IRA http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/3832/all en-US 5 Biggest Ways Millennials Risk Their Retirements http://www.wisebread.com/5-biggest-ways-millennials-risk-their-retirements <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-biggest-ways-millennials-risk-their-retirements" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/sad_man_has_spent_all_his_money.jpg" alt="Sad man has spent all his money" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>If you're stressing out about whether or not you're saving enough for retirement, you're not alone. Millennials are among those struggling the most with this dilemma. According to a 2016 study, 64 percent of working millennials believe they'll never save a $1 million nest egg.</p> <p>Why are millennials so worried? Sadly, this age group is prone to making less-than-ideal money moves that could hurt them later in life. Let's review the five biggest ways in which millennials are risking their retirement. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-things-millennials-should-do-today-to-prepare-for-retirement?ref=seealso" target="_blank">4 Things Millennials Should Do Today to Prepare for Retirement</a>)</p> <h2>1. Delaying the start of retirement savings</h2> <p>Nearly four in 10 millennials haven't started saving for retirement. The same 2016 survey found that 61 percent of females and 50 percent of males belonging to the millennial generation have their finances stretched &quot;too thin&quot; to save for retirement. Even worse, 54 percent of women and 43 percent of men of this generation are living paycheck to paycheck.</p> <p>However, delaying retirement contributions has a serious impact. If a worker were to deposit just $50 per month into a 401(k) with an 8 percent annual rate of return for 10 years, they would end up with around $9,200 at the end of the 10-year period. The IRS sets a cap on how much you can contribute to a retirement account per year, which for 2017, is $18,000 to a 401(k) and $5,500 to an IRA. If you keep delaying your contributions to your retirement accounts, you'll never be able to fully make up that gap.</p> <h2>2. Taking out high student loans</h2> <p>Student Loan Hero estimated the average student loan balance for a member of the Class of 2016 at $37,172, up 6 percent from the year before. With so many Americans still believing in the importance of postsecondary education, it's easy to see how the average student loan continues to climb. Studies have shown that higher education still leads to better earnings potential, after all.</p> <p>Still, loans are rising too fast. Back in 1993, only 45 percent of college graduates had a student loan and their average balance was $15,000 in inflation-adjusted dollars. By having to pay down a high student loan, millennials are foregoing sizable contributions to their retirement accounts.</p> <p>Assuming a $30,000 balance on a federal direct loan with a 4 percent interest rate, you would pay about $304 per month. That's $3,648 in missed retirement contributions every year. By the time that a millennial pays back that standard loan (10 years), they would have missed out on $54,259 in retirement savings, assuming an 8 percent annual return.</p> <h2>3. Putting their kids' college fund before their own retirement fund</h2> <p>Given the tough time that they're having paying back their own student loans, 19 percent of millennial parents say education for their children is their top financial priority, according to TD Ameritrade. Those millennial parents are socking away an average $310 every month for their children's college fund.</p> <p>Every month, these millennial parents are hit with the double whammy of paying down their own student loans and then putting money away for their children's education. No wonder millennial parents ranked saving for retirement third on their list of financial priorities. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-saving-too-much-money-for-a-college-fund-is-a-bad-idea?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Why Saving Too Much Money for a College Fund Is a Bad Idea</a>)</p> <h2>4. Not setting a retirement savings goal</h2> <p>If you don't know where you're going, you'll never know when you get there. According to the Employment Benefit Research Institute, across all generations, workers age 25&ndash;34 are the smallest percentage of individuals who have tried to calculate how much money they'll need to live comfortably in retirement.</p> <p>By not setting a retirement savings goal, millennials may be misjudging how much to contribute from every paycheck toward their retirement accounts. This explains the low average contribution levels per paycheck from millennial men and women &mdash; 7.3 and 5.7 percent, respectively. In 2016, 75 percent of workers age 25&ndash;34 said their total savings and investments were under $25,000.</p> <h2>5. Accepting a first-job salary offer without negotiation</h2> <p>Faced with a countdown to start paying back student loans, many millennials are so eager to start generating income they skip salary negotiations. According to a survey from NerdWallet and Looksharp, of 8,000 recent grads that entered the job market between 2012 and 2015, only 38 percent negotiated their salary offer from a new employer. The same survey revealed that 74.4 percent of employers had room for a 5 to 10 percent salary bump, 8.6 percent of them had room for a 11 to 20 percent salary bump, and 1.3 percent of them were willing or able to go above 20 percent.</p> <p>Do millennials skip negotiations over fear of having their job offer retracted? Not really: Close to nine out of 10 employers in the survey had never done such a thing.</p> <p>Failing to negotiate a starting salary is one of the biggest ways in which millennials are shortchanging their retirement. Let's crunch some numbers to see why. In 2016, The Collegiate Employment Research Institute found that the average starting salary for holders of a bachelor's degree was $41,880. Negotiating a 5 to 10 percent raise on your first-job salary offer would have yielded a starting salary ranging from $43,974 to $46,068. That would have been an extra $2,094 to $4,188 per year, enough to cover six to 13 $304 monthly payments on a $30,000 federal direct loan with a 4 percent interest rate.</p> <p>Saving for retirement may seem like a big hairy monster, but it doesn't need to be that way. By understanding what's keeping you from starting or saving enough for your retirement, you'll have a better chance of meeting your retirement saving goals. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-face-4-ugly-truths-about-retirement-planning?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Face 4 Ugly Truths About Retirement Planning</a>)</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/damian-davila">Damian Davila</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-biggest-ways-millennials-risk-their-retirements">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-signs-you-arent-saving-enough-for-retirement">10 Signs You Aren&#039;t Saving Enough for Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-reasons-every-millennial-needs-a-roth-ira">6 Reasons Every Millennial Needs a Roth IRA</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/left-a-job-do-a-rollover">Left a job? Do a rollover.</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/half-of-americans-are-wrong-about-their-retirement-savings">Half of Americans Are Wrong About Their Retirement Savings</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-tax-day-is-april-15-and-other-weird-financial-deadlines">Why Tax Day Is April 15 and Other Weird Financial Deadlines</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Retirement 401(k) college funds IRA millennials not saving enough paycheck to paycheck salary negotiation savings goals student loans young adults Tue, 20 Jun 2017 08:00:11 +0000 Damian Davila 1961116 at http://www.wisebread.com Half of Americans Are Wrong About Their Retirement Savings http://www.wisebread.com/half-of-americans-are-wrong-about-their-retirement-savings <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/half-of-americans-are-wrong-about-their-retirement-savings" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-172427755 (1).jpg" alt="Couple learning they&#039;re wrong about their retirement savings" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="142" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Some financial mistakes are easier to recover from than others. Failing to properly plan for retirement falls into the not-so-easy camp. And yet, the latest in a long series of retirement preparedness studies indicates that many working age households in the U.S. are making this very mistake.</p> <p>This new study, prepared by the Center for Retirement Research (CRR) at Boston College, analyzed two key findings. First, it compared people's objectively measured, actual retirement preparedness with their perceived preparedness. And second, instead of just highlighting how many people are less prepared than they think (a common finding among retirement studies), it also found that some people are actually more prepared than they realize, causing needless worry.</p> <p>Let's break it down.</p> <h2>Over half are not well prepared</h2> <p>According to the CRR study, over half (52 percent) of working age households are at risk of not being able to maintain their current standard of living in retirement. That's even if these households work until age 65, annuitize all of their financial assets, and turn their home equity into an income stream via a reverse mortgage.</p> <p>In 1989, just 30 percent of households were deemed to be at risk. The study's authors attribute the growth in this number to three main factors:</p> <ul> <li>The increased time people are spending in retirement &mdash; the result of a fairly static average retirement age (around 63) combined with lengthening life spans.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Increases in Medicare premiums.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>The sweeping change from defined-benefit to defined-contribution retirement plans, such as 401(k) plans. In managing their own retirement accounts, the authors said, &quot;individuals make mistakes at every step along the way,&quot; which has resulted in a woefully inadequate median retirement account balance of just $111,000 for households nearing retirement.</li> </ul> <h2>Over half of the unprepared don't realize it</h2> <p>Of the 52 percent of households that are at risk of not being able to maintain their standard of living in retirement, the CRR study found that nearly two-thirds (63 percent) don't know they're in trouble at all &mdash; the worst possible situation. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-signs-you-arent-saving-enough-for-retirement?ref=seealso" target="_blank">10 Signs You Aren't Saving Enough for Retirement</a>)</p> <p>The study's authors identified two main reasons.</p> <p>First, there is a &quot;wealth illusion&quot; that comes from having a 401(k). In other words, a person may have what seems like a lot of money in their plan, but not realize how little income it could actually produce in retirement.</p> <p>For example, a standard assumption is that 4 percent of your retirement savings can be withdrawn each year in retirement without too much danger of running out of money. A $100,000 balance would then translate into just $4,000 per year.</p> <p>The second reason is a false sense of security that comes from having a relatively high income. A high-income earner may not understand that Social Security benefits will replace a smaller percentage of his or her income than someone with a lower income. In other words, for high-income people, it takes more personal savings to maintain their standard of living in retirement than they may realize.</p> <h2>Of those who are prepared, half don't realize it</h2> <p>If 52 percent of all working age households are not adequately preparing for retirement, that means 48 percent are doing a good job. However, of those prepared 48 percent, the CRR study found that half worry that they're not on track. Of course, that's a much better problem to have than not realizing you're unprepared, but unnecessary worry is still a problem.</p> <p>The study's authors cited three main factors:</p> <ul> <li>For homeowners, not understanding how much income could be generated through a <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/reverse-mortgages-the-best-way-to-eat-your-home?ref=internal" target="_blank">reverse mortgage</a>.<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>For those still covered by a defined-benefit pension plan, not fully appreciating just how valuable that benefit is. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/if-youre-lucky-enough-to-receive-a-pension-here-are-6-things-you-need-to-do?ref=seealso" target="_blank">If You're Lucky Enough to Receive a Pension, Here Are 6 Things You Need to Do</a>)<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>If married, not understanding how much money they may be entitled to via spousal Social Security benefits.</li> </ul> <h2>Solutions</h2> <p>What should you do if you realize you may be under or over-preparing for retirement? Run some numbers using a retirement planning calculator &mdash; preferably a couple of calculators since different tools use different assumptions &mdash; and rerun the numbers periodically. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-much-should-you-have-saved-for-retirement-by-30-40-50?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How Much Should You Have Saved for Retirement by 30? 40? 50?</a>)</p> <p>Knowledge is your best bet when it comes to staying on track with your retirement savings. Don't just guess. Figure out how much you need to be investing each month so that you can afford to live comfortably in your retirement years, and then, make the necessary changes in your budget to set that money aside. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-retirement-planning-steps-late-starters-must-make?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Retirement Planning Steps Late Starters Must Make</a>)</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/matt-bell">Matt Bell</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/half-of-americans-are-wrong-about-their-retirement-savings">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/one-smart-thing-you-can-do-for-your-retirement-today">One Smart Thing You Can Do for Your Retirement Today</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/this-is-why-you-cant-postpone-planning-for-your-retirement-and-how-to-start">This Is Why You Can&#039;t Postpone Planning for Your Retirement (And How to Start)</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/intimidated-by-retirement-investing-get-professional-help">Intimidated by Retirement Investing? Get Professional Help!</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/left-a-job-do-a-rollover">Left a job? Do a rollover.</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/we-do-the-math-save-for-retirement-or-pay-off-credit-card-debt">We Do the Math: Save for Retirement or Pay Off Credit Card Debt?