-to-latecomers-2009-11?op=1">Betamax, Everquest, and Rio</a> lost out to later, more innovative products. This can translate to the individual, as well. Most dream jobbers I know took existing ideas and made them more customer-friendly, more beautiful, or more affordable for the masses.</p> <h2>3. Be Likeable</h2> <p>One could argue that being great at your job is enough, and that personality is an added little bonus that can't hurt when needed. Unless you want your career to be mired in drama, however, being unlikeable can lead others to question your professional capabilities (just ask Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook's &quot;King&quot; of bad buzz).</p> <p>Unless you're independently wealthy and completely risk-proof, there is always a financial and professional incentive to play nicely with others. Being at least moderately likeable can get your far, and more traditional companies will be more likely to work with someone who won't constantly rock the boat.</p> <h2>4. Connect Socially With Professionals &mdash; Online</h2> <p>Millennials are figuring out that there really isn't much of a blur between online and IRL (&quot;in real life&quot;) worlds, especially when it comes to social interactions. Applying that mentality to professional interactions could be the key to getting your dream job.</p> <p>Sites like LinkedIn are making it all too easy to get your professional profile out there, yet too many professionals try to keep their online and IRL spheres distinctly separate. Here's an idea: Stop doing that. Being professional in all of your online dealings showcases your business potential, as well. Not only will you blow the socks off recruiters and talent scouts, but you'll never have to worry about your Tumblr account biting you in the backside because you posted something uncouth.</p> <h2>5. Remain Focused, Yet Flexible</h2> <p>Whatever field you decide to dominate, stay true to your strengths, and take every opportunity to polish those specific skills you feel will shine the brightest in your chosen specialty. If you program, be certain to stay top of new technologies; if you write, get down to the nitty gritty of your craft by reading widely and studying the best in your niche. But don't limit yourself to job offers or opportunities in your field. The best players stay true to their skillset, but are daring enough to go outside of their anticipated category of work. Co-mingle with others outside of your realm to see how your special skillset can be applied in different industries.</p> <p>Of course, if you find that any of the above behaviors are out of your wheelhouse, you can always take the advice of Dirty Jobs guru Mike Rowe, who tells people to, quite simply, do away with the <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2014/10/15/opinion/rowe-right-career/">dream job mentality</a>. Finding contentment in your existing job isn't a crime, and may lead to better overall satisfaction in other areas of your life.</p> <p><em>Have you found your dream job? How did you get there?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/linsey-knerl">Linsey Knerl</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-people-who-have-their-dream-jobs-do">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-8"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-8-worst-things-good-employees-do">The 8 Worst Things Good Employees Do</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/turn-your-passion-into-a-living">Turn Your Passion Into A Living</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/adaptation-lessons-learned-from-being-unemployed">Adaptation: Lessons learned from being unemployed</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-is-your-dream-job">What Is Your Dream Job?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-surprising-benefits-of-failure">7 Surprising Benefits of Failure</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income dream job job promotion success Thu, 19 Feb 2015 10:00:05 +0000 Linsey Knerl 1299783 at http://www.wisebread.com 3 Weird Ways People Get Promoted http://www.wisebread.com/3-weird-ways-people-get-promoted <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/3-weird-ways-people-get-promoted" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock_000064732223_Full.jpg" alt="business man selfie" title="business man selfie" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>There are lots of ways to get promoted. Hard work, diligence, nepotism... But at some companies, not even having a relative in a senior position is worth much when it comes to climbing up the ranks. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-unique-ways-to-score-a-job-interview?ref=seealso">12 Unique Ways to Score a Job Interview</a>)</p> <p>Read on for three of the quirkiest, most inventive promotion methods you've ever heard of. They're anything but run of the mill.</p> <h2>1. An Algorithm</h2> <p>Seven years ago a team of Google's senior-most data crunchers set out to create a mathematical equation to determine <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KY8v-O5Buyc#t=151">who got promoted</a> and when. &quot;We wanted analytics to spit out our people decisions,&quot; says Google VP of People Analytics Prasad Setty. Previously, the company's top dogs would gather for several days at a hotel where they would scour performance reviews and ultimately hand out promotions to those employees they concluded were most deserving. It was an exhausting and time-consuming process, one that Google executives believed big data could accomplish more efficiently. And so the fate of thousands of employees was entrusted to an algorithm.</p> <p>Turns out, people didn't like that much. &quot;We thought that these people who lived in the world of search and ads algorithms all day long would love this,&quot; Setty says. But when the algorithm was presented to Google's hiring committees, they were completely unreceptive. They simply didn't think an algorithm could replace the consideration and care that goes into human resources decisions. And so, after much debate, Google executives agreed that people should make people decisions. Data still contributes to Google's promotions processes, but it's people that are at the reigns.</p> <p>It seems robots won't be taking over for human resources managers anytime soon.</p> <h2>2. Random Selection</h2> <p>Organizations would be more efficient if they promoted people at random. That's the counterintuitive conclusion arrived at by three Italian researchers who were awarded the 2010 Ig Nobel prize in management for their research. Their work is based on the <a href="http://arxiv.org/abs/0907.0455">Peter Principle</a>, the idea that merit-based promotion results in many people assuming positions that exceed their level of competency. To fix this problem, the researchers simply removed merit from the equation. What they found is that when people win promotions by lottery, the entire organization performs better. Yes, we know it sounds crazy, but these researchers did the math to back it up.</p> <p>What the Italians didn't consider, however, is the reaction of employees when informed by management that when it comes to future promotions, their hard work and accomplishments won't be considered. (We predict the scene would be something just short of the apocalypse.)</p> <h2>3. A Sense of Humor</h2> <p>Proteus International&nbsp;<a href="http://www.forbes.com/sites/erikaandersen/2013/05/06/want-to-get-a-promotion-be-funny/">weighs a person's sense of humor</a> when making hiring and promotion decisions, according to founding partner Erika Andersen. &quot;Last year we had two final candidates for an admin job in our company; both looked great on paper, and their phone interviews had been positive,&quot; she writes in an explainer on Forbes. &quot;We then had both candidates do an in-person 'inbox simulation' &mdash; in effect, a couple of hours doing tasks and interactions he or she would do on the job. So both people came into the office and spent a couple of hours with us. It quickly became very clear which person we wanted. A key difference: One candidate had a sense of humor, while the other was almost completely humorless.&quot;</p> <p>It wasn't that the chosen candidate told jokes; rather, she was quick-witted and funny in an understated sort of way. Andersen explains, &quot;When I said, 'You're a native New Yorker? I don't meet many of those,' she replied, 'Yeah, I know more people in New York who are from other countries than from other boroughs.'&quot; Nothing worthy of an SNL performance, but it's the kind of clever and light-hearted remark that makes a person generally pleasant to be around.</p> <p>As it turns out, humor is valued by executives far beyond the boardroom at Proteus International. A recent survey by Robert Half Finance found that 79% of chief financial officers believe an&nbsp;<a href="http://blog.roberthalffinance.com/humor-career-advice">employee's sense of humor</a>&nbsp;plays an important role in how well they fit in with the company's corporate culture. Many of those surveyed also said they believe a person with a sense of humor produces better work.</p> <p><em>What's the strangest way you've been promoted?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/brittany-lyte">Brittany Lyte</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/3-weird-ways-people-get-promoted">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-simple-steps-to-discovering-your-true-salary-potential">6 Simple Steps to Discovering Your True Salary Potential</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-8-worst-things-good-employees-do">The 8 Worst Things Good Employees Do</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-biggest-mistakes-freelancers-make">The 5 Biggest Mistakes Freelancers Make</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-to-say-to-your-boss-to-get-a-promotion-or-raise">5 Things to Say to Your Boss to Get a Promotion or Raise</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-you-should-never-do-after-getting-a-raise">10 Things You Should Never Do After Getting a Raise</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income marketing promotion raise self promotion Thu, 29 Jan 2015 12:00:13 +0000 Brittany Lyte 1283631 at http://www.wisebread.com 7 Job Search Stunts to Get You Noticed by Employers http://www.wisebread.com/7-job-search-stunts-to-get-you-noticed-by-employers <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/7-job-search-stunts-to-get-you-noticed-by-employers" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/job-seeker-480474317-small.jpg" alt="job seeker" title="job seeker" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Did you ever think your dream job would be snatched away by a desperate grad with a viral gimmick? No. No you didn't.</p> <p>In today's society, we're more interested social media hacks than work experience. We'd rather follow a good speaker than a good leader. And we'd rather have an out-of-the-box thinker than someone who knows what he/she wants. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-outdated-job-search-techniques-to-avoid?ref=seealso">10 Outdated Job Hunt Techniques to Avoid</a>)</p> <p>But don't worry, the same rules apply to you. If your previous job hunting strategies have failed, we've compiled an inspiring list of crazy stunts that landed real jobs for real people.