employment http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/3863/all en-US 5 Money Matters That Won't Affect Your Credit Score http://www.wisebread.com/5-money-matters-that-wont-affect-your-credit-score <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-money-matters-that-wont-affect-your-credit-score" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/excellent_credit_score_concept.jpg" alt="Excellent Credit Score concept" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>You already know that your credit score is a key number. Lenders use it to determine if they'll approve you for financing, and at what interest rates. But you might be surprised to learn what <em>does</em> and <em>does not</em> impact this critical number.(See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-financial-mistakes-that-wont-hurt-your-credit-score?ref=seealso">5 Financial Mistakes That Won't Hurt Your Credit Score</a>)</p> <p>If your goal is to boost your credit score, read on. It's important to know what factors you don't have to worry about.</p> <h2>1. Your salary</h2> <p>You might think that how much money you earn each year is an important figure when applying for a loan or credit. And lenders will ask you to verify your income whenever you apply for a mortgage or auto loan. But your salary has no impact on your credit score. This score measures how well you pay your bills and manage your credit. It doesn't measure how much money you earn. Getting a raise or taking a job with a bigger salary will not cause your score to budge up or down.</p> <h2>2. Your job history</h2> <p>Currently unemployed? It won't affect your credit score. Have you worked steadily for the last two decades, with no gaps in your employment history? This won't boost your score past any other consumer. Again, credit scores rise or fall depending on how you pay your bills and how you handle your credit. Credit score keepers are unconcerned with whether you've been fired multiple times or if you've been a model employee.</p> <h2>3. Marital status</h2> <p>Your credit score won't rise or fall because you're married or single. Your credit score is separate from your partner's. If your partner has bad credit, this will have no impact on your own score.</p> <p>A partner with bad credit, though, could hurt you when you're ready to apply for a loan together. Lenders will look at all three of your credit scores, and all three of your partner's credit scores &mdash; each maintained by Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion &mdash; then use the middle score of whichever partner has the lowest scores.</p> <p>For instance, if you have credit scores of 780, 750, and 790 from the three credit bureaus, and your partner has scores of 640, 680, and 700, your lender will use your partner's middle score of 680 when determining whether you qualify for a loan you are applying for jointly. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-things-i-learned-about-money-after-getting-married?ref=seealso" target="_blank">8 Things I Learned About Money After Getting Married</a>)</p> <h2>4. Where you live</h2> <p>You probably know that where you live can cause the premiums you pay for homeowners or auto insurance to rise or fall. But where you live has no bearing on your credit score. You may live in the most expensive subdivision in the most expensive community in your state. This, however, won't automatically give you a higher credit score.</p> <h2>5. Your age</h2> <p>You might think you've become financially wiser as you age. You might even be right. But your age also has no impact on your credit score. However, if you have gotten better at paying bills on time and reducing your credit card debt as you've gotten older, this will improve your score.</p> <h2>What does hurt</h2> <p>Missing credit card, mortgage, or auto payments <em>will</em> send your credit score tumbling. If you are 30 days or more late on these revolving payments, you can expect your score to fall by 100 points or more. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-simple-ways-to-never-make-a-late-credit-card-payment?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Simple Ways to Never Make a Late Credit Card Payment</a>)</p> <p>The same holds true if you declare bankruptcy or lose a home to foreclosure. These financial missteps can cost you 150 credit points or more. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/3-terrible-things-foreclosure-does-to-your-credit?ref=seealso" target="_blank">3 Terrible Things Foreclosure Does to Your Credit</a>)</p> <p>Missed payments generally stay on your credit reports for seven years. Chapter 13 bankruptcy filings and foreclosures also remain on your report for seven years, while Chapter 7 bankruptcy filings remain for 10 years.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F5-money-matters-that-wont-affect-your-credit-score&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F5%2520Money%2520Matters%2520That%2520Wont%2520Affect%2520Your%2520Credit%2520Score.jpg&amp;description=5%20Money%20Matters%20That%20Wont%20Affect%20Your%20Credit%20Score"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/5%20Money%20Matters%20That%20Wont%20Affect%20Your%20Credit%20Score.jpg" alt="5 Money Matters That Won't Affect Your Credit Score" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dan-rafter">Dan Rafter</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-money-matters-that-wont-affect-your-credit-score">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-the-age-of-your-credit-history-matters">Why the Age of Your Credit History Matters</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-steps-to-getting-excellent-credit">5 Steps to Getting Excellent Credit</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-credit-report-mistakes-that-could-be-costing-you-big">4 Credit Report Mistakes That Could Be Costing You Big</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/heres-why-credit-scores-and-reports-are-not-the-same">Here&#039;s Why Credit Scores and Reports Are Not the Same</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-reasons-building-credit-in-college-helps-you-win-at-life">5 Reasons Building Credit in College Helps You Win at Life</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Personal Finance affects credit score age credit history credit score employment marital status raise credit score salary Thu, 25 Jan 2018 10:00:06 +0000 Dan Rafter 2091488 at http://www.wisebread.com 9 Signs You're Making All the Right Career Moves http://www.wisebread.com/9-signs-youre-making-all-the-right-career-moves <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/9-signs-youre-making-all-the-right-career-moves" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/having_a_positive_attitude_is_rewarding_0.jpg" alt="Having a positive attitude is rewarding" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Your career is important. It provides financial stability for you and your family, and in many ways, it can dictate your future &mdash; where you live, what you can afford, and the type of lifestyle you're able to lead.</p> <p>When there&rsquo;s a possibility for career advancement on the horizon, it&rsquo;s good to be able to spot it early. That way, you won't risk jumping ship too early or passing up on a great opportunity. If you see these signs at work, that's good news; you're making all the right career moves.</p> <h2>1. Getting a raise out of nowhere</h2> <p>If you are brought into a meeting with the boss (and possibly human resources) and told you&rsquo;re getting a raise, then congratulations &hellip; you&rsquo;re climbing the ladder to success.</p> <p>Raises without notice, separate from the annual 3 to 4 percent raise every employee gets, are a surefire indicator that the company is very happy with the work you&rsquo;ve been doing. So happy, in fact, that they value you enough to spend more money to keep you around. They may also add to the pot by giving you additional vacation days, sick days, and flexible hours. All of these rewards are designed to get you to stay put, be happy, and keep the company happy. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/you-got-a-raise-now-what?ref=seealso" target="_blank">You Got a Raise! Now What?</a>)</p> <h2>2. Being invited to more meetings featuring important people</h2> <p>Is your calendar getting fuller? Are you now in meetings with those &ldquo;higher-ups&rdquo; that you&rsquo;ve only heard mentioned in annual reports and water cooler talk? Well, get ready for the big time.</p> <p>When your boss decides that you should be put in front of people that make important decisions, she is doing so because you will make her look good. She wants to show you off and attach herself to someone who is clearly making all the right moves. This, of course, may bring additional pressure. You don&rsquo;t want to mess up in front of the executives, so take the time to prepare yourself, know your stuff, and be on your best behavior both in and out of important meetings.</p> <h2>3. You&rsquo;re put in charge of more high-profile projects</h2> <p>Being put on a key initiative the company is working on says a lot about your chances of a promotion. Every business, large or small, has that one major development or client; and they only put their top people on it. If you are asked to join the team of Project X, you know you&rsquo;ve just been given a great deal of credit. Most likely, how you perform on that project, under pressure, will determine the promotion and raise your boss is planning to give you. So, don&rsquo;t let him or her down.</p> <h2>4. You&rsquo;re invited to spend more free time with the boss</h2> <p>A boss usually works longer hours than the team, although there can be exceptions to that. However, if your boss is getting in early, leaving late, and still wants to spend some of his extracurricular time getting to know you, that&rsquo;s a good sign.</p> <p>For instance, being invited to lunch to discuss your role and your contributions to the team is great for you. If your boss asks you to play a round of golf over the weekend, that&rsquo;s another great sign that you&rsquo;re being considered for a bigger role. He is looking to get to know more about you than the day-to-day work stuff. How&rsquo;s your family life? Are you happy in your position? How do you treat people when you&rsquo;re out of the office? You&rsquo;re being eyed up for a promotion. Of course, if there is any hint of impropriety, and this feels like anything other than business, talk to HR immediately.</p> <h2>5. The boss wants to know about your goals within the company</h2> <p>One of those tricky interview questions we often get is, &ldquo;Where do you see yourself five years from now?&rdquo; That question takes on a different meaning once you&rsquo;re within the company.</p> <p>Now, it&rsquo;s not just about loyalty to the company, but your ambitions within it. Are you driven? Do you have your eye on a management position? Do you have plans that could increase the growth of the business? Are you a go-getter, or are you happy to coast? Chances are, if you respond with &ldquo;I&rsquo;ll be happy just doing what I&rsquo;m doing now,&rdquo; you&rsquo;ll throw a huge red flag up for the boss. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-you-might-be-sabotaging-your-job?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Ways You Might Be Sabotaging Your Job</a>)</p> <h2>6. You&rsquo;re going on more business trips and conferences</h2> <p>Here&rsquo;s a cold, hard fact: Businesses do not like to invest in people that are not important to them. Budgets for conferences and business trips are watched carefully, and a select few get to take advantage of these benefits. If you&rsquo;ve gone from sitting in an office all day to jet-setting and attending industry events, all on the company&rsquo;s dime, you&rsquo;re sending the right signals to management. They are investing in you, and they want you to stay.</p> <h2>7. Co-workers have nothing but praise for you</h2> <p>Are you suddenly the apple of everyone&rsquo;s eye? Are people actively coming to you just to tell you what a great job you did on that last big project, or asking you to help them on other projects? Do your co-workers, some of whom have been fairly cold or hands-off in the past, now want to hang out at lunch? Well, guess what? Someone, somewhere, knows that you&rsquo;re popular with the people that matter. They want to be associated with a winner.</p> <p>If people suddenly <em>stop</em> talking to you, and you cannot get anyone to return a call, that&rsquo;s a sure sign that the opposite is true &mdash; you&rsquo;re on the way out.</p> <h2>8. The boss is in line for a promotion</h2> <p>When your boss starts hinting that she is about to get a cushy new role within the company, don&rsquo;t panic. While it may seem like things are about to change, they could very well be changing for the better.</p> <p>Promotions have a knock-on effect, meaning that the boss&rsquo;s shoes will be filled by a direct report. If that&rsquo;s you, or you&rsquo;re one of the contenders, you are almost certainly in the running to fill that spot. All you have to do now is prove you can do the job. Volunteer for more tasks. Assume a mentoring role in meetings. Look the part, act the part, and chances are, you&rsquo;ll get the job.</p> <p>Even if you don&rsquo;t, your relationship with your boss could be an asset in the future. Perhaps there are other projects or roles she could refer you for, in which case her newly enhanced status makes you look even better.</p> <h2>9. Your annual appraisals are off the charts</h2> <p>If your company has a review or appraisal system in place, you can quickly see what your chances are of a promotion from the grades and comments you get. For example, if you&rsquo;re judged on a scale of one to five for specific skills, and you are hitting mostly fours and fives, you&rsquo;re excelling. This is used as a bargaining chip by your boss when it comes time to recommend departmental promotions.</p> <p>If you&rsquo;re hovering around the threes and fours, you&rsquo;re doing well, but are probably going to stay put for a while. That&rsquo;s OK too. At least you know what you need to work on. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-to-bring-up-with-your-boss-at-your-annual-review?ref=seealso" target="_blank">10 Things to Bring Up With Your Boss at Your Annual Review</a>)</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F9-signs-youre-making-all-the-right-career-moves&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F9%2520Signs%2520Youre%2520Making%2520All%2520the%2520Right%2520Career%2520Moves.jpg&amp;description=9%20Signs%20Youre%20Making%20All%20the%20Right%20Career%20Moves"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/9%20Signs%20Youre%20Making%20All%20the%20Right%20Career%20Moves.jpg" alt="9 Signs You're Making All the Right Career Moves" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-signs-youre-making-all-the-right-career-moves">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-be-successful-as-a-first-time-manager">How to Be Successful as a First-Time Manager</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-essential-facts-women-should-know-before-asking-for-a-raise">5 Essential Facts Women Should Know Before Asking for a Raise</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-youre-sabotaging-your-next-promotion">5 Ways You&#039;re Sabotaging Your Next Promotion</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/they-offered-you-a-promotion-and-no-pay-raise-now-what">They Offered You a Promotion and No Pay Raise. Now What?