</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Retirement 401(k) investing IRA nest egg preparedness saving money Fri, 28 Apr 2017 09:00:08 +0000 Matt Bell 1935019 at http://www.wisebread.com Why Tax Day Is April 15 and Other Weird Financial Deadlines http://www.wisebread.com/why-tax-day-is-april-15-and-other-weird-financial-deadlines <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/why-tax-day-is-april-15-and-other-weird-financial-deadlines" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-175261184.jpg" alt="Learning why Tax Day is on April 15" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>April is one of the finest months of the year. The sun breaks through the clouds, the cherry blossoms bloom, and the promise of warm weather beckons.</p> <p>So of course, the IRS, in its infinite wisdom, decided to place Tax Day right smack dab in the middle of all of this riotous spring beauty.</p> <p>Though I have always believed that the placement of Tax Day in mid-April is proof of the federal government's grim sense of humor, there is actually some method to their madness &mdash; both for this, and all other seemingly arbitrary financial dates and deadlines.</p> <p>Here are the reasons behind some of the most head-scratching financial dates in the United States.</p> <h2>Why is Tax Day on April 15?</h2> <p>Paying federal income taxes is actually a relatively new phenomenon in American history. The first time an income tax was levied on Americans was in 1861 in order to help pay for the Civil War. In 1872, the law surrounding the tax was repealed after opponents successfully argued that federal income tax was unconstitutional.</p> <p>Fast forward to February 3, 1913, when Congress adopted the 16th amendment to the constitution, which allows for federal income tax. Congress also determined the first due date for filing 1913 taxes would be March 1, 1914 &mdash; one year and a couple of weeks later. March 1 offered an easy-to-remember due date that gave citizens just over a full year to get used to being taxpayers, gather up their receipts into the early 20th century version of a shoe box, and file their first returns.</p> <p>Then in 1918, the due date was moved to March 15, for reasons that no one in Congress saw fit to explain or write down.</p> <p>Congress again moved the filing due date in 1955, this time to the now-familiar date of April 15. According to the IRS, the date change helped to spread out the tax season workload for IRS employees.</p> <p>However, there may be a slightly more mercenary reason for the date change: According to Ed McCaffery, a University of Southern California law professor and tax guru, by the mid 1950s, the income tax was applying to increasing numbers of middle class workers, which meant the government had to issue more refunds. &quot;Pushing the deadline back gives the government more time to hold on to the money,&quot; McCaffery claimed in Fortune magazine. And the longer the government holds onto taxes that have been withheld but are destined to be refunded, the more interest it earns on the money.</p> <h3>Okay, so why is Tax Day on April 18 this year?</h3> <p>If you look at an April calendar for 2017, you'll see that April 15 falls on a Saturday this year, which means we get a little extension, since Tax Day can't fall on a weekend. However, you might be confused as to why we get an extension to Tuesday, April 18, instead of Monday, April 17.</p> <p>The reason for our extra day is a Washington, D.C. holiday known as Emancipation Day. Though only Washington, D.C. observes this holiday, a federal statute enacted decades ago states that holidays observed in our nation's capital have a nationwide impact.</p> <h2>Why was 65 chosen as full retirement age for Social Security?</h2> <p>When the Social Security Act was officially adopted in 1935, the age of 65 was chosen as the standard retirement age for beneficiaries. Why was that age chosen as the proper time for full retirement? Why not 63 or 67 or 70?</p> <p>There are a couple of persistent myths out there about this choice, but they are nothing more than misconceptions:</p> <h3>Myth #1: People would die before collecting</h3> <p>The age of 65 was chosen so that people would not live long enough to collect benefits. According to life expectancy actuarial tables from 1930, the average life span was 58 for men and 62 for women, which would make it seem as if Social Security was designed to never make a payout to beneficiaries. However, this myth stems from an unfamiliarity with actuarial tables, which offer an average of <em>all </em>life spans, starting from birth. High infant mortality in the 1930s lowered the overall rate of life expectancy, but anyone who made it to adulthood had a much better chance of reaching age 65 and collecting benefits.</p> <h3>Myth #2: Bismarck was 65</h3> <p>The age of 65 was chosen because Otto von Bismarck &mdash; the author of the world's first old-age social insurance program upon which our Social Security program was partially based &mdash; was 65 when Germany adopted his program. This myth is false on several counts. Bismarck was actually 74 when the German system was adopted, and Germany initially set the retirement age at 70. Germany's retirement age was not lowered to 65 until 1916, at which point Bismarck had been dead for nearly two decades.</p> <h3>The truth behind 65</h3> <p>The actual reason why 65 was chosen as the initial full retirement age for Social Security is pretty boring. The Committee on Economic Security, which Franklin D. Roosevelt created to propose Social Security legislation, conducted a comprehensive analysis of actuarial studies, domestic private pension systems in America, and the social insurance experience in other countries. Based upon that research, the committee recommended 65 as the standard retirement age for Social Security.</p> <h2>Why is 59&frac12; the minimum age to take distributions from tax-deferred retirement accounts?</h2> <p>When it comes to tax-deferred accounts like 401(k)s and traditional IRAs, you are not allowed to take distributions until you have reached the magical age of 59&frac12;. Otherwise, you will owe a 10 percent early withdrawal penalty on the amount you withdraw, in addition to the ordinary income tax you'll owe whenever you take a distribution.</p> <p>So why is the IRS asking you to celebrate half-birthdays when you're nearly 60 years old? Congress used the age of 59&frac12; as the earliest withdrawal age because life insurance actuarial tables consider you to be 60 years old once you have reached the age of 59 and six months &mdash; and at the time that the rules were put in place, 60 was a relatively common age for retirement.</p> <h2>Why must you begin taking required minimum distributions from tax-deferred retirement accounts at age 70&frac12;?</h2> <p>Of course, the IRS is not just about picking random minimum ages for when you <em>can </em>take distributions from tax-deferred retirement accounts &mdash; they also have a random age for when you <em>must </em>take distributions from those accounts.</p> <p>Since the money in your tax-deferred account was placed there before you paid taxes on it, Uncle Sam does want you to eventually pull the money out again so he can get his cut of the money in the form of taxes. That means the IRS requires each account holder to begin withdrawing money during the year that they reach age 70&frac12;. This is called the required minimum distribution (RMD).</p> <p>But unlike the 59&frac12; rule, 70&frac12; does not actually mean your half-birthday. The IRS makes a distinction between those individuals born in the first half of the year and those born in the second half. If your birthday falls between January 1 and June 30, you have to take your first RMD during the calendar year you turn 70. But if your birthday falls between July 1 and December 31, then you don't officially have to take your first RMD until the calendar year you turn 71.</p> <p>Describing this year as being when you are 70&frac12; is actually shorthand, since some folks will be taking their first RMD the year they turn 70, and some will be taking their first RMD the year they turn 71.</p> <h2>Why does Social Security think New Year's babies were born in the previous year?</h2> <p>Unless you happen to have a January 1 birthday, you might not know about this odd piece of Social Security dating. But according to the Social Security Administration, individuals born on the first of the year are considered to have birthdays in the previous year. So Social Security will group someone with a January 1, 1954 birthday with beneficiaries who were born in 1953.</p> <p>This can actually make a big difference when it comes to some Social Security benefits, particularly when those benefits are eliminated. For instance, in 2015 Congress ended the restricted application strategy for any beneficiary born after 1953. The restricted application let applicants specify which Social Security benefits they did <em>not</em> want to apply for, even if they were eligible for all of them. So, for example, beneficiaries who reached full retirement age could claim a spousal benefit while continuing to let their own grow. Beneficiaries who were born on January 1, 1954 were grouped with those with 1953 births &mdash; which means anyone born on January 2, 1954 had rotten luck in terms of using the restricted application.</p> <p>Why does Social Security extend a year 24 hours past the time the rest of us do? This odd birth year dating occurs because the Social Security Administration groups beneficiaries who have birthdays on the first of the month with beneficiaries born in the previous month. This grouping allows first-of-the-month babies to have a little more leeway when it comes to deadlines and other requirements. In order to be completely fair with the first-of-the-month grouping, January 1 babies are then considered to have been born in the previous year.</p> <h2>The government is not entirely lacking in sweet rhyme and pure reason</h2> <p>The financial dates that we all must adhere to may seem like ridiculous and arbitrary decisions, but there was some thought put into them. Those thoughts might only make sense to the people that made the decisions, but at least we know they weren't throwing darts at a calendar.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/emily-guy-birken">Emily Guy Birken</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-tax-day-is-april-15-and-other-weird-financial-deadlines">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/heres-how-your-taxes-will-change-when-you-retire">Here&#039;s How Your Taxes Will Change When You Retire</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/3-ways-more-money-in-retirement-might-cost-you">3 Ways More Money in Retirement Might Cost You</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-sobering-facts-about-social-security-you-shouldnt-panic-over">5 Sobering Facts About Social Security You Shouldn&#039;t Panic Over</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/3-reasons-to-claim-social-security-before-your-retirement-age">3 Reasons to Claim Social Security Before Your Retirement Age</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-smart-ways-to-boost-your-social-security-payout-before-retirement">6 Smart Ways to Boost Your Social Security Payout Before Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Retirement Taxes 401(k) ages benefits dates distributions finance facts full retirement age IRA IRS social security tax day trivia Wed, 29 Mar 2017 08:00:22 +0000 Emily Guy Birken 1914689 at http://www.wisebread.com Here's How Your Taxes Will Change When You Retire http://www.wisebread.com/heres-how-your-taxes-will-change-when-you-retire <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/heres-how-your-taxes-will-change-when-you-retire" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-508211721.jpg" alt="" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="142" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>When most people dream about their retirement, they focus on the places they'd like to travel, the hobbies they'd like to spend time on, and the people they will see more of. Pondering how to deal with taxes in retirement generally does not enter into these sorts of reveries.</p> <p>While everyone should plan for the good stuff in retirement, it's also important to recognize the less fun aspects of retiring &mdash; like taxes. If you are prepared for the financial side of retirement, then you'll be better able to enjoy your time.</p> <p>Here's what you need to know about how your taxes will be different post-retirement.</p> <h2>Understanding Your Tax Bracket</h2> <p>Before discussing how your taxes change in retirement, it's a good idea to understand both what your tax bracket is and what that means for the amount of money you owe. As of 2017, these are the federal tax brackets for ordinary income:</p> <p><strong>Tax Rate &nbsp; &nbsp; Married Filing Jointly &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;Most Single Filers</strong><br /> 10% &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; $0&ndash;$18,650 &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;$0&ndash;$9,325<br /> 15% &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; $18,651&ndash;$75,900 &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;$9,326&ndash;$37,950<br /> 25% &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; $75,901&ndash;$153,100 &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;$37,951&ndash;$91,900<br /> 28% &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; $153,101&ndash;$233,350 &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;$91,901&ndash;$191,650<br /> 33% &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; $233,351&ndash;$416,700 &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;$191,651&ndash;$416,700<br /> 35% &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; $416,701&ndash;$470,700 &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;$416,701&ndash;$418,400<br /> 39.6% &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;$470,701+ &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; $418,401+</p> <p>What these tax brackets describe is your marginal tax rate, which is the rate you pay on the highest portion of your income. For instance, if you are single and fall in the 25% tax bracket, you are not taxed 25% on all of your income. You are taxed 25% on any income above $37,950, you are taxed 15% on any income between $9,326 and $37,950, and you are taxed 10% on any income below $9,325.</p> <h2>The Tax You Will No Longer Pay in Retirement</h2> <p>Let's start with the good news. There is one type of federal tax that retirement income and Social Security income are both exempt from. That's the Federal Insurance Contributions Act (FICA) tax, which funds Social Security and Medicare.</p> <p>Employed individuals see 6.2% of their gross earnings taxed for Social Security through FICA (and their employers also kick in 6.2%, making the total tax contribution 12.4% of each earner's gross income). In addition to Social Security, FICA also collects 1.45% of your gross income for Medicare Part A.</p> <p>Once you retire and you are no longer earning income from employment, then all of your income will be exempt from FICA &mdash; even any income you take from tax deferred accounts, such as 401K accounts or traditional IRA accounts. That's because your contributions to these accounts were already subject to FICA taxes, even if you funded the account with pre-tax dollars.