</p> <h2>1. Billboard Lands Media Grad 60 Job Offers</h2> <p>By far the most publicized job stunt in recent memory is that of <a href="http://www.adampacitti.com/employadam.html">Adam Pacitti</a>, a college grad with a media production degree who found himself working as a coin exchanger at a video game arcade.</p> <p>After job applications failed, Adam decided enough was enough and of course, as any of us would have done, spent his last 500 pounds on a billboard. After being featured in literally every news source imaginable, Adam received over 60 solid job offers and went to work for award-winning production company KEO.</p> <p>What few people realize is that Adam put a whole lot more work in than simply buying a billboard. His spot in news media was only the result of a successful multi-platform social media campaign that went viral. Viral media always finds its way into the news these days, so his success shouldn't be a surprise.</p> <p>If that sounds like too much work, you'll love our next stunt.</p> <h2>2. Grad Student Suits Up, Hits the Metro, and Lands a Job</h2> <p>If you aren't one for all that social media nonsense, you'll love the story of <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/2014/09/10/graduate-handed-cvs-waterloo-station-dream-job_n_5795724.html">Alfred Ajani</a>. Alfred's marketing degree wasn't enough to land one of 300 positions he applied for, so he decided to go on the offensive.</p> <p>Armed with a suit and a stack of CVs, Alfred posted up at Waterloo station, collecting a few emails and business cards in the process.</p> <p>Oh but wait, that's actually not what landed him his job. Twitter took his post viral, where it caught the attention of recruitment company Asoria Group, who offered him a job via&hellip; LinkedIn.</p> <p>Looks like you're going to need those social media accounts after all.</p> <h2>3. Grad Lands Dream Job After Walking London Streets In a Sandwich Board</h2> <p>At this point, you're probably frantically following people on Twitter, preparing for your next job stunt. But just take a breather. It might be easier than you think.</p> <p>After making the unfortunate decision to get a history degree, <a href="http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/howaboutthat/6221701/Graduate-uses-sandwich-board-to-find-job.html">David Rowe</a> found himself predictably jobless. Emboldened by a father-son debate, David strapped a sandwich board around his shoulders and advertised that he would work the first month free.</p> <p>He was then interviewed by recruiting firm Parkhouse Bell and ended up landing his dream job, which I'm assuming was in recruiting. We're guessing the firm saw his photo on Facebook, but it hasn't been confirmed, so you know... there might just be room for something more old fashioned.</p> <h2>4. Send QR Code Cupcakes to Editorial Teams</h2> <p>If public infamy isn't your cup of tea, what about something more direct and personable?</p> <p>Like cupcakes. Everybody loves cupcakes.</p> <p>Blogger and fashionista <a href="http://www.scarphelia.com/2013/06/act-six-scene-one-turning-great-ideas.html">Katie Oldham</a> decided to take her summer internship into her own hands with the help of a local bakery. Katie researched the editorial teams at her favorite publishing companies and delivered special batches of cupcakes with her website's QR code to their London offices.</p> <p>And it worked! She interned for Cosmopolitan, and her website is currently part of the Vice blogging network.</p> <h2>5. Home Brewed Beer Resumes</h2> <p>Nothing says work hard and party harder like a home-brewed batch of beer. What makes that beer even better? Resume covers of course.</p> <p>Brennan Gleason takes a distinguished spot on our list as being the only to pull off a successful job hunt stunt outside of the UK. Then again, he did it in Canada, so potato-patata.</p> <p>Brennan wanted to nab a sexy graphic design job, so what did he do? He designed custom resume covers for six-packs of beer he brewed himself.</p> <p>Let's see...</p> <ul> <li>Creativity&hellip; check.</li> <li>Graphic design skills&hellip; check.</li> <li>Free specialty beer for the office&hellip; CHECK!</li> </ul> <p>Surprise, surprise &mdash; <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/06/26/resume-on-beer-brennan-gleason_n_5534535.html">Brennan</a> was hired.</p> <h2>6. Wacky Website Campaign Turns Bakery Manager Into VP</h2> <p>Many of you are under the false impression that working successfully at your company will translate into a promotion.</p> <p>Not true!</p> <p>That VP spot just went to this guy. Despite seven tries, his CV tells us he hasn't been able to hold down a job for even one calendar year. But guess what!? He acted super wacky on video and a lot of people laughed, so he's qualified to be your boss!</p> <p>His name is <a href="http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/weird-news/dad-dan-conways-wacky-job-hunting-2477515">Dan Conway</a>, but you can call him &quot;Yes, Sir.&quot; Dan launched a wacky website campaign consisting of him doing wacky things in order to find work and was eventually made a VP of marketing for a company I won't advertise.</p> <p>Apparently, <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QWffOEVI7IY#t=38">THIS</a> is what British marketing employers look for in their executives.</p> <h2>7. Grad Lands Social Media Manager Position by PMing a Stranger</h2> <p>What's the quickest way to land an interview? Find the owner's profile and hit them up with a private message.</p> <p>&hellip;Said no one ever. Unless you're <a href="http://mashable.com/2010/03/08/job-seeker-results/">David Cohen</a>. David knew a guy who knew a guy, and he randomly messaged that guy, who then interviewed him with another guy, and now David's their top social media guy.</p> <p>Sounds quaint. Perhaps you should try it. Just don't blame us if you get slapped with a restraining order.</p> <p><em>Have you ever tried to land a job with an outlandish stunt? What did you do &mdash; and did you get the job?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/jacob-mcmillen">Jacob McMillen</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-job-search-stunts-to-get-you-noticed-by-employers">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-the-job-without-saying-a-word">How to Get the Job Without Saying a Word</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/flashback-friday-the-65-best-career-tips-weve-ever-shared">Flashback Friday: The 65 Best Career Tips We&#039;ve Ever Shared</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/make-guerrilla-job-hunting-work-for-you">Make Guerrilla Job Hunting Work for You</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/using-times-new-roman-on-your-r-sum-is-like-wearing-sweatpants-to-an-interview">Using Times New Roman on Your Résumé Is Like Wearing Sweatpants to an Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-dream-jobs-youre-never-too-old-to-pursue">9 Dream Jobs You&#039;re Never Too Old to Pursue</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Job Hunting job search promotion resume self promotion Mon, 20 Oct 2014 09:00:03 +0000 Jacob McMillen 1238130 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Simple Steps to Discovering Your True Salary Potential http://www.wisebread.com/6-simple-steps-to-discovering-your-true-salary-potential <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-simple-steps-to-discovering-your-true-salary-potential" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/wealthy-businessman-478885063-small.jpg" alt="wealthy businessman" title="wealthy businessman" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Salary negotiation is not always easy, especially if you don't know the value you and your position bring to your team and to your company.</p> <p>So ask yourself these six questions and uncover your true market worth before you start driving a hard bargain. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/you-should-always-negotiate-a-raise-here-are-10-reasons-why?ref=seealso">You Should Always Negotiate a Raise: Here are 10 Reasons Why</a>)</p> <h2>1. How Valuable Are You to Your Team?</h2> <p>For any salary negotiation to be successful, you need to be highly regarded by your boss and colleagues. If your reputation is lacking, it's time to start enhancing skills and networking within the office. People who <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/you-should-always-negotiate-a-raise-here-are-10-reasons-why">get ahead at work</a> tend to follow through on their commitments, help other people reach their goals, and do more than what is merely expected. Get a firm understanding of what skills and traits are valued within your organization and do your best to personify them.</p> <p>If you don't know what these are, it never hurts to ask. Set up time with your boss to ask which skills she'd like to see you develop. Talk to senior team members and find out what successes led to their promotions. Ask peers how you're perceived within the organization (or even within your team). All of this feedback can help you develop the picture of where you currently stand and what steps you can take to move up within your organization.</p> <h2>2. Do You Understand Your Compensation Structure?</h2> <p>Many positions come with multiple compensation streams including salary, commission, stock options, and retirement and health benefits. Each is (normally) offered for a different reason and so should be considered separately when negotiating for compensation.</p> <p>Salary is what your employee offers in exchange for your job performance. In theory, if you do a good job, you'll get higher pay raises.</p> <p>Stock options, in contrast, are generally offered to incentivize employee loyalty, which is why you'll often see this perk packaged with a vesting schedule. In other words, don't fail to negotiate for a salary bump because your employer offers a stock option. According to one career writer, the best time to ask for a raise is when you first recognize <a href="http://www.businessinsider.com/how-to-ask-for-a-raise-and-get-it-2014-6">you're not being paid your fair worth</a>. If you wait for your annual review, your team's salary increases will have already been planned out, and your boss likely won't have budget flexibility. Start lobbying six months in advance, however, and you have real potential to change the outcome of the conversation.</p> <p>Attractive health and retirement benefits are designed to make a job more attractive than competing offers for new prospects.</p> <h2>3. How Is Your Industry Compensating Your Role?</h2> <p>You'll want to be aware of the salary range for your role, within your industry and geographic location. Jobs in some industries and areas of the country pay substantially higher than in others. Check out services like <a href="http://www.salary.com">Salary.com</a> or <a href="http://www.payscale.com">Payscale</a> to research the range for your current field.</p> <h2>4. What Would It Cost to Replace You?</h2> <p>Before you can negotiate, it pays to know that what you're asking for is less than your<a href="http://www.zanebenefits.com/blog/bid/312123/Employee-Retention-The-Real-Cost-of-Losing-an-Employee"> replacement cost</a>. According to one health benefits and insurance blog, it costs a business the equivalent of six to nine months of salary to recruit and train a new worker. For someone making $40,000 per year, that adds up to $20,000 to $30,000.