401(k) http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/3831/all en-US How to Revive an Old Retirement Fund http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-revive-an-old-retirement-fund <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-revive-an-old-retirement-fund" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/rescue_your_401k.jpg" alt="Rescue your 401k" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>You know that you should be investing regularly in a 401(k) plan or IRA to build a retirement nest egg. But what if you haven't been contributing enough to your 401(k)? What if that old IRA that you started a decade ago has been sitting untouched ever since?</p> <p>Or, what if you're past 50 and retirement is looming ever nearer?</p> <p>The good news is that it's possible to revive an old or neglected retirement savings plan, even after you've hit the half-century mark. It just takes dedication to devoting more of your income to your IRA or 401(k) plan along with a willingness to take advantage of catch-up contributions that are available to those 50 or older. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-retirement-planning-steps-late-starters-must-make?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Retirement Planning Steps Late Starters Must Make</a>)</p> <h2>Some concerning statistics</h2> <p>According to a 2017 retirement plan wellness &quot;scorecard,&quot; 75 percent of Baby Boomers between ages 50 and 68 are contributing to their 401(k) plans. That sounds great, but Baby Boomers actually had the lowest participation among all age groups in the study.</p> <p>The same study found that 77 percent of Gen Xers (ages 35&ndash;49) contributed to their 401(k) plans while 82 percent of millennials (ages 21&ndash;34) did the same.</p> <p>More worrisome news came from the 2017 PWC Employee Financial Wellness Survey. The survey found that 30 percent of Baby Boomers have just $50,000 or less saved for retirement &mdash; significantly short of the amount needed for a happy and healthy post-work life. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-signs-you-arent-saving-enough-for-retirement?Ref=seealso" target="_blank">10 Signs You Aren't Saving Enough for Retirement</a>)</p> <h2>Time to play catch-up</h2> <p>If you don't have enough money in your 401(k) plan, or if you have an IRA that you've been mostly neglecting, you can boost the amount of money you save each year if you are age 50 or older.</p> <p>For the 2017 tax year, you are allowed to contribute up to $18,000 in a 401(k) plan. But if you're over 50, you can go past this threshold with what are known as catch-up contributions. Currently, at 50+, you can contribute an extra $6,000 to a 401(k) for a total of $24,000 a year.</p> <p>Traditional and Roth IRAs also have catch-up policies for investors 50 or older. For the 2017 tax year, you can contribute up to $5,500 in either type of IRA. But if you are 50 or older, you can contribute an additional $1,000 for a total of $6,500 this year in your neglected IRA.</p> <p>If you can make these extra contributions happen, do it. The catch-up contributions are designed to help sluggish savers boost their retirement dollars as they get closer to leaving the workforce. They're a good option for providing a boost to a 401(k) plan or a largely ignored IRA.</p> <h2>Increase your regular contributions</h2> <p>When you take out a 401(k), you tell your employer what percentage of your paycheck you want devoted to the savings vehicle. If you're not contributing as much as possible with each paycheck by the age of 50, now is the time to change that. It is absolutely essential, if your retirement savings account is lacking, to boost those regular contributions.</p> <p>You should definitely increase those contributions so that you are saving enough to meet your company's matching program, if it offers one. Many employers offer a matching program. To take advantage of this, you'll have to contribute a set minimum amount of dollars in a given year to your 401(k).</p> <p>The amount of money employers match, and the way company matching programs work, varies. But it is possible to earn thousands of dollars in free money each year if you contribute enough of each paycheck to qualify for matching funds from your employer. Those funds are basically free dollars from your company, and can help provide another boost to a 401(k) plan that needs more money.</p> <h2>Change your spending priorities</h2> <p>Once retirement nears, boosting your savings for it should become your top financial priority. Fortunately, many adults in their 50s have already helped pay for their children's college tuitions, so that major expense is behind them. These adults can then boost the amount of money they contribute to old IRAs or underfunded 401(k) funds.</p> <p>But what if you still have children getting ready to attend or already attending college? It's OK to tell these kids that your retirement savings come first.</p> <p>Financial experts agree that it is more important for adults to build their retirement savings than it is for them to pay for their children's college tuitions. This doesn't mean that you can't help your kids pay for college. It just means that you shouldn't contribute so much that you can't afford to sock away enough for retirement. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/are-you-ruining-your-retirement-by-spoiling-your-kids?Ref=seealso" target="_blank">Are You Ruining Your Retirement by Spoiling Your Kids?</a>)</p> <p>As you move past 50, it's time to shift priorities toward yourself. You don't want to enter retirement unsure of whether you have enough dollars saved up to afford it.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fhow-to-revive-an-old-retirement-fund&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FHow%2520to%2520Revive%2520an%2520Old%2520Retirement%2520Fund.jpg&amp;description=How%20to%20Revive%20an%20Old%20Retirement%20Fund"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/How%20to%20Revive%20an%20Old%20Retirement%20Fund.jpg" alt="How to Revive an Old Retirement Fund" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dan-rafter">Dan Rafter</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-revive-an-old-retirement-fund">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/half-of-americans-are-wrong-about-their-retirement-savings">Half of Americans Are Wrong About Their Retirement Savings</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/3-common-retirement-regrets-you-can-avoid">3 Common Retirement Regrets You Can Avoid</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-face-these-7-scary-facts-about-retirement-saving">How to Face These 7 Scary Facts About Retirement Saving</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-age-milestones-that-impact-your-retirement">6 Age Milestones That Impact Your Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-signs-you-arent-saving-enough-for-retirement">10 Signs You Aren&#039;t Saving Enough for Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Retirement 401(k) baby boomers catch up contributions IRA neglect nest egg old accounts Fri, 10 Nov 2017 09:00:06 +0000 Dan Rafter 2045998 at http://www.wisebread.com 5 Investment Moves That Prove You're Finally a Grown-Up http://www.wisebread.com/5-investment-moves-that-prove-youre-finally-a-grown-up <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-investment-moves-that-prove-youre-finally-a-grown-up" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/businessman_protecting_coins_in_saplings.jpg" alt="Businessman Protecting Coins In Saplings" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>You know that investing is a smart move: It's a way to grow your wealth over time and boost the odds that you'll have enough money to live the happiest possible retirement. But how do you know when you're investing your money like a grown-up and not like a kid?</p> <p>It's about taking reasonable risks, doing your research, and changing your investment mix when it makes sense. In other words, you know you're investing like a grown-up when you treat investing like what it is: work.</p> <p>These are the five investment moves that prove you're finally a grown-up.</p> <h2>1. You're not afraid to invest in stocks</h2> <p>It's true that stocks come with more risk. But investing in stocks comes with the potential for much higher rewards, too. If you ignore stocks and only invest in safe assets such as bonds, you run the risk of losing significant profits over time.</p> <p>According to TIME Money, since 1926, portfolios made up mostly of stocks have never had losses that last 20 years or more. These same portfolios reported average gains of more than 10.8 percent annually, while portfolios made up of bonds averaged returns of just 4 percent a year.</p> <p>If you're investing like a grown-up, you won't run away from the high-reward potential of stocks. Instead, you'll make sure to include stocks as part of your overall investment portfolio. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-reasons-to-invest-in-stocks-past-age-50?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Reasons to Invest in Stocks Past Age 50</a>)</p> <h2>2. You do your research</h2> <p>Your friend comes to you with a hot tip, claiming that you absolutely must invest in this new company. They tell you you'll be getting in on the ground floor of something big. An immature investor might jump at that opportunity, but a grown-up will do the research before acting on the tip.</p> <p>This means reading company reports and listening to conference calls. It means studying the product or service this &quot;hot&quot; company is offering. It means seeking out the advice of true financial experts. And, yes, all of that takes time and work. But to invest like a grown-up means you're willing to put in that effort before investing your dollars. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-dumb-stock-picking-mistakes-even-smart-investors-make?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Dumb Stock Picking Mistakes Even Smart Investors Make</a>)</p> <h2>3. You don't sell too quickly</h2> <p>It's tempting to sell a stock when it's either soaring in value or falling. But reacting too quickly to changes in value, whether positive or negative, is the sign of an immature investor. The grown-up investor realizes that investing sometimes requires patience.</p> <p>Consider a stock that rises in value after you buy it. Sure, if you sell it, you'll make a quick profit. But what if you held onto the stock longer? If the stock is a solid one, it might continue to increase in value over time. If you sell too early, you might miss out on plenty of future profit.</p> <p>You also don't want to hold onto a losing investment for too long, but it's still possible to sell too quickly. If you're patient, and if you've done your research on the company before investing, it might make sense to hold onto the stock until its value begins to rebound. If you sell as soon as the stock loses value, you're certain to take a loss. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-secret-to-successful-investing-is-trusting-the-process?ref=seealso" target="_blank">The Secret to Successful Investing Is Trusting the Process</a>)</p> <h2>4. You're not hunting for bargains</h2> <p>You don't want to overpay for stocks, but sometimes investing in a quality company takes a significant amount of money. Grown-up investors know that it's better to invest in a strong company while paying a bit more than it is to get a bargain price for a company that won't perform as well.</p> <p>The truth is, if you want to invest in top companies, you'll have to spend more to do so. Don't let your quest for bargain prices trick you into investing in underwhelming companies.</p> <h2>5. You don't cash out your 401(k) when you change jobs</h2> <p>When you change jobs, you'll usually have to figure out what to do with the 401(k) plan in which you've been investing. The immature move? Cashing it out for a quick buck. The grown-up move? Rolling that 401(k) over into an IRA.</p> <p>If you cash out your 401(k), you'll lose a good portion of the money you saved because of taxes and, depending on your age, penalties for withdrawing the cash too early.</p> <p>By rolling over the funds, you won't suffer any penalties or tax hits, and your money will continue to grow over the years. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-step-by-step-guide-to-rolling-over-your-401k?ref=seealso" target="_blank">The Step-by-Step Guide to Rolling Over Your 401(k)</a>)</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F5-investment-moves-that-prove-youre-finally-a-grown-up&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F5%2520Investment%2520Moves%2520That%2520Prove%2520You%2527re%2520Finally%2520a%2520Grown-Up.jpg&amp;description=5%20Investment%20Moves%20That%20Prove%20You're%20Finally%20a%20Grown-Up"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/5%20Investment%20Moves%20That%20Prove%20You%27re%20Finally%20a%20Grown-Up.jpg" alt="5 Investment Moves That Prove You're Finally a Grown-Up" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dan-rafter">Dan Rafter</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-investment-moves-that-prove-youre-finally-a-grown-up">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-millennial-investors-can-get-past-the-great-recession">How Millennial Investors Can Get Past the Great Recession</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-money-lessons-we-can-learn-from-baseball">8 Money Lessons We Can Learn From Baseball</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-types-of-investors-which-one-are-you">8 Types of Investors — Which One Are You?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-reasons-to-invest-in-stocks-past-age-50">7 Reasons to Invest in Stocks Past Age 50</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-things-you-need-to-know-about-investing-in-company-stock">7 Things You Need to Know About Investing in Company Stock</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Investment 401(k) bargains buy and hold fear grown-up money moves retirement risk stocks Tue, 07 Nov 2017 09:01:07 +0000 Dan Rafter 2045997 at http://www.wisebread.com 3 Common Retirement Regrets You Can Avoid http://www.wisebread.com/3-common-retirement-regrets-you-can-avoid <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/3-common-retirement-regrets-you-can-avoid" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/retirement_plan_concept.jpg" alt="Retirement plan concept" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>One of the best ways to set your life on a positive course &mdash; financially and otherwise &mdash; is to find out what older people wish they had done when they were younger. Along these lines, Vanguard <a href="https://vanguardblog.com/2017/04/18/the-coulda-shoulda-woulda-behind-every-retirement-story/" target="_blank">recently asked readers</a> of its blog, &quot;If you had a do-over, what would you do differently to prepare for retirement?&quot;</p> <p>That question generated a treasure trove of advice. They covered a lot of ground, but many pertained to the following three regrets.</p> <h2>Getting started with an investing plan too late</h2> <p>This is a common lament among older people, and it's easy to see why. Numerous studies show that too many people have too little saved for their later years. According to the 2017 Retirement Confidence Survey by the Employee Benefit Research Institute, only 56 percent of American workers are saving for retirement at all. Of those with no formal retirement plan, 67 percent have less than $1,000 in savings and investments. That can spell hardship later in life.