</p> <h2>The Taxes You Will Owe on Tax-Deferred Accounts</h2> <p>Tax-deferred accounts, like 401Ks and traditional IRAs, allow workers to set money aside before Uncle Sam takes any income tax (although FICA taxes are deducted before the money is placed in such accounts). That money grows tax-free, and once the account holder reaches age 59&frac12;, they can take distributions from it without any penalty.</p> <p>However, the money will then be considered ordinary income and taxed accordingly. So that means a single retiree's $30,000 distribution from their IRA will place them in the 15% tax bracket, and they will owe $4,033.75:</p> <p>10% of $9,325 = $932.50</p> <p>15% of $20,675 = $3,101.25 ($30,000 - $9,325 = $20,675)</p> <p>$932.50 + $3,101.25 = 4,033.75</p> <p>The other important thing to remember about tax-deferred accounts is that you will have to take required minimum distributions (RMDs) once you reach age 70&frac12;. That's because the IRS does not want you to hold onto the money, tax-free, forever. Once you reach 70&frac12;, you must take the RMD amount every year, or owe the IRS 50% of the amount you should have withdrawn. The RMD is calculated based on your date of birth, the balance of each tax-deferred account as of December 31 of the previous year, and one of three <a href="https://www.irs.gov/retirement-plans/plan-participant-employee/required-minimum-distribution-worksheets" target="_blank">IRS distribution tables</a>, and it is taxed as ordinary income.</p> <h2>No Taxes on Roth IRA and Roth 401K Distributions</h2> <p>The Roth versions of IRAs and 401Ks are also tax-advantaged, but the tax burden is front-loaded. That means you invest after-tax dollars into your Roth account, the money grows tax-free, and any distributions taken after you have reached age 59&frac12; and have held the account for at least five years are completely tax-free.</p> <p>This is one of the reasons why many retirement experts recommend investing in both traditional and Roth tax-advantaged accounts, because it offers you tax-savings both during your career and once you reach retirement.</p> <h2>Capital Gains Taxes</h2> <p>Any investments you have made outside of tax-advantaged accounts &mdash; such as stocks, bonds, mutual funds, and real estate &mdash; are taxed as capital gains, which is great news for many investors.</p> <p>That's because long-term capital gains tax rates, which apply to assets you have held for a year or longer, are quite low. For any investor in the 10% or 15% tax bracket, long-term capital gains taxes are a very favorable 0%. Investors in the 25% through 35% tax bracket will only owe 15% on long-term capital gains, while those in the 39.6% tax bracket owe 20% on long-term capital gains.</p> <p>Short-term capital gains, on the other hand, are taxed at your ordinary income tax rate, as is the interest on your savings account and CDs, as well as dividends paid by your money market mutual funds.</p> <h2>Taxes on Your Social Security Benefits</h2> <p>Up to 85% of your Social Security benefits may be subject to income tax in retirement. The higher your non-Social Security income in retirement, the more likely it is that you'll owe taxes on your Social Security benefit.</p> <p>The way the IRS determines whether your benefits are taxable is by calculating something known as provisional income. The formula for determining the provisional income is: one-half of your Social Security benefits, plus all your other income, including tax-exempt interest. (While tax-exempt interest is included in this calculation, tax-free distributions from a Roth IRA are not.)</p> <p>This means that the more money you take from your retirement accounts, the more of your Social Security benefits are considered taxable.</p> <h2>Taxes on Pensions and Annuities</h2> <p>Pensions from both private companies and the government tend to be taxed as ordinary income, unless you also contributed after-tax dollars to your pension.</p> <p>As for annuities, the tax on your annuity will depend partly on how you purchased it. For instance, if you used pre-tax dollars (like from an IRA) to purchase your annuity, then your annuity payments will be taxed as ordinary income. However, if you purchased the annuity with after-tax dollars, then you will only be taxed on interest earned. With each annuity check you receive, a portion will be considered non-taxable principal, and a portion will be interest that is taxed at your ordinary income tax rate.</p> <h2>Diversifying Your Taxes</h2> <p>Most people recognize that diversifying investments is a sound strategy for growing wealth. However, it's also a good idea to diversify your taxes &mdash; that is, make sure you will not be paying all of your taxes at the same time.</p> <p>Many workers only contribute to tax-deferred retirement accounts, which means they will be facing large tax bills in retirement. It makes more sense to understand when and how you will owe taxes on your various sources of retirement income, and try to diversify the tax burden.</p> <p>Taking a small tax hit now, by investing a Roth account or making other investments with post-tax dollars, will help make sure you are not overwhelmed by your tax burden once you retire.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/emily-guy-birken">Emily Guy Birken</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/heres-how-your-taxes-will-change-when-you-retire">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/3-ways-more-money-in-retirement-might-cost-you">3 Ways More Money in Retirement Might Cost You</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-tax-day-is-april-15-and-other-weird-financial-deadlines">Why Tax Day Is April 15 and Other Weird Financial Deadlines</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/should-you-choose-a-roth-401k-or-a-regular-401k">Should You Choose a Roth 401k or a Regular 401k?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-penalty-free-ways-to-withdraw-money-from-your-retirement-account">7 Penalty-Free Ways to Withdraw Money From Your Retirement Account</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/13-crucial-social-security-terms-everyone-needs-to-know">13 Crucial Social Security Terms Everyone Needs to Know</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Retirement Taxes 401k benefits capital gains distributions FICA IRA medicare social security tax brackets tax changes tax-deferred accounts Thu, 09 Mar 2017 10:30:37 +0000 Emily Guy Birken 1902767 at http://www.wisebread.com 3 Ways More Money in Retirement Might Cost You http://www.wisebread.com/3-ways-more-money-in-retirement-might-cost-you <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/3-ways-more-money-in-retirement-might-cost-you" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-622064048.jpg" alt="Learning how more money in retirement might cost you" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="142" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>You might think that there is no such thing as too much money in retirement. After all, without a steady income from working, you need your retirement nest egg to last you throughout your golden years. So more money must be better, right?</p> <p>Well, as The Notorious B.I.G. once said, the more money we come across, the more problems we see &mdash; even in retirement. While I would never discourage anyone from saving as much as they can for retirement, it is a good idea to recognize what kinds of additional problems a large retirement portfolio could cause you.</p> <p>Here's what you need to know about the potential pitfalls of having more money in retirement:</p> <h2>1. You Will Owe Taxes on Tax-Deferred Retirement Accounts</h2> <p>According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, as of December 2016, <a href="https://www.bls.gov/opub/btn/volume-5/pdf/defined-contribution-retirement-plans-who-has-them-and-what-do-they-cost.pdf" target="_blank">44% of all workers</a> were participating in a tax-deferred defined contribution plan, such as a 401K or an IRA. These types of retirement accounts allow workers to put pretax dollars aside for their retirement, where the money grows tax-free. Once you reach age 59&frac12;, you may withdraw money from such tax-deferred accounts without penalty.</p> <p>The potential trouble comes from the fact that any distribution you take from your tax-deferred account is taxable as ordinary income. This means that you will be taxed on that income in the same way you would be taxed on the same amount of income from a job. Because of the taxes you will owe on your distributions, the money in your tax-deferred retirement account is worth less than the dollar amount.</p> <p>Since many workers anticipate having a lower tax bracket in retirement than they do during their career &mdash; that is, they expect to have a much lower retirement income than career income &mdash; it makes sense to put off the taxes they will pay on the money in their 401K or IRA until after retirement. However, for anyone who manages to create a large retirement portfolio from a modest salary during their career, the tax burden in retirement will be much larger.</p> <h2>2. Required Minimum Distributions May Force You to Withdraw Money You Don't Want</h2> <p>If you put money aside into a tax-deferred account, the IRS will want to see its cut of the money eventually. For that reason, the IRS requires each account holder to begin withdrawing money during the year that he or she reaches age 70&frac12;. There is a minimum amount you must withdraw, and the IRS levies a stiff penalty for failing to do so &mdash; you will owe 50% of the amount that should have been withdrawn.</p> <p>In addition, the required minimum distribution is calculated based on your date of birth, the balance of each tax-deferred account as of December 31 of the previous year, and one of three <a href="https://www.irs.gov/retirement-plans/plan-participant-employee/required-minimum-distribution-worksheets" target="_blank">IRS distribution tables</a>. That means your required minimum distribution must be recalculated each year using your new end-of-year balance from the previous year and your new distribution period according to the IRS distribution table. Getting the amount wrong can be potentially costly, and if you have a great deal of money in your tax-deferred accounts, you will be required to take more money than you necessarily want to access in one year.</p> <p>Don't forget, this required minimum distribution is also taxed as regular income (as we discussed above), so in addition to potentially withdrawing money you don't want, you will also owe taxes on the amount that you are required to withdraw.</p> <h2>3. You Will Be Taxed on Your Social Security Benefits</h2> <p>Many people are unaware of the fact that up to 85% of their Social Security benefits may be subject to income tax in retirement. The higher a retiree's non-Social Security income, the more likely it is that they will owe taxes on their Social Security check.</p> <p>The way the IRS determines whether your benefits are taxable is by calculating something known as provisional income. The formula for determining the provisional income is: One-half of your Social Security benefits, plus all your other income, including tax-exempt interest. (While tax-exempt interest is included in this calculation, tax-free distributions from a Roth IRA are not.)</p> <p>Your provisional income is compared to an upper and lower base amount to determine how much of your Social Security benefits are taxed, if any. If you file as single, then your lower base amount is $25,000. If your provisional income is above that amount, then you owe taxes on 50% of your Social Security benefits. The upper base amount for single filers is $34,000. If your provisional income is above that amount, then you owe taxes on 85% of your Social Security benefits.</p> <p>What this means is that the more money you take from your retirement accounts, the more of your Social Security benefits are considered taxable.</p> <p>For instance, if you are single and you take $38,000 from your IRA in retirement each year, then you are in the <a href="https://taxfoundation.org/2017-tax-brackets" target="_blank">25% tax bracket</a> and you owe taxes on 85% of your Social Security benefits since your income is above the upper base limit. If you decide to withdraw an additional $1,000 from your IRA one year, your additional $1,000 in income will cause $850 more of your Social Security income to be considered provisional income, making it subject to taxation at your marginal tax rate of 25%. You'll owe $462.50 on your $1,000 withdrawal ($1,850 x 25% = $462.50) between your IRA taxes and your Social Security benefit taxes.</p> <h2>More Money in Retirement Is a Good Problem to Have</h2> <p>Though having a large nest egg may cause some headaches after your retirement, it's important to remember that this is a better problem to have than facing retirement <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-signs-you-arent-saving-enough-for-retirement" target="_blank">without enough savings</a>. Just recognize that large amounts of money need to be properly managed and you need to stay on top of your financial life post-career. You can handle each of the financial problems that you may see with a larger retirement portfolio, as long as you are aware of them and prepared for them.</p> <p> &nbsp;</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/emily-guy-birken">Emily Guy Birken</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/3-ways-more-money-in-retirement-might-cost-you">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/heres-how-your-taxes-will-change-when-you-retire">Here&#039;s How Your Taxes Will Change When You Retire</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-tax-day-is-april-15-and-other-weird-financial-deadlines">Why Tax Day Is April 15 and Other Weird Financial Deadlines</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-american-cities-where-you-can-retire-on-just-social-security">5 American Cities Where You Can Retire On Just Social Security</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/3-reasons-to-claim-social-security-before-your-retirement-age">3 Reasons to Claim Social Security Before Your Retirement Age</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-important-things-to-know-about-your-401k-and-ira-in-2016">5 Important Things to Know About Your 401K and IRA in 2016</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Retirement Taxes 401k benefits contributions income IRA social security tax brackets tax-deferred Wed, 08 Mar 2017 10:00:10 +0000 Emily Guy Birken 1901333 at http://www.wisebread.com The Fiduciary Rule Is Under Review — How Will This Affect Your Investments? http://www.wisebread.com/the-fiduciary-rule-is-under-review-how-will-this-affect-your-investments <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/the-fiduciary-rule-is-under-review-how-will-this-affect-your-investments" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-531215119.jpg" alt="Man learning how fiduciary rule will affect investments" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>If you have money invested in a retirement plan, such as a 401K or an IRA, chances are high you'll be impacted by an executive order issued recently by President Trump.