</p> <p>If you're an employee worth keeping (i.e., you're good at what you do and not at PIA to be around), then your boss would probably rather avoid the hassle and cost of finding a new recruit. The problem? Bosses aren't always proactive about making sure their employees are paid fairly. It's up to you to open a dialogue about your expectations. Ask what steps you can take to improve your job skills and reach a higher salary level. If your boss isn't willing to discuss a potential salary increase (even over the long term), it may be an indication that you're not valued in your role or that there just isn't budget for the bump. If this is the case, then consider step number 5 (or 6).</p> <h2>5. Is Your Current Employer Your Best Option?</h2> <p>If your current boss doesn't appreciate the value you bring to the role, it may be time to start looking at other options. Sometimes a non-quantifiable event like a personality conflict with a boss can get in the way of an employee's upward mobility. If you know you provide quality work but still can't seem to move beyond your current role, it may be time to explore options outside of your current employer. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-10-things-you-need-to-do-if-you-want-to-quit-your-job?ref=seealso">The 10 Things You Need to Do If You Want to Quit Your Job</a>)</p> <h2>6. What's Going On Outside of Your Company?</h2> <p>Keeping your finger on your industry's pulse is the best way to stay aware of new job opportunities. If you're not properly valued by your current employer, you may want to find out what a competitor would pay for your skills.</p> <p>Make connections through trade organizations, your local chamber of commerce, or by befriending people who perform similar functions at the competitor down the street. You never know what opportunities may arise and it can pay off to be well networked. You may even want to apply for competitor jobs. Being offered a position that pays 20% more can provide valuable leverage with your current boss. Or, you may simply decide that the new position offers better long-term opportunity than your current gig. Either way, the more you know about the current market in your industry, the better prepared you are for any opportunities that may come your way. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/your-31-hidden-networks-that-can-help-you-land-jobs?ref=seealso">Your 31 Hidden Networks That Can Help You Land Jobs</a>)</p> <p><em>Have you used your negotiating prowess to land a new and better job? What knowledge did you arm yourself with and what strategies worked best for you? We want to hear about it in the comments below.</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/alaina-tweddale">Alaina Tweddale</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-simple-steps-to-discovering-your-true-salary-potential">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-4"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/these-10-words-and-phrases-are-keeping-you-from-getting-a-raise">These 10 Words and Phrases Are Keeping You From Getting a Raise</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-negotiate-higher-pay-at-your-next-new-job">How to Negotiate Higher Pay at Your Next New Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-8-worst-things-good-employees-do">The 8 Worst Things Good Employees Do</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/are-you-underpaid-how-to-figure-out-what-salary-you-deserve">Are You Underpaid? How to Figure Out What Salary You Deserve</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-times-a-higher-salary-isnt-worth-it">6 Times a Higher Salary Isn&#039;t Worth It</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income earnings paycheck promotion raise salary Fri, 17 Oct 2014 09:00:04 +0000 Alaina Tweddale 1236864 at http://www.wisebread.com Bosses Say These Are Their 6 Favorite Qualities in Employees — Do You Have Them? http://www.wisebread.com/bosses-say-these-are-their-6-favorite-qualities-in-employees-do-you-have-them <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/bosses-say-these-are-their-6-favorite-qualities-in-employees-do-you-have-them" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/boss-employee-working-162277415-small.jpg" alt="boss employee working" title="boss employee working" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>If you can't get ahead at work, there's probably a reason why. You might not have the experience or educational background for a specific position &mdash; or worse, your boss may feel that you lack important qualities. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-to-say-to-your-boss-to-get-a-promotion-or-raise?ref=seealso">5 Things to Say to Your Boss to Get a Promotion or Raise</a>)</p> <p>Since your boss holds the key to your future with the company, it is imperative that you understand qualities employers look for in employees. This can be the difference between advancing up the corporate ladder and staying stuck in the same position.</p> <h2>1. Good Communication Skills</h2> <p>Bosses look for employees with strong communication skills &mdash; written and spoken. Being able to clearly express yourself is a major asset and can take your career to the next level.</p> <p>&quot;If you have a gift for the spoken and written word, you will always put your best foot forward. Being articulate is highly prized in today's workplace, when time is at a premium and technology requires constant communication,&quot; Lynn Taylor, a national workplace expert and author of <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0470457643/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=0470457643&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=FSOK7MOUNS3ZLT5N">Tame Your Terrible Office Tyrant: How to Manage Childish Boss Behavior and Thrive in Your Job</a>, <a href="http://www.forbes.com/sites/jacquelynsmith/2013/11/15/the-20-people-skills-you-need-to-succeed-at-work/">told Forbes.com.</a></p> <p>Master good communication skills and you might become the official or unofficial spokesperson for the company. You don't have to become a walking dictionary. But if your communication style needs improvement, it doesn't hurt to brush up on your English and writing skills, or take a public speaking course or workshop on your own dime.</p> <h2>2. Adaptability</h2> <p>Companies must adapt or evolve to keep pace with the times, and it's important for employees to evolve as well.</p> <p>&quot;I have found that people who are comfortable with change in general tend to be more successful,&quot; <a href="https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/article/20130924104438-407452-how-i-hire-adaptability-and-5-other-must-haves">says Jennifer Dulski</a>, President and COO at <a href="http://change.org">Change.org</a>.</p> <p>Even if you do not understand the changes taking place in the organization, go with the flow and trust that your boss knows what she's doing. The end goal is simple &mdash; grow the company. And if the company grows, so can your income. So, don't buck the system or make it difficult for your boss. Being adaptable goes hand-in-hand with being a team player. Team players put aside their personal feelings and work for the common good of the company.</p> <h2>3. Honesty</h2> <p>Bosses have enough on their plates, and they don't have time to supervise each employee. Therefore, employers need workers who are honest and willing to follow rules and policies, even when no one's watching. An honest employee is committed from start to finish, honest in everything, and takes responsibility for his actions.</p> <p>&quot;If they can't be honest with themselves and honest with me, then we are likely going to be wasting time and not operating at our full potential. I expect all team members to express any concern that comes up so we can keep improving not only our processes, but also our morale,&quot; <a href="http://www.monster.com/about/b/16-values-startup-employees-share#.VBdnPkvPZuY">says Patrick Curtis</a>, founder at <a href="http://www.wallstreetoasis.com/">WallStreetOasis.com</a>.</p> <h2>4. Hard-Working Mentality</h2> <p>Bosses need employees who go beyond the call of duty. Technically, you shouldn't be expected to do anything outside your job description, especially if you're not getting paid for your time. But at the same time, taking the initiative and going the extra mile speaks volumes.</p> <p>Karen Rehn, owner of HH Staffing Services, brings attention to a recent employee trait survey that says &quot;57% of <a href="https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/article/20140729173700-45510292-employee-traits-what-are-employers-really-looking-for">managers are looking for hard working employees</a>, those who embody work ethic and good ole hard work.&quot;</p> <p>It takes hard work for a company to succeed, and most employers can't get to the top without help from diligent employees. So, your commitment to the job won't go unnoticed and it can open doors to a brighter future with the company.</p> <h2>5. Punctuality and Conscientiousness</h2> <p>From clocking in on time to meeting deadlines, it only takes one tardy or unreliable employee to get everyone off schedule. Do a self-evaluation to determine whether your punctuality needs improvement. A manager may not say anything to you, but arriving even five minutes late or turning in an assignment 15 minutes late doesn't go unnoticed. If you can't be counted on to handle seemingly insignificant tasks, how can your boss trust you with bigger responsibilities?</p> <p>&quot;If the resume has typos or the candidate is late or sloppy, you can be sure those typos will translate into frustrating quality issues on the job,&quot; <a href="https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/article/20130924094909-131079-how-i-hire-trust-your-gut-and-take-your-time">says Josh Bersin</a>, Principal and Founder, Bersin by Deloitte.</p> <h2>6. Leadership</h2> <p>Your boss might be the top dog, but he needs a few leaders on his team. No good comes from being a follower. And when bosses look to promote, they prefer applicants who aren't too impressionable. As a leader, you can motivate your co-workers or be a voice of reason during difficult situations.</p> <p>&quot;Anyone can get others to show up for work. Leaders, on the other hand, genuinely inspire people to choose to follow them &mdash; on a mission, toward a goal, or perhaps even to transform an industry,&quot; <a href="https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/article/20130924101600-128201973-how-i-hire-let-s-do-lunch">says Walt Bettinger</a>, President and CEO of The Charles Schwab Corporation.</p> <p><em>Are you a boss? Are there other qualities you'd like to add? Let me know in the comments below.