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-ugly-truth-of-workplace-success-popularity-still-matters">The Ugly Truth of Workplace Success: Popularity Still Matters</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building climbing the ladder employment good signs management meetings promotions raises Thu, 18 Jan 2018 10:00:06 +0000 Paul Michael 2087012 at http://www.wisebread.com 5 Ways You Might Be Sabotaging Your Job http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-you-might-be-sabotaging-your-job <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-ways-you-might-be-sabotaging-your-job" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/office_worker_filing_asleep_at_the_job.jpg" alt="Office Worker Filing Asleep at the Job" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>You've been fired &mdash; again. Are you starting to sense a pattern? The solution to any problem is to look at the root cause. While the job might simply not have been a good fit, people who have suffered a string of job terminations might want to consider that they may be a <em>small </em>part of the problem.</p> <p>No, I'm not saying you deserved to be fired &mdash; but you may be engaging in sloppy or naive behaviors that don't do you any favors in the workplace.</p> <p>Here are five bad behaviors that might be sabotaging your job.</p> <h2>1. Sharing your future career plans</h2> <p>Do you have grand plans to escape your current job? Do you plan to jump ship in two or three months?</p> <p>Stop and think before you mention it to any coworkers &mdash; including those you consider friends. Word gets around the office quickly, and sooner or later, the news will make its way to management.</p> <p>Next time the higher-ups need to lay someone off, individuals with one foot out the door might be the first to go. Even if you don't seriously plan to start sending out resumes tomorrow, your company won't be incentivized to keep someone around that they suspect is actively looking for another job.</p> <p>Can you afford to be pre-emptively fired? If you can't, wait until you actually have a new position lined up and intend to put in your two weeks' notice.</p> <h2>2. Engaging in gossip</h2> <p>Unfortunately, people can be pretty mean, and high school behaviors aren't always left in the past. Water cooler gossip runs rampant in many professional settings, but don't let that be an excuse to join in. As tempting as gossip can be, you need to steer far, far away from it.</p> <p>Unfounded rumors and gossip can hurt not only your coworkers, but come back to bite you as well. If you're constantly earning a reputation as a big mouth and a backstabber, none of your colleagues will want you around &mdash; and management probably won't, either. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-career-moves-that-prove-youre-finally-a-grown-up?ref=seealso" target="_blank">8 Career Moves That Prove You're Finally a Grown-Up</a>)</p> <h2>3. Imitating your coworkers' bad habits</h2> <p>Your colleagues may have some bad habits. They might watch movies on their computer, or mess around on Twitter all day while on the job. Don't assume that because they're getting away with it, it's fine for you to do the same.</p> <p>There may be more to the story than you realize. Maybe management doesn't care if your coworkers are messing around on Twitter, because they do their job well and turn in assignments on time. Maybe office politics are at play. Maybe your office mates are just good at not getting caught. Regardless of their situation, if you're regularly following in their footsteps and slacking off, you could be putting your job at serious risk.</p> <h2>4. Inability to take criticism with grace</h2> <p>No one is immune to criticism, and at many jobs, you'll be subject to regular performance reviews. Savvy professionals should keep an open mind, make note of the manager's suggestions, and work to create an actionable plan to improve their performance.</p> <p>Workers should, in most cases, never:</p> <ul> <li> <p>Blame everyone else without looking at their own part in a problem.</p> </li> <li> <p>Verbally attack the manager.</p> </li> <li> <p>Deny knowing about an issue if the manager has brought it up a dozen times.</p> </li> <li> <p>Refuse to acknowledge a problem and discuss improvement.</p> </li> <li> <p>Act put-upon, as if expectations of doing an assigned task is a hardship, or;</p> </li> <li> <p>Try to shift the subject by bringing up coworkers' issues.</p> </li> </ul> <p>If you don't quite understand why the manager has an issue, you can initiate a respectful discussion. Just make sure that the manager understands the discussion is to help you grasp the problem, so a solution can be properly discussed.</p> <p>If you genuinely believe the change isn't needed, it might be better to concede for now. Do it the manager's way. You can fight the battle to change any inefficient norms later. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/ace-your-next-performance-review-with-these-7-tricks?Ref=seealso" target="_blank">Ace Your Next Performance Review With These 7 Tricks</a>)</p> <h2>5. Bad attitude</h2> <p>Yes, jobs can be soul-sucking grinds. Yes, the managers might be slimy ladder climbers. Yes, you might feel that the organization takes every chance to whittle away at your quality of life.</p> <p>No, you shouldn't aggressively express your displeasure with every word and action.</p> <p>Why? One individual with a bad attitude can insidiously infect the quality of the entire workplace. An unhappy employee can pass on their discontent and anger to their coworkers. Weeks of murmurs about all the perceived problems will eventually negatively affect everyone around you.</p> <p>A bad attitude can also lead to subpar work and rude behavior toward customers or coworkers; both of which can eventually lead to a job termination.</p> <p>No one expects you to be upbeat and perky all the time. Just try to rein in the attitude a tad.</p> <p>By eliminating a few bad habits, you'll be on the road to a less ruinous career path. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-keep-a-personal-problem-from-hurting-your-career?Ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Keep a Personal Problem From Hurting Your Career</a>)</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F5-ways-you-might-be-sabotaging-your-job&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F5%2520Ways%2520You%2520Might%2520Be%2520Sabotaging%2520Your%2520Job.jpg&amp;description=5%20Ways%20You%20Might%20Be%20Sabotaging%20Your%20Job"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/5%20Ways%20You%20Might%20Be%20Sabotaging%20Your%20Job.jpg" alt="5 Ways You Might Be Sabotaging Your Job" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/samantha-stauf">Samantha Stauf</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-you-might-be-sabotaging-your-job">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-fired">How to Get Fired</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-unprofessional-habits-that-could-kill-your-career">10 Unprofessional Habits That Could Kill Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/you-re-fired-20-signs-that-a-pink-slip-is-coming">You’re Fired! 20 Signs That a Pink Slip is Coming</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-be-successful-as-a-first-time-manager">How to Be Successful as a First-Time Manager</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-get-laid-off-a-step-by-step-guide">How to Get Laid Off: A Step-By-Step Guide</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building bad behaviors bad habits employment fired gossip job termination morale performance reviews unprofessional Mon, 08 Jan 2018 09:30:16 +0000 Samantha Stauf 2081071 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Things You Need to Do if You're Retiring in 2018 http://www.wisebread.com/6-things-you-need-to-do-if-youre-retiring-in-2018 <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-things-you-need-to-do-if-youre-retiring-in-2018" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/happy_retirement_celebration_party_cupcakes_with_candles.jpg" alt="Happy Retirement Celebration Party Cupcakes with Candles" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>You&rsquo;re ready to retire in 2018. A long career is behind you, and you're finally ready to enjoy your golden years after decades of hard work and saving.</p> <p>But just because retirement is at your doorstep doesn&rsquo;t mean you don&rsquo;t still have a few important steps to take. Here are six things you need to do right now to start your 2018 retirement off on the right foot.</p> <h2>1. Calculate your retirement budget</h2> <p>Creating any sort of budget rarely sounds like fun, but when you&rsquo;re ready to retire, it&rsquo;s a necessity. Remember, that paycheck you&rsquo;ve counted on for so long is disappearing. You need to make sure you have enough money coming in each month to support yourself.</p> <p>First, calculate how much money you&rsquo;ll have available each month. Include all sources of income, including Social Security benefits, money from the savings you&rsquo;ve built up, royalties, rents, disability payments, and annuity payments. Then, calculate your fixed expenses that remain the same each month. These would include rent or mortgage payments, car payments, and insurance costs &mdash; everything from life and health, to homeowners and auto.</p> <p>Create reasonable estimates for expenses that might fluctuate each month. This includes costs such as utility bills, the money you spend on groceries, transportation costs, and, always important, the estimated amount of dollars you&rsquo;ll spend on entertainment, traveling, and eating out.</p> <p>Once you have these figures, you&rsquo;ll know if you have enough money to support the retirement lifestyle you want.</p> <h2>2. Make some tweaks</h2> <p>Maybe, after creating this budget, you discover that you don&rsquo;t have enough incoming dollars to cover all your expenses. This means it&rsquo;s time to make some changes. If money is tight, you might have to cut back on discretionary expenses like going out to dinner or the movies. You might not be able to take a road trip every month. You might have to put off that cruise.</p> <p>If you need more dramatic savings, it might be time to consider putting your home on the market. If you sell it and downsize into a smaller residence &mdash; maybe a condo or apartment &mdash; you might be able to generate enough money, and save enough in monthly mortgage expenses, to afford a more luxurious retirement lifestyle.</p> <p>You might also consider selling your car, if you&rsquo;re still making payments on it, and purchasing a more affordable vehicle that might cost hundreds of dollars less each month. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-you-can-cut-costs-right-before-you-retire-0?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Ways You Can Cut Costs Right Before You Retire</a>)</p> <h2>3. Talk to your partner about your retirement hopes</h2> <p>You don&rsquo;t want to hit retirement only to discover that you&rsquo;re happy puttering around the house and reading while your partner is looking forward to traveling the country in an RV.</p> <p>Partners need to talk about their retirement goals long before they leave the working world. If you haven&rsquo;t done this yet, and you&rsquo;re ready to retire in 2018, it&rsquo;s time to have this conversation.</p> <p>Retirement brings with it plenty of free time &mdash; maybe more than you expected. You might get tired of reading or fishing pretty quickly. It&rsquo;s best to discuss how you&rsquo;ll fill these extra hours with your partner or spouse before retirement hits. Doing so will increase the odds that both of you will enjoy a happy retirement together. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-money-conversations-couples-should-have-before-retirement?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Money Conversations Couples Should Have Before Retirement</a>)</p> <h2>4. Consider whether you still want to work</h2> <p>Many retirees take on part-time work after they leave their full-time jobs. Some do this for financial reasons, while others simply enjoy the act of going to work and staying productive.</p> <p>Take a long look at yourself. If you enjoy the routine of going to work, and find working satisfying, taking a part-time job might be the right decision for you. Or maybe you&rsquo;ll want to use your retirement years to set up a consulting business or pursue a dream job in the arts.</p> <p>Just make sure to plan for this move. Share your goals with your partner, so that he or she isn&rsquo;t blindsided when you announce that you&rsquo;re going back to work. And if you&rsquo;re retiring next year, take the time now to make the connections and prep your resume so that you can transition as smoothly as possible to your new job. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-creative-remote-jobs-that-can-supplement-your-retirement-income?ref=seealso" target="_blank">4 Creative Remote Jobs That Can Supplement Your Retirement Income</a>)</p> <h2>5. Explore your community</h2> <p>Again, retirement comes with plenty of free time. If you don&rsquo;t want to work, maybe you&rsquo;ll want to volunteer to fill in those hours. Now is the time to explore volunteer opportunities in your community. That way, when you do retire, you&rsquo;ll already have a plan for how you&rsquo;ll occupy those long post-work days. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-find-your-new-identity-after-retirement?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Find Your New Identity After Retirement</a>)</p> <h2>6. Get conservative with your investments</h2> <p>If you haven&rsquo;t already, move your retirement savings out of stocks and into less volatile savings vehicles such as bonds. It&rsquo;s true that bonds don&rsquo;t have the same ceiling when it comes to big gains, but you don&rsquo;t want a dip in the stock market six months before you retire to eat up a big chunk of your retirement savings. Instead, play it safe by moving your savings to retirement vehicles that aren&rsquo;t as likely to hit a big dip.