</p> <p>It centers on the &quot;fiduciary rule,&quot; one of former President Obama's initiatives that was scheduled to go into effect on April 10th. President Trump put the brakes on it by ordering the Labor Department to study the issue further.</p> <p>Whether the rule goes into effect or not, you would be wise to understand what all the fuss is about and how it could affect you.</p> <h2>Fiduci&hellip;What?</h2> <p>Financial professionals, such as financial planners, insurance agents, brokers, and others, are legally bound to adhere to certain standards of conduct, the highest of which is a fiduciary standard. Anyone working under that standard, which today includes Certified Financial Planners and Registered Investment Advisers, is required to act in their clients' best interests, detail all commissions and fees, and disclose any potential conflicts of interest.</p> <p>Others, including many brokers and life insurance agents, are held only to a suitability standard. That means if two financial products could meet a client's needs, but one would pay the financial adviser a higher commission, he or she could recommend that product to their client.</p> <p>The Obama administration estimated that biased advice steering people to needlessly high-cost, high-commission financial products and services costs investors $17 billion per year in fees and lost investment income. Its fiduciary rule would require any financial professional recommending retirement-related financial products or services to adhere to a fiduciary standard.</p> <h2>What It Means for You</h2> <p>Here are some steps you can take to help make sure your retirement accounts are run in your best interest, rather than the managers'.</p> <p>If you participate in a 401K, 403(b), or other workplace retirement plan, ask questions about how your investment options were selected. Some plans have a very limited set of choices or offer mutual funds with high fees. In particular, take a look at the &quot;expense ratio&quot; tied to the funds. That's the percentage of the money you invest in the fund that goes toward the expenses of operating the fund. For example, if you buy shares of a fund with an expense ratio of 0.73%, for every $1,000 you invest, $7.30 will go toward the fund's operating expenses. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/watch-out-for-these-5-sneaky-401k-fees?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Watch Out for These Sneaky 401K Fees</a>)</p> <p>According to Morningstar, the average expense ratio is .78% for an actively-managed mutual fund and .18% for a passively-managed (index) fund. If the funds in your plan are significantly higher than that, ask your plan administrator to explain why.</p> <p>Find out if any of the companies behind the funds in your plan participate in &quot;revenue sharing agreements&quot; in which they pay to be part of your plan. Often, these are higher-fee funds.</p> <p>A good resource is <a href="https://www.brightscope.com/" target="_blank">Bright Scope</a>, an independent evaluator of workplace retirement plans. See if it has evaluated your employer's plan, and if so, see what it says about the fees charged by your plan.</p> <p>Employees at some companies have even sued their workplace retirement plans over what they felt were needlessly high-cost investment options. In 2015, the U.S. Supreme Court gave employees the right to do so.</p> <p>If you work with a financial planner, insurance agent, or other financial professional, ask whether the person you work with adheres to a fiduciary standard. As awkward as it may be, ask about the commissions or other compensation they receive from the products or services you purchase through them. Before committing to working with someone, interview a couple of others and compare costs.</p> <h2>Three Situations That Warrant Extra Caution</h2> <p>Be especially careful about deferred annuities, mutual funds with a &quot;front-end load,&quot; and 401K &quot;rollovers.&quot; In each situation, you may be especially vulnerable to receiving biased advice. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-3-step-plan-to-choosing-your-first-or-next-mutual-fund?ref=seealso" target="_blank">3-Step Plan to Choosing a Mutual Fund</a>)</p> <p>With deferred annuities, you invest now in order to receive a stream of income in your later years. Deferred annuities usually provide salespeople with high commissions and come with especially onerous surrender charges if you decide to cancel your contract. Be very cautious. Generally, the type of annuity that makes the most sense is an immediate fixed annuity purchased around the time of retirement, and even then only with a portion of your nest egg. If someone is recommending an annuity for you and retirement is far down the road, at very least, ask lots of questions about fees, commissions, and surrender charges. And carefully weigh the comparative advantages of investing in mutual funds outside of an annuity instead.</p> <p>Some financial advisers exchange their advice for the commissions they receive by recommending mutual funds with front-end loads, or sales fees. If you put $1,000 into a mutual fund with a 5% front-end load, that means you've lost $50 right out of the gate. At a time when there are countless no-load funds available, including target-date funds that automate some of the most important steps an adviser would do for you (such as, determine and then manage your asset allocation), it's difficult to imagine a situation where it would make sense to pay such fees. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/commission-free-etfs-a-great-option-for-cost-conscious-investors?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Commission Free ETFs: A Great Option for Cost Conscious Investors</a>)</p> <p>When you leave your employer &mdash; whether for retirement or to move on to another company &mdash; plenty of brokers would love to have you <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/a-simple-guide-to-rolling-over-all-of-your-401ks-and-iras?ref=internal" target="_blank">rollover your 401K money</a> into an IRA at their firm. Such rollovers often do make sense because an IRA will give you more investment options. Just be sure to ask questions. Are there account fees? Is investment advice available to you from a fiduciary adviser? Compare the costs and services of at least three brokers.</p> <h2>Bottom Line</h2> <p>No matter what happens with the fiduciary rule, it's in your best interests to require all financial professionals you seek advice from to adhere to a fiduciary standard. At very least, they should fully and clearly disclose any fees, commissions, and potential conflicts of interest.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/matt-bell">Matt Bell</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-fiduciary-rule-is-under-review-how-will-this-affect-your-investments">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-reasons-why-a-roth-ira-may-be-better-than-your-401k">4 Reasons Why a Roth IRA May be Better Than Your 401(k)</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-important-things-to-know-about-your-401k-and-ira-in-2016">5 Important Things to Know About Your 401K and IRA in 2016</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/should-you-choose-a-roth-401k-or-a-regular-401k">Should You Choose a Roth 401k or a Regular 401k?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-10-biggest-myths-about-investing">The 10 Biggest Myths About Investing</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-money-moves-to-make-as-soon-as-you-conquer-debt">7 Money Moves to Make as Soon as You Conquer Debt</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Financial News Investment 401k advisers brokers commissions ethics fiduciary rule insurance agents IRA trump Fri, 03 Mar 2017 10:30:38 +0000 Matt Bell 1901229 at http://www.wisebread.com The Inventor of the 401K Has Second Thoughts About Your Retirement Plan — Now What? http://www.wisebread.com/the-inventor-of-the-401k-has-second-thoughts-about-your-retirement-plan-now-what <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/the-inventor-of-the-401k-has-second-thoughts-about-your-retirement-plan-now-what" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-171328267.jpg" alt="" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="141" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>In the early 1980s, the 401K plan was introduced as a potential supplement to the pension plans offered by employers. Now, they are a staple of retirement planning, while pensions are available to fewer workers than ever before.</p> <p>A 401K allows workers to set aside a certain amount of their salary and invest into a variety of mutual funds. Often, companies will match contributions up to a certain amount. These plans can be powerful vehicles for amassing great wealth in retirement, but the founders of these plans recently voiced concerns that the plans are inadequate for many people, and that they were never meant to <em>replace </em>pensions altogether.</p> <p>For sure, 401K plans place more of the savings burden and risk onto the individual than pensions do. And many plans are lousy, with high fees and poor investment choices. So, what to do? Here's how to build that big retirement fund even when you're at the mercy of the 401K.</p> <h2>1. Save Up to the Match, Regardless</h2> <p>You may be annoyed that a 401K is all your employer has to offer, but if the company is offering to match contributions, you'd be a fool not to participate. Even if the plan has lousy mutual funds with high fees, free money is still free money. Most good companies offer at least 50 cents for every dollar you contribute up to a certain amount, and that can add up to a lot of dough over time.</p> <h2>2. Get an IRA</h2> <p>A 401K is not the only vehicle for saving for retirement. Individual retirement accounts, or IRAs, offer some good tax advantages and better flexibility than a 401K. There's no company match for an IRA, but you have the ability to invest in just about anything. That's why many investors will put money in a 401K up to the company match, then put any additional savings in IRAs. Most people can contribute $5,500 annually into an IRA. With a traditional IRA, any money you contribute is deducted from your taxable income. With a Roth IRA, your money is taxed right away but you don't have to pay tax on any gains when you withdraw the money at retirement.</p> <h2>3. Start Early and Have a Long Time Horizon</h2> <p>Despite the flaws of a 401K, it's still very possible to amass a large sum for retirement if you begin investing when you are young and keep it up for a long time. If you enter the workforce when you're 18 and keep saving and investing until retirement age, that means you'll have 45 years to allow your nest egg to grow. In fact, under this scenario, it's possible to retire a millionaire by putting aside less than a few hundred dollars per month.</p> <h2>4. Find the Low-Cost Funds</h2> <p>Even if your 401K plan isn't perfect, you owe it to yourself not to make matters worse by investing in bad funds. Many 401K plans offer mutual funds with high management fees and other expenses, but most also offer low-cost options, including basic S&amp;P 500 Index funds. Find those funds with the lowest fees, so you get to keep more of your money. Look for funds with expense ratios below 0.5%, if possible.</p> <h2>5. Embrace the Power</h2> <p>When an employer offers a pension, it almost always contributes to a pension fund and then hopes that investment returns are enough to meet the obligations they have to employees. So in reality, the only significant difference between a pension and a 401K plan is who is in control. With a 401K plan, you have more control over how you invest. For some people, this is scary. But for others, it's just as scary to leave their financial future in the hands of others.</p> <h2>6. Make a Good 401K Part of Your Job Search</h2> <p>Think about the last time you searched for a job. When you applied and interviewed for positions, did you take the quality of the company's 401K plan into account? Chances are, this was far down the list of concerns, below salary, health benefits, and even vacation time. But imagine if more people turned down job offers because of a lousy 401K plan or a low company match. If more prospective employees voiced concerns about the quality of retirement plans during the hiring process, companies might be more likely to improve their plans.</p> <h2>7. Talk to Your Lawmakers</h2> <p>It's unlikely that the President or Congress can force companies to bring back pensions, but they are the ones who could change 401K plans to make them more attractive. Lawmakers could pass legislation that improves the tax benefits of plans or increases the amount investors are allowed to contribute. They could pressure companies to boost their matching contributions, and require more companies to offer plans to more employees. Lawmakers could also propose new kinds of savings plans managed by the government. At the very least, voicing your concerns about the quality of the 401K as a retirement option could start a conversation on Capitol Hill.</p> <h2>8. Join a Union, If You Can</h2> <p>Much of the erosion of defined benefit plans has coincided with the drop in influence of labor unions in America. According to the AFL-CIO, about 75% of union workers participate in defined benefit plans, compared to about 20% for nonunion workers. But far fewer people are part of unions these days.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/tim-lemke">Tim Lemke</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-inventor-of-the-401k-has-second-thoughts-about-your-retirement-plan-now-what">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-retirement-terms-every-new-investor-needs-to-know">15 Retirement Terms Every New Investor Needs to Know</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-important-things-to-know-about-your-401k-and-ira-in-2016">5 Important Things to Know About Your 401K and IRA in 2016</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/stop-making-these-10-bogus-retirement-savings-excuses">Stop Making These 10 Bogus Retirement Savings Excuses</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-signs-you-arent-saving-enough-for-retirement">10 Signs You Aren&#039;t Saving Enough for Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-face-4-ugly-truths-about-retirement-planning">How to Face 4 Ugly Truths About Retirement Planning</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Retirement 401k contributions employer match IRA nest egg pensions Roth savings Mon, 13 Feb 2017 10:30:33 +0000 Tim Lemke 1889313 at http://www.wisebread.com 4 Reasons People Don't Retire Early — and How You Can http://www.wisebread.com/4-reasons-people-dont-retire-early-and-how-you-can <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/4-reasons-people-dont-retire-early-and-how-you-can" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-503452702.jpg" alt="Woman learning reasons people don&#039;t retire early" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Retirement is undeniably a time of drastic change in most people's lives. Typically, people have spent at least four decades in the workplace by the time they accept their gold watch. The average retirement age is 62 to 65, depending on where you live, according to a survey by SmartAsset.