</p> <p>In the words of Vanguard readers:</p> <p>&quot;I wish someone would have taught me about the power of compounding when I was 10 instead of learning about it when I was in my early 30s.&quot;</p> <p>&quot;If I had a 'do-over,' I would have taken my financial future more seriously much sooner. I eventually learned the right lessons, but I long-courted the deadly twins &mdash; ignorance and immediate self-gratification. Thus, I forfeited my best financial friend &mdash; time. Now time is my unforgiving and fleet-footed competitor, and it is only by doing considerably more of my late-learned lessons that I am able to maintain a winded, yet hopeful, pace.&quot;</p> <h3>What to do?</h3> <p>Start investing! If that seems far easier said than done, a couple of practical steps you could take include:</p> <ol style="margin-left: 40px;"> <li> <p><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/build-your-first-budget-in-5-easy-steps" target="_blank">Create a budget</a> so you can proactively plan how to best allocate your income in a way that makes room for investing, and;</p> </li> <li> <p>Set up an automatic monthly transfer from your paycheck to your workplace retirement plan or from your checking account to an IRA. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-retirement-planning-steps-late-starters-must-make?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Retirement Planning Steps Late Starters Must Make</a>)</p> </li> </ol> <h2>Not thinking carefully about the tax implications of different retirement savings options</h2> <p>Several Vanguard readers regretted using tax-<em>deferred </em>investment vehicles such as a traditional 401(k) or IRA instead of a tax-<em>free </em>vehicle such as a Roth IRA.</p> <p>Respondents noted:</p> <p>&quot;In addition to being diversified in asset classes, I should have also been diversified in tax types &mdash; i.e., most of my funds are in a 401(k) &hellip; so now everything I withdraw is taxable.&quot;</p> <p>&quot;The mistake I made was not converting my IRA to a Roth IRA in the 1990s. I thought the taxes for the conversion were too high. The result is that we are paying a higher tax rate now because the RMD (required minimum distribution) has raised our tax bracket and has increased our Medicare premium considerably each month. It has been an expensive lesson.&quot;</p> <h3>What to do?</h3> <p>Consider a Roth IRA or 401(k). Generally speaking, a Roth works best for younger people who are in a relatively low tax bracket. However, even for older, better-paid people, consider splitting your retirement contributions between a Roth and a traditional 401(k) or IRA. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/401k-or-ira-you-need-both?ref=seealso" target="_blank">401K or IRA? You Need Both</a>)</p> <h2>Not developing a compelling vision for retirement</h2> <p>Several readers said their retirement planning was mostly about money. They wish they had spent more time thinking about how to use their time in their later years.</p> <p>Some examples:</p> <p>&quot;The financial aspects of retirement have worked out OK. I had been planning that aspect of retirement for many, many years. What I did not anticipate or prepare for was the lack of identity in retirement. When I walked out the door on my last day of work, that was the last I saw or heard from coworkers. I had a job where I mattered and all of a sudden that stopped. Yes, the financial aspects of retirement are important, but you cannot neglect the psychological aspects of retirement.&quot;</p> <p>&quot;Don't just assume you'll enjoy relaxing after working for many years. Your job was a large part of your identity and you need to have a plan to fill that in with something else!&quot;</p> <h3>What to do?</h3> <p>Think about an issue you care about and how you might be part of the solution, whether through volunteer work or maybe even a business you start.</p> <p>In her book, <em>Life Reimagined</em>, Barbara Bradley Hagerty summarizes countless studies about how to move effectively from midlife onward. She said the research is clear: Being part of a cause that matters to you increases happiness and even extends life.</p> <p>Being intentional about avoiding these three common retiree regrets should give you greater confidence and peace of mind that you're on track toward a financially comfortable, meaningful retirement. And <em>that </em>could go a long way toward helping you dodge one other very common regret among the elderly: having spent too much time worrying.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F3-common-retirement-regrets-you-can-avoid&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F3%2520Common%2520Retirement%2520Regrets%2520You%2520Can%2520Avoid.jpg&amp;description=Goal%20Setting%3A%20Getting%20Out%20of%20Debt%20Once%20and%20For%20All"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/3%20Common%20Retirement%20Regrets%20You%20Can%20Avoid.jpg" alt="3 Common Retirement Regrets You Can Avoid" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/matt-bell">Matt Bell</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/3-common-retirement-regrets-you-can-avoid">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-6"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-age-milestones-that-impact-your-retirement">6 Age Milestones That Impact Your Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/half-of-americans-are-wrong-about-their-retirement-savings">Half of Americans Are Wrong About Their Retirement Savings</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/if-you-want-your-401k-to-grow-stop-doing-these-6-things">If You Want Your 401K to Grow, Stop Doing These 6 Things</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/intimidated-by-retirement-investing-get-professional-help">Intimidated by Retirement Investing? Get Professional Help!</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/this-is-why-you-cant-postpone-planning-for-your-retirement-and-how-to-start">This Is Why You Can&#039;t Postpone Planning for Your Retirement (And How to Start)</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Retirement 401(k) identity crisis investing IRA late starts midlife regrets taxes Wed, 01 Nov 2017 09:00:06 +0000 Matt Bell 2040659 at http://www.wisebread.com 4 Retirement Planning Moves Every 20-Something Must Make http://www.wisebread.com/4-retirement-planning-moves-every-20-something-must-make <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/4-retirement-planning-moves-every-20-something-must-make" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/group_of_mixed_race_people_holding_piggy_bank.jpg" alt="Group of mixed race people holding Piggy Bank" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>When you're in your 20s, retirement seems pretty far in the future. But you might be surprised: The end of your working days isn't as far away as you think. Even though you're just starting out in your career, you should be taking important steps now to improve your odds of a financially stable retirement later. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/retirement-planning-if-you-re-under-30?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Retirement Planning If You're Under 30</a>)</p> <h2>Start saving early</h2> <p>Again, you might think as a 20-something that you're too far away from retirement to worry about it. But saving as early as you can &mdash; like, right after you enter the workforce &mdash; can pay off big when it's time to retire.</p> <p>The easiest way to start saving early for retirement is to take advantage of your employer's 401(k) plan. This plan allows you to set aside a percentage of each paycheck in a mutual fund. You contribute every week, and thanks to the magic of compounding, your retirement savings will grow more quickly the more you've contributed. Your employer may also match up to a certain percentage of your contributions. That's free money you never want to leave on the table.</p> <p>The goal, of course, is to have enough money saved that, with the help of other outside income such as Social Security payments, you'll be able to live a happy and healthy lifestyle after retiring &mdash; one in which you won't have to worry about money.</p> <p>The faster you start putting money away, the easier it is to reach this goal. Financial analysts say you should put away at least 10 percent of every paycheck for retirement starting in your 20s. If you can put away more, that's even better. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-dumb-401k-mistakes-smart-people-make?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Dumb 401(k) Mistakes Smart People Make</a>)</p> <h2>Ask for more money</h2> <p>It's an older study, but 2010 research from Temple and George Mason Universities discovered an interesting trend: If you get a raise early in your career, it can have a compounding effect on your salary for the rest of your working life.</p> <p>The study used an example of a 25-year-old employee starting out with a $50,000 salary versus a $55,000 salary. Assuming a 5 percent annual pay raise, the employee who started out with an additional $5,000 would earn over $600,000 more during a 40-year career. Just think how far those extra funds could go toward saving for retirement.</p> <p>The lesson here? Don't be shy about asking your employer for a raise. You might not get $5,000, but even a small raise of $2,000 or $3,000 can pay off over time as you boost your earning power. It's easier to save more money for retirement when you are earning a higher salary. That 10 to 15 percent you save from each paycheck will naturally be higher if those paychecks are larger. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/you-should-always-negotiate-a-raise-here-are-10-reasons-why?ref=seealso" target="_blank">You Should Always Negotiate a Raise: Here Are 10 Reasons Why</a>)</p> <h2>Build an emergency fund</h2> <p>While it's important to set aside money for retirement, it's equally necessary to <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-easy-ways-to-build-an-emergency-fund-from-0?ref=seealso" target="_blank">save money for an emergency fund</a>. As the name suggests, an emergency fund is a pool of money, usually in a risk-free savings account, that you draw from when you need a quick infusion of cash to pay for unexpected events such as a new car transmission or medical bill.</p> <p>Why does this account matter for retirement savings? If you don't have an emergency fund, you're more likely to cover financial emergencies with your credit card. This leads to a large increase in high-interest debt. If you're then devoting too much money to paying down this debt, you won't have as many dollars to put toward retirement.</p> <p>Early in your 20s is a great time to start building that emergency fund. Financial experts recommend that you have at least six months' to a year's worth of daily living expenses saved in your emergency account at all times. Start building toward that goal now.</p> <h2>Tackle student loan debt</h2> <p>If you're like many 20-somethings, you're dealing with tens of thousands of dollars in student loan debt. The faster you pay this off, the better.</p> <p>If you have any extra money, put it toward your student loan debt. Just make sure that your loan servicer is using this extra money to pay off the principal balance and not the interest.</p> <p>The faster you pay off your student loans, the more money you'll have for saving for retirement. Paying off your college debt might seem like a struggle now, especially when your income is lower, but in a few years, you'll be thankful you did it. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-surprising-ways-to-pay-off-your-student-loans?ref=seealso" target="_blank">8 Surprising Ways to Pay Off Your Student Loans</a>)</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F4-retirement-planning-moves-every-20-something-must-make&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F4%2520Retirement%2520Planning%2520Moves%2520Every%252020-Something%2520Must%2520Make_0.jpg&amp;description=4%20Retirement%20Planning%20Moves%20Every%2020-Something%20Must%20Make"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/4%20Retirement%20Planning%20Moves%20Every%2020-Something%20Must%20Make_0.jpg" alt="4 Retirement Planning Moves Every 20-Something Must Make" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dan-rafter">Dan Rafter</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-retirement-planning-moves-every-20-something-must-make">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-money-moves-every-new-college-student-should-make">7 Money Moves Every New College Student Should Make</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-money-moves-to-make-the-moment-you-graduate">5 Money Moves to Make the Moment You Graduate</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dont-start-a-family-before-reaching-these-5-money-goals">Don&#039;t Start a Family Before Reaching These 5 Money Goals</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/3-ways-americans-are-getting-better-at-managing-their-money">3 Ways Americans Are Getting Better at Managing Their Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/its-never-too-late-to-fix-these-5-money-mistakes-from-your-past">It&#039;s Never Too Late to Fix These 5 Money Mistakes From Your Past</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance 20 somethings 401(k) asking for a raise compound interest emergency funds employer match money moves student loans young adults Tue, 31 Oct 2017 08:00:06 +0000 Dan Rafter 2039973 at http://www.wisebread.com 5 Ways to Get the Most From Your Employer’s Automated Retirement Plan http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-to-get-the-most-from-your-employer-s-automated-retirement-plan <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-ways-to-get-the-most-from-your-employer-s-automated-retirement-plan" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/arrows_pointing_in_positive_direction_on_401k_statement.jpg" alt="Arrows Pointing In Positive Direction On 401(k) Statement" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>An increasing number of companies are automating their 401(k) plans &mdash; automatically enrolling new hires and even automatically choosing investments for employees. If that's true of your employer, don't be lulled into a false sense of confidence. Just because many decisions are being made for you doesn't necessarily mean they're the <em>right</em> decisions. Here's what you need to know.</p> <h2>1. Stay in</h2> <p>The starting point of automated retirement plans is automated enrollment. To not participate, you have to opt <em>out. </em>Don't do that. For the vast majority of employees, participation is a good thing.</p> <h2>2. Invest enough</h2> <p>Most automated plans set employee contributions at very low rates, such as 3 percent of salary, at least initially. Many employees, perhaps assuming that's how much they <em>should</em> be investing, never change their contribution rate.</p> <p>However, 3 percent of salary is almost certainly not enough &mdash; not enough to get the full company match if that's available, and not enough to save adequately for retirement. So, use a free online retirement planning calculator to find out how much you should be saving and set your contribution rate accordingly.