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F6-things-you-need-to-do-if-youre-retiring-in-2018&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F6%2520Things%2520You%2520Need%2520to%2520Do%2520if%2520You%2527re%2520Retiring%2520in%25202018.jpg&amp;description=6%20Things%20You%20Need%20to%20Do%20if%20You're%20Retiring%20in%202018"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/6%20Things%20You%20Need%20to%20Do%20if%20You%27re%20Retiring%20in%202018.jpg" alt="6 Things You Need to Do if You're Retiring in 2018" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dan-rafter">Dan Rafter</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-things-you-need-to-do-if-youre-retiring-in-2018">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-retiring-with-debt-isnt-the-end-of-the-world">Why Retiring With Debt Isn&#039;t the End of the World</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-reasons-why-financial-planning-isnt-just-for-the-wealthy">6 Reasons Why Financial Planning Isn&#039;t Just for the Wealthy</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-to-do-if-youre-laid-off-before-you-retire">What to Do if You&#039;re Laid Off Before You Retire</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-come-up-with-1000-in-the-next-30-days">How to Come Up With $1,000 in the Next 30 Days</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-you-can-cut-costs-right-before-you-retire-0">6 Ways You Can Cut Costs Right Before You Retire</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Retirement about to retire budgeting cutting costs employment expenses free time income investments part-time jobs planning Wed, 20 Dec 2017 09:30:10 +0000 Dan Rafter 2073561 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Ways the Government Helps Disaster Victims Recover http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-the-government-helps-disaster-victims-recover <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-ways-the-government-helps-disaster-victims-recover" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/disaster_recovery_center_sign.jpg" alt="Disaster Recovery Center Sign" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Hurricane season has captured big chunks of recent news cycles, with massive storms Irma and Harvey devastating areas in Florida and Texas. The IRS and other U.S. government agencies are working to help people get back on their feet after these terrible natural disasters. Here's what they're doing.</p> <h2>1. Allowing loans and hardship withdrawals from retirement funds</h2> <p>Usually, the IRS levels penalties against early withdrawals from 401(k) and 403(b) retirement accounts. But it recently announced that in the case of Irma and Harvey, victims can take loans and hardship withdrawals against their retirement funds without penalties. All of the specifics for this IRS initiative can be found on the <a href="https://www.irs.gov/newsroom/tax-relief-in-disaster-situations" target="_blank">IRS disaster relief page</a>.</p> <h2>2. Offering tax relief</h2> <p>The IRS provides tax relief to those who are impacted by disasters. This relief takes the form of tax filing and payment extensions, as well as the ability to claim losses on tax returns that may lower the amount of tax owed. Once an area is a federally declared disaster area, the IRS automatically marks all taxpayers in that area as eligible for relief. The details about these tax relief programs are also on the IRS's webpage for disaster relief.</p> <h2>3. Helping victims find shelter</h2> <p>If you need to find short-term shelter after a disaster, the government has services to help you. You can search for open shelters in your area by texting SHELTER and your ZIP code to 4FEMA (43362). For example: SHELTER 12345. You can also visit FEMA's page on <a href="https://www.fema.gov/interim-housing-resources" target="_blank">Interim Housing</a> if you've been displaced by a disaster and you need to find a longer-term rental home.</p> <h2>4. Granting government relief funds</h2> <p><a href="https://www.disasterassistance.gov/" target="_blank">DisasterAssistance.gov</a> makes it possible to find local resources and apply for assistance. There are also relief funds and programs available for<a href="https://www.irs.gov/businesses/small-businesses-self-employed/disaster-assistance-and-emergency-relief-for-individuals-and-businesses-1" target="_blank"> small businesses</a> and those who are self-employed.</p> <h2>5. Hiring temporary recovery workers after a disaster</h2> <p>Both FEMA and the Small Business Administration (SBA) are currently hiring temporary workers in affected areas to speed the recovery efforts. FEMA's website details the <a href="https://careers.fema.gov/hurricane-workforce" target="_blank">opportunities it has available</a> and SBA has set up a special website where you can <a href="https://www.sba.gov/disaster-assistance/hurricane-response-jobs-sba" target="_blank">apply for hurricane response jobs</a>.</p> <h2>6. Cracking down on price gouging</h2> <p>After a natural disaster, it isn't unusual to find crucial necessities like gas and bottled water sold at ridiculously inflated prices &mdash; including reports of water for $99 a case and gas for $10 a gallon following Hurricane Harvey. This is known as price gouging, and it is illegal. People who have spotted or been victimized by this practice are encouraged to report it to their <a href="https://www.usa.gov/state-consumer" target="_blank">state attorney general</a>.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F6-ways-the-government-helps-disaster-victims-recover&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F6%2520Ways%2520the%2520Government%2520Helps%2520Disaster%2520Victims%2520Recover.jpg&amp;description=6%20Ways%20the%20Government%20Helps%20Disaster%20Victims%20Recover"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/6%20Ways%20the%20Government%20Helps%20Disaster%20Victims%20Recover.jpg" alt="6 Ways the Government Helps Disaster Victims Recover" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/christa-avampato">Christa Avampato</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-the-government-helps-disaster-victims-recover">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-indirect-ways-taxes-to-the-rich-may-hurt-you">6 Indirect Ways Taxes to the Rich May Hurt You</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-reasons-an-hsa-is-actually-worth-having">10 Reasons an HSA Is Actually Worth Having</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-meeting-the-2018-401k-contribution-limits-will-brighten-your-future">6 Ways Meeting the 2018 401(k) Contribution Limits Will Brighten Your Future</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/should-you-choose-a-roth-401k-or-a-regular-401k">Should You Choose a Roth 401k or a Regular 401k?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-to-do-if-you-have-a-tax-lien-on-your-house">What to Do If You Have a Tax Lien On Your House</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Financial News Taxes assistance employment financial aid government harvey hurricanes IRA irma natural disasters shelter tax relief Fri, 22 Sep 2017 09:00:06 +0000 Christa Avampato 2023631 at http://www.wisebread.com 8 Keys to Quitting a Job Like a Professional http://www.wisebread.com/8-keys-to-quitting-a-job-like-a-professional <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/8-keys-to-quitting-a-job-like-a-professional" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/i_quit_my_job.jpg" alt="I Quit My Job" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>This is it: You're ready to quit. You've been dreaming of this moment for months (or years) and you are all set to let the company know you're moving on. Well, before you throw down your resignation letter and waltz out of the door, take some time to make sure you do this the right way.</p> <h2>1. First and foremost &mdash; Are you sure you're ready to quit?</h2> <p>Like, really sure? Because once you hand in your notice, you've put yourself on a path that leads directly out of that company. So, make sure you're leaving for the right reasons.</p> <p>Some people act irrationally after a major upheaval or event at work, and hand in their notice while they're still in a cloud of anger and frustration. If you have been feeling this, and have decided &quot;I've had enough,&quot; then take at least a few days to cool off and think it over. Talk to people you trust, and explain the situation. They may agree with you, and say that you're working in a toxic environment that is hurting your health. But, they may say that you have a good job with good coworkers, and that you're blowing things out of proportion.</p> <h2>2. You might not be required to give two weeks' notice</h2> <p>Most states in the U.S. have something called &quot;at-will employment.&quot; This means your employer can terminate you at any time, without any reason at all, and without any kind of warning. Conversely, you have the exact same rights with regard to leaving. You can quit at any time, for whatever reason (even if you don't have one), and walk out of the door without giving notice.</p> <p>Some employers like to have it both ways. They will be more than happy to let you go at the drop of a hat, but the company handbook states that you are required to provide a minimum of two weeks' notice. This is just something the company wants, but cannot enforce. If you live in an at-will employment state, two weeks' notice is not required. But, if you don't provide it, and leave the company in the lurch, you are potentially burning a valuable bridge. You always want to leave on good terms if you can, so unless the situation requires an immediate exit, give your employer the two weeks they expect.</p> <h2>3. Write an excellent resignation letter</h2> <p>Now is the time to start working on a resignation letter. If you have been at the company less than a year, you don't have to go overboard. Be polite, explain briefly that you are moving on to a new stage in your career, and thank the company for the opportunity they gave you. If you have a lot of years under your belt with the company, you may also want to add in some of the significant achievements and successes you had at the company, and call out people who genuinely made a difference to you, and helped you grow.</p> <p>You may be tempted to throw people under the bus in this letter, or point out everything that is wrong with the company. Don't do it. This is a permanent record, signed by you, and that can come back to bite you.</p> <h2>4. Hand in your notice on a Friday</h2> <p>There are all sorts of reasons to wait until Friday to hand in your notice. Midweek is just an odd time, and on a Monday or Tuesday, you are catching people as they are about to dive into a full week of work. Doing it on a Friday is best. It gives you and your employer the rest of the day, and the weekend, to think about it and come to terms with the decision. If you are a key member of the team, your boss will likely need to come up with a game plan on how to replace you. He or she may also want to make you a counteroffer, asking you to sit on your resignation and think it over. For this reason, Friday is the most strategic day to hand in your notice.</p> <h2>5. Be positive and productive in your final weeks</h2> <p>You've handed in your two weeks' notice, and now you can just coast for the next 14 days, right? Well, not so fast. It can be tempting to slack off, take long lunch breaks, arrive late, leave early, and have a general disregard for the rules you used to obey. But that is not going to sit well with a company that is still paying your salary.</p> <p>You can have the &quot;What are they gonna do, fire me?&quot; attitude, but it's not professional. You have history with this company, it has paid your salary and probably provided health benefits, and you owe it to the company, and yourself, to act as professionally as you did before you resigned. In some cases, if you don't have another job to go to, the company may well ask you to stay on as a contractor, at a higher rate of pay, until they find your replacement. They will not offer this if you are just treating the job as a joke.</p> <h2>6. Help the company through the transition</h2> <p>After you resign, you should offer your services in finding your replacement. You should also be willing to speak to the departments you work with on a regular basis, and ask them what you can do in your final two weeks to make sure everything runs smoothly once you are gone. Do they need certain files or contact names? Do they need you to show them how certain processes are managed, from inception through completion? Take this time to ensure that when you leave, the ship is not sinking without you.</p> <h2>7. Don't use the exit interview as a complaining session</h2> <p>A lot of people who resign have some sharp words for the human resources department, or the owner of the company. And while it is OK to point out areas of improvement, you should do it in the most constructive way you can.</p> <p>This should not be the time to do corporate assassinations on people who've crossed you over the years. If you have genuine concerns about some of the people you are leaving behind due to a toxic work environment, then by all means bring those up. But be delicate about it. Talk about the need for improved communication, or more flexible working hours and telecommuting. Give them a checklist that makes them think you really want the company to flourish after you depart.</p> <h2>8. Stay in touch</h2> <p>Seriously, don't burn a bridge. You don't know what could happen in the future, and a company that you have a history with can be a powerful ally when you need help. If you ever need to pick up contract work or come back in a different role, you will want to have people to reach out to.</p> <p>So, use LinkedIn and social media to stay in touch. Send the occasional email to people you know there, asking how they're doing. Be a friend to them. It can really pay dividends should your departure become a mistake.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F8-keys-to-quitting-a-job-like-a-professional&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F8%2520Keys%2520to%2520Quitting%2520a%2520Job%2520Like%2520a%2520Professional.jpg&amp;description=8%20Keys%20to%20Quitting%20a%20Job%20Like%20a%20Professional"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/8%20Keys%20to%20Quitting%20a%20Job%20Like%20a%20Professional.jpg" alt="8 Keys to Quitting a Job Like a Professional" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-keys-to-quitting-a-job-like-a-professional">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-never-to-bring-up-in-a-job-interview">5 Things Never to Bring Up in a Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-questions-you-should-always-ask-in-an-exit-interview">8 Questions You Should Always Ask in an Exit Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-things-to-do-on-your-first-day-at-a-new-job">6 Things to Do on Your First Day at a New Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-transition-to-a-new-career-after-30">6 Ways to Transition to a New Career After 30</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/13-great-reasons-to-quit-your-job">13 Great Reasons to Quit Your Job</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building burning bridges employment human resources leaving a job professional quitting two week's notice working Mon, 11 Sep 2017 08:30:08 +0000 Paul Michael 2017192 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Hire Your First Employee http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-hire-your-first-employee <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-hire-your-first-employee" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/tell_me_more_about_yourself.jpg" alt="Tell me more about yourself" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Hiring your first employee is exciting! And also pretty intimidating. You don't need a complicated system in place to make your first hire, but you <em>do</em> need to take a few essential steps along the way. Here are some ways to simplify the process of hiring your first employee.