</p> <p>While work can provide routine and stability, as the years go by it can also grow to feel burdensome and stale. When to retire is a very personal question, linked to lifestyle and finances. Here are a few of the common reasons people feel they're not ready for retirement. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-reasons-early-retirement-might-be-financially-risky?ref=seealso" target="_blank">4 Reasons Early Retirement Might be Financially Risky</a>)</p> <h2>Worried About Having Enough Money</h2> <p>It's probably not a surprise that monetary reasons are number one on this list. Having a regular paycheck affords a lot of comfort that can be hard to walk away from.</p> <p>One of the most common reasons most individuals won't consider an early retirement is fear that their savings will be insufficient to provide the lifestyle they've been used to in their working years.</p> <p>However, if you're serious about wanting to retire now, there are ways you can make your savings go further, such as <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-american-cities-where-you-can-retire-on-just-social-security?ref=internal" target="_blank">retiring in a cheaper state</a>, or even a foreign country where the cost of living is lower. Also, using the <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-save-an-extra-109486-a-year?ref=internal" target="_blank">right credit card can save you thousands</a> of dollars a year.</p> <p>Alternatively, the <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/can-you-really-make-a-living-in-the-gig-economy?ref=internal" target="_blank">gig economy</a> affords a lot of ways for people who are officially retired to earn disposable income. For instance, you could <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/this-is-how-you-rent-your-place-on-airbnb-and-succeed?ref=internal" target="_blank">rent out a room on a site like Airbnb</a> to help pad your savings. Just make sure you check out local laws in your area for any restrictions on short-term rentals.</p> <h2>Hesitant to Lose Identity Tied to Work</h2> <p>In the Western world, one of the first questions we ask when meeting someone new is, &quot;What do you do?&quot; The meaning, of course, is what do you do for work. This question is a way of situating someone socioeconomically, understanding their background and education, and gaining a window into their lives.</p> <p>Of course, identity goes beyond what you do for work, and this is an important shift to be conscious of when considering retirement. Many individuals may feel that they are giving up a part of themselves when they decide to stop working.</p> <p>However, there are many other meaningful activities outside of work that have an equally important bearing on identity. These may include hobbies such as artwork, exercise, reading, writing, or travel.</p> <p>While a loss of identity is a common fear for people facing retirement, in reality, retirement can give you the time to explore other creative outlets that you wouldn't have been able to partake in with a busy work schedule.</p> <p>Instead of viewing the end of work as losing part of your identity, try to shift to viewing this as a time to explore different components of who you are. This will make early retirement meaningful, not boring.</p> <h2>Anxious Due to No Concrete Retirement Plan</h2> <p>According to a 2015 survey by the Deloitte Center for Financial Services, only 49% of consumers have a formal retirement plan. The problem of not having a plan for retirement is that it leaves fears and emotions to govern your decisions, as opposed to concrete numbers. Plus, by putting a plan in place, you can see very clearly what steps you need to follow to reach a certain goal, like retiring in five years, for example. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-retirement-planning-steps-late-starters-must-make?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Retirement Planning Steps for Late Starters</a>)</p> <h2>Afraid of Being Bored and Restless</h2> <p>Some people simply put off retirement because they are worried about being bored with all the extra time on their hands once they're not going to the office every day.</p> <p>However, retirement doesn't mean that you have to stop working entirely. Some individuals use this time to move from a decades-long career they've grown tired of to more fulfilling employment, or even their own business.</p> <p>If your new pursuit is something that gives you the chance to vary your work schedule, that can be very stimulating, too. Additionally, some universities offer free classes to those over 65 years of age.</p> <p>You can also take up countless hobbies like yoga, dance, snorkeling, scuba diving, golfing, hiking, or biking. To stimulate the mind, you can throw yourself into an artistic endeavor or learn a new language, the ideal activity for those who choose to retire overseas.</p> <p>Retirement is not just the end of one chapter, but also the beginning of a new one. Often, the biggest roadblocks to retiring are fear-based. It can help to re-evaluate the situation by looking at the facts, instead of just relying on emotions.</p> <p>Of course, the decision to retire is a personal one, and the right age to retire is different for everyone.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/amanda-gokee">Amanda Gokee</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-reasons-people-dont-retire-early-and-how-you-can">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-retirement-planning-steps-late-starters-must-make">7 Retirement Planning Steps Late Starters Must Make</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-keys-to-an-early-retirement">4 Keys to an Early Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/left-a-job-do-a-rollover">Left a job? Do a rollover.</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-signs-you-arent-saving-enough-for-retirement">10 Signs You Aren&#039;t Saving Enough for Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-reasons-why-a-roth-ira-may-be-better-than-your-401k">4 Reasons Why a Roth IRA May be Better Than Your 401(k)</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Retirement 401k early retirement IRA retirement planning saving Tue, 07 Feb 2017 10:30:37 +0000 Amanda Gokee 1885695 at http://www.wisebread.com 15 Retirement Terms Every New Investor Needs to Know http://www.wisebread.com/15-retirement-terms-every-new-investor-needs-to-know <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/15-retirement-terms-every-new-investor-needs-to-know" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/retirement_blocks_73115095.jpg" alt="New investor learning retirement terms" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Congratulations! By starting your retirement fund, you've taken one of the most important steps toward a comfortable retirement. But as a novice investor, you may feel a bit overwhelmed with all the available information, including contribution limits, early penalty fees, and Roth 401Ks. To help you make sense of it all, let's review 15 key terms you should know:</p> <h2>1. 401K</h2> <p>The 401K is the most popular qualified employer-sponsored retirement plan in the U.S. The two most common types of 401K plans are the traditional 401K, to which you contribute with pretax dollars, and the Roth 401K, which accepts contributions with after-tax dollars. Earnings in a traditional 401K grow on a tax-deferred basis (you'll pay taxes on the funds when you withdraw them during retirement) and those in a Roth 401K grow tax-free forever, since you've paid taxes upfront.</p> <h2>2. After-Tax Contributions</h2> <p>Only certain types of retirement accounts, such as Roth 401Ks and Roth IRAs, accept contributions with after-tax dollars. When you contribute to a retirement account with after-tax dollars, your retirement funds grow tax-free forever, since you've already paid Uncle Sam.</p> <h2>3. Catch-Up Contribution</h2> <p>Retirement investors who are 50 and older at the end of the calendar year can make extra annual &quot;catch-up&quot; contributions to qualifying retirement accounts. Catch-up contributions allow older savers to make up for lower contributions to their retirement accounts in earlier years. In 2016 and 2017, catch-up contributions of <a href="https://www.irs.gov/retirement-plans/plan-participant-employee/retirement-topics-catch-up-contributions">up to $6,000</a> (on top of traditional annual contribution limits) are allowed for 401Ks and up to $1,000 for IRAs.</p> <h2>4. Contribution Limits</h2> <p>Every year, the IRS sets a limit as to how much you can contribute to your retirement accounts. In 2016, you can <a href="https://www.irs.gov/retirement-plans/plan-participant-employee/retirement-topics-ira-contribution-limits">contribute up to $5,500</a> ($6,500 if age 50 or over) to traditional and Roth IRAs and <a href="https://www.irs.gov/retirement-plans/plan-participant-employee/retirement-topics-contributions">up to $18,000</a> ($24,000 if age 50 or over) to a traditional or Roth 401K. These annual contribution limits to retirement accounts remain unchanged for 2017. If you exceed your contribution limit, you'll receive a penalty fee from the IRS, unless you take out excess moneys by a certain date.</p> <h2>5. Early Distribution Penalty</h2> <p>To discourage retirement savers from withdrawing funds before retirement age, the IRS imposes an additional 10% penalty on distributions before age 59 &frac12; on certain retirement plans. Keep in mind that you're always liable for applicable income taxes whether you take a distribution from your retirement plan before or after age 59 &frac12;. Under certain circumstances, you're allowed to <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-penalty-free-ways-to-withdraw-money-from-your-retirement-account">withdraw money early</a> from a retirement account without the penalty.</p> <h2>6. Fee</h2> <p>You've heard that there is no such thing as a free lunch and no retirement plan is exempt from this rule. There's always a cost for the employer or employee, or both. Always check the prospectus from any fund for its annual expense ratio and any other applicable fee. An annual expense ratio of 0.75% means that for every $1,000 in your retirement account, you're charged $7.50 in fees. And that's assuming that you don't trigger any other fees! (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/watch-out-for-these-5-sneaky-401k-fees?ref=seealso">Watch Out for These 5 Sneaky 401K Fees</a>)</p> <h2>7. Index Fund</h2> <p>An index fund is a type of mutual fund that tracks of a basket of securities (generally a market index, such as the Standard &amp; Poor's 500 or the Russell 2000). An index fund is a passively managed mutual fund that provides broad market exposure, low investment cost, and low portfolio turnover. Due to its low annual expense ratios, such as 0.16% for the Vanguard 500 Index Investor Shares [Nasdaq: <a href="https://finance.yahoo.com/quote/vfinx">VFINX</a>], index funds have become a popular way to save for retirement. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/3-steps-to-getting-started-in-the-stock-market-with-index-funds?Ref=seealso">3 Steps to Getting Started in the Stock Market With Index Funds</a>)</p> <h2>8. IRA</h2> <p>Unlike a 401K, an individual retirement account (IRA) is held by custodians, including commercial banks and retail brokers. The financial institutions place the IRA funds in a variety of investments following the instructions of the plan holders. A traditional IRA accepts contributions with pretax dollars, and a Roth IRA accepts contributions with after-tax dollars. An advantage of using a Roth IRA is that it provides several exemptions to the early distribution penalty.</p> <h2>9. 401K Loan</h2> <p>Some retirement plans allow you to take a loan on a portion of your available balance &mdash; generally, 50% of your vested account balance, or <a href="https://www.irs.gov/retirement-plans/retirement-plans-faqs-regarding-loans">up to $50,000</a>, whichever is less. While the loan balance is generally due within five years, it becomes fully due within 60 days from separating from your employer. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-questions-to-ask-before-you-borrow-from-your-retirement-account?ref=seealso">5 Questions to Ask Before You Borrow From Your Retirement Account</a>)</p> <h2>10. Mutual Fund</h2> <p>By pooling funds from several investors, money managers are able to invest in a wide variety of securities, ranging from money market instruments to equities. Investing in a mutual fund enables an individual retirement investor to gain access to a wide variety of investments that she wouldn't necessarily have access to on her own. Depending on its investment strategy, mutual funds can have a wide variety of fees. So, make sure to read the fine print. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-sneaky-investment-fees-to-watch-for?ref=seealso">4 Sneaky Investment Fees to Watch For</a>)</p> <h2>11. Pretax Contribution</h2> <p>When you contribute to your employer-sponsored retirement account with pretax dollars, you're allowed to reduce your taxable income. For example, if you were to make $50,000 per year and contribute $5,000 to your 401K with pretax dollars, then you would only have to pay applicable income taxes on $45,000! You delay taxation until retirement age when you're more likely to be in a lower tax bracket.</p> <h2>12. Required Minimum Distribution (RMD)</h2> <p>You can't keep moneys in your retirement account forever. At age 70 &frac12;, you generally have to start taking withdrawals from an IRA, SIMPLE IRA, SEP IRA, or 401K. An RMD is the minimum amount required by law that you have take out from your retirement account each year to avoid a penalty from the IRS. You can use of one of these <a href="https://www.irs.gov/retirement-plans/plan-participant-employee/required-minimum-distribution-worksheets">requirement minimum distribution work sheets</a> to calculate your RMD.</p> <h2>13. Rollover</h2> <p>When you separate from your employer, you generally have up to 60 days to transfer moneys in your previous retirement account to a new retirement account accepting those moneys. This process is known as a rollover. In a direct rollover, the process is automatic; in an indirect rollover, you receive a cash-out check from your previous employer to rollover the moneys to a new qualifying retirement account. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/a-simple-guide-to-rolling-over-all-of-your-401ks-and-iras?ref=seealso">A Simple Guide to Rolling Over All of Your 401Ks and IRAs</a>)</p> <h2>14. Target-Date Fund</h2> <p>A target-date fund is a retirement investment fund that seeks to provide higher returns to young investors and gradually reduce risk exposure as they get closer to retirement age. Since the Pension Protection Act granted target-date funds the status of qualified default investment alternative in 2006, these type of funds have gained popularity. About half of 401K participants <a href="https://www.ebri.org/publications/ib/index.cfm?fa=ibDisp&amp;content_id=3347">hold a target-date fund</a>.</p> <h2>15. Vesting</h2> <p>In any retirement account, only money that is fully vested truly belongs to you. While all of your contributions and the matching contributions from your employer to your retirement account are always fully vested, some employer contributions, such as company stock, may follow a vesting schedule. In <em>cliff vesting</em>, you only become fully vested after a certain period of time. In <em>graded vesting</em>, you gradually gain ownership of those employer contributions.