</p> <p>If you can't afford to contribute enough right away, see if your company's plan offers <em>auto-escalation</em>, which will automatically increase your contribution rate over time. If it does, signing up would help you follow through on your good intentions.</p> <h2>3. Choose the right investment(s)</h2> <p>Your plan may automatically invest your contributions in a target-date fund. Such funds have many benefits, but also a few features you should watch out for. The primary benefits are that they come with preset asset allocations based on the year of your intended retirement, and they automatically become more conservatively invested as you near your target retirement date. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-you-need-to-know-about-the-easiest-way-to-save-for-retirement?ref=seealso" target="_blank">What You Need to Know About the Easiest Way to Save for Retirement</a>)</p> <p>The primary thing to watch out for is that not all target-date funds are created equal. Funds from different fund companies all designed with the same target retirement date in mind can have very different stock/bond allocations.</p> <p>It would be best to determine your optimal asset allocation using a tool such as Vanguard's free <a href="https://personal.vanguard.com/us/FundsInvQuestionnaire" target="_blank">Investor Questionnaire</a>. Then choose the target-date fund that most closely matches that allocation. It might be one with an earlier or later target retirement date than your actual planned retirement date, depending on your optimal asset allocation.</p> <h2>4. Don't pay too much in fees</h2> <p>If a target-date fund is the default investment in your 401(k) plan, and if you like the idea of using a target-date fund, you should still check the fund's expense ratio. The lower, the better. For example, with a fund charging an expense ratio of 0.75 percent, you'll pay $7.50 in fees each year for every $1,000 you have invested. If the expense ratio is 0.25 percent, you'll pay $2.50 per year for every $1,000 invested.</p> <p>If the default fund's expense ratio is on the high side (to give you a point of reference, Vanguard charges just 0.16 percent for its 2040 target-date fund), see if your plan gives you access to a brokerage window. If so, you should be able to choose a target-date fund from among many fund companies, which should enable you to choose a lower-cost fund. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/watch-out-for-these-5-sneaky-401k-fees?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Watch Out for These 5 Sneaky 401K Fees</a>)</p> <p>Another option is to see if your plan offers index funds, which typically have very low expense ratios. If so, consider using such funds to build a portfolio that matches your optimal asset allocation. You may be able to do so using as few as three funds.</p> <h2>5. Keep your hands off the money</h2> <p>Some companies with automatic retirement plans are finding that many participants are surprised by how quickly money has built up in their accounts. Surprise is quickly followed by a desire for that money, which is then followed by a loan.</p> <p>It would be far better to remember what the money is for (retirement!) and keep your hands off. One of the key ingredients for successful investing is time. Pulling money from your account, even temporarily, gives it less time to compound. Plus, if you borrow against your account and then leave your employer &mdash; whether by your choice or your employer's &mdash; you'll have to repay the entire loan, usually within 60 days.</p> <p>Automation has been very effective at driving up participation rates in 401(k) plans, which has been beneficial for thousands of people. However, to get the most out of your employer's automated plan, make sure the automated choices are truly the best choices for you. If they're not, don't be afraid to make some manual changes.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F5-ways-to-get-the-most-from-your-employer-s-automated-retirement-plan&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F5%2520Ways%2520to%2520Get%2520the%2520Most%2520From%2520Your%2520Employers%2520Automated%2520Retirement%2520Plan.jpg&amp;description=5%20Ways%20to%20Get%20the%20Most%20From%20Your%20Employers%20Automated%20Retirement%20Plan"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/5%20Ways%20to%20Get%20the%20Most%20From%20Your%20Employers%20Automated%20Retirement%20Plan.jpg" alt="5 Ways to Get the Most From Your Employer&rsquo;s Automated Retirement Plan" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/matt-bell">Matt Bell</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-to-get-the-most-from-your-employer-s-automated-retirement-plan">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-11"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-traps-to-avoid-with-your-401k">7 Traps to Avoid With Your 401(k)</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-face-4-ugly-truths-about-retirement-planning">How to Face 4 Ugly Truths About Retirement Planning</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/bookmark-this-a-step-by-step-guide-to-choosing-401k-investments">Bookmark This: A Step-by-Step Guide to Choosing 401(k) Investments</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-age-milestones-that-impact-your-retirement">6 Age Milestones That Impact Your Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-save-for-retirement-when-you-are-unemployed">How to Save for Retirement When You Are Unemployed</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Retirement 401(k) automated retirement plans contributions expense ratios fees loans target date funds Wed, 18 Oct 2017 08:30:06 +0000 Matt Bell 2037239 at http://www.wisebread.com 7 Things You Need to Know About Investing in Company Stock http://www.wisebread.com/7-things-you-need-to-know-about-investing-in-company-stock <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/7-things-you-need-to-know-about-investing-in-company-stock" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/surging_business.jpg" alt="Surging Business" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>If you are employed by a public company, there is a chance that you will be offered the option to invest in company stock in your 401(k) or purchase company shares at a discount. This can be a nice perk for employees, and a possible incentive for them to work hard and remain loyal to the company.</p> <p>But investing in company stock is not without its pitfalls. You may recall stories about workers from Enron, Lehman Brothers, and other firms who lost much of their retirement money when those companies went bankrupt.</p> <p>If you have the chance to purchase company stock, consider taking advantage of it. But also be aware of some of these key pieces of information beforehand.</p> <h2>1. Sometimes you get company stock for free or at a discount</h2> <p>Companies distribute stock to employees in a number of different ways. Sometimes, it's simply given to workers as part of compensation plans. Other times, it's in the form of options that allow workers to buy shares at a certain price. (For example, you may be able to lock in shares at $45 per share even if they are selling at $60 on the open market.) This can be a nice benefit to employees beyond the normal salary, and it's often designed as an incentive to make them feel more invested in the company's success. If the company does well and share prices rise, employees can benefit financially. But the flip side is also true. If the company performs poorly, you could lose.</p> <h2>2. You already depend on your company</h2> <p>Your financial well-being is already heavily dependent on the success of your employer. The company pays your salary, offers you health benefits, and may match your contributions to your retirement plan. If you accept company stock, even more of your financial future is tied up with the health of the company.</p> <p>&quot;By using one's financial capital (i.e. 401(k) balance) to purchase employer stock, an individual is effectively over-allocating to the future success of his or her current employer,&quot; Morningstar said in a research report on the issue. This may be fine when the company is doing well, but bad news if the company is struggling. If you do accept company stock, take steps to diversify your income and investment holdings so your success and the company's success are not so intertwined.</p> <h2>3. Company stock should not be your sole retirement strategy</h2> <p>Many people have found themselves in trouble when they've decided to put all of their retirement plan contributions into company stock. Or, they've accepted company stock as compensation without contributing their own money into a diverse set of investments. This is dangerous because it places all of your retirement money into a single company that could go bust at any time.</p> <p>This is what happened with many Enron employees, who were left with nothing for their retirement when the company collapsed. Company shares should only be viewed as one component of a broader investment portfolio that includes a healthy mix of stocks from various industries and asset classes.</p> <h2>4. There may be tax implications</h2> <p>Unless your employer allows you to buy company stock as part of a tax advantaged retirement plan, you will be asked to pay taxes on any dividends you earn, and on capital gains when you sell. So keep this in mind at tax time.</p> <p>If you own a large amount of company stock, those shares could represent a sizable tax bill that you will have to plan for. And if you decide to sell shares shortly after acquiring them, remember that capital gains could be taxed at the normal income rate rather than the long-term capital gains rate, which is lower.</p> <h2>5. Companies that offer stock aren't necessarily stronger</h2> <p>You should not assume that a company's stock will perform well just because they are offering shares to you. In fact, there is some evidence to suggest that companies that dish out a lot of stock to employees actually perform worse than companies that don't. You may feel like you are cheating if you invest in companies other than your own, but your future self will thank you.</p> <h2>6. You may end up with more company stock than you realize</h2> <p>If you've acquired company stock over the years and it's performed well, you may find that over time it has taken on a disproportionate share of your investment portfolio's value. On one hand, it's good that the share price has risen, but now your portfolio is way out of balance and a big bulk of savings is at risk if those shares drop in value.</p> <p>It always makes sense to check your portfolio frequently and rebalance when you find yourself overweight with any one investment. This is especially true when dealing with company stock. As a general rule, avoid letting company stock make up more than 10 percent of your total investments.</p> <h2>7. Owning company stock has become less popular</h2> <p>Offering company stock used to be more common than it is now among organizations looking to attract top talent. The percentage of company stock in 401(k) plans has declined over the last decade. Back in 1999, company stock made up about 17 percent of the assets in 401(k) plans, but that figure has declined to 7 percent, according to the Employee Benefit Research Institute. And it appears that newer employees are less likely to place company stock in their retirement plans; EBRI reported that just 30 percent of new workers placed company stock in their 401(k) plan, compared to 44 percent of all planholders.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F7-things-you-need-to-know-about-investing-in-company-stock&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F7%2520Things%2520You%2520Need%2520to%2520Know%2520About%2520Investing%2520in%2520Company%2520Stock.jpg&amp;description=7%20Things%20You%20Need%20to%20Know%20About%20Investing%20in%20Company%20Stock"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/7%20Things%20You%20Need%20to%20Know%20About%20Investing%20in%20Company%20Stock.jpg" alt="7 Things You Need to Know About Investing in Company Stock" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/tim-lemke">Tim Lemke</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-things-you-need-to-know-about-investing-in-company-stock">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-7"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/bookmark-this-a-step-by-step-guide-to-choosing-401k-investments">Bookmark This: A Step-by-Step Guide to Choosing 401(k) Investments</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-costly-mistakes-diy-investors-make">9 Costly Mistakes DIY Investors Make</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/think-outside-the-index-when-you-rebalance-your-investment-portfolio">Think Outside the Index When You Rebalance Your Investment Portfolio</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-the-risk-averse-can-get-into-the-stock-market">How the Risk Averse Can Get Into the Stock Market</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-investment-moves-that-prove-youre-finally-a-grown-up">5 Investment Moves That Prove You&#039;re Finally a Grown-Up</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Investment 401(k) company stocks employee discounts portfolio pros and cons rebalancing retirement risks taxes Mon, 16 Oct 2017 08:30:10 +0000 Tim Lemke 2035892 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Face These 7 Scary Facts About Retirement Saving http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-face-these-7-scary-facts-about-retirement-saving <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-face-these-7-scary-facts-about-retirement-saving" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/how_much_savings_will_you_need_to_retire.jpg" alt="How much savings will you need to retire" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Articles warning about our lack of retirement preparedness are a dime a dozen, and maybe that's part of the problem. We hear the warnings so often that we've become numb to them.</p> <p>Maybe packing the scariest statistics into one article will have more impact and motivate more of us to get in the retirement savings game. That's what this article is designed to do. But brace yourself: The picture isn't pretty.</p> <h2>1. You might not be saving enough</h2> <p>According to the Employee Benefit Research Institute (EBRI), about two out of every five workers today (44 percent) are not saving <em>any</em> money for retirement. None.</p> <p>Even among today's oldest workers &mdash; those closest to retirement &mdash; many have far too little saved for their later years. Among workers age 55 or older, 45 percent have less than $100,000 saved.</p> <p>If these folks really kick their savings into gear &mdash; let's say they end up with $250,000 by the time they finish their career &mdash; that still won't provide much to live on. A standard <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-retirement-rules-of-thumb-that-actually-work?ref=internal" target="_blank">retirement rule of thumb</a> says you can withdraw 4 percent of your nest egg every year without having to worry about draining your account before you die. At $250,000, that translates into just $10,000 of annual retirement income. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-signs-you-arent-saving-enough-for-retirement?ref=seealso" target="_blank">10 Signs You Aren't Saving Enough for Retirement</a>)</p> <h2>2. You might outlive your money</h2> <p>Among the many risks financial planners talk about is <em>longevity risk</em>; the danger of living a long life. It may sound kind of funny to frame that as a risk since most of us would <em>like </em>to live a long life. However, running out of money before you run out of time wouldn't be very funny at all.</p> <p>A man who is 65 years old today can expect to live another 19.2 years, according to the Social Security Administration's Life Expectancy Calculator. A 65-year-old woman can expect to live another 21.6 years.</p> <p>Are you on track to save enough to cover your retirement expenses that long?</p> <h2>3. If you're young, you're probably not saving aggressively enough</h2> <p>Many millennials &mdash; people with the best opportunity to take advantage of compounding interest &mdash; are investing far too conservatively. A 2014 UBS Investor Watch survey found that millennials were almost as likely as baby boomers to describe their risk tolerance as conservative. The same survey found millennials holding over half their assets in cash.</p> <p>When you're young, the riskiest thing you can do with your investments is to play it too safe. Doing so will make it hard to outpace inflation and you'll miss out on much of the growth that compounding can provide. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-facts-millennials-should-know-about-retirement-planning?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Facts Millennials Should Know About Retirement Planning</a>)</p> <h2>4. You can't count on Social Security to fill in much of the gap</h2> <p>As of July 2017, the average Social Security retirement benefit was just $1,325 per month. Even scarier, the Social Security Administration notes that Social Security provides 90 percent or more of the income received by about one in five elderly married couples, and two in five elderly singles.</p> <p>A big part of the problem is that many people claim benefits as soon as they qualify &mdash; age 62. That guarantees the lowest possible monthly benefit. Waiting until full retirement age (67 for anyone born in 1960 or later), or even better, age 70, will boost monthly benefits substantially. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-smart-ways-to-boost-your-social-security-payout-before-retirement?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Smart Ways to Boost Your Social Security Payout Before Retirement</a>)</p> <h2>5. You shouldn't count on working for pay in your later years</h2> <p>Plan B for a growing number of today's workers is to retire after the typical retirement age of 65. For many, it isn't that they love their job so much; it's that they know they'll need the money.</p> <p>But their aspirations don't match reality. According to EBRI, 52 percent of today's workers <em>expect</em> to retire after age 65 or never retire, whereas just 14 percent of today's over-65 crowd <em>actually</em> retired that late or never retired.</p> <p>In fact, 48 percent of today's retirees left the workforce <em>earlier</em> than planned &mdash; mostly due to health issues or the need to care for a loved one.</p> <h2>6. You may have no idea how much you should be saving for retirement</h2> <p>EBRI found that just 41 percent of all of today's workers have tried to figure out how much they will need to have saved by the time they retire in order to live comfortably. Those that <em>have</em> run the numbers tend to save more for retirement. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/this-one-thing-could-be-the-key-to-retiring-rich?Ref=seealso" target="_blank">This One Thing Could Be the Key to Retiring Rich</a>)</p> <h2>7. You may not be able to afford your later life health care costs</h2> <p>A recent Fidelity study found that a couple retiring this year would need $275,000 to cover their health care premiums, copays, deductibles, and out-of-pocket costs for prescription drugs over the course of their retirement. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-unexpected-expenses-for-retirees-and-how-to-manage-them?ref=seealso" target="_blank">9 Unexpected Expenses for Retirees &mdash; And How to Manage Them</a>)</p> <p>What that figure <em>doesn't </em>include is long-term care, and yet, today's 65-year-olds have a 70 percent chance of needing some type of long-term care before they die, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. And that care is costly. Genworth's latest annual Cost of Care survey found that a private room in a nursing home cost nearly $7,700 per month in 2016, or over $92,000 per year. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/is-long-term-care-insurance-worth-it?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Is Long Term Care Insurance Worth It?</a>)</p> <p>If these scary statistics have convinced you to take action, here are three of the most important steps to take: Run the numbers to figure out how much you should be saving for retirement, make saving a priority, and wait at least until full retirement age before claiming Social Security benefits.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fhow-to-face-these-7-scary-facts-about-retirement-saving&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FHow%2520to%2520Face%2520These%25207%2520Scary%2520Facts%2520About%2520Retirement%2520Saving.jpg&amp;description=How%20to%20Face%20These%207%20Scary%20Facts%20About%20Retirement%20Saving"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/How%20to%20Face%20These%207%20Scary%20Facts%20About%20Retirement%20Saving.jpg" alt="How to Face These 7 Scary Facts About Retirement Saving" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/matt-bell">Matt Bell</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-face-these-7-scary-facts-about-retirement-saving">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-age-milestones-that-impact-your-retirement">6 Age Milestones That Impact Your Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-signs-its-time-to-retire">8 Signs It&#039;s Time to Retire</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-retirement-planning-changes-when-youre-single">7 Ways Retirement Planning Changes When You&#039;re Single</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-overcome-these-4-common-retirement-fears">How to Overcome These 4 Common Retirement Fears</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-tax-day-is-april-15-and-other-weird-financial-deadlines">Why Tax Day Is April 15 and Other Weird Financial Deadlines</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Retirement 401(k) expenses health care IRA not saving enough outliving money scary facts social security Wed, 04 Oct 2017 09:00:06 +0000 Matt Bell 2030771 at http://www.wisebread.com Three of the Toughest Decisions You'll Face in Retirement http://www.wisebread.com/three-of-the-toughest-decisions-youll-face-in-retirement <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/three-of-the-toughest-decisions-youll-face-in-retirement" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/senior_couple_thave_a_breakfast_at_cafe.jpg" alt="Senior couple thave a breakfast at cafe" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>After spending a lifetime saving for retirement, you might think (or hope) the tough financial work is over. But in reality, retirement will bring several <em>new</em> financial challenges. Here are three of the key questions you'll need to address along with some recommendations.</p> <h2>1. When should I take Social Security?</h2> <p>There are many options here, especially when coordinating benefits with a spouse. Understanding the rules around three important age milestones can help you think through the best choice. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-questions-to-ask-before-you-start-claiming-your-social-security-benefits?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Questions to Ask Before You Start Claiming Your Social Security Benefits</a>)</p> <h3>Age 62</h3> <p>This is when you first become eligible to receive Social Security benefits. If you opt to take them this early, you'll get the smallest monthly benefit. While it's true that you may end up collecting benefits for the longest period of time by starting at age 62, if you can afford to do so, it's generally best to wait at least until your full retirement age (FRA). At that point, your monthly benefit will increase by 30 percent.</p> <p>If you're planning to continue working to some degree in your early to mid 60s, this may be another reason to wait. Claiming Social Security benefits before your FRA will trigger an &quot;earnings test.&quot; After you earn a certain amount (about $17,000 in 2017), for every two dollars of income, your Social Security benefits will be reduced by one dollar.</p> <p>You can learn more about the <a href="https://www.ssa.gov/oact/cola/rtea.html" target="_blank">earnings test</a> on the Social Security Administration's website.</p> <h3>Full retirement age</h3> <p>If you were born in 1960 or later, your <a href="https://www.ssa.gov/planners/retire/retirechart.html" target="_blank">full retirement age is 67</a>. That's the age at which you become eligible to receive what the Social Security Administration deems to be your &quot;full&quot; benefit.</p> <p>An important consideration related to your FRA has to do with spousal benefits. If you earned significantly more than your spouse over your careers, his or her spousal benefit (half your full retirement age benefit) may be larger than his or her own benefit. While your spouse could file for spousal benefits as early as age 62, he or she will get the maximum amount only if you <em>both</em> wait until your full retirement ages before claiming benefits.</p> <h3>Age 70</h3> <p>While it may sound as if full retirement age is when you'll qualify for your maximum benefit, waiting until age 70 will actually give you more. When I checked my benefits on the Social Security Administration website, I found that waiting until age 70 would boost my monthly benefit amount by nearly <em>28 percent </em>versus claiming it at my FRA of 67.</p> <p>In addition to qualifying for this higher monthly benefit, another important reason to consider waiting this long has to do with the potential impact on your spouse. Let's say you're the husband and have been the higher earner. When you pass away, your wife will be able to trade her benefit for your larger benefit, which she will receive for the rest of her life. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-smart-ways-to-boost-your-social-security-payout-before-retirement?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Smart Ways to Boost Your Social Security Payout Before Retirement</a>)</p> <h2>2. How much of my nest egg can I withdraw?</h2> <p>A long-standing rule of thumb is that you can safely withdraw 4 percent of your nest egg each year, bumping that amount up by the rate of inflation each year, without having to worry about depleting your savings before you die.</p> <p>However, there are many moving parts to this equation. Your cost of living will probably vary throughout retirement, and so will the stock market's performance.</p> <p>So, instead of adhering to a fixed formula, rerun the numbers each year using what some planners call a <em>dynamic withdrawal strategy</em>: Determine how much to withdraw based on the performance of your portfolio and your spending needs.</p> <h2>3. Which nest egg funds should I tap first?</h2> <p>If you have money in various accounts, such as a taxable account, a tax-deferred account (traditional IRA/401(k)), and a tax-free account (Roth IRA/401(k)), here's a recommended path for greatest tax efficiency.</p> <p>Generally, it's best to use money in your <em>taxable </em>accounts first, which allows funds in tax-advantaged accounts to continue growing on a tax-deferred or tax-free basis.</p> <p>Next, use money from your traditional IRA or 401(k) accounts. In fact, you <em>have to </em>start taking money from these accounts beginning at age 70&frac12;. That's when required minimum distribution (RMD) rules kick in. If you don't withdraw at least a specific minimum amount, you'll owe stiff penalties to the IRS.</p> <p>One factor to keep in mind is that if you have substantial balances in traditional IRA or 401(k) accounts, waiting to tap any of this money until age 70&frac12; may make your RMDs so large that they'll push you into a higher tax bracket. If that's the case, you may want to start taking some withdrawals from these accounts earlier than age 70&frac12;.</p> <p>It's usually best to save your Roth IRA money for last since they are not subject to RMD rules. If you don't need the money, you can let it continue growing tax-free.</p> <h2>Stay in the game</h2> <p>While retirement may be a time when you want to step away from some of the many responsibilities you had during your working years, it's important that you stay proactive with regard to your finances. Making well thought out decisions in the three areas discussed above will go a long way toward helping you enjoy financial peace of mind in your later years.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fthree-of-the-toughest-decisions-youll-face-in-retirement&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FThree%2520of%2520the%2520Toughest%2520Decisions%2520You%2527ll%2520Face%2520in%2520Retirement.jpg&amp;description=Three%20of%20the%20Toughest%20Decisions%20You'll%20Face%20in%20Retirement"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/Three%20of%20the%20Toughest%20Decisions%20You%27ll%20Face%20in%20Retirement.jpg" alt="Three of the Toughest Decisions You'll Face in Retirement" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/matt-bell">Matt Bell</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/three-of-the-toughest-decisions-youll-face-in-retirement">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-tax-day-is-april-15-and-other-weird-financial-deadlines">Why Tax Day Is April 15 and Other Weird Financial Deadlines</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-age-milestones-that-impact-your-retirement">6 Age Milestones That Impact Your Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-face-these-7-scary-facts-about-retirement-saving">How to Face These 7 Scary Facts About Retirement Saving</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/heres-how-your-taxes-will-change-when-you-retire">Here&#039;s How Your Taxes Will Change When You Retire</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-smart-ways-to-boost-your-social-security-payout-before-retirement">6 Smart Ways to Boost Your Social Security Payout Before Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Retirement 401(k) benefits decisions full retirement age IRA questions required minimum distributions social security withdrawals Wed, 27 Sep 2017 08:00:06 +0000 Matt Bell 2025922 at http://www.wisebread.com How Millennial Investors Can Get Past the Great Recession http://www.wisebread.com/how-millennial-investors-can-get-past-the-great-recession <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-millennial-investors-can-get-past-the-great-recession" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/businessman_cowering_on_blue_blackboard_background_with_chalk.jpg" alt="Businessman cowering on blue blackboard background with chalk" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>For many millennials, jumping head first into investing is not easy. Many of them have jarring memories of rough stretches in the market &mdash; most notably, the crash in 2007&ndash;2008 that led to the Great Recession. One recent survey from Legg Mason Global revealed that 82 percent of millennials say their investment decisions are influenced by that financial crisis and ensuing economic downturn.