</p> <h2>Decide what your employee will do</h2> <p>First things first: You know you're busy and you have more on your plate than you can accomplish alone. However, do you know exactly what your employee will take off your hands? Before you write an ad or think about a salary, make a list of the tasks and responsibilities you'd like to hand off to an employee. This list will help you hire the right person, and will also help you know exactly how to get them to full productivity quickly.</p> <h2>Write that employee handbook</h2> <p>Writing an employee handbook sounds like an overly complicated, formal process. It doesn't have to be! An employee handbook can be direct, casual, whimsical, full of pictures, and even interactive. It can also be a simple document of a few pages that covers the important values and rules you need to have in place for all employees, present and future. The U.S. Small Business Administration has a thorough guide to <a href="https://www.sba.gov/starting-business/hire-retain-employees/employee-handbooks" target="_blank">writing a handbook</a>, or you can find free templates online.</p> <h2>Set up a payroll service</h2> <p>In hiring an employee, what's most important to you is getting work done. What's most important to your first employee is getting a paycheck. Take some friendly advice: Hire a payroll service to handle the paycheck part of the equation. You will save yourself countless dollars in time and headaches. A good payroll service will provide necessary tax withholdings according to federal and state rules, keep accurate documentation, allow customizable withholdings to be set as needed, and ensure that your employee gets paid on time. All you have to do is go through the initial setup process and put a salary in place.</p> <p>And for the record: It's a really, really good idea to pay yourself through a payroll service, too. Missing tax documentation will always come back to haunt you.</p> <h2>Advertise for a great employee</h2> <p>Now you're ready to start seeking your first employee. Start by writing a great job listing ad. How, you ask? The keys to a great employment ad are specificity and authenticity.</p> <p>Specificity means that you'll list the exact tasks and responsibilities that your employee will take on. Don't use a vague term like &quot;Office Manager&quot; or &quot;Production Assistant&quot; without stating exactly what that means in your business. By making your ad specific, you will automatically filter out the applicants who aren't qualified or interested in completing the work you actually need done.</p> <p>Authenticity means that your employment ad should be like you, and like your business. If you're a casual, mom-and-pop kind of place, don't write an ad with formal language and overblown requirements for employment. Use first-person language, for example: &quot;We're looking for someone to work at the front counter.&quot;</p> <p>On the other hand, if your business is a more formal establishment with a dress code and high-end clientele, reflect that accurately in your advertisement. Use a more formal tone: &quot;Bobkin, Bobkin, and Butters, LLP, seek a qualified office assistant.&quot; The language and tone you use in your initial ad help you attract the type of applicant that will fit well and work well in your business.</p> <h2>Provide initial training</h2> <p>While you're waiting for the pre-filtered applications to roll in, thanks to your stellar employment ad, get your training materials in place. Do this by going back to that list of tasks and responsibilities that you want your first employee to handle. For each major task, write down the step-by-step process to complete it, well, completely. For each responsibility, list the tasks to be completed and, as appropriate, the timelines, resources, contacts, and other pertinent information.</p> <p>When you make that first hire, you'll have the information to start their training. As a general rule, it's a good idea to do two things: First, provide a copy of the complete training material to your employee, so they can go over it and get a big picture of the role they're taking. Second, prioritize the tasks and responsibilities and work with your new employee on each one in order of importance.</p> <h2>Set up a system for performance reviews</h2> <p>Ah, the dreaded performance review! Employees don't tend to love them, and frankly, neither do employers. However, when done well and frequently, reviews can create a working relationship that's much more beneficial for everyone involved.</p> <p>Start by letting your employee know that you will provide weekly feedback in their first month, or quarter. This is important as new employees often have no way to gauge if they're doing the job right and meeting your standards, or not. Not knowing leads to anxiety and tension, which leads to more mistakes, and can create an ugly cycle of stress and mess-ups. Provide clear, regular, weekly (at a minimum) feedback for your new employee for at least their first month.</p> <p>Thereafter, feedback sessions on a quarterly, monthly, or even a continued weekly basis are the most effective. Annual reviews are too few and far-between to be effective; they have the fun effect of making employees feel blindsided and betrayed. Don't do that! Instead, provide ongoing, informal feedback to your employee, either in face-to-face meetings or via phone, email, or messaging.</p> <p>You can provide feedback on a scheduled basis (weekly or monthly, for example) or after the completion of a task or project. In both cases, shorter, more frequent meetings tend to be more helpful. For best results, focus less on &quot;what you did wrong&quot; criticism and more on &quot;specific steps to improve&quot; instruction.</p> <p>A last note: It's a great idea to get feedback from your employee, as well as giving feedback to your employee. It's your first hire, but it probably won't be your last. Ask your new employee how you can make the process easier and be a better boss; you'll be even better prepared when it's time for your second hire.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fhow-to-hire-your-first-employee&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FHow%2520to%2520Hire%2520Your%2520First%2520Employee.jpg&amp;description=How%20to%20Hire%20Your%20First%20Employee"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <div align="center"> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/How%20to%20Hire%20Your%20First%20Employee.jpg" alt="How to Hire Your First Employee" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/annie-mueller">Annie Mueller</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-hire-your-first-employee">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-grow-your-solo-business-without-hiring-employees">How to Grow Your Solo Business Without Hiring Employees</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-to-build-business-credit-when-youre-self-employed">5 Ways to Build Business Credit When You&#039;re Self-Employed</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-small-business-credit-cards-affect-your-personal-credit">How Small Business Credit Cards Affect Your Personal Credit</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-best-credit-cards-for-small-businesses">Best Credit Cards for Small Businesses</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-does-your-personal-guarantee-on-a-business-credit-card-mean">What Does Your Personal Guarantee On a Business Credit Card Mean?</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Entrepreneurship business owner employees employment first hire hiring interviews reviews small business training Fri, 28 Jul 2017 08:30:10 +0000 Annie Mueller 1990725 at http://www.wisebread.com The Ugly Truth of Workplace Success: Popularity Still Matters http://www.wisebread.com/the-ugly-truth-of-workplace-success-popularity-still-matters <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/the-ugly-truth-of-workplace-success-popularity-still-matters" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/another_success_for_the_team.jpg" alt="Another success for the team" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>If you thought the popularity contests of high school would end once you entered the workforce, you might be in for a rude awakening.</p> <p>Sadly, almost every place you will ever work places a value on popularity. They may not admit it, or even realize they do it, but managers and clients will always reward it. Here's why popularity matters so much at work, and how you should handle it.</p> <h2>Popular employees get promotions and raises</h2> <p>No manager is ever going to confess that they promote people simply because they like them, but it's a fact of working life.</p> <p>If you want to climb the ladder, you need to become a well-liked figure in your department. If you want to climb the ladder quickly, you should become one of the most well-liked figures in the whole organization. If you're highly respected, well-known, and people only have good things to say about you, then it's easier for someone in the decision-making process to sign their name on a promotion form.</p> <p>Conversely, if you're not popular, or even worse, disliked, then your hard work may never be rewarded. It sounds childish. After all, if you do your job well and make the company money, isn't that all that matters? No, it's not. People are people, and they won't want to reward someone they don't like.</p> <h2>Popularity at work can help you stay physically and mentally healthy</h2> <p>It seems like an obvious conclusion to draw, but it was actually part of a recent Duke University study performed on macaque monkeys. Macaques are close evolutionary relatives to humans, and were considered ideal subject matter for the research.</p> <p>Female macaques were introduced to an enclosure, and the order of their arrival dictated their social ranking. Newcomers were at the bottom rung of the social ladder. Researchers found that lower-ranking monkeys showed lower levels of some disease-fighting cells than their higher-ranking counterparts. When researchers changed up status rankings by reorganizing the groups of macaques, they found the same results. Monkeys moved into higher-status groups showed improvements in their immune systems. &quot;Those whose status improved became more sought-after grooming partners once they were promoted, giving them more opportunities to relieve stress through bonding,&quot; according to the university's website.</p> <p>Now, while it's clearly not possible to test this in an office environment, the results do show that the popularity and social standing of each monkey directly correlated to their health and well-being.</p> <p>This makes sense in the workplace, where we spend the vast majority of our time. If you are popular, you get the stress-busting rewards of social bonding. Your self esteem takes a boost, and you feel like an important part of the team. You look forward to coming to work, and you have a great attitude.</p> <p>Conversely, if you are excluded, you generally feel like the odd one out, and your self esteem is going to nose-dive. You will likely take more sick days, and will not attend the social functions put on after work hours. This will all have a detrimental effect on your career.</p> <h2>Being perceived to be popular carries even more weight</h2> <p>According to Alan Redman, a business psychologist at the Criterion Partnership, there are actually two different types of popularity. And for work purposes, one is much more valuable than the other.</p> <p>The first type is known as being &quot;sociometrically popular.&quot; In layman's terms, this means that you are a genuinely popular, well-liked person who socializes well. You treat people fairly, you care for your coworkers, and you may even organize events and bring in food and treats for the team. This, although helpful to your career, is not going to go over as well as the second type &mdash; &quot;perceived popularity.&quot;</p> <p>Perceived popularity is more about balancing social activities with common strategies that lead to advancement. For example, you'll happily go to a team outing, enjoy drinks after work, play on the baseball team, and bring in snacks. But, you play office politics, too. You may manipulate situations to your advantage, work behind the scenes to remove certain people from the company, or go out of your way to be nice to people who can directly improve your position. You'll be seen as a nice person overall, but will also be seen as someone who means business.</p> <p>In short, &quot;If you just want to be popular, be socially popular, but if you want to get to the top, mix social popularity with relationally aggressive behavior,&quot; says Redman.</p> <h2>So, how do you become more popular?</h2> <p>It's not going to happen overnight. If you are already popular at work, it won't take much effort to launch yourself into the top. Attend a few more social functions, speak up a little more in meetings, show a little more empathy, bring in more treats, and basically be a more improved social version of your current self.</p> <p>However, if you are not considered popular, or worse still, you're actively disliked, then you have a mountain to climb. People formulate strong perceptions of you based on the first few encounters they have with you, compounded with the opinions of their peers. You will have to go out of your way to get into their good books without being blatant.</p> <p>If you suddenly start bringing food in every day, organizing team events, offering help on projects, and basically doing a complete 180 on your previous persona, people might smell a rat. So, be gradual. If there's a meeting and you're usually silent, or a naysayer, chime in a few times with some positive thoughts. Attend the occasional get together, without making it obvious that you're trying to fit in. Buy a round of drinks. Tell a few jokes.</p> <p>At work, occasionally bring in treats with a good reason, such as an early morning meeting that could use coffee and doughnuts. Slowly, but surely, you will start to change perceptions. Before you know it, you'll be asked to come out more. You'll be included in more lunchtime trips to the local cafe or restaurant. And people will say things like, &quot;Wow, I had no idea you could be so funny,&quot; or, &quot;You have really come out of your shell.&quot;</p> <p>Is it sad that this matters at work? Yes, it is. But we cannot change it. However, knowing that it makes a difference means we can make the system work for us. Good luck.