</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/mikey-rox">Mikey Rox</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/bosses-say-these-are-their-6-favorite-qualities-in-employees-do-you-have-them">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-generosity-is-key-to-everything-including-your-career">Why Generosity Is Key to Everything — Including Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-ways-a-second-language-can-boost-your-career">11 Ways a Second Language Can Boost Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-to-say-to-your-boss-to-get-a-promotion-or-raise">5 Things to Say to Your Boss to Get a Promotion or Raise</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-money-moves-to-make-after-a-promotion">10 Money Moves to Make After a Promotion</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Personal Development career getting hired good employee job promotion Thu, 02 Oct 2014 09:00:05 +0000 Mikey Rox 1225625 at http://www.wisebread.com 5 Things to Say to Your Boss to Get a Promotion or Raise http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-to-say-to-your-boss-to-get-a-promotion-or-raise <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-things-to-say-to-your-boss-to-get-a-promotion-or-raise" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/boss-employee-handshake-140300414-small.jpg" alt="boss employee handshake" title="boss employee handshake" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>The squeaky wheel gets the grease, and that goes double when it comes to asking for a promotion or a raise.</p> <p>A 2014 study performed by management consulting firm Accenture found that nearly 80% of employees who ask for a raise, and 70% of employees who <a href="http://www.accenture.com/SiteCollectionDocuments/PDF/Accenture-IWD-2014-Research-Career-Capital.pdf">ask for a promotion, get one</a>. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-ways-to-finally-get-that-promotion-this-year?ref=seealso">12 Ways to finally Get That Promotion This Year</a>)</p> <p>But even with such high success rates, the study found that half of the people polled never bring up the subject of a promotion or a raise to their superiors, potentially robbing themselves of advancement. Getting ahead and earning more can be as easy as asking for it, as long as you know what to say. So go ahead and try one of the following angles.</p> <h2>1. &quot;I'm Good for the Company.&quot;</h2> <p>Remind higher-ups of your value whenever the opportunity arises, such as during performance reviews, meetings, and other business-related conversations with management. You don't want to bring up every little thing you do, but you should definitely mention those specific times when you exceeded a customer's expectations, outdid yourself on a special project, or had an especially positive impact on the bottom line. Make sure you have hard numbers or other evidence to back up your claims, or it may just come across as empty bragging.</p> <h2>2. &quot;I Have a Unique Skill Set.&quot;</h2> <p>One of the best ways to set yourself up for a promotion or raise is to let management know about the distinctive knowledge, skills, and experience you bring to the table. Think about the things you do or know that go above and beyond what is necessary for your current position. Even better, demonstrate how those skills have helped you overcome issues or otherwise perform your job. Of course, the absolute best way to go about it is to let your boss know how you can use your one-of-a-kind knowledge to address a current or recurring problem.</p> <h2>3. &quot;What He Said.&quot;</h2> <p>How do upper leadership, top performers, and key influencers interact and engage upper management and each other? Observing these interactions during meetings as well as in the break room can tell you a lot about the communication styles and behaviors adopted by leaders in your company. To learn even more, engage these key people in conversation by making a positive comment about how they handled a recent project and asking specific questions, such as how they dealt with a prominent issue or managed to come in under budget despite the high demands of a client.</p> <h2>4. &quot;I Understand the Inner Workings.&quot;</h2> <p>Showing that you know the little nuances that keep the business running smoothly tells your supervisors that you understand not just the nature of your position, but the interconnected network of other employees and departments as well. Use the intel you gather from all that bigwig shoulder rubbing to enhance your knowledge and demonstrate your grasp of things that exceed your job description, especially the details of any specific positions you're gunning for. Peruse trade publications and professional association newsletters and attend industry-related functions to stay up-to-date on the bigger picture, as well.</p> <h2>5. &quot;People Like Me.&quot;</h2> <p>You may be the absolute best person for the job, but your chances of snagging a raise or promotion can be affected negatively if you don't have a good rapport with coworkers and supervisors. A 2010 study to <a href="http://books.google.com/books?id=JcpU___4L7sC&amp;pg=PA125&amp;lpg=PA125&amp;dq=favorable+impression+performance+review+study+pfeffer&amp;source=bl&amp;ots=9-P0-n6gVL&amp;sig=uYzdxXvDRyB-Sf7VDBV031JO5hg&amp;hl=en&amp;sa=X&amp;ei=5y3QU4PWH4LC8AGqiYGYAw&amp;ved=0CB8Q6AEwAA#v=onepage&amp;q=favorable%20impression%20performance%20review%20study%20pfeffer&amp;f=false">determine the effect friendliness has on performance evaluations</a> found that participants gave more favorable reviews to people who displayed better interpersonal skills than those who appeared less amiable, even when the good-natured subject performed worse on tasks. The leader of the project, Stanford professor Jeffrey Pfeffer, summarized the gist of his findings in a 2013 interview: &quot;<a href="http://www.bakadesuyo.com/2013/04/interview-stanford-mba-school-professor-teaches-secret-promotions-raises-power/">Life is really about relationships</a> and your success in getting promoted and getting raises and getting hired, depends on the quality of the network and relationships you were able to build with a large number of other people inside your company and for that matter, outside your company.&quot;</p> <p><em>What have you said to help you get that promotion or raise? Please share in comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/lauren-treadwell">Lauren Treadwell</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-to-say-to-your-boss-to-get-a-promotion-or-raise">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-5"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-a-side-hustle-can-further-your-career">5 Ways a Side Hustle Can Further Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-important-signs-that-your-job-sucks">10 Important Signs That Your Job Sucks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-generosity-is-key-to-everything-including-your-career">Why Generosity Is Key to Everything — Including Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-money-moves-to-make-after-a-promotion">10 Money Moves to Make After a Promotion</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-ways-to-finally-get-that-promotion-this-year">12 Ways to Finally Get That Promotion This Year</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building career promotion raise Wed, 27 Aug 2014 15:00:04 +0000 Lauren Treadwell 1195556 at http://www.wisebread.com These 10 Words and Phrases Are Keeping You From Getting a Raise http://www.wisebread.com/these-10-words-and-phrases-are-keeping-you-from-getting-a-raise <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/these-10-words-and-phrases-are-keeping-you-from-getting-a-raise" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/female-businesswomen-talking-480160831-small.jpg" alt="female businesswomen talking" title="female businesswomen talking" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Nobody seems to have told 2014 that the <a href="http://www.epi.org/publication/class-of-2014/" style="text-decoration:none;">recession ended five years ago</a>.</p> <p>Not only are college graduates having a hard time getting jobs, but current employees are having <a href="http://www.foxbusiness.com/personal-finance/2014/05/21/how-to-ask-and-get-raise-deserve/" style="text-decoration:none;">a hard time getting raises</a>. This means that now more than ever, you should take every interaction with your supervisor or boss as an opportunity to leave a positive impression.</p> <p>And while we can't necessarily tell you how to solve your companies' specific challenges or exceed your role's specific expectations, we can tell you that speaking eloquently and with confidence is a great way to stand from the crowd. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-ways-to-finally-get-that-promotion-this-year?ref=seealso" style="text-decoration:none;">12 Ways to Finally Get That Promotion This Year</a>)</p> <p>With that in mind, here are 10 words and phrases that you should drop from your vocabulary to increase your chances of getting a raise.</p> <h2>1. &quot;Oh&hellip;&quot;</h2> <p>If the first word coming out of your mind is &quot;oh&quot; every time that your boss asks you a question, she may get the impression that you have no idea of what's going in your projects. Being caught by surprise every now and then is not a corporate sin, but you shouldn't give the impression that your mind is wandering instead of focusing in your tasks.</p> <p>Stop looking like a deer caught in headlights and ask relevant, meaningful questions that allow you to gather more information.</p> <h2>2. &quot;Everything&quot;</h2> <ul> <li>What caused the delay in the project?</li> <li>What can I do to help you improve your performance?</li> <li>What are the benefits to our company from your job?</li> <li>What would you have done differently?</li> </ul> <p>If you answer &quot;everything&quot; to the four questions above, your supervisor is likely to facepalm. While it may be true that every single possible thing went wrong with your project, he is asking you to shine some light into the specifics.</p> <p>From that &quot;everything,&quot; cite up to three specific reasons and elaborate on them. Your supervisor will thank you and believe that you know your stuff.</p> <h2>3. &quot;Not My Job&quot;</h2> <p>Words to die by. If you are a fan of the Spiderman comics or movies, then you know that this mentality contributed to the eventual death of <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XsOGSMvQSxE" style="text-decoration:none;">Peter Parker's Uncle Ben</a>. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-surprisingly-frugal-lifestyles-of-12-famous-superheroes?ref=seealso" style="text-decoration:none;">The Surprisingly Frugal Lifestyles of 12 Famous Superheroes</a>)</p> <p>You cannot refuse to lend a hand to your coworkers all the time. Put yourself in their shoes and imagine if every single person in the office did that to you &mdash; how would you feel?</p> <p>Listen to your coworker's request and determine who is the right person to help. Remember what goes around, comes around. Set a positive expectation for when you are the one asking for help.</p> <h2>4. &quot;Honestly&quot;</h2> <p>Does this mean that unless you're saying &quot;honestly&quot; people are to assume that you're not being honest?</p> <p>Most people tell white lies or misrepresent facts. Researches have found that <a href="http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1213171/Men-lie-times-day-twice-women-study-finds.html" style="text-decoration:none;">men tell six lies a day</a> on average to their partner, boss and work colleagues, while women tell an average of three. However, this doesn't mean that you should create special truth periods through &quot;honestly.