</p> <p>This wariness, however, could be harmful to millennials' long-term financial prospects. If they are not investing now, they may not be accumulating enough wealth for a comfortable retirement.</p> <p>How can millennials <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-reasons-millennials-should-stop-being-afraid-of-the-stock-market" target="_blank">get over their fear</a> and begin putting their cash back into stocks and other investments?</p> <h2>Look at the market's historical performance</h2> <p>It's impossible to ignore the 35 percent plunge in stock market prices that took place in 2008. No question, a lot of people lost a lot of money that year. But do you know what happened in 2009? The market rose by more than 25 percent. And it went up the next year. And the year after that. In fact, the S&amp;P 500 has seen positive gains every single year since the market crash, and 2017 promises to be the ninth straight year of positive returns.</p> <p>Moreover, the market rose for the five years before the 2008 crash. That's positive returns in 14 out of the last 15 years. With consistent returns like that, it's silly to dwell on a single rotten year, especially when you have a long way to go before retirement.</p> <h2>Start with what you know</h2> <p>You may be terrified about putting your money in stocks after enduring the Great Recession. So consider starting small, with something you're familiar with. Buy some stock in a strong company you know and like. If you eat a lot at McDonald's, buy some shares. Do you subscribe to Netflix? Buy shares of the company. Do you shop at Amazon? Go ahead, buy a few shares. This will get you started, and if you see these investments go up in value, you may overcome your fear of investing. When that happens, begin placing more of your savings into a wider array of investments and build a full portfolio.</p> <h2>Talk to an unbiased financial adviser</h2> <p>Sometimes you just need someone to talk to. Deep down, you know you should probably be investing your money and saving aggressively for retirement, but you aren't sure where to start. Perhaps you don't feel equipped with enough information to feel at ease.</p> <p>Most certified financial planners will be happy to sit down and have a conversation with you. They can help you get started investing in a way that will be within your risk tolerance. They'll explain how the investments work and point to the average annual returns. They can tell you about strategies that can help you grow your money while protecting it against any future market crashes. Any adviser worth their salt is not going to talk down to you; in fact, if they want your business, they will do whatever they can to make you feel comfortable before you invest a dime.</p> <h2>Chat with those who have endured a crash &mdash; and rebounded</h2> <p>The Great Recession wasn't the first time that the markets took a tumble. They fell precipitously after the tech bubble burst, and after the attacks of September 11. The markets fell more than 20 percent in a single day in October of 1987. Just about every decade has had at least one year that was bad for investors.</p> <p>Those who lived through those crashes, however, will tell you that things rebounded every time, and in many cases they were able to take advantage of depressed prices to realize larger gains in the end. For sure, there are people who chose to shy away from investing altogether after enduring a bad loss. But most people who lived through these downturns will offer the advice of &quot;This too shall pass.&quot;</p> <h2>Think about tomorrow</h2> <p>The Great Recession was painful, but imagine the pain of not having enough money to retire. That's what could happen if you shy away from investing. If you are afraid of investing because of your awareness of what happened a decade ago, it's time to flip that fear toward the future. Think for a second about what it will be like to fall short of your retirement goals. Consider what it means to be working well past what should be your retirement age. Scary, right? (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/are-you-making-the-biggest-investment-risk-of-all?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Are You Making the Biggest Investment Risk of All?</a>)</p> <h2>Take a lower risk approach</h2> <p>Most millennials are still decades away from retirement, so it makes sense to invest in mostly stocks, which usually offer high returns in exchange for some risk. But if you're risk tolerance is low, it's still possible to generate solid returns with a more conservative approach. Feel free to mix in some bonds or dividend stocks that have performed well over time. Look at industry sectors like consumer goods that have shown solid growth over the years with relatively low volatility. Be aware that you will sacrifice some return for taking this lower-risk approach, but you can still build a sizable retirement fund if you give it time to grow.</p> <h2>Save as much as you can</h2> <p>If you are skittish about investing, that should not be an excuse to avoid saving money at all. You may not feel comfortable putting your money in the markets, but it's imperative that you at least spend less money than you earn and avoid the crippling effects of debt.</p> <p>Ideally, you will want to invest a good portion of your savings, but if you can't get over your fear of the markets, make sure you're putting aside cash for emergencies and large expenses. Perhaps after building a large enough cash reserve, you'll become frustrated with the measly returns from bank interest and look to invest more aggressively.</p> <h2>Recognize free money when you see it</h2> <p>Have you even bothered to sign up for your employer's 401(k) plan? If it's something you've avoided because you don't want to invest, recognize that you may be turning down free cash. Most employers match their workers' contributions into a plan up to a certain amount, and may even throw in additional direct contributions. This is free money that you can invest along with your own, and is designed to replace the defined benefit plans (pensions) that employers used to offer. In the past, no reasonable worker would turn down a pension payment, so it's just as important to accept matching contributions to 401(k) plans. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-signs-you-arent-saving-enough-for-retirement?ref=seealso" target="_blank">10 Signs You Aren't Saving Enough for Retirement</a>)</p> <h2>Add to your knowledge and skills</h2> <p>Outside of financial market strategies, there are other ways you can make yourself less vulnerable to a financial crash. You may not be able to control the economy or the performance of the stock market, but you can control how attractive you might be to employers. Your education shouldn't end when you leave college. Don't be afraid to continue learning, both in the classroom and on the job.</p> <p>Take on new challenges and learn new skills. This might mean learning to code or becoming an expert in Excel or web design. Or, maybe some advanced writing or graphic design skills will help you. Bolstering your resume in this way will improve your chances of landing and keeping a job, and may lead to a higher income. If there is another market crash and recession, you'll feel confident that you can weather the storm.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fhow-millennial-investors-can-get-past-the-great-recession&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FHow%2520Millennial%2520Investors%2520Can%2520Get%2520Past%2520the%2520Great%2520Recession.jpg&amp;description=How%20Millennial%20Investors%20Can%20Get%20Past%20the%20Great%20Recession"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/How%20Millennial%20Investors%20Can%20Get%20Past%20the%20Great%20Recession.jpg" alt="How Millennial Investors Can Get Past the Great Recession" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/tim-lemke">Tim Lemke</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-millennial-investors-can-get-past-the-great-recession">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-13"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-investment-moves-that-prove-youre-finally-a-grown-up">5 Investment Moves That Prove You&#039;re Finally a Grown-Up</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-reasons-millennials-should-stop-being-afraid-of-the-stock-market">7 Reasons Millennials Should Stop Being Afraid of the Stock Market</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-things-you-need-to-know-about-investing-in-company-stock">7 Things You Need to Know About Investing in Company Stock</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/your-loss-aversion-is-costing-you-more-than-your-fomo">Your Loss Aversion Is Costing You More Than Your FOMO</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-dumb-401k-mistakes-smart-people-make">5 Dumb 401(k) Mistakes Smart People Make</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Investment 401(k) fear great recession loss aversion market crashes millennials retirement Mon, 25 Sep 2017 16:26:40 +0000 Tim Lemke 2023545 at http://www.wisebread.com Bookmark This: A Step-by-Step Guide to Choosing 401(k) Investments http://www.wisebread.com/bookmark-this-a-step-by-step-guide-to-choosing-401k-investments <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/bookmark-this-a-step-by-step-guide-to-choosing-401k-investments" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/real_estate_agent_working_with_client_online.jpg" alt="Real estate agent working with client online" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>It's no secret that 401(k) fund options are notoriously opaque. While target-date funds provide convenience to investors, they often come with higher fees than alternative investment vehicles, have highly variable returns, and aren't a good fit for many retirement savers. Let's simplify things, and review a low-stress strategy for building a solid two-to-three-fund portfolio for your 401(k).</p> <h2>The downsides to target-date funds</h2> <p>Designed to gradually adjust your investment mix as you approach retirement age, target-date funds have exploded in popularity since their designation as qualified default investment alternatives by the 2006 Pension Protection Plan. The upsides of target-date funds are that they're easy to select (96 percent of Vanguard plans make it the default investment option), they automatically rebalance, and they offer appropriate investment diversification. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-you-need-to-know-about-the-easiest-way-to-save-for-retirement?ref=seealso" target="_blank">What You Need to Know About the Easiest Way to Save for Retirement</a>)</p> <p>However, all that convenience comes at a high price. A 2015 review of over 1,700 target-date funds by FutureAdvisor determined that their average expense ratio (the annual fee charged to shareholders to cover operating expenses) was a relatively high 1.02 percent, meaning that you'd pay $51 every year for every $5,000 in your balance. Assuming an average investment return of 7 percent per year, you would miss out on an extra $4,998 in retirement savings over a 30-year period.</p> <p>On top of high fees, some target-date funds' returns barely cover their high annual expense ratios. The same review of 1,700 target-date funds pointed out that the lowest five-year average annual returns were 2.9 percent. (Returns are expressed net of expense ratios.) As of September 2017, 2.9 percent is not that much higher than the rate of a five-year CD at a credit union.</p> <p>Here's a better alternative to target-date funds.</p> <h2>Your guide to choosing your 401(k) investment options</h2> <p>In his 2013 letter to Berkshire Hathaway shareholders, Warren Buffett (aka The Oracle of Omaha) provided an investment strategy that would &quot;be superior to those attained by most investors who employ high-fee managers.&quot; Buffett recommended putting 90 percent of one's investments in a very low-cost S&amp;P 500 index fund, and the remaining 10 percent in short-term government bonds. This is the same advice that he has set in his will. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-best-pieces-of-financial-wisdom-from-warren-buffett?ref=seealso" target="_blank">The 5 Best Pieces of Financial Wisdom From Warren Buffett</a>)</p> <p>More and more 401(k) plans are offering passively managed index funds that track a benchmark, such as the S&amp;P 500. And for good reason: The Vanguard 500 Index Investor Shares Fund [Nasdaq: VFINX] has an annual expense ratio of 0.14 percent, just a $7 annual fee for a balance of $5,000. That's $44 in annual savings when you compare it to a target-date fund with a 1.02 percent annual expense ratio.</p> <p>Worried that this approach doesn't provide you enough diversification? Think again: An index fund tracking the S&amp;P 500 is investing in 500 large-cap companies. That's as diversified as you can get. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-too-much-investment-diversity-can-cost-you?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How Too Much Investment Diversity Can Cost You</a>)</p> <p>Let's use Buffett's advice to build your 401(k) plan's portfolio.</p> <h3>Step 1: Check your plan for a U.S. equities index fund</h3> <p>There is a good chance that your 401(k) plan offers a low-cost S&amp;P 500 index fund. Buffett personally recommends an S&amp;P 500 Vanguard index fund. Vanguard is an investment management company known for having very low fees compared to competitors, especially on its index funds. In 2016, close to 60 percent of Vanguard plans offered an index core giving you access to broadly diversified index funds for U.S. stocks. In truth, you can do just as well with other index funds tracking the S&amp;P 500, such as the Fidelity 500 Index Investor [Nasdaq: FUSEX] and the Northern Stock Index [Nasdaq: NOSIX].</p> <p>In the event, that you don't have access to a low-cost index fund tracking the S&amp;P 500 through your workplace 401(k), you have two action items. First, see if your plan offers another large cap index fund (one investing in large U.S. companies based on a market index). This type of fund normally invests at least 80 percent of its assets in securities within its benchmark index, such as the Fidelity Large Cap Stock Fund [Nasdaq: FLCSX] and the Vanguard U.S. Growth Fund [Nasdaq: VWUSX]. Second, contact your plan administrator and request adding a low-cost S&amp;P 500 index fund.</p> <h3>Step 2: Check your plan for a fund of short-term investment-grade bonds</h3> <p>Just like there are index funds for investing in equities, there are also index funds for investing in bonds. For example, there is the Vanguard Short-Term Investment-Grade Fund [Nasdaq: VSFTX], which has an annual expense ratio of 0.20 percent, or $10 in fees for a balance of $5,000.</p> <p>Don't have access to such a fund? Look for a low-cost fund giving you the most exposure to high- and medium-quality, investment-grade bonds with short-term maturities, including corporate bonds, pooled consumer loans, and U.S. government bonds. Why short-term maturities? Short-term bonds tend to have low risk and low yields, ensuring that one portion of your nest egg remains stable at all times &mdash; something you'll really benefit from during any recessions.