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/damian-davila">Damian Davila</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-retirement-terms-every-new-investor-needs-to-know">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-important-things-to-know-about-your-401k-and-ira-in-2016">5 Important Things to Know About Your 401K and IRA in 2016</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-inventor-of-the-401k-has-second-thoughts-about-your-retirement-plan-now-what">The Inventor of the 401K Has Second Thoughts About Your Retirement Plan — Now What?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/optimize-your-ira-and-401k">Optimize Your IRA and 401(k)</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/should-you-choose-a-roth-401k-or-a-regular-401k">Should You Choose a Roth 401k or a Regular 401k?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/stop-making-these-10-bogus-retirement-savings-excuses">Stop Making These 10 Bogus Retirement Savings Excuses</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Retirement 401k contributions employer-sponsored retirement index funds IRA new investors Roth savings target date funds taxes terms Thu, 17 Nov 2016 11:00:14 +0000 Damian Davila 1834559 at http://www.wisebread.com 4 Ways Couples Are Shortchanging Their Retirement Savings http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-couples-are-shortchanging-their-retirement-savings <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/4-ways-couples-are-shortchanging-their-retirement-savings" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/couple_retired_happy_62784562.jpg" alt="Retired couple shortchanging their retirement savings" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Whether retirement is decades away or if it is knocking on your door, there are some key mistakes that couples sometimes make when planning for their retirement. It's not too late to fix them, and addressing these problems now can potentially stave off issues in the future.</p> <p>Are you and your spouse making these retirement mistakes?</p> <h2>Relying on One's Spouse's Retirement</h2> <p>One common mistake that couples make is that they only rely on <em>one </em>spouse's income and retirement savings. While you might be able to live comfortably off one spouse's income now, when you are healthy, you have to calculate just how much you and your spouse will both need in retirement. Hopefully you will both be healthy well into your last years, but plan for the &quot;what ifs.&quot; Have both partners contribute to separate retirement accounts, if you both are working. If one spouse is self-employed or a freelancer, there are still retirement options for them.</p> <p>Even if one spouse does not work, they can still contribute to an IRA account. Carol Berger, CFP&reg;, of Berger Wealth Management, says that spousal IRA accounts are available for married couples who file taxes jointly. Berger says, &quot;This allows a contribution to be made for the nonworking spouse and helps his or her retirement nest egg grow. For example, in 2016, a nonworking spouse can contribute up to $5,500 to an IRA in their name ($6,500 if age 50 or older).&quot;</p> <h2>Putting Your Kids First</h2> <p>There is no doubt that you love your children and that it is easy to put their needs above retirement needs. However, don't delay on saving for retirement for your kids' sake. Saving for retirement should always trump saving for college education. Furthermore, retirement savings should not be dipped into to pay for college.</p> <p>The simple reason is that your children will have access to scholarships, loans, and work to help support them through college. Even if they graduate with a heavy load of debt, they have a long time to pay it off. There are no scholarships for retirement, and I am guessing the last thing you want to do is return to work.</p> <p>&quot;Time does not favor waiting because you lose the benefits of compounding,&quot; says Good Life Wealth Management president, Scott Stratton, CFP&reg;, CFA. &quot;If you put $5,000 into an IRA and earn 8% for 25 years, you'd have $34,242. Invest the same $5,000 10 years before retirement, and you'd only have $10,794. Or to put it another way, if you waited until 10 years before retirement, you'd have to invest $15,860 &mdash; instead of $5,000 &mdash; to reach $34,242.&quot;</p> <h2>Avoiding the Issue</h2> <p>Money is not always the easiest thing to talk about, however, if you avoid the issue, then you will only cause the problem to grow. Sit down with your spouse and talk about your present financial situation. Talk about where you want to be financially in the next year, in five years, and in retirement.</p> <p>If you both agree that you want to spend your retirement traveling and not tied to credit card debt or a mortgage payment, then you need to put in place the right money habits now.</p> <p>You should develop realistic action steps that will help you reach your financial goals a year from now, five years from now, and most importantly, in retirement. That means you might have to tighten your budget and pay more toward debt. Having clear financial goals will also help you stand firm as a couple when it is tempting to refinance the house to redo the backyard. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-retirement-planning-steps-late-starters-must-make?ref=seealso">7 Retirement Planning Steps Late Starters Must Make</a>)</p> <h2>Not Planning for Medical Costs</h2> <p>As discussed briefly above, many couples forget to financially plan for medical costs. It is easy to think, &quot;We won't need that much money in retirement because we won't buy anything or have to care for kids.&quot; However, medical expenses can add up quickly, especially in the last years of life. The cost of caretakers, regular doctor's visits, special medications, and even residency at a hospice can drain retirement savings in a matter of a few years.</p> <p>The worst thing is that many adult children are stuck with the financial burden of their parents' medical costs. Nearly one in 10 people over 40 are considered in the &quot;<a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-the-sandwich-generation-can-get-ahead">sandwich generation</a>.&quot; This means they are caring for their own children while also caring for aging parents. The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research reports that Medicare doesn't cover the most common types of long-term care and that a nursing home can cost as much as <a href="http://www.apnorc.org/news-media/Pages/News+Media/Poll-Sandwich-generation-worried-about-own-long-term-care-.aspx">$90,000 per year</a>. If retirement funds don't cover the necessary care for aging parents, their children will either have to foot the bill or try to take care of their parents themselves.</p> <p>Jody Dietel, Chief Compliance Officer at WageWorks says that there is a retirement tool that is often overlooked. A <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-an-hsa-saves-you-money">health savings account</a> (HSA) can help cover medical costs. Dietel says, &quot;It's important to understand that there's a place for both a 401K and an HSA. Establishing an HSA gives you the ability to amass savings to be used exclusively for health care expenses and preventing the need to dip into 401K funds for medical-related costs in retirement.&quot;</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/ashley-eneriz">Ashley Eneriz</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-couples-are-shortchanging-their-retirement-savings">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-4"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dont-despair-over-small-retirement-savings">Don&#039;t Despair Over Small Retirement Savings</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/3-ways-more-money-in-retirement-might-cost-you">3 Ways More Money in Retirement Might Cost You</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/left-a-job-do-a-rollover">Left a job? Do a rollover.</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-signs-you-arent-saving-enough-for-retirement">10 Signs You Aren&#039;t Saving Enough for Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-reasons-why-a-roth-ira-may-be-better-than-your-401k">4 Reasons Why a Roth IRA May be Better Than Your 401(k)</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Retirement 401k couples expenses health care health savings accounts HSA income IRA marriages medical costs Mon, 14 Nov 2016 10:00:06 +0000 Ashley Eneriz 1830892 at http://www.wisebread.com New Job? Don't Make These 7 Mistakes With Your Benefits http://www.wisebread.com/new-job-dont-make-these-7-mistakes-with-your-benefits <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/new-job-dont-make-these-7-mistakes-with-your-benefits" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_shaking_hands_77096849.jpg" alt="Woman making mistakes with new job benefits" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>In September 2016, total nonfarm payroll employment in the U.S. <a href="http://www.bls.gov/news.release/empsit.nr0.htm">rose by 156,000</a>. If you were among those Americans who recently landed a new gig &mdash; or plan on landing one within the near future &mdash; congratulations! But as you get your benefits and retirement planning set up at your new workplace, don't make these seven mistakes.</p> <h2>1. Not Setting Up Your New Retirement Account Before December 31st</h2> <p>Make to sure to set up your new employer-sponsored retirement account before December 31st. Otherwise, you won't be able to reduce your 2016 taxable income by making contributions before Tax Day (April 17th, 2017) or the day you file your federal tax return, whichever is earlier. If you wait until the new year to set up your retirement account, any contributions made before Tax Day will reduce your 2017 taxable income &mdash; and you'll lose the opportunity to reduce your 2016 AGI (Adjusted Gross Income) by any contributed amount.</p> <h2>2. Not Completing a 401K or IRA Indirect Rollover</h2> <p>If you had a balance of less than $5,000 in your previous job's 401K or IRA plan, there is a good chance that you received an automatic cashout with a 20% withholding from your employer for applicable taxes. From the last day of your employment, you have 60 days to put the entire balance of the previous retirement account (including the mentioned 20% withholding!) into a new employer-sponsored retirement account that accepts rollovers. This process is known as an indirect rollover.</p> <p>You'll get that 20% withholding money back from the IRS in next year's tax return. In the event that your new employer's retirement account doesn't accept a rollover from your previous account, consider opening an IRA with a local financial institution before the 60-day deadline. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/a-simple-guide-to-rolling-over-all-of-your-401ks-and-iras?ref=seealso">A Simple Guide to Rolling Over All of Your 401Ks and IRAs</a>)</p> <h2>3. Leaving W-4 Forms Alone</h2> <p>Depending on a variety of factors, your old W-4 tax withholdings may not cut it at your new gig. To figure out whether you're withholding too much (or too little), grab all of your latest pay stubs, find a copy of last year's tax return, and visit the online <a href="https://www.irs.gov/individuals/irs-withholding-calculator">IRS Withholding Calculator</a>.</p> <p>After punching in your data, this tool will provide recommendations on how to adjust your W-4 with your new employer to make sure that you meet your tax liability and minimize your refund. There's no sense in over-withholding and expecting a large refund, since the IRS doesn't pay interest while it sits on excess withholdings. That's money better kept in a savings or retirement account, where it can gain interest and compound over time.</p> <h2>4. Missing the Deadline to Make an Additional Estimated Tax Payment</h2> <p>If the IRS Withholding Calculator were to tell you that you're seriously behind your tax liability, you'll probably need to make amends <em>pronto, </em>lest you end up owing Uncle Sam at tax time. It's to your benefit to make an additional estimated tax payment to reduce or eliminate such a liability. For example, in the event that you know that there is an end-of-year bonus or commission check arriving before January 17, 2017, you have the option to use part of that check to make an estimated tax payment with <a href="https://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/f1040es.pdf">Form 1040-ES</a>.</p> <p>Make sure to use the IRS Withholding Calculator to estimate the right amount to mail to the IRS with Form 1040-ES and keep a photocopy of both the form and check for your own records.</p> <h2>5. Not Enrolling in a New FSA Plan Within 30 Days</h2> <p>You have up to 30 days from your hire date to enroll in an employer's flexible spending account (FSA). If you miss that deadline, you'll have to wait until your company renews its FSA plan, your plan administrator announces an open enrollment period, or you have a qualifying life event, such as changing marital status or having a baby.</p> <h2>6. Forgetting About Balances in Previous FSA Accounts</h2> <p>You may be so busy training at your new job and completing paperwork that you forget about remaining benefits at your previous employer. Check the rules from your previous FSA account regarding the expiration date of available money once you separate from your old employer. Most FSA plans provide a grace period to use the money, but some of those deadlines may be as early as the end of the month in which you separate from your employer. Unless you use your FSA funds in full by the applicable deadline, you'll lose them all.</p> <h2>7. Going More Than Two Months Without Health Coverage</h2> <p>As you're transitioning from one job to the other, keep an eye on the start and end dates of previous and current health plans. Under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), better known as Obamacare, you owe a fee for any period greater than two months in which you, your spouse, or your tax dependents don't have qualifying health coverage. In most cases, the penalty fee is 1/12 per month of <a href="https://www.healthcare.gov/fees/fee-for-not-being-covered/">2.5% of your household income</a> or $695 per adult, whichever is higher.</p> <p>Being uncovered for only one to two months, qualifies you for a <a href="https://www.healthcare.gov/exemptions-tool/#/results/2015/details/short-gap">short gap exemption</a> and you're not liable for the fee. Find out whether or not you're able to claim a health coverage exemption with <a href="https://www.healthcare.gov/exemptions-tool/#/">HealthCare.gov's Exemption Screener</a>.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/damian-davila">Damian Davila</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/new-job-dont-make-these-7-mistakes-with-your-benefits">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/left-a-job-do-a-rollover">Left a job? Do a rollover.