&quot; Additionally, if you say &quot;honestly&quot; out loud, it sounds as if you're venting frustration rather than infusing confidence in your statements.</p> <h2>5. &quot;I'll Try&quot;</h2> <p>Does this mean that you will do it or not? There is a big difference in either answer, so you need to be more specific than that.</p> <p>For example, imagine that you want to get a raise. The &quot;I'll try&quot; answer doesn't provide you any specifics. You don't have a target date, a list of action items, or a target salary to reach. If you want a raise, you have to go for it, not just try. From those who ask for a raise, <a href="http://www.cbsnews.com/news/easiest-way-to-get-a-raise-and-promotion/" style="text-decoration:none;">85% at least get something</a> and 63% get at least as much as they asked for.</p> <p>So say yes or no, and fully commit to a course of action.</p> <h2>6. &quot;It's Just Business&quot;</h2> <p>It's never just business. The <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/use-the-8020-rule-to-maximize-your-financial-opportunities" style="text-decoration:none;">80/20 rule explains</a> why.</p> <p>This ratio reminds us that 80% of your revenue, comes from 20% of your client base. That 20% is a combination of legacy clients, satisfied clients, and &quot;afraid of change&quot; clients. You know most of those clients by name and are comfortable enough to have a relaxed, casual chit-chat with them during conference calls. These clients are sticking with your company because of a good relationship. It's just not business.</p> <p>By coldly claiming &quot;it's just business,&quot; you are burning bridges and closing doors to potential business opportunities. And you're also potentially closing a door on your own raise if your supervisor catches wind.</p> <h2>7. &quot;Just Kidding&quot;</h2> <p>Every office needs a bit of good humor. No office needs passive-aggressiveness. And the end-all phrase of passive-aggressiveness is &quot;just kidding.&quot; As in:</p> <ul> <li>&quot;Kelly is such a slacker. Just kidding!&quot;</li> <li>&quot;Because Matt aaaaalways shows up on time, right? Just kidding!&quot;</li> <li>&quot;I didn't mean that, you know I was just kidding, don't you?&quot;</li> </ul> <p>Sugar coating insults or negative comments leads to resentment. There is a time and a place for jokes. Make sure that you learn the appropriate situations for serious and light comments at your company. Making enemies means losing respect, means having a tougher time justifying why you deserve more responsibility and compensation than you're already getting.</p> <h2>8. &quot;Let Me Finish This First&quot;</h2> <p>Every time that you hear this phrase, three things often come to mind:</p> <ul> <li>This person can only work on one thing at a time.</li> <li>This person is very rigid and not willing to adapt.</li> <li>This person is not willing to listen to me.</li> </ul> <p>While multitasking can do more harm than good, it is also true that our brains can handle <a href="http://www.feedbooks.com/userbook/23831.pdf" style="text-decoration:none;">five to nine things</a> at once. When asked to pay attention to something that may be more urgent, you need to answer that call. Being a team player provides you ammunition for the next time that your supervisor is doing performance reviews or that you ask for a raise.</p> <h2>9. &quot;But&hellip;&quot;</h2> <p>This one word has the power to undo everything positive you listed earlier. As in:</p> <ul> <li>&quot;Your design is outstanding, but&hellip;&quot;</li> <li>&quot;Yes, you show up to work early, however&hellip;&quot;</li> <li>&quot;I love the latest logo revision, but&hellip;&quot;</li> </ul> <p>People don't hear enough compliments throughout the day. Researchers say that you should give between <a href="http://appreciationadvantage.com/how-many-compliments-should-you-give" style="text-decoration:none;">three to ten positive comments for each negative one</a> you dish out. So the next time you provide a compliment, simply say it, and let it marinade on the other person. Especially when closing a meeting or ending a call, you want to end on a high note that resonates for a couple moments.</p> <h2>10. &quot;I'm No Expert&hellip;&quot;</h2> <p>Then you shouldn't be saying anything!</p> <ul> <li>Would you ask a non-expert in medicine about how to treat a disease</li> <li>Would you care that somebody without legal expertise reviews your will?</li> <li>Would you trust your retirement account to a person without expertise in financial matters?</li> </ul> <p>No, you wouldn't.</p> <p>When you don't have the expertise, let the experts talk. And when you do hold the necessary credentials, don't undermine them and just state your case. You will sound more assertive and look more professional.</p> <p>And so will your new compensation package.</p> <p><em>What other words and phrases need to disappear from our professional vocabulary? Please share in comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/damian-davila">Damian Davila</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/these-10-words-and-phrases-are-keeping-you-from-getting-a-raise">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-6"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-simple-steps-to-discovering-your-true-salary-potential">6 Simple Steps to Discovering Your True Salary Potential</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-to-turn-your-stress-into-money">8 Ways to Turn Your Stress Into Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-to-say-to-your-boss-to-get-a-promotion-or-raise">5 Things to Say to Your Boss to Get a Promotion or Raise</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-a-side-hustle-can-further-your-career">5 Ways a Side Hustle Can Further Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/didnt-get-the-raise-ask-for-this-instead">Didn&#039;t Get the Raise? Ask for This, Instead</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building earnings extra income income paycheck promotion raise Fri, 15 Aug 2014 09:00:04 +0000 Damian Davila 1184375 at http://www.wisebread.com Why Generosity Is Key to Everything — Including Your Career http://www.wisebread.com/why-generosity-is-key-to-everything-including-your-career <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/why-generosity-is-key-to-everything-including-your-career" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/business-teamwork-466223211-small.jpg" alt="teamwork" title="teamwork" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>True generosity means giving without expecting anything &mdash; zero, zilch, nada &mdash; in return. Generosity takes many forms, both tangible and intangible.</p> <p>You donate to a specific cause, volunteer at a food pantry, offer to help the intern write a press release, give away free copies of your recently published book&hellip; Opportunities to brighten someone's day abound. And yet, although it may seem paradoxical, being generous can also brighten your day &mdash; and your career. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-giving-to-charity-is-good-for-you?ref=seealso">5 Ways Giving to Charity Is Good For You</a>)</p> <h2>Generosity Can Boost Your Career &mdash; and Happiness</h2> <p>Giving makes people happier, increasing their productivity at work and leading to long-term success.</p> <p>A 2008 Harvard Business School study found that participants who gave money to another person resulted in <a href="http://hbswk.hbs.edu/item/5944.html">greater feelings of happiness</a> than those who spent money to buy something for themselves. While this study specifically focused on participants giving something tangible (money), the same logic can apply to intangible gifts of generosity, like time, advice, and mentoring.</p> <p>Happier people make <a href="http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/newsandevents/pressreleases/new_study_shows/">better employees</a> because they work harder and tend to be more productive. Just ask the folks at Zappos and Google, two companies well known for their innovative corporate culture based on happy employees.</p> <p>The positive feelings that result from acts of generosity can be traced to <a href="http://www.ninds.nih.gov/news_and_events/news_articles/brain_activity_during_altruism.htm">biology</a>, according to an earlier study conducted by the National Institutes of Health. Regions of the brain associated with pleasure, social connection and trust are activated when people contribute to charity, according to the research.</p> <p>&quot;Charity&quot; in your career may take the form of leading a networking discussion group, offering a free podcast, or introducing a recent college graduate to your company's hiring manager.</p> <h2>Team Players Win the Networking Game</h2> <p>Karma aside, the selfish ones usually finish last &mdash; and alone. By contrast, in life and at work, generous people generally build supportive networks. They are seen as more likable, and people are attracted to their presence (perhaps because they are so happy!).</p> <p>Generosity also helps you exude confidence. When you offer to mentor the new hire on your sales team, you send a positive message: &quot;I know I'm good at what I do, and I'm not afraid that you'll overtake me in sales if I show you my trade secrets.&quot;</p> <p>Confident people often believe that knowledge is like the flame of a candle; it shines just as brightly no matter if one person or 10 people are enjoying its beauty. Therefore, they don't feel a need to &quot;hoard&quot; information due to any insecurities. They are true team players.</p> <p>Eleanor C. Whitney, author of the book <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1621060071/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&amp;camp=1789&amp;creative=390957&amp;creativeASIN=1621060071&amp;linkCode=as2&amp;tag=wisbre03-20&amp;linkId=6MHFANJKY3GEGXV5">Grow</a>, said that &quot;when you <a href="http://idealistcareers.org/how-being-generous-can-help-your-career/">act with generosity</a> you are consistently open with your skills, ideas and knowledge. When you are generous you don't just give of yourself, but acknowledge the contributions and needs of others. The result is a network of people who are also willing to help you.&quot;</p> <p>Networking &mdash; and its multiplier effect &mdash; can be one of the most influential factors leading to professional success. It is often listed as the number one way to find a job. And the importance of networking &mdash; in person and online &mdash; extends throughout your career, by increasing your exposure (and, thereby, perhaps sales) and by building and nurturing mutually beneficial relationships.</p> <h2>Generous People Make More Effective Bosses...</h2> <p>&hellip;Which in turn inspires more successful employees.</p> <p>It may be one of the least-touted qualities of a good leader, but generosity may well be one of the most important. Communications expert Jodi Glickman explains that if a manager or leader is generous, he or she is generally well-liked.