</p> <p>Then, request that your plan administrator add a low-cost index fund for domestic bonds.</p> <h3>Step 3: Allocate 90 percent to the equities index fund and 10 percent to the bonds index fund</h3> <p>Now you're ready to rebalance your portfolio. Using your online portal, look for an option that says &quot;exchange funds&quot; or &quot;transfer money between funds&quot; to move your nest egg dollars from your existing investments into the equities index fund and bonds index fund. (Note: Depending on your plan rules, including vesting rules, you may not be able to move 100 percent of your balance until a certain date. In that case, move everything that you can and the remaining once it becomes eligible.)</p> <p>Exchange your entire 401(k) balance and allocate 90 percent of that amount to the equities index fund and 10 percent to the bonds index fund. Confirm your transaction.</p> <h3>Step 4: Adjust your future contributions</h3> <p>To keep future contributions going into the right place, adjust your paycheck investment mix so that 90 percent of withholdings go to the equities index fund and 10 percent go into the bonds index fund.</p> <p>If your 401(k) offers an automatic rebalance feature, opt-in for it so that your portfolio is automatically readjusted to the 90/10 without you moving a finger. If your 401(k) doesn't offer that feature, plan to manually rebalance your account once a year.</p> <h3>Step 5: Revisit the 90/10 allocation at important life changes</h3> <p>Marriage. Birth of your first child. Purchase of your first home. Being able to start making catch-up contributions. Reaching age 59 1/2. These and more critical milestones in your life may require you to adjust your 90/10 allocation. As you get closer to retirement age, you should gradually shift from a growth strategy (selecting funds that exhibit signs of above-average growth) to an income strategy (picking funds that provide a steady stream of income) so that you hold fewer stocks and more bonds. The beauty of a target-date fund is that is does all of this for you automatically as you age. Without one, you'll need to stay on top of this occasional rebalancing yourself.</p> <h2>The bottom line</h2> <p>One of the main reasons that your 401(k) will perform better is that you're minimizing fees. If you were to allocate 90 percent of a $5,000 401(k) balance into the Vanguard 500 Index Investor Shares Fund [Nasdaq: VFINX] and 10 percent into the Vanguard Short-Term Investment-Grade Fund [Nasdaq: VSFTX], you would just pay $7.30 in annual fees. That's $43.70 in annual savings over putting the entire $5,000 in a target-date fund with a 1.02 percent annual expense ratio. It doesn't sound like a large amount of savings, but compounded over the years it can add up to thousands of dollars more in your retirement fund.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fbookmark-this-a-step-by-step-guide-to-choosing-401k-investments&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FA%2520Step%2520By%2520Step%2520Guide%2520To%2520Choosing%2520Investments.jpg&amp;description=A%20Step-by-Step%20Guide%20to%20Choosing%20401(k)%20Investments"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/A%20Step%20By%20Step%20Guide%20To%20Choosing%20Investments.jpg" alt="A Step-by-Step Guide to Choosing Investments" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/damian-davila">Damian Davila</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/bookmark-this-a-step-by-step-guide-to-choosing-401k-investments">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-14"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-warren-buffett-says-you-should-invest-in-index-funds">Why Warren Buffett Says You Should Invest in Index Funds</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/think-outside-the-index-when-you-rebalance-your-investment-portfolio">Think Outside the Index When You Rebalance Your Investment Portfolio</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-the-risk-averse-can-get-into-the-stock-market">How the Risk Averse Can Get Into the Stock Market</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-make-sure-you-dont-run-out-of-money-in-retirement">How to Make Sure You Don&#039;t Run Out of Money in Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-things-you-need-to-know-about-investing-in-company-stock">7 Things You Need to Know About Investing in Company Stock</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Investment Retirement 401(k) bonds equities expense ratios fees index portfolio rebalancing s&p 500 short-term bonds target-date funds Warren Buffett Thu, 21 Sep 2017 08:31:06 +0000 Damian Davila 2023013 at http://www.wisebread.com 8 Signs It's Time to Retire http://www.wisebread.com/8-signs-its-time-to-retire <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/8-signs-its-time-to-retire" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/senior_woman_relaxing_0.jpg" alt="Senior woman relaxing" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>There will come a time when you consider making the shift from worker bee to retiree. But knowing the best moment to stop working is not always easy to determine. How do you know whether your money will last once you stop earning a salary? Is there a &quot;magic age,&quot; when retiring makes sense, or do you just go with a gut feeling?</p> <p>There's no science to knowing when to retire, but there may be some signs to follow. If most or all of these apply to you, maybe it's time to submit that resignation and begin the next chapter of your life.</p> <h2>1. You have enough money for the retirement you want</h2> <p>It's impossible to know precisely how much you'll need in retirement, but there are some basic calculations you can make to see how long your money will last if you stop working.</p> <p>You must first calculate what your annual living expenses will be. Research shows that people tend to spend less as they get older, but be sure to factor in the potential costs of new activities like travel, eating out, and caring for grandchildren. Then, examine how much money you have saved, and what the return on that money might be as you age. Match those numbers up with your expected life span. There are other things to consider, such as whether you plan to draw equity from your home. There are many online calculators that can help you with these figures.</p> <p>Generally speaking, if you take the annual expenses you expect and multiply them by 25, you'll be in the ballpark of what you need to retire comfortably. Once you are approaching this number, it may be a sign that you can stop working. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-you-can-cut-costs-right-before-you-retire-0?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Ways You Can Cut Costs Right Before You Retire</a>)</p> <h2>2. You must collect distributions from your retirement plan</h2> <p>If you have a 401(k) or IRA, there comes a point at which you are required to take distributions. For most people, this age is 70-&frac12;. You can delay taking 401(k) distributions until after you stop working, but not for the money in a traditional IRA. If you are being forced to take distributions, there's not much incentive to continue working.</p> <h2>3. You can collect the maximum in Social Security</h2> <p>The government incentivizes people to retire later by offering them more money from Social Security if they wait longer to collect it. You can begin collecting benefits as early as age 62, but those benefits will be higher if you wait longer. Those approaching retirement age can get full benefits if they wait until age 67, and may get additional credits if they wait until age 70. If you're already getting the maximum benefit from the government, perhaps it's a sign that you're ready to retire for good. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-smart-ways-to-boost-your-social-security-payout-before-retirement?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Smart Ways to Boost Your Social Security Payout Before Retirement</a>)</p> <h2>4. Your expenses are the lowest they've been in years</h2> <p>Your house is completely paid off. The kids are out of the house and college is paid for. You're not yet at the point where you have high medical expenses. Your cost of living hasn't been this low in decades. Sure, you may have big ticket things you want to pay for (travel, for example), but your day-to-day existence no longer requires a bi-weekly paycheck. It's still important to assess whether you have enough saved to last, but if you've downsized your lifestyle to a super-low level, it may no longer be necessary to keep working.</p> <h2>5. You no longer get any pleasure from work</h2> <p>We've all heard stories about older people who continue working simply because it makes them happy. Often, working gives them purpose and a sense of satisfaction that can't be replaced in retirement. But what if you're not one of these people? What if the work itself isn't rewarding, and you find yourself drained rather than energized by it? Then it may be time to consider retiring, assuming that your financial ducks are lined up well. Life is too short to work at an unsatisfying job if you don't have to.</p> <h2>6. Your health is starting to decline</h2> <p>In a perfect world, you will be healthy and spry enough to take advantage of all that retirement can offer. You will be perfectly able to handle that long bike tour through the south of France, and those backpacking trips on the Pacific Crest Trail. You'll have energy to spend time and keep up with your grandkids. But, if you are starting to see your health fade, perhaps it's time to stop working before you're unable to enjoy retirement the way you wish.</p> <h2>7. Your spouse wants you to</h2> <p>If your significant other is done working and has an urge to begin the next chapter of their life, perhaps it's that time for you as well. Many of the happiest retired couples are those that retire at the same time, and make post-work plans together. How fun is your spouse's retirement going to be if you're still schlepping into the office every day? (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-money-conversations-couples-should-have-before-retirement?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Money Conversations Couples Should Have Before Retirement</a>)</p> <h2>8. You are confident in your post-work plans</h2> <p>Many people continue working because they honestly don't know what they'd do otherwise. But if you have mapped out your retirement life, have a good sense of how you'll fill your days, and feel excited about what you want to do, that's a sign you may be ready to retire. If work is actually preventing you from moving forward on your plans, maybe it's time to think seriously about stopping work, assuming you are also ready financially.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F8-signs-its-time-to-retire&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F8%2520Signs%2520Its%2520Time%2520to%2520Retire.jpg&amp;description=8%20Signs%20Its%20Time%20to%20Retire"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/8%20Signs%20Its%20Time%20to%20Retire.jpg" alt="8 Signs It's Time to Retire" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/tim-lemke">Tim Lemke</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-signs-its-time-to-retire">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-face-these-7-scary-facts-about-retirement-saving">How to Face These 7 Scary Facts About Retirement Saving</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-age-milestones-that-impact-your-retirement">6 Age Milestones That Impact Your Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/three-of-the-toughest-decisions-youll-face-in-retirement">Three of the Toughest Decisions You&#039;ll Face in Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-expensive-mistakes-of-the-newly-retired">9 Expensive Mistakes of the Newly Retired</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/these-5-expenses-will-probably-cost-you-a-lot-less-in-retirement">These 5 Expenses Will Probably Cost You a Lot Less in Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Retirement 401(k) downsizing expenses Health leisure required minimum distributions saving money social security working Thu, 14 Sep 2017 08:00:06 +0000 Tim Lemke 2020506 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Age Milestones That Impact Your Retirement http://www.wisebread.com/6-age-milestones-that-impact-your-retirement <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-age-milestones-that-impact-your-retirement" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/piggy_bank_with_happy_birthday_party_glasses.jpg" alt="Piggy bank with Happy birthday party glasses" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Legally significant ages seem to cluster early in life &mdash; you can drive at 16, vote, smoke, and enlist at 18, and drink at 21. After that, you might think that there are no more important age milestones to reach.</p> <p>But there <em>are</em> more important milestones you'll reach as you near retirement. Here are the important ages that can impact your retirement, and the reasons why they were chosen.</p> <h2>Age 50 &mdash; Take advantage of catch-up contributions</h2> <p>IRAs and 401(k) retirement plans are tax-advantaged, which means you receive a tax-break by contributing to them. For traditional IRAs and 401(k)s, you contribute pretax income, which means you lower your overall tax burden for the year, and the money grows tax-free. With Roth IRAs and 401(k)s, you contribute post-tax dollars, and the money still grows tax-free. Since high income earners could potentially avoid paying any taxes at all if they simply contributed a large enough portion of their income, there are limits to the amount of money you can contribute each year. As of 2017, you can contribute an annual total of $5,500 to an IRA and $18,000 to a 401(k).</p> <p>However, there is something called a catch-up provision for anyone over age 50. If you've reached your half-century mark, you can contribute an additional $1,000 to an IRA (for a $6,500 total contribution) and an additional $6,000 to a 401(k) (for a $24,000 total contribution). Taking advantage of these catch-up provisions can help you to make sure your retirement is more secure.</p> <h2>Age 59&frac12; &mdash; Take penalty-free withdrawals from tax-sheltered accounts</h2> <p>Since you fund traditional IRAs and 401(k)s with pretax income, every withdrawal you make will be taxed at your ordinary income tax rate. But if you try to withdraw money from either of these types of accounts before you have reached age 59&frac12;, then you will also owe a 10 percent early withdrawal penalty on the amount you withdraw, in addition to the ordinary income tax.</p> <p>You are not required to take withdrawals as of age 59&frac12; &mdash; that is just the earliest age that you are allowed to do so without incurring a penalty.</p> <p>You might be wondering why 59&frac12; is the magic number. Congress decided to use this age because life insurance actuarial tables consider you to be 60 years old once you have reached age 59 and six months, and at the time that the rules were put in place, 60 was a relatively common age for retirement.</p> <h2>Age 62 &mdash; Take early Social Security retirement benefits</h2> <p>Social Security beneficiaries reach eligibility as of age 62. This is the very earliest that you can access your benefits from Social Security, although taking your benefits the moment you've blown out 62 candles is not necessarily a good idea.