</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-health-insurance-benefits-youre-probably-not-using">6 Health Insurance Benefits You&#039;re Probably Not Using</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/going-without-health-insurance-in-2015-heres-what-itll-cost-you">Going Without Health Insurance in 2015? Here&#039;s What It&#039;ll Cost You</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-vital-things-to-remember-when-buying-health-insurance">5 Vital Things to Remember When Buying Health Insurance</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/still-without-health-insurance-here-s-how-much-the-penalties-will-cost-you">Still Without Health Insurance? Here’s How Much the Penalties Will Cost You</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Insurance Retirement 401 k affordable care act benefits employers flexible spending health care IRA medical insurance new job obamacare rollovers taxes Mon, 31 Oct 2016 10:00:07 +0000 Damian Davila 1822947 at http://www.wisebread.com The Penalty-Free Way to Withdraw Retirement Money Early http://www.wisebread.com/the-penalty-free-way-to-withdraw-retirement-money-early <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/the-penalty-free-way-to-withdraw-retirement-money-early" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/saving_money_retirement_85578577.jpg" alt="Withdrawing retirement early without any penalties" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>It's widely know that for most retirement plans, including an IRA and 401K, there is a cost to withdrawing money before you reach 59-&frac12; years of age. Take money out of a traditional IRA or 401K early and you're stuck paying taxes plus a 10% early withdrawal fee. If you withdraw money from a Roth IRA early, you'll have to pay tax on any withdrawn gains.</p> <p>There are some ways to avoid this penalty, including one mechanism that may be unknown to many investors.</p> <p>It's called a SEPP (stands for Substantially Equal Periodic Payment), and it may help some investors access their money early without a cost. The basic idea behind a SEPP is that you can receive regular payments (usually annually) from your retirement account, as long as they are a consistent amount and you do so for a certain length of time.</p> <p>Here are some key things you need to know.</p> <h2>1. You Must Take Withdrawals for at Least Five Years</h2> <p>Once you begin a SEPP program, you are required to make regular withdrawals for five years or until you are 59-1/2, whichever comes last (with some exceptions for disability or market decline). So for example, a person who is 56 must make withdrawals until they are 61. A person who is 45 must continue to make withdrawals for the next 14-1/2 years. Thus, it's generally not a good idea to embark on a SEPP program if you are young. If you stop the program before the required time is up, you must pay the IRS all of the waived penalties, plus interest.</p> <h2>2. Calculating Your Payments Is, Well, Complicated</h2> <p>Okay, so you're required to make regular withdrawals of the same amount of money. But how much should you be withdrawing? There are three main methods of determining this.</p> <h3>The Required Minimum Distribution Method</h3> <p>In simple terms, divide your total account balance by your life expectancy. (The IRS has a table to help you determine this.) Under this method, the amount you withdraw must be recalculated each year and could change.</p> <h3>The Fixed Amortization Method</h3> <p>Under this system, payments are based on the life expectancy of the account holder and a chosen interest rate.</p> <h3>The Annuity Method</h3> <p>To determine payments under this system, divide your account balance by an annuity factor that is based on your age.</p> <p>Generally speaking, the Required Minimum Distribution method is the most straightforward and will result in the smallest payments. This makes it a better choice for investors who do not want to deplete their accounts as quickly. However, payments must be recalculated each year, whereas the other two options only require calculations to be made once.</p> <h2>3. It's Not a Good Idea for an Emergency</h2> <p>There may be times when you are tempted to withdraw from your retirement account to take care of a financial emergency. But a SEPP isn't designed to help you with that. The five-year requirement makes it impossible to make a single withdrawal or even a small series of withdrawals. If you have a one-time emergency, you're better off find other methods to get cash quickly.</p> <h2>4. It Won't Always Work for a 401K</h2> <p>If you're considering using a SEPP to withdraw money from a 401K plan, the IRS requires you to first separate from the employer that maintains the plan. So once again, this is not a decision to make lightly. That said, 401K plans from previous employers are acceptable, as are any rollover IRAs you created from past plans.</p> <h2>5. It Is Not Easily Adjustable</h2> <p>Once you sign up for a SEPP program, there's no way to cancel it before the required time. If you find that your payments are too much, you can change your calculation method to the Required Minimum Distribution method. But this change is only allowed once.</p> <h2>6. You Must Stop Contributing</h2> <p>Once you decide to use a SEPP program, you can't adjust the balance of the retirement account. That means no more adding money to the account and no separate withdrawals. Any change to the account balance could lead to the SEPP being disqualified, in which case you're on the hook for all of the penalties and taxes, plus interest.</p> <h2>7. Withdrawing Money Early Means You Will Have Less Later</h2> <p>It's important to remember that a retirement account is called a <em>retirement </em>account for a reason. Your goal should be to ensure that money in the account lasts for the entire time after you are done working. That could mean decades. So if you are withdrawing money early, understand that you are reducing the amount that will be available to you later in life.</p> <h2>8. You Probably Need Professional Help</h2> <p>A SEPP is not an easy thing to understand or set up yourself. A tax and investment adviser will help you understand if a program is right for your particular situation, and walk you through the steps to determine the proper payments.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/tim-lemke">Tim Lemke</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-penalty-free-way-to-withdraw-retirement-money-early">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-penalty-free-ways-to-withdraw-money-from-your-retirement-account">7 Penalty-Free Ways to Withdraw Money From Your Retirement Account</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-questions-to-ask-before-you-borrow-from-your-retirement-account">5 Questions to Ask Before You Borrow From Your Retirement Account</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-important-things-to-know-about-your-401k-and-ira-in-2016">5 Important Things to Know About Your 401K and IRA in 2016</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-retirement-terms-every-new-investor-needs-to-know">15 Retirement Terms Every New Investor Needs to Know</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/should-you-choose-a-roth-401k-or-a-regular-401k">Should You Choose a Roth 401k or a Regular 401k?</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Retirement 401k annuity IRA penalties sepp substantially equal periodic payment taxes withdrawals Tue, 18 Oct 2016 10:30:09 +0000 Tim Lemke 1815050 at http://www.wisebread.com Rich People Spend $350K+ to Park Their Cars — Here's How We'd Spend it Instead http://www.wisebread.com/rich-people-spend-350k-to-park-their-cars-heres-how-wed-spend-it-instead <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/rich-people-spend-350k-to-park-their-cars-heres-how-wed-spend-it-instead" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/fancy_sports_car_91447401.jpg" alt="Spend $350K on this instead of parking fancy cars" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>I came across a news report recently about the construction of a <a href="http://money.cnn.com/2016/09/14/luxury/autohouse-car-condo-miami/index.html">luxury condominium for cars</a>. It will allow people with fancy cars to park their vehicles in a secure environment, at the reasonable cost of just $350,000.</p> <p>Yes, $350,000 for a place to park.</p> <p>Suffice it to say, we can think of smarter things to do with $350,000. If you are lucky enough to have this kind of cash available to you, consider these alternative and sensible ways to spend your money.</p> <h2>1. Bolster That Emergency Fund</h2> <p>Before you shell out thousands of dollars for that custom-made personal watercraft, ask yourself if you'd have enough cash left to pay for a major medical bill if you got hurt. Or a hot water heater if it leaked all over your basement. Ask yourself how long you could get by if you lost your job. It's bad to blow money on unnecessary things. It's even worse to blow that money when you have nothing saved for a rainy day. Make sure you have <em>at least</em> three months of living expenses in liquid savings before you make any crazy purchases.</p> <h2>2. Pay Off High-Interest Debt</h2> <p>If you have money, there's no real excuse for carrying high-interest debt, such as that from credit cards. Interest from debt can erode your net worth, so pay off as much as you can. Focus on paying down the debts with the highest interest rates and go from there.</p> <h2>3. Contribute Maximum Toward Retirement</h2> <p>If you have a high income, there's no reason to hold back on putting as much into your retirement funds as possible. Those with 401K accounts can contribute up to $18,000 per year, and anyone with earned income can contribute $5,500 annually into an individual retirement account. Both of these accounts allow you to invest and see your money grow in a tax advantaged way. Focus on investments that mirror the overall performance of the stock market, and you'll see your money grow without much stress. Maxing out retirement funds may very well be the least frivolous thing to do with your money.</p> <h2>4. Invest Even More</h2> <p>Okay, so you've maxed out the amount you can place in retirement accounts. That doesn't mean you can't continue to invest! If you have the funds, consider buying stocks, mutual funds, and exchange-traded funds in a traditional brokerage account. You will have to pay taxes on any gains, but if you're investing for the long haul, you'll still come out well ahead in most cases.</p> <h2>5. Go to College</h2> <p>The best kind of investment is an investment in yourself. If you have enough money to pay for college, go for it! A typical person with a bachelor's degree <a href="https://trends.collegeboard.org/education-pays/figures-tables/lifetime-earnings-education-level">earns 66% more</a> over the course of their lifetime than someone who does not got to college, according to the College Board. And the earnings get even higher for those with advanced degrees. If you've already been to college, consider opening a college savings account for your children or another relative who's college-bound. Most states offer 529 plans that allow you to invest money without paying tax on the gains, provided that the money is later used for education expenses.</p> <h2>6. Buy a Home (Or a Second One)</h2> <p>If you're sitting on a sizable sum of money, it might make sense to put some toward a down payment on a house or other piece of real estate. It's better than renting, because you're building equity and may be able to even sell the real estate later at a profit. If you already own a home, consider buying a second and renting it out. This way, you not only get the benefits of real estate ownership, but an additional income stream as well. This sure beats cars or other material items that don't accrue in value.</p> <h2>7. Do Some Home Maintenance and Upgrades</h2> <p>Maybe it's time for a new roof, or your furnace has been on the fritz. Maybe you've always wanted to turn the basement into a nice family room. If you invest a little money into your home, you can stave off expensive repairs later, and any upgrades you make could increase your home value.</p> <h2>8. Give Some Away</h2> <p>$350,000 is a fair chunk of change, so why not give some away to a cause that you support? Remember that all charitable donations are tax deductible, so there's a financial benefit to giving away cash rather than spending it on something silly.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/tim-lemke">Tim Lemke</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/rich-people-spend-350k-to-park-their-cars-heres-how-wed-spend-it-instead">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-4"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-money-moves-to-make-as-soon-as-you-conquer-debt">7 Money Moves to Make as Soon as You Conquer Debt</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dont-let-outdated-money-advice-endanger-your-money">Don&#039;t Let Outdated Money Advice Endanger Your Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-ways-to-increase-your-net-worth-this-year">10 Ways to Increase Your Net Worth This Year</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-times-its-okay-to-delay-retirement-savings">5 Times It&#039;s Okay to Delay Retirement Savings</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-money-moves-to-make-when-a-layoff-is-coming">10 Money Moves to Make When a Layoff Is Coming</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance Budgeting 401k charity debt emergency funds investing IRA luxury money retirement spending Thu, 13 Oct 2016 09:30:20 +0000 Tim Lemke 1811799 at http://www.wisebread.com 7 Retirement Planning Steps Late Starters Must Make http://www.wisebread.com/7-retirement-planning-steps-late-starters-must-make <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/7-retirement-planning-steps-late-starters-must-make" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/couple_saving_retirement_33504544.jpg" alt="Couple making retirement planning steps late" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Most Americans aren't saving enough for retirement &mdash; and worse, many are off to a late start. Since 2011, the annual percentage of U.S. workers with less than $1,000 in savings and investments for retirement has ranged from <a href="https://www.ebri.org/pdf/briefspdf/EBRI_IB_422.Mar16.RCS.pdf">26% to 36%</a>.</p> <p>These low savings levels are taking a toll on nest eggs. One estimate puts the ideal retirement savings for an individual at <a href="http://www.fool.com/investing/general/2015/10/03/the-average-americans-retirement-savings-by-ageand.aspx">age 45 at $162,000</a> and calculates that, in reality, most Americans are about $100,000 short of that goal by the time they reach age 45. Let's review what late-starters should do to give their savings a necessary boost and learn some tips for those who are 15, 10, or five years away from retirement.</p> <h2>15 Years Away From Retirement</h2> <p>Assuming that your target retirement age is 65, you're now 50 years old and are likely to be part of the Generation X. About half of members of Generation X have <a href="http://time.com/money/4258451/retirement-savings-survey/">less than $10,000</a> in retirement savings.