</p> <p>But it goes much further than that. &quot;<a href="https://www.linkedin.com/today/post/article/20131209165135-14770338-generosity-the-key-to-getting-ahead">Generous bosses get 10x the productivity</a> from their employees; generous employees' stars rise in tandem with their bosses'.&quot;</p> <h2>Small Gestures Go a Long Way</h2> <p>Being generous doesn't necessarily mean donating a million dollars to your favorite charity (although that would indeed be generous!).</p> <p>Giving your time to mentor a new employee may take just an hour out of your day, but could set your new colleague on a solid path for success. Contributing $5 to the kitty for the mailroom employee's 10th anniversary at the company won't break your bank, but the collective efforts of your department breed feelings of social connectedness and goodwill.</p> <p>Thanks to social media, we are more up-to-date than ever when it comes to our friends' and colleagues' professional news. That means plenty of opportunities to send a congratulatory email to a former co-worker on a new job, refer a friend for a vacant position in your company, wish your new client all the best as she goes on maternity leave, or offer some insightful tips to a group discussion on LinkedIn.</p> <p>Being generous with your thoughtfulness in ways that you might deem &quot;insignificant&quot; could have a very big impact on someone else.</p> <h2>Win-Win Doesn't Get Any More Classic</h2> <p>When you give to others, the world gets a little brighter. Generosity is about more than karma &mdash; what goes around comes around &mdash; and its ripple effects can boomerang back to you in many positive, often unexpected, ways, especially in your career.</p> <p><em>How has generosity boosted your career? Please share in comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/mardee-handler">Mardee Handler</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-generosity-is-key-to-everything-including-your-career">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/bosses-say-these-are-their-6-favorite-qualities-in-employees-do-you-have-them">Bosses Say These Are Their 6 Favorite Qualities in Employees — Do You Have Them?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-ways-to-finally-get-that-promotion-this-year">12 Ways to Finally Get That Promotion This Year</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/financial-tricks-to-master-for-a-happier-life">Financial Tricks to Master for a Happier Life</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-ways-a-second-language-can-boost-your-career">11 Ways a Second Language Can Boost Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-to-say-to-your-boss-to-get-a-promotion-or-raise">5 Things to Say to Your Boss to Get a Promotion or Raise</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Personal Development career charity generosity leadership productivity promotion Tue, 22 Jul 2014 21:00:06 +0000 Mardee Handler 1164532 at http://www.wisebread.com 14 Career-Threatening Work Habits That No One Will Tell You About http://www.wisebread.com/14-career-threatening-work-habits-that-no-one-will-tell-you-about <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/14-career-threatening-work-habits-that-no-one-will-tell-you-about" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/frustrated-worker-465449949-small.jpg" alt="frustrated worker" title="frustrated worker" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="137" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Passed over for a promotion? Feeling stuck in your job? Maybe you are feeling invisible. There could be a reason &mdash; or reasons &mdash; your career is going nowhere. And the worst part? Nobody is telling you what you're doing wrong. Does any of this look like the work you?</p> <h2>1. You Don't Dress Professionally</h2> <p>We started out with &quot;Casual Friday,&quot; but that seems to have expanded to Tuesdays, alternate Wednesdays, and the occasional Monday.</p> <p>If you have started wearing jeans or really casual clothes a few days per week, chances are, your boss (and his or her bosses) have noticed, too. Determine first what is appropriate. Is there a dress code at your workplace? That is your starting point. Next, observe what the &quot;movers and shakers&quot; are wearing. While you do not want to completely copy them, try choosing some similar conservative pieces and adding your own touches. How is your hairstyle? Are you dousing yourself in perfume? How much makeup are you wearing &mdash; too much, or too little? Guys, a little aftershave goes a long way. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/this-is-how-you-dress-like-don-draper-on-the-cheap?ref=seealso">This Is How You Dress Like Don Draper on the Cheap</a>)</p> <h3>The Fix</h3> <p>If you have a friend with good style, ask them to come help you sort out your closet and possibly take you shopping. You don't need to break the bank to do this &mdash; check out thrift or consignment stores for <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-dress-for-success-and-still-spend-less">bargain work clothes</a> that look like you're ready to take the next step in your career.</p> <h2>2. You Have Bad Breath</h2> <p>This is such a difficult thing to bring up. In fact, it's so embarrassing, that many bosses and coworkers would much rather avoid you than tell you that you have bad breath. A good rule I heard once: If someone offers you a mint or piece of their gum, take it and say thank you. That may have been a gentle way to tell you that you have bad breath. Our love of coffee drinks can be problematic, too. Coffee breath is not pleasant!</p> <h3>The Fix</h3> <p>Keep a toothbrush and toothpaste in your drawer at work (just be sure to clean the sink afterward) as well as mints and gum. There are plenty of <a href="http://www.popsci.com/article/science/how-cure-garlic-breath?dom=PSC&amp;loc=recent&amp;lnk=5&amp;con=how-to-cure-garlic-breath">cures for garlic breath</a> and plenty of <a href="http://www.therabreath.com/articles/news/oral-care-industry-news/coffee-breath-is-easy-to-get-hard-to-get-rid-of-2201.asp">coffee breath cures</a>, too.</p> <h2>3. Your Hand Never Goes Up</h2> <p>There are always those annoying tasks that nobody wants to tackle. They are usually tedious, boring, and there may be very little recognition for a job well done. But somebody needs to do them! Maybe you have always managed to avoid eye contact when the call for help went out, thus branding yourself as the person who isn't a team player.</p> <h3>The Fix</h3> <p>Be a hero and volunteer for a few projects that need ownership. Handle them to the best of your ability, and your boss will be grateful and know that you are a go-to person.</p> <h2>4. Your Voice is Problematic</h2> <p>There are some people who do seem to have loud, or booming voices. That's fine in a bar, or outdoors, but in an office, you need to use your inside voice. Sometimes, we may not want a conversation shared with our entire group of coworkers. Have you ever worked with people who speak in a monotone? That can be off-putting, as well as the worker who mumbles. Also, watch your speech patterns. In a recent job interview I conducted, a candidate used the word &quot;totally&quot; 26 times. She may have been qualified to do the work, but she will not get the chance.</p> <h3>The Fix</h3> <p>If you think you might have issues with your <a href="http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424127887323735604578440851083674898">voice or speech patterns</a>, try to get some feedback from a friend, or see a speech pathologist.</p> <h2>5. You Don't, or Won't, Think Outside the Box</h2> <p>&quot;That isn't the way we do things.&quot; Ever heard that one? Does it make you a little crazy? It should. Even in work situations with many layers of bureaucracy, we need to cut costs, work more efficiently, and try new methods. If you are resistant to trying new things, your boss is probably exasperated, and won't come to you for help.</p> <h3>The Fix</h3> <p>Volunteer to set up a focus group to examine the problem. Try mapping, clustering, whatever &mdash; give your boss a list of possibilities. Even if a solution is not readily available, be the person who tries to solve it.</p> <h2>6. You Once Complained That Something &quot;Wasn't in Your Job Description&quot;</h2> <p>And, by doing so, you marked yourself as a problem child. Assuming that the request was not immoral or illegal, it may have been a great opportunity to help out, learn something new, and add to your skill set. But now, having complained, your boss will probably steer clear of asking you again.</p> <h3>The Fix</h3> <p>Turn over a new leaf and give it a go. You might need to talk to your boss, explain the reasons for your previous reaction (likely anxiety), and ask to be considered next time there is a need.</p> <h2>7. You Don't Network</h2> <p>There are employees who clock in, clock out, and that's it. They may do their jobs competently and thoroughly. But when promotions are handed out, they are passed over. Has this been you? It might be because you do not network. Do you attend classes or seminars in your field, or attend community events to promote your company? If you think just showing up for work is enough, you're wrong. Companies need good ambassadors.</p> <h3>The Fix</h3> <p>Start small. Try volunteering to represent the company at a college fair or school career day. Attend a Chamber of Commerce mixer. Join a company-sponsored sports team. You'll enjoy yourself, have fun, meet nice people, and boost your profile at work and in the community.</p> <h2>8. You Don't Promote Yourself</h2> <p>Promoting yourself is tough to do, and in some cultures, it's especially difficult, because it is considered to be bragging or immodest. However, if you don't show your boss what it is that you do all day, your boss may only have a vague, or incorrect, perception.</p> <h3>The Fix</h3> <p>Show your boss what you do. Put together a succinct report and send it to your boss each month. Here is your opportunity to illustrate what you did: &quot;Our new system enabled us to process 35% more applications per week&quot; or &quot;Streamlined office supply list, saving 20% this month.&quot;</p> <h2>9. You Gossip (More Than the Usual)</h2> <p>Office gossip is part of office culture. It is certainly pervasive everywhere I have ever worked. Beware, though, of becoming <em>the</em> &quot;office gossip.&quot; You probably can identify this person. Conversations stop when you walk near, and fake smiles appear. This person relishes spreading gossip and is probably not repeating anything interesting or possibly beneficial, but something purely spiteful. Also, they do this repeatedly. If you're that person, chances are, your boss will want nothing to do with you, because you have successfully labeled yourself as a troublemaker.</p> <h3>The Fix</h3> <p>Before you succumb to gossip, think about how you feel when you do it (crummy). My trick? Change the subject.</p> <h2>10. You Don't Continue Your Education Voluntarily</h2> <p>Even highly-educated people cannot rest on their laurels. Continuing to take courses keeps you sharp and up to date. Your boss may not be able to force you to take classes, but might wish you would. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-cheap-ways-to-continue-your-education-without-going-back-to-school?ref=seealso">8 Cheap Ways to Continue Your Education Without Going Back to School</a>)</p> <h3>The Fix</h3> <p>Classes do not have to be expensive. Check with your local library or community college; try <a href="https://www.coursera.org/">Coursera</a>, or contact the national association for your profession for continuing education. Join a book group, which will get you to read really good literature and meet people. Try <a href="https://www.youtube.com/">Youtube.com</a> for mini-classes. Don't forget to mention what you have taken in your report to your bosses!</p> <h2>11. You Don't Handle Yourself Well in Social Situations</h2> <p>If you have not been asked to represent the company at a conference, luncheon, college fair or cocktail party, there may be a problem. You may be somebody who is not perceived as being professional or capable of presenting a positive company image. It could be your manner of dress, or your social skills. Maybe you attended something with your boss and did not handle the situation well. Do you know how to shake hands, make small talk, or pay for lunch? Are you approachable? (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/18-things-people-with-good-social-skills-never-do?ref=seealso">18 Things People With Good Social Skills Never Do</a>)</p> <h3>The Fix</h3> <p>Check out <a href="http://www.toastmasters.org/">Toastmasters</a>. Besides teaching you to be socially comfortable, they have a leadership program. Or, invite a friend to lunch; explain you need to practice and ask for feedback.</p> <h2>12. You Aren't Aligned with the Company Mission</h2> <p>Do you even know <em>what</em> your company's mission <em>is</em>? If so, what do you do to support it? Your boss is not likely to promote a person who cannot describe the company mission, vision, goals, etc.</p> <h3>The Fix</h3> <p>Learn what your company's mission is, and use your monthly report to demonstrate how your projects promote and align with your company.</p> <h2>13. You Aren't Dependable</h2> <p>A big report was due, and you called in sick. Your team had a project due, and you forgot to turn in your data. Word gets around about a person's dependability. After a while, though, a boss may just give up. If it's a civil service situation, you may be difficult to fire, so it may be that you will be ignored, and not given anything to do.</p> <h3>The Fix</h3> <p>Unless you are happy just sitting around for eight hours a day, start being a better employee. Show up, turn in reports, play your part, do your thing. Apologize for past transgressions, if necessary, and let your coworkers and boss know you're going to do better. You may have to work at it for a while to re-build trust.</p> <h2>14. Your Skills Aren't Up to Par</h2> <p>Are you faking it? Do you really have no clue how to run software, assimilate a report, or write a good memo? Odds are, your boss has noticed, and she probably isn't all that interested in educating you on the company's dime.</p> <h3>The Fix</h3> <p>Get the training, now, on your own. Find a class, hire a tutor, read a book, ask a friend. You do not want to have to rely on someone else to help you do your job (and if they are doing it, they ought to be getting credit, not you).</p> <p><em>Anything I've overlooked? Please tell us in comments!</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/marla-walters">Marla Walters</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/14-career-threatening-work-habits-that-no-one-will-tell-you-about">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-7"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-to-deal-when-you-work-with-someone-you-hate">8 Ways to Deal When You Work With Someone You Hate</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/your-stressful-job-may-be-making-you-healthier">Your Stressful Job May Be… Making You Healthier?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/you-are-what-you-do-16-ways-to-improve-your-body-language">You Are What You Do: 16 Ways to Improve Your Body Language</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-signs-you-were-raised-by-parents-with-bad-social-skills">5 Signs You Were Raised by Parents With Bad Social Skills</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-times-you-should-never-feel-guilty-at-work">8 Times You Should Never Feel Guilty at Work</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income etiquette promotion social skills work Tue, 08 Jul 2014 11:00:04 +0000 Marla Walters 1154566 at http://www.wisebread.com 12 Ways to Finally Get That Promotion This Year http://www.wisebread.com/12-ways-to-finally-get-that-promotion-this-year <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/12-ways-to-finally-get-that-promotion-this-year" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/ladder-178777105.jpg" alt="climbing ladder" title="climbing ladder" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="141" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Do you ever feel like everyone else but you gets rewarded at work?</p> <p>Your slacker cubicle neighbor pulls a couple of all-nighters, closes a deal, and promptly gets better and bigger accounts to manage. The seemingly average performer down the hall gets pulled away from the drudgery of day-to-day work to head a new branch office. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/25-signs-that-youve-been-at-the-same-job-too-long?ref=seealso">25 Signs You're at the Same Job for Too Long</a>)</p> <p>Your coworkers may not be doing everything perfectly. But they may be doing a few things extremely well, enough to get on the boss's radar and move to the next level of responsibility.</p> <p>What propels people to success varies from company to company. But there are specific actions you can take to make sure you get a promotion as quickly as possible. Consider these ways to get selected for the next big job.</p> <h2>1. Start Doing the Job You Want</h2> <p>Show your boss you can handle more complex situations than your current position requires. Take on duties associated with the job you want, being careful not to violate company policies, cross unmarked territory lines, or slack off on your present accountabilities.</p> <p>Yes, you'll run the risk of spending more time at work for little or no extra pay. But your boss won't have to guess whether you are ready for the next step in your career. A promotion will be a formality because you'll already be doing the job you want. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/25-career-changes-you-can-make-today?ref=seealso">Career Changes You Can Make Today</a>)</p> <h2>2. Look and Act Like You Belong in a Better Position</h2> <p>Step up your professional style. Upgrade your wardrobe, correct bad habits, refresh your language, and expand your conversational horizons. Make subtle improvements over time so the transformation is not sudden or contrived. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/build-a-work-wardrobe-for-any-job-on-a-budget?ref=seealso">Build a Work Wardrobe for Any Job</a>)</p> <p>Your boss should feel comfortable that your professional presence will be appropriate in a new role. For example, you may need to impress senior-level staff, venture capital investors, or clients in a higher level position. The more you can look and act the part, the more likely you'll be promoted.</p> <h2>3. Solve Problems That Are Worth Solving</h2> <p>Identify and solve persistent problems. To get favorable attention, your solutions should benefit the company's profitability, its productivity, or its relationships with customers. So, make sure you are dealing with a genuine concern of higher-ups, not squashing a minor irritation that annoys only you.</p> <p>Demonstrate initiative, resourcefulness, and the ability to collaborate with and lead people. Successfully solving a problem can get you noticed, appreciated, and promoted.</p> <h2>4. Discover and Position Yourself for Upcoming Openings</h2> <p>Broaden your knowledge of the company's talent requirements. Pinpoint the types of skills and experiences needed.</p> <p>At the same time, expand your network among peers and senior-level staff. Get to know the hiring decision-makers through interactions on work-related projects, corporate-sponsored outreach programs, and social activities.</p> <p>When the company needs qualified people for a new role, your name may surface as a candidate. Plus, you should fare better in interviews because you'll be more likely to have the credentials and know the hiring decision-makers. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-simple-networking-tricks?ref=seealso">Simple Networking Tricks</a>)</p> <h2>5. Develop Yourself</h2> <p>Continually improve your professional capabilities. Find ways to get better at your job in ways that are meaningful to you. Become more promotable internally by gaining the skills needed most by your employer. Attend in-house training sessions. Participate in development opportunities offered by professional organizations. Earn an advanced degree in your field. Keep up with industry trends.</p> <p>Demonstrate that you are both committed to and capable of professional success. Your employer should find ways to tap your talent and keep you onboard through better and better opportunities.</p> <h2>6. Keep HR Updated on Your Credentials</h2> <p>Let your human resources representative know about your educational achievements, professional skills, designations, etc. before you apply for a promotion. Starting and maintaining a dialogue with the HR staff can help you stay in front of those who influence hiring managers. Plus, you can learn what skills are valued by the company.</p> <p>Many large employers have talent databases that are accessed for the purposes of identifying current employees qualified for an opening or finding those who might benefit from professional development activities. By keeping your credentials updated in the system, you are increasing the chances you will be considered for growth opportunities.</p> <h2>7. Talk to Your Boss About Your Career Path</h2> <p>Schedule sessions with your boss to discuss career possibilities within the organization. Frame your conversations in terms of making greater contributions to the company while building your career.</p> <p>Not only will you know what steps to take to progress, your supervisor will be aware of your interest in getting a promotion.</p> <h2>8. Stop Acting So Comfortable in Your Current Position</h2> <p>Excel in your current job, but don't let your boss think that you're so comfortable you want to stick around forever. Demonstrate enthusiasm for growth opportunities. Build relationships with people in other departments. Create processes that make your job readily transferable to a new employee.</p> <p>Managers love consistency and stability. So, your boss may want to keep great performers, like you, where they are, especially if they sense you are reasonably happy. Show that promoting (and replacing) you won't disrupt the workflow or workplace harmony.</p> <h2>9. Move to a Place That Is Career Enhancing, Even If It's Boring</h2> <p>Take the job that is promising in terms of professional growth, even if you must move to a less desirable location. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-places-it-pays-to-relocate-to?ref=seealso">6 Places It Pays to Relocate To</a>)</p> <p>Make the adjustment to your personal lifestyle without downsizing your career ambitions. Keep in touch with executive leaders through regular visits to the corporate office and updates on your accomplishments.