</p> <p>Social Security changes the benefit amount based on whether you retire before or after your full retirement age. This means the longer you wait, the more money you will see in your benefit checks &mdash; to the tune of about an additional 8 percent per year. If you take benefits before hitting your full retirement age, your payments will be permanently reduced. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-questions-to-ask-before-you-start-claiming-your-social-security-benefits?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Questions to Ask Before You Start Claiming Your Social Security Benefits</a>)</p> <p>These early benefits have been around for quite some time. Early retirement at age 62 was introduced for women only in 1956, and the option was extended to men in 1961. Women were offered this benefit first because of the concern for widows without an income, although it became clear that men were also very interested in the option of taking early benefits.</p> <h2>Age 64 and 9 months &mdash; Enroll in Medicare</h2> <p>The initial seven-month enrollment period for Medicare spans from the three months before your 65th birthday, through the month of your birthday, and the three months following your birthday. Enrolling during this period means you will pay no fees or penalties for enrollment, and enrolling within the three months before your 65th birthday means that you will have Medicare coverage starting on the first day of your birthday month. Enrolling during your birthday month or afterward will result in a delayed start for coverage.</p> <p>If you miss the initial enrollment period for Medicare, you can still sign up during the general enrollment period between January 1 and March 31 of each year, and your coverage will begin July 1 of that year. However, there is a late penalty for missing your initial enrollment period. For Medicare Part A, your monthly premium will increase by 10 percent for twice the number of years that you could have had Part A but didn't sign up.</p> <p>If you miss the initial enrollment period for Part B, you will have to pay the late enrollment penalty for as long as you are a Medicare beneficiary. The monthly premium will increase by 10 percent for each full 12-month period that you were eligible for Part B but did not sign up.</p> <h2>Age 66 or 67 &mdash; Reach full Social Security retirement age</h2> <p>Your full retirement age is the point at which you receive your full benefits from Social Security. When Social Security was first enacted, 65 was chosen as the retirement age. In 1983, to deal with the coming demographic shift that would occur when baby boomers started to retire, Congress gradually increased the full retirement age from 65 to 67, based on birth year:</p> <table> <tbody> <tr> <td> <p><strong>Birth Year</strong></p> </td> <td> <p><strong>Full Retirement Age</strong></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <p>1943-1954</p> </td> <td> <p>65</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <p>1955</p> </td> <td> <p>66 and 2 months</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <p>1956</p> </td> <td> <p>66 and 4 months</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <p>1957</p> </td> <td> <p>66 and 6 months</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <p>1958</p> </td> <td> <p>66 and 8 months</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <p>1959</p> </td> <td> <p>66 and 10 months</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <p>1960 and later</p> </td> <td> <p>67</p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <h2>Age 70&frac12; &mdash; Begin taking required minimum distributions</h2> <p>When you put money into a tax-deferred account like a traditional IRA or 401(k), you don't have to pay taxes on that money until you withdraw it. While this helps your tax burden during your career, you do need to remember that Uncle Sam will want his cut eventually.</p> <p>This is why the IRS requires each account holder to begin withdrawing money during the year he or she reaches age 70&frac12;. There is a minimum withdrawal you must take, and failing to take out the minimum means the IRS will take 50 percent of the amount you should have withdrawn.</p> <p>To figure out your required minimum distribution (RMD), you need to calculate it based upon the balance of each of your tax-deferred accounts as of December 31 of the previous year, and the correct IRS distribution table. These tables calculate life expectancy based upon your age and give you a number (corresponding to the number of years they expect you to live), by which you will divide your balance to determine your RMD.</p> <p>It may seem that 70&frac12; is an arbitrary number, but there is a lot of thought put into this milestone age. The IRS makes a distinction between people born in the first half of the year, and those born in the second half. If your birthday falls between July 1 and December 31, you don't officially have to take an RMD until the year you turn 71. This means that those with birthdays in the first half of the year take their first RMD the year they turn 70, and those with a later birthday take their first RMD the year they turn 71 &mdash; which averages out to 70&frac12;.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F6-age-milestones-that-impact-your-retirement&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F6%2520Age%2520Milestones%2520That%2520Impact%2520Your%2520Retirement.jpg&amp;description=6%20Age%20Milestones%20That%20Impact%20Your%20Retirement"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/6%20Age%20Milestones%20That%20Impact%20Your%20Retirement.jpg" alt="6 Age Milestones That Impact Your Retirement" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/emily-guy-birken">Emily Guy Birken</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-age-milestones-that-impact-your-retirement">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-4"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-tax-day-is-april-15-and-other-weird-financial-deadlines">Why Tax Day Is April 15 and Other Weird Financial Deadlines</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/three-of-the-toughest-decisions-youll-face-in-retirement">Three of the Toughest Decisions You&#039;ll Face in Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/3-common-retirement-regrets-you-can-avoid">3 Common Retirement Regrets You Can Avoid</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-face-these-7-scary-facts-about-retirement-saving">How to Face These 7 Scary Facts About Retirement Saving</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-signs-its-time-to-retire">8 Signs It&#039;s Time to Retire</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Retirement 401(k) ages catch-up contributions fees IRA milestones penalties required minimum distributions rmd social security taxes Wed, 23 Aug 2017 08:00:08 +0000 Emily Guy Birken 2007140 at http://www.wisebread.com 7 Ways Retirement Planning Changes When You're Single http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-retirement-planning-changes-when-youre-single <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/7-ways-retirement-planning-changes-when-youre-single" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/senior_woman_relaxing.jpg" alt="Senior woman relaxing" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>It can sometimes feel like everything is created with couples in mind &mdash; including retirement planning. When every article, tip, and suggestion for retirement starts with the assumption that you are married, you might be forgiven for assuming that retiring solo is just a matter of cutting retirement planning advice in half.</p> <p>But there are specific challenges and concerns (not to mention benefits!) that single retirees need to prepare for before they hang up their careers. Here are seven ways that preparing for retirement is different for singles.</p> <h2>1. You need to have adequate disability insurance</h2> <p>Relying on no one but yourself can feel pretty liberating. Not only do you answer to no one but yourself, but you also get to enjoy the fruits of your own labor without having to compromise.</p> <p>The downside to this, however, is figuring how you will protect yourself in case your income runs dry. While anyone who relies on income from their job should carry adequate disability insurance, this is even more important for single workers who may not have another safety net to catch them if a disability makes it impossible to work. You need to protect yourself, your income, and your assets from the possibility you may be unable to work, even before you start the nitty-gritty of retirement planning.</p> <p>Even if you have disability insurance through work, that may not be adequate to protect you from a loss of income. Make sure you know exactly how much your work insurance covers and for how long, so that you are not left without an income if it's not enough. Also, don't assume that you are immune to potential disabilities just because the most strenuous thing you do at work is operate the copy machine. Illness is behind the majority of long-term absences from work &mdash; and anyone can get sick at any time.</p> <h2>2. Prepare for your health care needs</h2> <p>Health care costs are a major concern for all retirees, since this is one aspect of your retirement budget that you may not have control over. According to a 2016 Fidelity study, a 65-year-old couple retiring in 2016 would need $260,000 for health care to cover their medical and health care needs for the rest of their lives.</p> <p>That dollar figure is frightening no matter your marital status, and it's important that single people recognize that their costs may be higher than just half of a couple's health care costs. That's because many married couples can help each other to remain independent in ways that single retirees would need to pay for. For instance, you may need to pay for someone to help you at home or for entry into a retirement community sooner than a married couple would need those things.</p> <p>While <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/is-long-term-care-insurance-worth-it" target="_blank">long-term care insurance</a> has often been touted as a method of mitigating these expenses for both married and single retirees, the cost of this kind of insurance has become prohibitive. To prepare for the possibility of bad health in retirement, singles should also explore creative solutions to long-term health issues. For instance, taking in a rent-free roommate who helps with daily tasks is not only money-saving, but also offers social support. Planning ahead for potential solutions to health and mobility issues can provide you with some imaginative solutions that money can't buy.</p> <h2>3. Assign a power of attorney</h2> <p>It's easy to assume that you can skip the whole issue of legal planning if you are single and childless, but that's not necessarily true. For instance, do you know who will take care of your health care or financial decisions if you should become incapacitated? You need to assign a power of attorney to make sure that your wishes are followed if you cannot make your own decisions.</p> <p>Your power of attorney also needs to know where to find your important papers and should be kept apprised of any changes in your life or directives. This is the person who will pay your bills and handle your advanced directive if you fall ill. You can either pick someone in your life whom you trust, or hire a professional whom you trust to fill that role.</p> <h2>4. Invest in tax-deferred retirement vehicles during your career</h2> <p>Single workers miss out on a number of tax breaks that are offered to married couples. According to Jane Hodges writing for <em>The Wall Street Journal</em>, &quot;Without child tax credits, a spouse exemption, and no one with whom to realize the benefits of filing jointly, singles can take a pretty big tax punch during peak earning years.&quot;</p> <p>For this reason, single workers have a particular need to invest in tax-advantaged retirement vehicles, such as 401(k) and traditional IRA accounts. These vehicles allow you to make pretax contributions, which lowers your taxable income while also helping you prepare financially for retirement.</p> <h2>5. Consider rolling over into a Roth IRA before age 70&frac12;</h2> <p>Of course, Uncle Sam will still want his cut of the income you put in tax-deferred retirement accounts, which can cause a nasty tax surprise for singles post-retirement. That's because withdrawals from tax-deferred retirement accounts are taxed as ordinary income, and single retirees still do not have access to the tax breaks offered to married couples.</p> <p>This can become a serious problem for some single retirees as of age 70&frac12; because of the required minimum distributions on tax-deferred accounts. Traditional IRAs and 401(k)s require that retirees begin withdrawing a minimum distribution (based on a percentage of total assets) at age 70&frac12;, which means you might be facing a surprisingly high tax bracket upon reaching age 70&frac12;. You may also be forced to take more money from your accounts than you want or need because of the required minimum distribution.</p> <p>To protect yourself from this potentially painful tax bite, consider rolling over a portion of your assets from tax-deferred funds to a Roth IRA account before age 70&frac12;. Since Roth accounts are funded with after-tax dollars, you will have to pay ordinary income tax on your rollover. However, this will allow you to decide when you will pay those taxes and give you more freedom to keep your money invested if you don't need it.</p> <h2>6. Hold off on Social Security for as long as you can</h2> <p>Options for optimizing Social Security benefits are much simpler for singles. Basically, the only way to get a higher monthly benefit if you are single is to wait. The longer you can wait to receive your benefits between age 62 (the earliest you can take benefits) and 70 (when the benefits stop growing), the more money you will see with every monthly check. Even if you cannot wait until age 70, or your full retirement age (currently age 66), know that each month you delay taking your Social Security retirement benefits means a little more money in your checks.</p> <p>It's also important to remember that the federal government does not necessarily define single the same way you do. If you are divorced but were married for at least 10 years, then you are eligible for spousal benefits based on your ex's income record. However, you will collect your spousal benefits concurrently with your retirement benefits, so you will only see an increased benefit if your ex-spouse made a lot more money than you did.</p> <h2>7. Embrace the opportunities</h2> <p>While the IRS and Social Security Administration may both make marriage look like the better option &mdash; at least financially &mdash; it's important for singles to remember how many more opportunities they have available to them than do married couples. That's because a footloose and fancy-free retiree has far fewer obstacles to retirement than does a married couple.</p> <p>For instance, retiring abroad can be a very economical (not to mention fun) choice, and it is much easier for a single retiree to pull up roots than it is for a couple. Similarly, traveling in retirement can be much cheaper for one, since you do not have to compromise on where you are willing to save money.