</p> <h3>Step 1: Take Advantage of Catch-Up Contributions</h3> <p>Starting at age 50, you're now legally allowed to start making annual catch-up contributions on top of the regular contribution limits to your qualifying retirement accounts. In 2016, individuals age 50 and over could contribute an extra:</p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.irs.gov/retirement-plans/plan-participant-employee/retirement-topics-catch-up-contributions">$6,000</a> on top of the $18,000 limit to 401K (other than a SIMPLE 401K), 403b, SARSEP, and governmental 457b plans;<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>$3,000 in catch-up contributions to SIMPLE IRA or SIMPLE 401K plans; and<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>$1,000 on top of the $5,500 limit to traditional or Roth IRAs.</li> </ul> <p>Additionally, individuals with at least 15 years of employment can make additional contributions to their 403b plans on top of the regular $6,000 in catch-up contributions. For more details, review the <a href="https://www.irs.gov/retirement-plans/plan-participant-employee/retirement-topics-403b-contribution-limits">IRS rules for 403b contribution limits</a>.</p> <h3>Step 2: Chase Lower Investment Fees</h3> <p>When choosing funds for your 401K, you may think that there's little difference between a fund with an annual expense ratio of 0.16% and a fund with one of 0.25%. However, when you're 15 years away from retirement, those differences compound over time. A $30,000 investment would cost $48 per year on the first fund and $75 per year on the second fund.</p> <p>By investing in the fund with the higher annual expense ratio, and assuming that both funds have an annual return of 7%, you would miss out on an extra $703.94 in retirement savings by the time you reach age 65. Not to mention on the additional gains on those moneys that you would have during your retirement years.</p> <p>Several studies have shown that expense ratios are the only reliable predictor of future fund performance. For example, research from rating agency Morningstar has found that <a href="http://news.morningstar.com/articlenet/article.aspx?id=347327">low-cost funds consistently outperform high-cost funds</a>.</p> <h2>10 Years Away From Retirement</h2> <p>At this point, you're now 55 years old and you're supposed to be wiser. Still, about <a href="http://time.com/money/4258451/retirement-savings-survey/">33% of Americans</a> age 55 and over have no retirement savings and 26% have retirement accounts with balances under $50,000. On top of taking advantage of catch-up contributions and chasing lower-cost funds, here are some additional steps to give your retirement strategy a much-needed boost.</p> <h3>Step 3: Consider Cities Where You Can Retire on Just Social Security</h3> <p>It can be a humbling experience to have to tighten your belt after having worked so hard for many decades. If you're going to become part of the <a href="https://www.ebri.org/pdf/briefspdf/EBRI_IB_422.Mar16.RCS.pdf">62% of U.S. retirees</a> that expect Social Security to be a major source of income during retirement, start investigating what U.S. cities are better suited to live on your expected check from the Social Security Administration (SSA).</p> <p>Here are three list of cities to start your search:</p> <ul> <li><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-american-cities-where-you-can-retire-on-just-social-security">5 American Cities Where You Can Retire On Just Social Security <p> </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-exciting-affordable-american-cities-to-retire-in">4 Exciting, Affordable American Cities to Retire In <p> </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-more-exciting-affordable-american-cities-to-retire-in">4 More Exciting, Affordable American Cities to Retire In</a></li> </ul> <p>Thinking about your budget during your retirement years is a good idea so you can plan withdrawals from your retirement account, figure out your necessary contributions for the next decade, and figure out ways to rein in expenses.</p> <h3>Step 4: Dial Down Your Investment Risk</h3> <p>Desperate times often call for desperate measures. However, playing part-time stock trader with your retirement funds or allocating more moneys to investment vehicles promising higher returns &mdash; and more risk! &mdash; isn't a good idea. Remember that only <a href="http://us.spindices.com/documents/spiva/spiva-us-mid-year-2014.pdf">20% to 25%</a> of actively managed funds beat their benchmark.</p> <p>Talk with your plan administrator about income investing, which focuses on picking financial vehicles that provide a steady stream of income. While you may think that bonds are your only option, there many other securities to choose from. For example, there are stocks that consistently pay dividends.</p> <h2>5 Years Away From Retirement</h2> <p>It's the final countdown to retirement age and now you're age 60. With a retirement savings benchmark of $260,494, <a href="http://time.com/money/4258451/retirement-savings-survey/">about 74% of Americans</a> are behind on their retirement savings. Here are three additional planning steps.</p> <h3>Step 5: Accumulate Delayed Retirement Credits</h3> <p>It's time to get the most accurate picture of your expected retirement benefit from the SSA. To do this, you can use the <a href="https://www.ssa.gov/OACT/anypia/anypia.html">Social Security Detailed Calculator</a>, which lets you estimate your retirement benefit by accessing your actual earnings record through a secure interface. If you find that monthly benefit check to be too low, one way to boost is delaying your SSA benefit past your full retirement age.</p> <p>Depending on the year that you were born, your full retirement age will fall somewhere between <a href="https://www.ssa.gov/planners/retire/retirechart.html">age 65 and 67</a>. For every year that you delay your retirement benefit past your full retirement age, you can get <a href="https://www.ssa.gov/planners/retire/delayret.html">up to an 8% increase</a> on your total annual benefit. The benefit increase no longer applies when you reach age 70, even if you continue to delay taking benefits.</p> <h3>Step 6: Delay Required Minimum Distributions</h3> <p>Generally, holders of traditional and Roth 401K plans must start taking required minimum distributions (RMDs) once they reach age 70-1/2.&nbsp;</p> <p>However, there is one way to delay RMDs. If you were to take a part-time job offering a retirement plan that allows you to rollover your old 401K plan, then you can continue to contribute to the new plan and delay your first RMD until April 1st of the year after you retire.</p> <p>Keep in mind that:</p> <ul> <li>Your old traditional 401K must go into a new 401K;<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Your old Roth 401K must go into a new Roth IRA;<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>Your new plan must accept rollovers; and<br /> &nbsp;</li> <li>You can't hold more than 5% of the company sponsoring the old plan to be able to do a rollover past age 70-1/2.</li> </ul> <p>Before you attempt a rollover past age 70-1/2, consult the plan administrator of your current retirement plan, the one from your potential new employer, and your tax accountant or financial planner, if you have one. This is one of those times that may warrant <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/who-to-hire-a-financial-planner-or-a-financial-adviser">hiring the right type of financial adviser</a> to prevent any tax penalties.</p> <h3>Step 7: Consider Retiring Abroad</h3> <p>Last but not least, one way to further stretch your nest egg is to retire in a city abroad to live better on a smaller budget, have access to generous tax breaks, and enjoy beautiful locales and ideal weather conditions.</p> <p>Several countries, including Costa Rica, Panama, and Nicaragua, offer retirement programs that provide U.S. retirees several benefits and require a minimum monthly SSA benefit ranging from $600 to $1,000 to qualify. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/x-exciting-world-cities-you-can-afford-to-retire-in">4 Exciting World Cities You Can Afford to Retire In</a>)</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F7-retirement-planning-steps-late-starters-must-make&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F7%2520Retirement%2520Planning%2520Steps%2520Late%2520Starters%2520Must%2520Make.jpg&amp;description=7%20Retirement%20Planning%20Steps%20Late%20Starters%20Must%20Make"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/7%20Retirement%20Planning%20Steps%20Late%20Starters%20Must%20Make.jpg" alt="7 Retirement Planning Steps Late Starters Must Make" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/damian-davila">Damian Davila</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-retirement-planning-steps-late-starters-must-make">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-reasons-people-dont-retire-early-and-how-you-can">4 Reasons People Don&#039;t Retire Early — and How You Can</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-reasons-why-a-roth-ira-may-be-better-than-your-401k">4 Reasons Why a Roth IRA May be Better Than Your 401(k)</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/left-a-job-do-a-rollover">Left a job? Do a rollover.</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-signs-you-arent-saving-enough-for-retirement">10 Signs You Aren&#039;t Saving Enough for Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-keys-to-an-early-retirement">4 Keys to an Early Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Retirement 401k 403b catch contributions IRA retirement planning saving Tue, 04 Oct 2016 10:30:13 +0000 Damian Davila 1805038 at http://www.wisebread.com 5 Times It's Okay to Delay Retirement Savings http://www.wisebread.com/5-times-its-okay-to-delay-retirement-savings <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-times-its-okay-to-delay-retirement-savings" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/hand_coin_piggybank_75172163.jpg" alt="Woman learning times it&#039;s okay to delay retirement savings" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>About one in five Americans isn't confident about <a href="https://www.ebri.org/publications/ib/index.cfm?fa=ibDisp&amp;content_id=3328">having enough money</a> for a comfortable retirement. If you're among them (or even if you aren't), putting off retirement savings seems like terrible advice. But if you're handling an ever-growing debt monster or an imminent threat of past contributions becoming taxable income &mdash; it may be okay to temporarily put a hold on retirement savings.</p> <p>Here are some of the very few instances you should ever consider temporarily delaying saving for retirement.</p> <h2>1. Paying Back a Loan From Your 401K</h2> <p>According to a study from The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, 20% of Americans <a href="http://www.pensionresearchcouncil.org/publications/document.php?file=1271">take out a loan</a> from their 401K plans. Even worse, there is evidence that treating your nest egg like a credit card can quickly become a bad habit: 25% of 401K borrowers take out a <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2013/08/17/your-money/one-dip-into-401-k-savings-often-leads-to-another.html?_r=0">third or fourth loan</a> and 20% of them take out five or more loans!</p> <p>While the full loan balance is generally due within five years, it becomes due within 60 days when terminating employment or failing to meet the established repayment schedule. Any outstanding balances become taxable income, triggering not only applicable income taxes but also additional tax penalties.</p> <p>Letting a 401K loan become taxable income will leave you with an unexpected, large tax bill next year and make you miss out on all the interest gains until retirement age. If you need to put retirement savings temporarily on hold to pay a 401K loan back ASAP, it's an understandable choice.</p> <h2>2. Dealing With Major Medical Expenses</h2> <p>If you're facing a major medical expense, you'll probably need all the help you can get. If your medical and dental expenses for the year are more than <a href="https://www.irs.gov/publications/p502/ar02.html">10% of your adjusted gross income</a> (7.5% if you or your spouse are over 65 or turned age 65 in 2016), you may qualify for hardship withdrawals from your retirement accounts. But a better option might just be to adjust the withholding on your paycheck using the <a href="https://www.irs.gov/individuals/irs-withholding-calculator">IRS Withholding Calculator</a>. This might allow you to pay for the expenses out of pocket by giving your budget more breathing room for the rest of the year. Sure, your retirement savings rate might temporarily slow, but at least you won't actively dip into them, either.</p> <h2>3. Eliminating High-Interest Credit Card Debt</h2> <p>In 2015, 21% of Americans believed that they would be in debt forever, up from 9% in 2013 and 18% in 2014. And high interest debt &mdash; such as credit card balances &mdash; are a big culprit.</p> <p>Instead of mortgaging your future to high-interest debt, <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/fastest-way-to-pay-off-10000-in-credit-card-debt?utm_source=wisebread&amp;utm_medium=internal&amp;utm_campaign=article">pay it off quickly</a>, and commit to putting the savings on interest payments toward retirement contributions. You'll probably even end up saving more toward retirement in the long run than if you kept making minimum credit card payments and wasting money on interest and fees. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/when-to-do-a-balance-transfer-to-pay-off-credit-card-debt?utm_source=wisebread&amp;utm_medium=seealso&amp;utm_campaign=article">When to Use a Balance Transfer Offer</a>)</p> <h2>4. Building an Emergency Fund</h2> <p>Thinking that your 401K is already your emergency fund is one of the <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-emergency-fund-myths-you-should-stop-believing">emergency fund myths</a> you should stop believing. Taking a loan from your 401K is very often a bad idea because of the reasons explained earlier. Instead, take a couple of months to build an emergency fund that meets your unique financial situation. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/figuring-the-size-of-your-emergency-fund?ref=seealso">Figuring the Size of Your Emergency Fund</a>)</p> <h2>5. Being Stuck in a Bad Forced-Transfer IRA</h2> <p>If a recent job change resulted in your previous 401K being forcefully transferred to an IRA, you might temporarily reconsider your retirement savings.</p> <p>If your forced-transfer IRA charges outrageous fees, you're better off holding off on your contributions until you qualify for your new employer's qualified plan. In the meantime, you could put the money that you would contribute to the IRA in an investment or saving account with a better return or pay down high-interest credit card debt.</p> <p>Once you set up your 401K with your new employer, roll over the entire balance from the forced-transfer IRA to the new account to improve the performance of your nest egg.</p> <p><em>What are other times it's okay to put off retirement?</em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/damian-davila">Damian Davila</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-times-its-okay-to-delay-retirement-savings">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. 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