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fthe-ugly-truth-of-workplace-success-popularity-still-matters&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FThe%2520Ugly%2520Truth%2520of%2520Workplace%2520Success-%2520Popularity%2520Still%2520Matters.jpg&amp;description=The%20Ugly%20Truth%20of%20Workplace%20Success%3A%20Popularity%20Still%20Matters"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/The%20Ugly%20Truth%20of%20Workplace%20Success-%20Popularity%20Still%20Matters.jpg" alt="The Ugly Truth of Workplace Success: Popularity Still Matters" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-ugly-truth-of-workplace-success-popularity-still-matters">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-signs-youre-making-all-the-right-career-moves">9 Signs You&#039;re Making All the Right Career Moves</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-career-moves-that-prove-youre-finally-a-grown-up">8 Career Moves That Prove You&#039;re Finally a Grown-Up</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-be-successful-as-a-first-time-manager">How to Be Successful as a First-Time Manager</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-jobs-that-robots-cant-do-yet">10 Jobs That Robots Can&#039;t Do, Yet</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-succeed-when-youre-the-oldest-person-at-work">How to Succeed When You&#039;re the Oldest Person at Work</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building corporate ladder coworkers employment getting ahead office politics popularity promotions Wed, 26 Jul 2017 09:00:14 +0000 Paul Michael 1990504 at http://www.wisebread.com 10 Jobs That Robots Can't Do, Yet http://www.wisebread.com/10-jobs-that-robots-cant-do-yet <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/10-jobs-that-robots-cant-do-yet" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/old_classic_tin_robot.jpg" alt="Old classic tin robot" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>You may have seen movies like <em>iRobot</em>,<em> Blade Runner</em>, and even <em>Star Wars</em>, and wondered if the future of employment looks bleak for humans. Indeed, it seems every day news stories cover the progress being made in artificial intelligence, and how more factory jobs continue to be taken by robotic workers.</p> <p>But does this mean that every job will eventually be done by a robot? Well, not likely. And the following jobs are safe for the foreseeable future.</p> <h2>1. Any kind of mental therapist</h2> <p>From psychology and psychiatry, to occupational therapy and even some aspects of social work, there is one huge reason why robots cannot do these jobs right now: They're not human.</p> <p>In any kind of therapy session, you need to feel heard and understood. You need a connection with the therapist to make any kind of progress, knowing that he or she is empathetic to your issues and genuinely wants to help. And that word &mdash; genuine &mdash; is at the heart of the problem for robots. Even if they can mimic a human's responses accurately and provide excellent advice, it will always feel programmed and unnatural. Pouring your heart out to a machine will never feel the same as conversing with a human, and that will make it almost impossible for robots to replace this role.</p> <h2>2. Investigative journalists</h2> <p>While it's true that some aspects of journalism are being automated, the kind of work that Woodward and Bernstein did on Watergate is unlikely to be replaced by robots any time soon. Even with great advances in artificial intelligence, robots still don't have that sense of intrigue that humans have.</p> <p>Humans are naturally curious, and when it comes to journalism, people look for things that aren't quite right. They question, probe, dig, and make connections that robots could not do without human intervention. Not only that, but the charm and personality of journalists opens doors, gets people talking, and brings facts out into the open. How many witnesses or informants will open up to a robot in a bar over a pint of beer?</p> <h2>3. Physicians and surgeons</h2> <p>Let's face it; if you found out you were going under the knife tomorrow, how happy would you be to know a robot was performing the procedure without any kind of human involvement?</p> <p>While advances in medical science have brought robots into the operating room, they are not yet at a stage of complete autonomy. They are there to help surgeons, and facilitate in complex and arduous tasks. Sometimes a surgeon can even use one remotely to operate on a patient in a different state (or even country).</p> <p>However, while robots can be painstakingly accurate, they are not yet sophisticated enough to replace surgeons and doctors. If anything were to go wrong during the operation, a robot may not be programmed with the correct response to fix it. A surgeon relies on hundreds of hours of experience, and will often have to think laterally to solve a problem. Sometimes, a surgeon will even follow a gut reactions based on countless other surgeries.</p> <p>Yes, a robot can make precise cuts, and administer medications exactly, but robots cannot replace the human touch that comes from a physician or surgeon. And let's not even go into the kind of malpractice that could result from a defective robot that did not have human oversight.</p> <h2>4. Authors</h2> <p>If you were a publisher looking to hire someone to write a novel for you, would you choose the talents of Stephen King, J.K. Rowling, or perhaps Neil Gaiman? Or would you instead bank on the inventiveness of a robot with AI?</p> <p>Very few people would choose the latter these days. But robot-written books are improving in quality. A short novel co-written by a robot (its co-author is human) made it past the first stage in a Japanese literary contest in 2016, in which the judges did not know which novels were written by humans and which by machines.</p> <p>For now, though, robots are limited to farming data and churning out perfect sentence structures and grammatically-correct paragraphs. None can touch the level of creativity that's required for plot and character development. That comes from the human mind, and probably will for a very long time.</p> <h2>5. Advertising creatives</h2> <p>The ad world was rocked last year by the introduction of &quot;<a href="http://www.adweek.com/agencyspy/mccann-japan-finally-hires-a-robot-as-creative-director/105466" target="_blank">robotic creative directors</a>.&quot; As a creative director myself, the news was initially a hammer blow; until I read what it can do, and how it does it.</p> <p>This &quot;creative director&quot; is really nothing more than an editing assistant that offers solutions based on millions of ads that are available for viewing, coupled with data on current consumers. But the robot cannot (at the moment anyway) come up with a brilliant, innovative ad to capture the imagination and sell a lot of products. That is very much a human endeavor; to create comedy, intrigue, and a &quot;need&quot; out of thin air. AI may help creatives to crack certain problems, but robots will not be taking over the advertising world just yet.</p> <h2>6. Teachers</h2> <p>Certain aspects of the teaching profession can be automated. You just have to look online to see the many thousands of options you have for education courses that are offered without any kind of human involvement.</p> <p>But raising children into responsible, well-educated adults is about much more than rote learning. There needs to be an understanding that goes well beyond facts and figures. Teachers have to deal with emotional issues, and respond to interesting and unusual questions in a &quot;human&quot; way. Despite what you may see in sci-fi movies, teachers are not yet going to be replaced by robots.</p> <h2>7. Film and television directors</h2> <p>Like authors, advertising creatives, and other similar professions, film and television direction is a skill that requires a great deal of innovation and lateral thinking. Directors have a vision of what they want to put on the screen, and that vision is uniquely human.</p> <p>Robots can assist with editing the movie, finding the best angles for shots, and even suggest script changes and lighting techniques. But for the time being, robots will never take the place of talents like Spielberg, Scorsese, and Nolan.</p> <h2>8. Archaeologists</h2> <p>Indiana Jones and Lara Croft can expect long and fruitful careers. Well, those may be fictional examples of the archaeology professions, but even so, the job is safe.</p> <p>Much of what an archaeologist does is theorizing. Basically, they look at fragments of evidence and piece together concepts and solutions that, to the best of their knowledge, make sense based on the information in front of them. But most of the time, it's intelligent guesswork. This kind of thinking is not something in which robots excel. They can come up with solutions to complex problems in nanoseconds, but ask them to &quot;have a guess&quot; and it's a different story.</p> <h2>9. Detectives</h2> <p>Certain aspects of policing and the law could one day be replaced by robots or computers, especially as artificial intelligence becomes even more sophisticated. However, the detective that works in homicide, missing persons, burglary, organized crime, and many other areas of the industry, has a long time before they need to worry.</p> <p>Aside from the fact that a human element is needed to make links between seemingly random pieces of information (often called &quot;a hunch&quot;), it would be nearly impossible for a robot to go to the places a detective must go to find clues, investigate witnesses, and dig up leads. And when it comes to undercover work, that's even more impossible. Yes, there are robot cops around right now in some countries, but they are really just souped-up information agents. They don't solve crimes.</p> <h2>10. Actors and entertainers</h2> <p>Several people have speculated that actors, singers, dancers, comedians, and other entertainers are one day going to be replaced. True, Peter Cushing died in 1994, and was digitally recreated with convincing effects in 2016's <em>Rogue One</em>. And as technology improves, so will these animated stars.</p> <p>However, the emotion and physicality that comes from a truly gifted entertainer is going to be impossible to generate for a long, long time. Performances can be mimicked, but real authenticity and sentiment is not something that comes easy for a robot. Our entertainers will be human for many decades to come.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/10%20Jobs%20That%20Robots%20Cant%20Do%2C%20Yet.jpg" alt="10 Jobs That Robots Can't Do, Yet" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-jobs-that-robots-cant-do-yet">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/20-ways-amazons-alexa-can-make-your-life-easier">20 Ways Amazon&#039;s Alexa Can Make Your Life Easier</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/finding-the-right-job-there-s-plenty-of-phish-in-the-sea">Finding the Right Job: There’s Plenty of Phish in the Sea</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-high-paying-jobs-that-didnt-exist-10-years-ago">9 High-Paying Jobs That Didn&#039;t Exist 10 Years Ago</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-use-technology-to-upgrade-your-career">6 Ways to Use Technology to Upgrade Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-to-transition-to-a-new-career-after-30">6 Ways to Transition to a New Career After 30</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Technology AI artificial intelligence career fields employment human workers jobs robots Mon, 24 Jul 2017 09:00:11 +0000 Paul Michael 1988260 at http://www.wisebread.com 7 Reasons You Shouldn't "Vacation Shame" Your Coworkers http://www.wisebread.com/7-reasons-you-shouldnt-vacation-shame-your-coworkers <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/7-reasons-you-shouldnt-vacation-shame-your-coworkers" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_stressed_work_654187068.jpg" alt="Woman being vacation shamed by coworkers" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>In 2015, Americans left <a href="http://www.projecttimeoff.com/research/work-martyrs-cautionary-tale" target="_blank">658 million vacation days</a> unused. It's a problem that has continued to ingrain itself in the American way of life, and it's only going to get worse. It even has a name &mdash; &quot;work martyrdom&quot; &mdash; and one of the most troubling reasons for it is feeling guilty about taking paid time off.</p> <p>Have you ever felt guilty about taking vacation, or made your coworkers feel guilty for taking time off? Well, you shouldn't. It's dangerous, and bad for both you and your company. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-ways-to-actually-take-all-your-vacation-days-this-year?ref=seealso" target="_blank">7 Ways to Actually Take All Your Vacation Days This Year</a>)</p> <h2>1. Vacation is vital for good health</h2> <p>You wouldn't want to make your coworkers physically ill, but by guilting them out of their vacation time, you could be contributing to some very serious health risks. The Framingham Heart Study, the world's longest running study of heart disease, has some frightening statistics on vacation and health. The biggest &mdash; that men who failed to take a vacation for two years or more were 30 percent more likely to experience a heart attack than peers who took regular time off.</p> <p>A Marshfield Clinic study showed that women who took at least two vacations per year were less likely to suffer from depression than those who don't take time off. Other research has shown that not taking vacation can also lead to higher blood pressure, stress, poor family relationships, and if you're extremely overworked, even suicide. So, it's vital to actually encourage coworkers to take time off, especially if they look worn out. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/science-proves-it-you-need-to-take-a-vacation?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Science Says We NEED to Take a Vacation</a>)</p> <h2>2. Vacation refreshes the mind and body</h2> <p>Research has proved it; when you take a vacation, you are improving your mind and your overall health. And if you work with people who need to be great at their jobs in order to make you and the company thrive, then you should encourage vacation time.</p> <p>A vacation is to a person what a reboot is to a computer that is slow, glitchy, and taking forever to do tasks that used to be done quickly. Mental breaks <a href="https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/mental-downtime/" target="_blank">recharge the mind</a>, and improve memory, productivity, and creativity &mdash; all vital in almost every job out there. You will find that although you may miss them when they're gone, your coworkers are upgraded versions of themselves when they return. And, they will be eager to dive in and get things done.</p> <h2>3. Vacation is just as much of a right as a bathroom or lunch break</h2> <p>Would you shame a coworker for daring to leave their desk for an hour to eat a meal? Would you point out that they could be doing valuable work when they are heading to the bathroom? Well, of course not. These are needs, and vacation is just as important as either of those.</p> <p>Vacation time may not be granted by U.S. law, but most employers offer paid leave as part of the benefits package. It's right there with health care and sick time (which, by the way, people also feel guilty about taking).</p> <p>The bottom line &mdash; every employee who takes paid time off has earned it, and they are simply using a benefit that comes with the position. In the case of people who don't get paid time off, which stands at around 25 percent, you have even less reason to shame them. They are losing money by taking this time, and that is a difficult financial decision for anyone to make.</p> <h2>4. Vacation keeps good employees at the company</h2> <p>An unhappy employee is one that is looking for another job. A 2015 Talent Trends survey found that one out of every three employees is actively looking for a new job. That's almost a third of the people at your company, right now, that wants out.