</p> <p>Your employer may be willing to promote an average performer in order to take advantage of untapped potential in an out-of-the-way branch location or sales territory. By accepting a position in one of these places, you can not only snag a better job in the short term but also build your resume, positioning yourself for the future.</p> <h2>10. Transfer to the Area Where People (Are Most Likely to) Get Promoted</h2> <p>You may need to make a lateral move before you can move upward. Study the organizational chart and notice which departments tend to promote their employees. Plan your next career steps accordingly.</p> <p>Leadership experts suggest that women (and men) in sales roles are <a href="http://blogs.hbr.org/2012/09/women-who-sell-get-promoted/">more likely to be promoted</a> than those in staff positions. The reasoning is that these employees are more likely to make significant contributions benefiting the bottom line, compared to lower-profile team members in other disciplines. Choose career paths in high-visibility fields for a faster and much surer trip to the upper echelons.</p> <h2>11. Give the Hiring Manager Plenty of Reasons to Promote You</h2> <p>At a minimum, meet your performance objectives, complete projects on time, and work effectively with your team members. In addition, build a list of accomplishments such as quantifiable sales growth and improved efficiency, along with specific credentials that prove you are the best candidate. You may even consider getting testimonials from customers or colleagues at sister facilities for your references and LinkedIn profile. Finally, if you think a past mistake may be held against you, let your boss know about actions you've taken to prevent further problems and examples of subsequent successes.</p> <p>Your boss or the hiring decision-maker may need to justify your selection for a promotion. Make it easy to pick you and explain why you are the best choice for the job.</p> <h2>12. Promote Yourself by Snagging a Job at Another Employer</h2> <p>You may need to change employers to get a promotion with greater responsibilities and compensation. Depending on your professional credentials and the new employer's organizational structure, you could go directly to a higher-level position or move up quickly after being hired. Look for high growth companies and ones with a clear career path.</p> <p>Your current employer may not promote people very often for reasons that have little to do with your job performance, initiative, credentials, etc. The company may be financially stable but experiencing minimal growth. Changing employers can open up new career possibilities.</p> <p><em>Have you recently gotten a promotion? What tips do you have to help people move up in their careers?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/julie-rains">Julie Rains</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-ways-to-finally-get-that-promotion-this-year">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-to-say-to-your-boss-to-get-a-promotion-or-raise">5 Things to Say to Your Boss to Get a Promotion or Raise</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-a-side-hustle-can-further-your-career">5 Ways a Side Hustle Can Further Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/bosses-say-these-are-their-6-favorite-qualities-in-employees-do-you-have-them">Bosses Say These Are Their 6 Favorite Qualities in Employees — Do You Have Them?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-generosity-is-key-to-everything-including-your-career">Why Generosity Is Key to Everything — Including Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-answer-23-of-the-most-common-interview-questions">How to Answer 23 of the Most Common Interview Questions</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building career career advancement promotion Tue, 11 Feb 2014 10:36:41 +0000 Julie Rains 1124084 at http://www.wisebread.com 7 Ways to Ace Your Next Performance Review http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-to-ace-your-next-performance-review <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/7-ways-to-ace-your-next-performance-review" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/6829475219_a71ddd3201_z.jpg" alt="office employee" title="office employee" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="141" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>For the most part performance appraisals are a lot of puffery, smoke and mirrors. They are done in a certain way, using certain guidelines, to keep the HR department compliant and to make sure everyone is relatively happy.</p> <p>But at their core is something important. These reviews give you a chance to hit the reset button on some issues, and also air a few legitimate grievances. They are a way to show your real value to the company, and to highlight major achievements from the past year. So, if you have a performance review looming on the horizon, keep these seven quick tips in mind and be ready for the best one-on-one with your boss you&rsquo;ve had all year. (See also:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.wisebread.com/i-hate-my-job">I Hate My&nbsp;Job! Now What?</a>)</p> <h2>1. Know the Process Inside and Out</h2> <p>If you&rsquo;ve ever watched the UK show &ldquo;The Office&rdquo; (one of the best comedy shows ever, by the way), you may remember the hysterical performance reviews. One in particular, between Keith and David Brent, showed the employee&rsquo;s complete lack of interest, or knowledge, about the whole procedure. It did not go well. That&rsquo;s comedy, but reality isn&rsquo;t so far from that truth. Make sure you know how the forms work, know what needs to be filled in, ask questions to HR if you have them, and do a dry run. You don&rsquo;t want to hand over something with spelling errors, crossed out words, and bad grammar.</p> <h2>2. Have Every Single Duck in a Row</h2> <p>If you&rsquo;re about to sing a song about your worth to the company and your desire for a raise or promotion, you need more than a charming personality to back it up. Bring printouts of projects that you excelled in. If you got emails thanking you for a tremendous effort, bring those, too. And, do the research on <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/earn-more-money-by-demanding-it">your salary</a>. If you&rsquo;re currently making $45k a year, but <a href="http://salary.com">Salary.com</a> says you should be more in the $55-60k range, bring the evidence. It&rsquo;s hard to argue with that facts.</p> <h2>3. Come With Questions</h2> <p>It&rsquo;s been a year (hopefully) since your last performance review. In that time, questions should naturally have arisen that you need to ask. Well, now is the time to ask them. Why did you get passed over for a promotion or supervising role? Why did someone else get the project you were hoping for? Why were you excluded from meetings that you felt required your presence? And so on. It&rsquo;s time for straight talk, and you deserve straight answers.</p> <h2>4. Address What Went Wrong</h2> <p>Was there a complete catastrophe at work? Did a client walk out of the door? Did a machine sputter and die due to something you were involved in? Did money go missing, and it cannot be explained?</p> <p>Well, you need to explain it. All of it. You don&rsquo;t want a black mark on your record because you could not prove you were not responsible for something bad that happened. And if you were, now is the time to explain exactly why, and how, things went wrong and what you&rsquo;ve done to make sure it doesn&rsquo;t go wrong again. Situations that escalate out of your control need to be explained. At the end of the day, bad things happen at work, but people rarely do them maliciously. You just need to make sure your employer knows that</p> <h2>5. Highlight Your Accomplishments</h2> <p>Now is not the time to be bashful or sit back and let others take credit. It's your review, you&rsquo;re under the spotlight, and you deserve the accolades.</p> <p>If you were a major participant in a big project, blow your own trumpet loud and clear. If you took the lead on a project, say so. If you spearheaded a major change within the company, let it be known that you were the one carrying the load. It&rsquo;s time to get what you deserve, and you need to make it known loud and clear.</p> <h2>6. Take Detailed Notes or Record the Interview</h2> <p>I say this because it has happened to me on more than one occasion &mdash; things have been said, and promised, in performance reviews that did not come to fruition afterwards. I have been offered raises and promotions that were not forthcoming. I did not take notes or record conversations (ask permission to do this, but there should be no reason not to let you) and I did not sign anything in those reviews. Long story short, it was my word against the manager&rsquo;s, and the manager had more clout than I did. Ideally, you could write down facts during the meeting, such as any promised raises, bonuses or promotions, and then have your manager sign your notes. That way, you are completely covered if things take a turn.<b> </b></p> <h2>7. Bring Up Your Goals for the Future</h2> <p>Finally, what do you want out of your current, or future, role at the company? What would make you happy professionally? What courses do you want to take to grow in your chosen career? Do you want to travel more (or at all)? Do you want to work with other departments or expand your reach creatively? Do you want to be a key player on certain projects?</p> <p>Goals are very important for performance reviews, as they set milestones for both you AND your company to reach. If you want to be better at your job, it will take the company&rsquo;s help as well. And this is the perfect time to strike that bargain and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/25-career-changes-you-can-make-today">find a way for you to improve</a>. As you improve, the company benefits, too.</p> <p>Those are my seven quick tips on how to ace that performance review. If you have more, feel free to let us all know in comments.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-to-ace-your-next-performance-review">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-ways-to-improve-your-performance-at-work">12 Ways to Improve Your Performance at Work</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/bosses-say-these-are-their-6-favorite-qualities-in-employees-do-you-have-them">Bosses Say These Are Their 6 Favorite Qualities in Employees — Do You Have Them?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-times-a-higher-salary-isnt-worth-it">6 Times a Higher Salary Isn&#039;t Worth It</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-ways-to-finally-get-that-promotion-this-year">12 Ways to Finally Get That Promotion This Year</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-generosity-is-key-to-everything-including-your-career">Why Generosity Is Key to Everything — Including Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building acheiving goals performance review promotion Wed, 09 Jan 2013 10:48:38 +0000 Paul Michael 959701 at http://www.wisebread.com