</p> <p>Single retirees can also explore alternative living options, like living with several friends &mdash; there's an excellent reason why all the Golden Girls were single, after all &mdash; or taking in a younger boarder or roommate, or even moving to a cheaper state. Making these decisions solo means you can find the living situation or opportunity that best fits your needs, wants, and temperament.</p> <!--<h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/7%20Ways%20Retirement%20Planning%20Changes%20When%20Youre%20Single.jpg" alt="7 Ways Retirement Planning Changes When You're Single" width="250" height="374" /></p> </div>--><!--<h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/7%20Ways%20Retirement%20Planning%20Changes%20When%20Youre%20Single.jpg" alt="7 Ways Retirement Planning Changes When You're Single" width="250" height="374" /></p> </div>--><br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/emily-guy-birken">Emily Guy Birken</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-retirement-planning-changes-when-youre-single">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-face-these-7-scary-facts-about-retirement-saving">How to Face These 7 Scary Facts About Retirement Saving</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/3-common-retirement-regrets-you-can-avoid">3 Common Retirement Regrets You Can Avoid</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-revive-an-old-retirement-fund">How to Revive an Old Retirement Fund</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-age-milestones-that-impact-your-retirement">6 Age Milestones That Impact Your Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-retirement-planning-steps-late-starters-must-make">7 Retirement Planning Steps Late Starters Must Make</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Retirement 401(k) advice disability insurance health care IRA loss of income not married power of attorney retirement planning singles Fri, 14 Jul 2017 09:01:05 +0000 Emily Guy Birken 1982441 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Save for Retirement When You Are Unemployed http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-save-for-retirement-when-you-are-unemployed <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-save-for-retirement-when-you-are-unemployed" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/latin_american_woman_saving_in_a_piggybank.jpg" alt="Latin American woman saving in a piggy bank" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>When you're unemployed, saving for retirement may be the last thing on your mind. It may seem impossible to save for the future when you have no steady income to even pay basic bills.</p> <p>But depending on your situation, it may still be possible to build your nest egg even if you're not working full-time. Here are some tools and suggestions for keeping an eye on the future during a period of joblessness.</p> <h2>Familiarize yourself with IRAs</h2> <p>Individual retirement accounts (IRAs) are great for people who don't have access to employer-sponsored retirement plans like 401(k) accounts. A traditional IRA is similar to a 401(k), in that any contributions are deducted from whatever taxable income you have. With a Roth IRA, on the other hand, earnings are taxed up front, but any gains you have won't be taxed when you withdraw money at retirement age.</p> <p>IRAs are useful for people who are self-employed, or who earn money inconsistently through part-time or freelance work. So if you're not employed full-time but still have some earned income, these accounts can help you save.</p> <h2>Think of retirement savings as a necessary expense</h2> <p>When you're unemployed, it's important to get a handle on all of your expenses so that you know where you need to cut. You may find that there are a lot of costs (luxury purchases, eating out, cable TV) that can be taken out of your household budget, while other expenses (food, electricity, debt payments) are more necessary. If you think of retirement savings as a necessity, you will be forced to cut spending elsewhere.</p> <h2>Roll over your old 401(k)</h2> <p>If you've been laid off from a job, you will no longer be able to contribute to the 401(k) you may have had from your employer. But the account will still exist and the money is still yours. You can let the old 401(k) account sit, but it's better to roll it into a traditional individual retirement account (IRA). The IRA will give you more flexibility and investment options, and may also have lower fees. And you can begin contributing to it once you have any earned income at all.</p> <h2>Focus on rebalancing</h2> <p>You may not be able to add much to your retirement accounts, but you can work to make sure they are optimized. This means making sure you have the right mix of investments based on your retirement date, and getting the optimal blend of stocks in various industries and asset classes. It's always smart to examine your portfolio to ensure you are not over- or underinvested in any one area.</p> <h2>Look for higher bank interest rates</h2> <p>If you're not taking in much income for the time being, you need to have your cash savings working for you. That means any cash savings you have should generate as much income as possible. Interest rates are still quite low, but many online banks offer interest rates on CDs and savings accounts that are higher than average.</p> <h2>Avoid the temptation to cash out</h2> <p>It may be tempting to take money out of your retirement funds, but you should avoid it if at all possible. One of the best ways to see your retirement savings grow is to let your investments do their thing. You can see a meaningful increase in your retirement savings just from market gains, even if you're not contributing for the time being.</p> <p>Withdrawing from retirement accounts, however, has consequences. First, any money you take out has no chance to grow and help you expand your overall retirement savings. Second, there are penalties and taxes associated with taking money out of retirement accounts early. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-questions-to-ask-before-you-borrow-from-your-retirement-account?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Questions to Ask Before You Borrow From Your Retirement Account</a>)</p> <h2>Continue to focus on growth, if you can</h2> <p>If you are unemployed and have some investments in a taxable brokerage account, you may be tempted to shift them to dividend stocks or other income-producing investments. This can give you extra income at a time when you may need it. But making this kind of adjustment could have a long-term negative impact on the overall growth of your portfolio. If dividends, bonds, or other income-focused investments will help you keep the lights on, fine. But it's best to focus on finding other sources of income, or reduce your spending first before going this route.</p> <h2>Reinvest dividends, if you can</h2> <p>If you do have dividend stocks already, you can still contribute to your retirement portfolio by reinvesting any dividend income you get from stocks. You may be tempted to use that investment income to pay bills and help get through your unemployed period, but if you can get by without it, direct the dividends to buy more stocks and other investments instead. Even small contributions added to your retirement accounts can add up to considerable savings over time.</p> <h2>Get your spouse involved</h2> <p>Perhaps you never thought to include your spouse in retirement planning because you felt it wasn't necessary while you were working. Now his or her income can be directed to help you save. This may be a challenge, since they are now also working to help pay more of the bills. But there are some ways to use your spouse's income for your own retirement accounts. If you have a traditional or Roth IRA, your spouse's earned income can go toward your account. (Note: This is only allowed if you file your taxes jointly.)</p> <h2>Plan to pay into accounts later</h2> <p>If you are unemployed but expect to be working in short order, you can postpone contributions to your IRA and add money later, even if it's after the end of the year. In fact, you can contribute to an IRA all the way up until April 15 of the following year. So for example, let's say you planned to max out your IRA by making monthly payments. (This would be about $458 monthly for a total of $5,500 for the year &mdash; the maximum amount allowed by the IRS for people under 50.) But let's say you are out of work from August through October of that year. You can hold off on contributing during that time and make up the difference in later months, even the first few months of the following year, if necessary.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fhow-to-save-for-retirement-when-you-are-unemployed&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FHow%2520to%2520Save%2520for%2520Retirement%2520When%2520You%2520Are%2520Unemployed.jpg&amp;description=How%20to%20Save%20for%20Retirement%20When%20You%20Are%20Unemployed"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/How%20to%20Save%20for%20Retirement%20When%20You%20Are%20Unemployed.jpg" alt="How to Save for Retirement When You Are Unemployed" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/tim-lemke">Tim Lemke</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-save-for-retirement-when-you-are-unemployed">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/yes-you-can-pay-for-education-with-an-ira">Yes, You Can Pay for Education With an IRA</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-make-sure-you-dont-run-out-of-money-in-retirement">How to Make Sure You Don&#039;t Run Out of Money in Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-reasons-to-invest-in-stocks-past-age-50">7 Reasons to Invest in Stocks Past Age 50</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/bookmark-this-a-step-by-step-guide-to-choosing-401k-investments">Bookmark This: A Step-by-Step Guide to Choosing 401(k) Investments</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-traps-to-avoid-with-your-401k">7 Traps to Avoid With Your 401(k)</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Investment Retirement 401(k) contributions dividends interest rates job loss loss of income rebalancing Roth IRA saving money stocks traditional ira unemployment Wed, 12 Jul 2017 09:00:14 +0000 Tim Lemke 1979037 at http://www.wisebread.com Best Money Tips: How to Get the Most Out of Your 401(k) http://www.wisebread.com/best-money-tips-how-to-get-the-most-out-of-your-401k <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/best-money-tips-how-to-get-the-most-out-of-your-401k" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/401k_savings_jar_538810408.jpg" alt="Learning how to get the most out of a 401(k)" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Welcome to Wise Bread's <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/topic/best-money-tips">Best Money Tips</a> Roundup! Today we found articles on ways to get the most out of your 401(k), simple hacks that will change how you travel, and summer tax scams to watch out for.</p> <h2>Top 5 Articles</h2> <p><a href="https://dyernews.com/3-tips-for-to-getting-the-most-out-of-your-401k/">3 Tips For Getting the Most Out of Your 401(k)</a> &mdash; Re-evaluate your contributions every so often, especially if your finances have changed &mdash; due to a promotion or a raise, for example. [Dyer News]</p> <p><a href="https://www.popsugar.com/smart-living/Travel-Hacks-43667791">These 3 Very Simple Hacks Will Change How You Travel Forever</a> &mdash; Remember that you are a guest when you travel to foreign countries. It's your responsibility to learn about the traditions of the place you're visiting and to respect the locals' way of life. [PopSugar Smart Living]</p> <p><a href="http://www.dontmesswithtaxes.com/2017/06/irs-warns-of-four-hot-summer-tax-scams.html">IRS warns of four hot summer tax scams</a> &mdash; Robocall scammers might invoke the IRS e-payment option, EFTPS, to sound more legit. Don't fall for it! [Don't Mess With Taxes]</p> <p><a href="https://moneyaware.co.uk/2017/06/7-ways-to-save-on-your-food-budget/">7 Ways to Save On Your Food Budget</a> &mdash; Try the store brand versions of the products that you usually buy name brand, and see if you can tell the difference. If store brand works for you, start buying that instead. [StepChange MoneyAware]</p> <p><a href="http://moneypantry.com/pharmacy-rewards-programs/">11 Best Pharmacy Rewards Programs: Earn Rewards for Shopping at Your Local Drugstore</a> &mdash; These pharmacy and drugstore loyalty programs offer discounts, members-only coupons, and points that you can redeem for store credit. [Money Pantry]</p> <h2>Other Essential Reading</h2> <p><a href="https://www.csmonitor.com/Technology/2017/0622/Facebook-wants-to-shift-its-focus-to-meaningful-online-communities-and-connections">Facebook wants to shift its focus to 'meaningful' online communities and connections</a> &mdash; Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg wants the social network to be a place where people can build communities with shared interests. [The Christian Science Monitor]</p> <p><a href="https://timemanagementninja.com/2017/06/5-tips-to-be-more-present-and-productive/">5 Tips to Be More Present and Productive</a> &mdash; Make eye contact when you are having a conversation with someone and show them that they have your full attention. [Time Management Ninja]</p> <p><a href="https://lifehacks.io/when-you-start-learning-a-new-language/">These 5 Amazing Things Will Happen When You Start Learning a New Language</a> &mdash; Learning a new language opens up career opportunities that weren't available to you before. [Life Hacks]</p> <p><a href="http://www.everybodylovesyourmoney.com/2017/06/26/invest-in-yourself.html">10 Healthy and Cost-Friendly Ways to Invest In Yourself</a> &mdash; If you're not working in your field of choice, start researching how to get the job you want. [Everybody Loves Your Money]</p> <p><a href="http://www.cashthechecks.com/3-steps-start-investing-like-millionaire/">3 Steps To Start Investing Like A Millionaire</a> &mdash; Max out your contributions to tax-advantaged investments, like the Roth IRA, to reduce your tax burden. [Cash The Checks]</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/amy-lu">Amy Lu</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/best-money-tips-how-to-get-the-most-out-of-your-401k">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-investment-moves-that-prove-youre-finally-a-grown-up">5 Investment Moves That Prove You&#039;re Finally a Grown-Up</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-things-you-need-to-know-about-investing-in-company-stock">7 Things You Need to Know About Investing in Company Stock</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/bookmark-this-a-step-by-step-guide-to-choosing-401k-investments">Bookmark This: A Step-by-Step Guide to Choosing 401(k) Investments</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-millennial-investors-can-get-past-the-great-recession">How Millennial Investors Can Get Past the Great Recession</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-save-for-retirement-when-you-are-unemployed">How to Save for Retirement When You Are Unemployed</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Investment 401(k) best money tips Wed, 28 Jun 2017 08:31:10 +0000 Amy Lu 1973676 at http://www.wisebread.com