</p> <p>It is a fact that it costs a company a lot more money to replace employees than it does to retain them. For entry level employees, it's between 30 percent and 50 percent of average annual salary. That figure increases to 150 percent for midlevel employees, and a <a href="https://www.eremedia.com/tlnt/what-was-leadership-thinking-the-shockingly-high-cost-of-employee-turnover/" target="_blank">whopping 400 percent</a> for high-level or specialized talent. And guess what? One of the big reasons people move on is the lack of a good work-life balance. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-signs-your-work-life-balance-is-off?ref=seealso" target="_blank">9 Signs Your Work-Life Balance Is Off</a>)</p> <p>It is in the best interests of your company to keep people around, because it will not be spending excessive amounts of money retraining staff. Want a raise? More travel? A promotion? It's more likely to happen if people aren't quitting due to lack of time off.</p> <h2>5. Vacation broadens the mind</h2> <p>Well, to be more accurate, travel broadens the mind. But it's a little hard to travel if you don't take a vacation.</p> <p>In some careers, especially ones that require creative or lateral thinking, this can be a great asset to the company. A well-furnished mind is one that can draw from many life experiences. This can translate to new, innovative ideas and suggestions, and lead to positive changes at the company. This, in turn, can boost productivity and profits, and even lead to expansion.</p> <p>Someone who is staring at the same four walls day after day, month after month, is not going to be as valuable to the company as someone who has gone out into the world and done something new. Your company needs people who are well-traveled, not overworked.</p> <h2>6. Vacation boosts organizational morale</h2> <p>Who wants to work in a company filled with miserable, exhausted, irritable employees? That's what you get if you work in an environment that vacation-shames people.</p> <p>When you have very little to look forward to, coupled with a hectic work schedule and poor work-life balance, you're not going to be much fun to be around. Compare that to someone who is planning to go on vacation. They are recognizably happier and more enthusiastic, because they're looking forward to doing something fun. For those weeks, or months, they bring a sunny disposition with them to work. Then, they go on vacation and come back rested, refreshed, and ready to help.</p> <p>This is all good for the company, and good for you. You will get a lift from their energy, instead of being dragged down by morale that's in the gutter.</p> <h2>7. Vacation leads to better performance reviews and higher salaries</h2> <p>Put this in the &quot;strange but true&quot; category if you like, but a 2006 study by Ernst &amp; Young found that each additional 10 hours of vacation an employee took led to performance reviews that were 8 percent higher the following year. And, of course, higher performance reviews lead to increased salary bumps, promotions, and greater opportunities within the company.</p> <p>Why would this be? Well, look back at all the reasons given in this article for taking a vacation, and the answer becomes obvious. Employees that take vacation are sharper, happier, healthier, and more productive than coworkers who do not take time off. Naturally, this translates to better performance at work, a better attitude, and a better review.</p> <p>So, even if you're not vacation-shaming anyone (and hopefully that's the case), you should look at your own vacation plan and increase your days off. It will positively impact your career.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F7-reasons-you-shouldnt-vacation-shame-your-coworkers&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F7%2520Reasons%2520You%2520Shouldnt%2520Vacation%2520Shame%2520Your%2520Coworkers.jpg&amp;description=7%20Reasons%20You%20Shouldn't%20%22Vacation%20Shame%22%20Your%20Coworkers"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/7%20Reasons%20You%20Shouldnt%20Vacation%20Shame%20Your%20Coworkers.jpg" alt="7 Reasons You Shouldn't &quot;Vacation Shame&quot; Your Coworkers" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-reasons-you-shouldnt-vacation-shame-your-coworkers">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-live-a-retired-life-before-retirement">How to Live a Retired Life Before Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/they-offered-you-a-promotion-and-no-pay-raise-now-what">They Offered You a Promotion and No Pay Raise. Now What?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-signs-your-work-life-balance-is-off">9 Signs Your Work-Life Balance Is Off</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-jobs-you-may-not-have-considered-but-should">9 Jobs You May Not Have Considered (But Should)</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-signs-youre-making-all-the-right-career-moves">9 Signs You&#039;re Making All the Right Career Moves</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income employment health benefits promotions shaming sick days time off vacation days vacation time working Wed, 05 Jul 2017 08:00:11 +0000 Paul Michael 1977385 at http://www.wisebread.com 9 Unexpected First Jobs of the Wealthy and Famous http://www.wisebread.com/9-unexpected-first-jobs-of-the-wealthy-and-famous <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/9-unexpected-first-jobs-of-the-wealthy-and-famous" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_serving_ice_cream.jpg" alt="Woman serving ice cream" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Singer, actor, author, business tycoon &mdash; everyone still starts somewhere. And while some people have the luxury of starting with wealth and fame behind them, others have had to scrape their way to the top. If you think millionaires and billionaires have always had it easy, think again. Many of them have worked jobs that may surprise you.</p> <h2>1. Orlando Bloom: Clay pigeon trapper</h2> <p>You probably know him as Legolas from <em>The Lord of the Rings</em>, or Will Turner from <em>Pirates of the Caribbean</em>. And although he's considered one of the sexiest men in the world, Orlando's first job was not exactly &quot;sexy.&quot;</p> <p>He was just 13-years-old when he took this job at the shooting range, and by all accounts, he loved it. &quot;I was a clay trapper,&quot; he said in a 2006 interview. &quot;People would go clay-pigeon shooting on the weekends, and when they said 'pull,' I was the one who released the pigeon. It was wild.&quot;</p> <p>Today, Orlando Bloom has a net worth estimated at $35 million.</p> <h2>2. Oprah Winfrey: Grocery store clerk</h2> <p>One of the most successful women in the world started her working life as many of us do &mdash; at the local grocery store. Oprah recounted her time working at the corner store for Oprah.com, part of the vast empire this billionaire businesswoman has created.</p> <p>&quot;I wasn't allowed to talk to the customers, and can you imagine for me? &hellip; That was very, very, very hard.&quot;</p> <p>She was in her early teens when she took the job in Nashville, but by the time she hit 16-years-old, she already had her sights set on broadcasting. She then landed a job reading the news at Nashville radio station, WVOL. The rest, as they say, is history.</p> <h2>3. Michael Dell: Dishwasher</h2> <p>In 1992, eight years after his computer company Dell was founded, Michael Dell became the youngest CEO ever to run a Fortune 500 company. He attributes his success to hard work, dedication, and doing whatever it takes to make your dreams happen.</p> <p>For the 12-year-old Michael Dell, that dream was to own a stamp collection. So, he took a job washing the dishes at the local Chinese restaurant &mdash; a job that, as you can imagine, was long hours for little pay, even for a boy not yet a teenager.</p> <p>But great oaks from little acorns grow, and just a few years later, he took apart an Apple computer to see exactly how it worked. His next dream was much more ambitious. And he achieved it.</p> <h2>4. Rod Stewart: Wallpaper screen printer</h2> <p>Known for his signature raspy crooning voice, Rod Stewart is an international singing superstar.</p> <p>Before he rose to fame, Rod held a couple of odd jobs, including newspaper deliverer and grave plot measurer. But before that, he had another unusual job that was short-lived &mdash; wallpaper screen printer.</p> <p>After dropping out of school at age 15, Rod worked printing the patterns on wallpapers. For some, a job like this could be a creative outlet. For Rod, it was never meant to be. Rod Stewart is colorblind, and that adversely affected his take on his job.</p> <p>&quot;If you are colorblind, one of the things you can't be is an aircraft pilot,&quot; he said in an interview. &quot;One of the other things you can't be is a wallpaper designer.&quot;</p> <p>He was laid off shortly after getting the job, but didn't let that dissuade him from pursuing the road to success. Today, Rod is worth about $235 million.</p> <h2>5. Sir Sean Connery: Milkman</h2> <p>He's considered by many to be the best James Bond ever to grace the screen. He is also still considered a sex-symbol, despite being 86-years-old. Back in 1944, when he was just 14, he earned his living pushing a barrow at the local Corstorphine Dairy, in a small village west of Edinburgh. The salary back then was 21 shillings per week &mdash; that's roughly &pound;1.05, which today would be the equivalent of around &pound;42, or $54.</p> <p>For most 14-year-olds, over $200 per month is a nice chunk of change. Still, he went on to become a legend in the acting business, but those early days pushing barrels of milk gave him quite the foundation.</p> <h2>6. Sir Richard Branson: Parakeet breeder</h2> <p>There are some people destined to become a huge success, and you can tell from an early age. Richard Branson clearly had the entrepreneurial spirit from the get-go, and at the age of just 11, he started a small business with his best friend breeding parakeets (known as &quot;budgies&quot; in the UK).</p> <p>&quot;With my best friend Nik Powell as my partner, we set about breeding budgerigars,&quot; Branson wrote in a 2013 LinkedIn article. &quot;We saw a gap in the market to sell budgies as they were very popular with kids in school at the time.&quot;</p> <p>Branson says that when he went off to boarding school, rats got to some of the birds. The remaining ones were set free, and he went on to sell Christmas trees, and a student magazine that became the foundation for Virgin Records.</p> <h2>7. Stephen King: Laundry worker</h2> <p>Stephen King is the master of horror, and one of the most famous authors who has ever lived. As a publisher of over 54 novels, inspiring countless movies and TV series, he's sold over 350 million copies of his books. But his beginnings were humble to say the least.</p> <p>After graduating from college in 1970, he tried to find work as a teacher, but there were no positions available. After marrying his wife Tabby in 1971, he was desperate for any kind of income to help support her and his children. So, he took a job as a laborer at an industrial laundry, and also moonlighted as a janitor.</p> <p>It was here that he set up a makeshift desk in the laundry room, between a huge washing machine and dryer, and on his wife's Olivetti typewriter, wrote stories for Playboy, Cavalier, and Penthouse. And from those small successes, and his wife's encouragement, he wrote a book &mdash; <em>Carrie</em>.</p> <h2>8. Barack Obama: Ice cream scooper</h2> <p>The 44th President of the United States of America honed his charming social skills at an early age. As a teenager, he took a job at the Baskin-Robbins on Honolulu, scooping the 31 flavors daily to lines of hungry patrons.</p> <p>Sue Thirlwall, brand operating officer for Baskin-Robbins, says that this job builds essential skills for use in later life. &quot;Scooping for America's favorite neighborhood ice cream shop can result in obtaining basic lifelong job skills, like handling consumer care in real time and keeping calm under pressure,&quot; she told the L.A. Times in 2009</p> <p>And if you look back on his presidency, even if you did not support him or his party, how often did you see Barack Obama become unhinged, or lose his cool? Maybe we should all take a stint in an ice cream parlor.</p> <h2>9. Amy Adams: Hooters waitress</h2> <p>Some of the most notable movies of the last decade feature Amy Adams, including <em>The Muppets</em>, <em>Doubt</em>, <em>Man of Steel</em>, <em>American Hustle</em>, and <em>Arrival</em>. But when she graduated high school, she only had one thing on her mind &mdash; a car. She was &quot;sick of taking the bus&quot; and found herself in the famous white and orange outfit at Hooters.</p> <p>&quot;I wasn't cut out to be a waitress, and I certainly wasn't cut out to be a Hooters waitress. That was a short-lived ambition,&quot; said Amy of her brief career. She lasted just long enough to raise the money, $900, for her new set of wheels &mdash; a Chevrolet. And thankfully for us all, she then pursued a career in acting.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F9-unexpected-first-jobs-of-the-wealthy-and-famous&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F9%2520Unexpected%2520First%2520Jobs%2520of%2520the%2520Wealthy%2520and%2520Famous.jpg&amp;description=9%20Unexpected%20First%20Jobs%20of%20the%20Wealthy%20and%20Famous"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/9%20Unexpected%20First%20Jobs%20of%20the%20Wealthy%20and%20Famous.jpg" alt="9 Unexpected First Jobs of the Wealthy and Famous" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-unexpected-first-jobs-of-the-wealthy-and-famous">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-crazy-investments-of-the-rich-and-famous">9 Crazy Investments of the Rich and Famous</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/make-sure-you-get-paid-and-4-other-great-tips-from-famous-commencement-speakers">Make Sure You Get Paid and 4 Other Great Tips From Famous Commencement Speakers</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-jobs-that-robots-cant-do-yet">10 Jobs That Robots Can&#039;t Do, Yet</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-10-best-high-paying-jobs-for-introverts">The 10 Best High Paying Jobs for Introverts</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-never-to-bring-up-in-a-job-interview">5 Things Never to Bring Up in a Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career Building Entertainment Barack Obama celebrities employment famous people first jobs odd jobs Oprah stephen king Tue, 04 Jul 2017 09:00:09 +0000 Paul Michael 1974218 at http://www.wisebread.com 9 Signs Your Work-Life Balance Is Off http://www.wisebread.com/9-signs-your-work-life-balance-is-off <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/9-signs-your-work-life-balance-is-off" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-529066538.jpg" alt="Woman realizing her work-life balance is off" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>For many Americans, the daily 9-to-5 is just a dream. The U.S. is renowned for having the longest work hours in the industrialized world, and our hours are only getting longer. Family, friends, personal pursuits, and general relaxation are all sacrificed.</p> <p>Too often, it's by choice. While extra toil may seem like the best way to advance your career, numerous studies &mdash; summarized in the Harvard Business Review &mdash; have shown that <a href="https://hbr.org/2015/08/the-research-is-clear-long-hours-backfire-for-people-and-for-companies" target="_blank">overworking can backfire</a> by damaging your health and <em>reducing </em>your productivity at work. One study in particular by HBR and the Boston Consulting Group found that forcing consultants to take time off at predictable periods (such as nights and weekends) improved their efficiency and effectiveness.</p> <p>Are you part of the growing, and disturbing, trend of self-sabotage through overwork? Read on, and see how many of these red flags you check off. It's possible your work-life balance is completely out of alignment.</p> <h2>1. You're working way too many hours</h2> <p>Let's start with the simplest red flag. The typical workweek is 40 hours. Some days you may work a little more, some a little less &mdash; but it should even out to around 40 hours overall. You may not have a time sheet to fill out, but you should still have a general idea of how many hours you're putting in.</p> <p>If it's consistently more than 50 per week, you are working too much. Any more than 60&ndash;70 hours a week, and you pretty much have no life outside of the office. This kind of stress can affect your health in many negative ways, including increasing your risk of <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22952309" target="_blank">heart problems</a>, <a href="http://www.thelancet.com/journals/landia/article/PIIS2213-8587%2814%2970178-0/abstract" target="_blank">type 2 diabetes</a>, and <a href="https://www.newscientist.com/article/dn26793-long-hours-make-people-more-likely-to-drink-heavily/#.VSLlF5N4r6c" target="_blank">substance abuse</a>.</p> <p>Even if you work from home, you need to delineate your time. If you have a home office, make it off limits after certain hours. If it's a laptop or computer in the corner of a room, shut it down. If you are working overtime for extra money, only do it for short periods of time.</p> <h2>2. Falling asleep (or barely staying awake) at work</h2> <p>If you're routinely having trouble staying awake on the job, you are probably putting in too many hours. It's not unusual for some professions to demand an excess of 40 hours per week. In advertising, for example, it's considered the norm to work 60 or 70 hours, which burns many people out. This burnout is not only dangerous &mdash; it's deadly. You risk having a stroke, severe anxiety, depression, and if you work more than 80 hours per week, your <a href="http://www.wiley.com/WileyCDA/PressRelease/pressReleaseId-112164.html" target="_blank">risk of major heart disease</a> increases by 94 percent!</p> <p>If you're sleeping at your desk, getting in early, staying late, and drinking eight cups of coffee to get through the day, you are working way too much. Slow down. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/13-hacks-to-avoid-burnout-at-work?ref=seealso" target="_blank">13 Hacks to Avoid Burnout at Work</a>)</p> <h2>3. You have no social life</h2> <p>Think back over the last few months. How many times did you cancel plans because your job took priority? How often did you turn down invitations to parties or get-togethers because &quot;something came up at work?&quot; Did you have to sell your tickets to a concert, or back out of a weekend trip, because the boss needed you to come in?</p> <p>These are all signs that your work-life balance is completely messed up. It's OK to work late once in awhile. Sometimes, it's unavoidable. But if your social life always takes a back seat to your career, you will suffer. And so will your work. You need down time. Take it.</p> <h2>4. Work is always on your mind</h2> <p>You muse about it at the dinner table. You think about it in bed. You lose track of the conversation because you're worried about the project you're working on. When the only thing on your mind is work, you have a serious problem.</p> <p>At work, it's great to be this focused. At home, your focus should be your family, your friends, your hobbies, and other nonwork pursuits. Thinking about the job all the time will take its toll on your mental health, and you'll eventually burn out.</p> <p>If you find yourself unable to switch off, it may be time to seek help from an occupational therapist. They will teach you coping skills that allow you to turn off the &quot;work brain&quot; and come back to reality.</p> <h2>5. You are constantly checking work emails</h2> <p>These days, we carry smartphones that put the office in our pockets. You can open emails in the checkout line at the grocery store, at the ballgame, or even on a date. And if you're doing any of those on a regular occasion, your job is taking over your life.</p> <p>You need to put hard restraints on your private time. You should not be expected to check emails all hours of the day and night. Some people even get woken up in the middle of the night by emails from an overzealous boss or coworker. Set limits. Refuse to answer emails after a certain time. It's as simple as that.</p> <h2>6. You never take a vacation or sick day</h2> <p>Americans aren't using their vacation days. As of 2015, workers only took an average of <a href="http://www.projecttimeoff.com/research/state-american-vacation-2016" target="_blank">16.2 days of vacation</a> per year &mdash; almost a week less than the average between 1978 and 2000 &mdash; and 55 percent left days unused. That's a lot of wasted opportunities for a healthier work-life balance.</p> <p>Vacation days are important. Sick days are important. Refusing to use either of them is going to have serious repercussions on your wellbeing. Even if you think you're completely fine, but haven't taken a vacation in years, you may be ready to burn out. Sadly, by the time it happens, it can take months to put right. Sick days are vital for when you are genuinely sick. Not only will showing up to work prolong your illness, but you'll also spread it to other people in the office.</p> <p>Your work suffers when you're sick, too. This is why companies want you to use your sick days when you are ill. Dedication is one thing, but letting your health suffer isn't helping you or your employer.</p> <h2>7. You crack under the slightest pressure</h2> <p>You find yourself having far less patience these days. You shout and become frazzled at the smallest provocation. You apologize often for outbursts that never should have happened. You are almost certainly showing signs of a work-life balance that is very unhealthy.</p> <p>When we have our work-life balance right, we can more easily handle problems that arise. We don't crack, and we don't fly off the handle. But the more we work, and the less time we have to relax, the quicker our patience reserves go into the red. If you're breaking easily, you need to re-evaluate the time you're spending at work.</p> <h2>8. You constantly think about quitting</h2> <p>They say that if you do something you love, you'll never work a day in your life. Most people don't have that luxury. It's a job, it pays the bills, it provides health insurance, and it serves its purpose.</p> <p>But if the job starts consuming your life, and all you can think about is quitting, then your work-life balance is way off. Yes, it may also be because the job itself is not pleasant, but when the bad job becomes the bane of your existence, it tips the scales. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-signs-you-should-quit-your-job?ref=seealso" target="_blank">8 Signs You Should Quit Your Job</a>)</p> <h2>9. Your personal space is a mess</h2> <p>No time to clean. No time to organize. No time to do anything other than work &mdash; and boy, does it show. It usually starts with your desk at the office, and then it spreads. Before you know it, your home is just the place you sleep and shower. Your space is an utter mess, and you ignore it all.</p> <p>Why? Because you're never there long enough to care. And when you are home, you're exhausted. Take a look around you, right now &mdash; has your personal space gotten out of hand? Is everything a mess? Then it's time to take a much-needed break.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-signs-your-work-life-balance-is-off">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-4"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/13-hacks-to-avoid-burnout-at-work">13 Hacks to Avoid Burnout at Work</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-reasons-a-big-paycheck-is-not-worth-staying-in-a-job-you-hate">5 Reasons a Big Paycheck Is Not Worth Staying in a Job You Hate</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/here-s-why-you-shouldn-t-work-in-your-downtime">Here’s Why You Shouldn’t Work in Your Downtime</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-jobs-you-may-not-have-considered-but-should">9 Jobs You May Not Have Considered (But Should)</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-reasons-you-shouldnt-vacation-shame-your-coworkers">7 Reasons You Shouldn&#039;t &quot;Vacation Shame&quot; Your Coworkers</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income burnout employment exhaustion overworked personal time stress work life balance working Tue, 16 May 2017 08:00:09 +0000 Paul Michael 1947497 at http://www.wisebread.com 10 Work Perks You Can't Get as a Freelancer http://www.wisebread.com/10-work-perks-you-cant-get-as-a-freelancer <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/10-work-perks-you-cant-get-as-a-freelancer" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-511733684.jpg" alt="Woman learning work perks she can&#039;t get as a freelancer" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>In some industries, the number of gig economy workers is growing faster than the number of payroll employees. Working as a freelancer certainly does have its advantages, the biggest of which are flexibility, freedom, and the ability to experience variety in your work.</p> <p>But if you find yourself staring at the walls of your cubicle, daydreaming about escaping the 9-to-5 and finding freedom as a freelancer, don't overlook the perks you could be getting at your regular job, right now. It may not be so easy to leave these things behind.</p> <h2>1. Stable income</h2> <p>One of the biggest benefits of a regular 9-to-5 job is the steady paycheck. As a salaried employee, you can plan your budget based on a stable stream of income. As a freelancer, your income can vary significantly from one month to the next. A few slow weeks can throw your finances into disarray, so you'll need to shift your entire budgeting strategy to make sure this doesn't happen. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-smart-way-to-budget-on-a-freelance-income?ref=seealso" target="_blank">The Smart Way to Budget on a Freelance Income</a>)</p> <h2>2. 401(k) match</h2> <p>Many traditional employers offer matching contributions to 401(k) plans. In other words, when you make a contribution to your retirement fund out of each paycheck, your employer will also contribute something. This is free money, and can total thousands of dollars each year. In the gig economy, you won't get this kind of assistance building your retirement fund. You'll need to make efforts to save for retirement all on your own, such as with an IRA or solo 401(k). (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/a-simple-guide-to-retirement-plans-for-the-self-employed?ref=seealso" target="_blank">A Simple Guide to Retirement Plans for the Self-Employed</a>)</p> <h2>3. Retirement counseling</h2> <p>Employers frequently offer training or educational programs to help workers plan their retirement investment strategy. Often, they'll even provide free access to financial planners to answer questions. Freelancers are on their own to figure out the road to retirement, and consulting with financial pros will have to come out of your own pocket.</p> <h2>4. Health Savings Account</h2> <p>A valuable benefit that many people miss out on is participating in a health savings account. Every paycheck, you can contribute pretax dollars to be used for health-related expenses. Some health savings accounts allow the funds to be placed in investments where the money can grow until it is needed. As a freelancer, you may be able to set up your own health savings account, but you will need to do a lot more research than someone who simply signs up for an established program through their 9-to-5. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-an-hsa-saves-you-money?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How an HSA Saves You Money</a>)</p> <h2>5. Paid vacation and holidays</h2> <p>Paid time off is an undisputed benefit of a regular 9-to-5. As a freelancer, you don't earn a paycheck while on vacation or holiday. If you want time off, you take time off from earning any income, too. This can certainly put a damper on enjoying your down time.</p> <h2>6. Making connections</h2> <p>As a 9-to-5 employee, you'll have opportunity to build relationships with the coworkers and senior-level staff you see every day. These connections can give you a special level of access to approach and meet other influential people in your company. Plus, it never hurts to have a few people to chat with as you pass the day. Freelancers can still find plenty of opportunity to network, but they'll need to go out of their way to make it happen. It won't be as simple as showing up to work.</p> <h2>7. Tech support and replacement</h2> <p>I have thousands of dollars worth of computer equipment sitting on my desk. It gets supported, maintained, and upgraded by my employer. As a freelancer, you are on your own to buy and support your technology needs. Do you need a special monitor? You'll need to shell out for one. Is your computer too old to do the job? The replacement comes out of your pocket. If something breaks? The repairman will be billing you directly.</p> <h2>8. Training, certification, and professional development</h2> <p>Companies often invest in their employees by providing training or certification programs to help them be better workers. Staying up-to-date on skills, technology, and industry trends is incredibly useful to the employees as well, and makes them more valuable in the marketplace. Freelancers will need to find, purchase, and commit to their own training. It can be very easy to rest on your laurels and let your skills become outdated, especially with no boss insisting you keep learning.</p> <h2>9. Awards and recognition opportunities</h2> <p>It looks great on a resume to list awards and other work honors that you have received. Many employers have some form of &quot;employee of the month&quot; or similar recognition. You may not be able to stock your resume with such accolades if you go out on your own. At the very least, you'll have to seek out and apply for awards, where you'll likely be up against a much larger pool of talent.</p> <h2>10. Employee discount programs</h2> <p>Another perk that businesses offer their employees is discounts on products and services. These can range from cellphone plans, to personal computer purchases, to fitness club memberships &mdash; even discounts on concert and amusement park tickets. As a freelancer, you'll miss out on these discounts.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dr-penny-pincher">Dr Penny Pincher</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-work-perks-you-cant-get-as-a-freelancer">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/they-offered-you-a-promotion-and-no-pay-raise-now-what">They Offered You a Promotion and No Pay Raise. Now What?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-ways-a-side-hustle-can-advance-your-career">8 Ways a Side Hustle Can Advance Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-questions-you-should-always-ask-in-an-exit-interview">8 Questions You Should Always Ask in an Exit Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/15-lucrative-side-hustles-for-city-dwellers">15 Lucrative Side Hustles for City Dwellers</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-great-retail-jobs-for-working-parents">5 Great Retail Jobs for Working Parents</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income 9-to-5 benefits employment freelancing gig economy pros and cons self employment side jobs work perks Mon, 08 May 2017 08:30:07 +0000 Dr Penny Pincher 1940327 at http://www.wisebread.com 8 Questions You Should Always Ask in an Exit Interview http://www.wisebread.com/8-questions-you-should-always-ask-in-an-exit-interview <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/8-questions-you-should-always-ask-in-an-exit-interview" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/women_work_discussion_516896268.jpg" alt="Woman asking questions during her exit interview" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Exit interviews are common when someone is leaving a job. And usually, the onus is on the employer to ask the questions. If you're taking a new job offer, they may want to know why you're leaving, or what they could have done to keep you around. If you're being let go, they'll want to make sure you know everything about the package you're receiving, and your legal options.</p> <p>Rarely do people talk about the questions <em>you</em> should ask in your exit interview. Here are eight that can provide invaluable answers.</p> <h2>1. Will my feedback be anonymous?</h2> <p>If you have some important issues to get off your chest, this is a very important question to ask beforehand. You don't want to tear into an awful boss or coworker, only to find out that it has gotten back to them. You may even want to consider if it's worth the risk at all; if you work in similar fields, your paths may cross again in the future.</p> <p>Despite this, you may feel a moral obligation to tell HR all about the problems that certain coworkers caused, for the sake of the people who are left behind. If you must spill the beans, ask this question before you say anything negative or controversial about anyone. You may even want to write something down that can go on record &mdash; minus your name, of course.</p> <h2>2. What did I do well during my time here?</h2> <p>You can phrase this question however you feel most comfortable, but what you're looking for here is feedback on your strengths. What did you do that made a difference to the company? Were you a rock star at certain things? Were you highly prized in areas you didn't even consider?</p> <p>All of this can be great information to take with you to your next job. You may have thought that speaking up in meetings about potential issues with a project was a cause for grief. But it turns out that people really valued you asking those &quot;Devil's Advocate&quot; questions, as it helped with the development of otherwise unconsidered issues. This kind of feedback can really bolster your performance in your next position.</p> <h2>3. Do I have the option to come back here one day?</h2> <p>It may seem like an odd question to ask &mdash; after all, you're probably leaving the company for very good reason. However, &quot;boomerang&quot; employees can be common in some industries, especially if you're leaving to relocate out of state and may one day return. If you're leaving on good terms, this probably won't be an issue. If you're leaving because things went sour with certain people, it may be tricky to return until they, too, have left. If you're being laid off, you should be given the option to apply for other job openings that match your skill-set in the future.</p> <h2>4. What could I have done better?</h2> <p>No one is perfect. Even an employee that is being begged to stay will still have some areas that could use improvement. Now is the time to find out what those shortcomings are, as this will help you become an even better employee for your next company.</p> <p>Don't take any of this feedback personally. You asked the question, and you need to be an adult about the answers you get. Even if things take a turn, and you suddenly find out someone you respected was constantly complaining about you behind your back, just take it in stride. Fix what you think needs fixing, and ignore the petty stuff.</p> <h2>5. Can I use you as a reference in the future?</h2> <p>It may seem like a no-brainer that they'll say yes, especially if you were a good employee, but many companies frown on their staff providing references for ex-employees. If someone from that company provides a glowing reference for a person who turns out to be unreliable, a thief, a sexual predator, or anything else negative, it can come back on the business and bite them.</p> <p>The HR department's job in any company is to look out for the business, not the people who work there. So, if you think you may want to use them as a future reference, ask before you put their name down. Otherwise, they'll typically verify your dates of employment, and that's about it.</p> <h2>6. When can I expect my final paycheck, and how much will it be?</h2> <p>Your final paycheck may not be issued to you on a regular pay period. It may also include unused vacation days, and depending on your company, unused personal days, sick time (although that's rare), and a portion of the annual bonus you were set to receive.</p> <p>Not only do you want to ask about the final total, but when you can expect to receive that amount, and whether it will be a live check or a bank deposit. If the numbers don't add up, say something now. If they don't have final totals yet, make sure you have the phone number of the person in the payroll department.</p> <h2>7. Is there any kind of noncompete in place?</h2> <p>If you were given an employee handbook when you first started, this may be covered in there. But, roles and responsibilities within an organization vary greatly between departments, so now is a good time to clarify. It's possible that you will be asked not to have any contact with your current clients or vendors for at least a year or two, especially if you will be looking to poach current accounts from your company.</p> <p>Legally, you may not have anything to worry about, as this is typically more of a courtesy. How you handle this, of course, is entirely up to you. At the end of the day, you have to do what's right for you and your family, and if there's nothing in writing to stop you approaching people, it's your call. And of course, if they approach you without any prompting, that's another ballgame entirely.</p> <h2>8. What about a severance package and health benefits?</h2> <p>If you're being laid off, your company may have a set severance package in place. Many businesses offer two weeks of pay for every year of service, up to a cap of their choosing. Others give you a set figure (anywhere from a week to a year) regardless of your time there.</p> <p>You'll also need to know what's happening with your health benefits. Unlike most other countries, health benefits are tied to employment in the U.S. and losing coverage can be costly (or even deadly). Will the company continue covering your health insurance, and if so, for how long? What about COBRA? These are important questions to ask, and if they won't continue coverage, ask for more money in your severance to help cover the costs.</p> <p>If you are planning to leave your company soon, make sure you have at least some of these questions ready for your exit interview. And if you suffer a layoff, please remember to ask about your severance and benefits. Good luck!</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-questions-you-should-always-ask-in-an-exit-interview">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-nows-the-right-time-to-jumpstart-your-career">Why Now&#039;s the Right Time to Jumpstart Your Career</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-deal-when-you-hate-your-new-job">How to Deal When You Hate Your New Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-fun-ways-to-leave-your-job">10 Fun Ways to Leave Your Job</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-financial-moves-to-make-the-moment-you-get-fired">11 Financial Moves to Make the Moment You Get Fired</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-things-you-must-do-before-you-quit-your-job">5 Things You Must Do Before You Quit Your Job</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Career and Income benefits employment exit interview feedback human resources job hunting Job Interview layoffs quitting severance Fri, 28 Apr 2017 08:31:04 +0000 Paul Michael 1936196 at http://www.wisebread.com 7 Things You Should Never Include in Your Cover Letter http://www.wisebread.com/7-things-you-should-never-include-in-your-cover-letter <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/7-things-you-should-never-include-in-your-cover-letter" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_work_thinking_473428184.jpg" alt="Woman learning things she should never include on a cover letter" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Writing the perfect cover letter is a job skill unto itself. In just a few paragraphs, you need to capture the reader's attention and expertly sell your skills and experience, all while striking the right professional tone.</p> <p>It's tempting to slap something together and tell yourself that your resume is more important. Truth be told, though, your cover letter is a key part of the package. Avoiding these seven cover letter gaffes will get you through the interview door faster.</p> <h2>1. Wrong information</h2> <p>Make sure that you have all the details right. Double check that you have the correct company name and spelling, the correct job title, the right address, and, where necessary, the correct name of the hiring manager.</p> <p>If you don't have the name of the hiring manager, you can often find it by calling the company's human resources department. Let HR know which position you're applying for and ask, &quot;To whom should I address my cover letter?&quot; They won't always tell you, but sometimes they will.</p> <p>Also double check your own personal information, including your name, address, email, and phone number. It may sound like common sense, but you'd be surprised how often these tiny typos cost people a job opportunity. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/almost-half-of-job-applicants-make-this-same-foolish-mistake?ref=seealso">Almost Half of Job Applicants Make This Same Foolish Mistake</a>)</p> <h2>2. Poor writing</h2> <p>Use complete sentences. Spell words correctly. Check (and have someone else check) your grammar and punctuation. You want this letter to be the best possible reflection of who you are and how you work, and making silly mistakes won't put your best self forward.</p> <h2>3. What you're lacking</h2> <p>Don't mention any skills or qualifications that you don't have. The cover letter is not the place to bring up any shortcomings.</p> <p>Instead, use this as an opportunity to sell yourself. Tell the potential employer why your skills and experiences are a perfect fit for the position. Remember, your cover letter isn't actually about you. It's about the company you'd like to work for and why you would be a good fit for them. Wow them with what you're offering, and maybe they won't even notice the experience you don't have.</p> <h2>4. Generic, cliché language</h2> <p>Show that you care and that you spent time on your cover letter by eliminating any generic, cliché phrases that could be part of any cover letter, for any job. Don't say that you're a &quot;team player&quot; with &quot;leadership experience&quot; who is also a &quot;hard worker.&quot; Nothing about that is unique, and it'll do nothing to differentiate you from other applicants.</p> <p>Instead, fill your letter with facts that demonstrate your unique skills. Emphasize results whenever possible. Talk about how you led a diverse team to solve a particular problem, or increased revenue by X percent. Then, explain how you would bring those skills to your new job.</p> <h2>5. Lies</h2> <p>Most people who lie on a cover letter don't do so intentionally. They panic &mdash; maybe feel inadequate &mdash; and then they either make something up or, more often, stretch the truth so it looks like they have more experience or qualifications than they actually do.</p> <p>The problem is, these things are easy to check, and besides &mdash; why would you want a job requiring skills you don't actually have? Instead, focus on qualifications you do have. If you feel tempted to stretch the truth often, maybe you need to look at different jobs or take some online courses so you actually have the skills you need for the work you want to do.</p> <h2>6. Personal information</h2> <p>This is not the time to talk about your dog, or your divorce, or about how you need this job because you have to support your three kids all on your own. Yes, those are important things to you, but they don't belong in your cover letter.</p> <p>Like I mentioned above, the cover letter isn't actually about you. It's about the company where you're applying, and how you can make it better. Even if your need for work is desperate, or if there are some personal things you think the company should know about you before they make a decision, the cover letter isn't the place to list them. Wait for an interview.</p> <h2>7. Long paragraphs</h2> <p>No one wants to read a wall of text, especially when they are scanning cover letters for keywords. So, keep your paragraphs short and limit your letter to a single page.</p> <p>This means that you have to be pithy in what you say. Straightforward is usually best. Describe your experience and qualifications, highlight how they satisfy key requirements of the job you're applying for, and then wrap it up. More words aren't necessarily better.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/sarah-winfrey">Sarah Winfrey</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-things-you-should-never-include-in-your-cover-letter">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-keep-your-job-search-a-secret">How to Keep Your Job Search a Secret</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/11-ways-college-grads-can-get-ahead-in-the-job-hunt">11 Ways College Grads Can Get Ahead in the Job Hunt</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-resume-rules-you-should-be-breaking">4 Resume Rules You Should Be Breaking</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-proper-ways-to-discuss-salary-in-a-job-interview">The Proper Ways to Discuss Salary in a Job Interview</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/almost-half-of-job-applicants-make-this-same-foolish-mistake">Almost Half of Job Applicants Make This Same Foolish Mistake</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Job Hunting advice career cover letters employment job applications Mistakes new jobs resumes Tue, 18 Apr 2017 08:30:11 +0000 Sarah Winfrey 1929793 at http://www.wisebread.com