bacteria http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/4107/all en-US Do You Know How Dirty Your Money Is? http://www.wisebread.com/how-dirty-is-your-money-really <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-dirty-is-your-money-really" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/iStock-531714398.jpg" alt="Person learning how dirty their money really is" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="141" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Cash. We need it to live. But have you ever stopped to think of what it is you're touching when you hold a $20 bill, or a handful of nickels and dimes? Unless they're crisp bills straight from the mint, or freshly unwrapped quarters, the chances are, they've changed hands many, many times. Let's break it down, and discover the filthy truth of what might be lurking on the money in your wallet.</p> <h2>The Lifespan of Bank Notes and Coins</h2> <p>Coins are built to last. Right now you can find coins for sale that date back to the age of Julius Caesar. The average <a href="https://coins.thefuntimesguide.com/coin-lifespan/" target="_blank">lifespan of a coin is around 30 years</a>, but some can still be in circulation after 50 years or more. They change hands thousands of times, and never get cleaned.</p> <p>Conversely, &quot;paper&quot; money is nowhere near as hardy, but as it's <a href="http://www.bep.gov/hmimpaperandink.html" target="_blank">made up of 25% linen and 75% cotton</a>, it's not really paper at all. It's cloth. This makes it resistant to folds (the average bill can be folded back and forth over 4,000 times before tearing), with a humble dollar bill lasting almost five years. However, because the material is also absorbent, it has the chance to pick up a multitude of germs and bacteria.</p> <h2>What's on Your Money?</h2> <p>The Dirty Money Project, in New York, has been studying our money for years. Their findings are not for the faint of heart. Each dollar bill carries roughly 3,000 types of bacteria on its surface. Common microbes found include the ones that cause acne and other skin problems. Anthrax was also detected, but fear not, it was not the weaponized variety.</p> <p>The Southern Medical Journal also did one of many studies conducted on the state of our one-dollar bills. A staggering <a href="https://www.highbeam.com/doc/1G1-98033286.html" target="_blank">94% of the bills they tested contained pathogenic</a>, or potentially pathogenic, organisms. In other words, almost every one-dollar bill you touch contains a bacterium, virus, or microorganism that causes disease. Now, what kind of disease you come into contact with is a matter of blind luck.</p> <p>Furthermore, the very dangerous bacteria MRSA (which can lead to the flesh-eating disease necrotizing fasciitis) was discovered on <a href="https://newsspc.wordpress.com/2012/09/24/cash-credit-cards-spreading-harmful-bacteria-spc-professors-work-shows/" target="_blank">80% of the dollar bills studied in a test</a> by St. Petersburg College professor Shannon McQuaig.</p> <h2>Specifically, What Germs Are on Bank Notes?</h2> <p>Of the many studies done, several of which have been cited in this article, the following dangerous microorganisms were found:</p> <h3>Streptococcus</h3> <p>This isn't too much of a concern. Should you contract this, you will most likely get a sore throat, although it can cause skin infections, urinary tract infections, and even pneumonia.</p> <h3>E. coli</h3> <p>You know this one well, especially after the spread of it last year at several Chipotle locations. Although many types of it are harmless, some can be deadly. E. coli has led to anemia and kidney failure, which can lead to death. Most people who get ill from it suffer stomach cramps, vomiting, and diarrhea.</p> <h3>Salmonella Enterica</h3> <p>A major cause of food poisoning, you will usually get this by eating contaminated food. However, anyone who handles raw food or fecal matter, and then handles money, can be responsible for spreading it.</p> <h3>Staphylococcus Aureus</h3> <p>This causes the staph infections you have probably heard about. Most commonly, this is a skin infection, but it can also lead to pneumonia, food poisoning, and blood poisoning.</p> <h3>MRSA</h3> <p>A type of staphylococcus aureus that is very dangerous, because it is resistant to antibiotics and other drugs in the methicillin class.</p> <h3>Proteus</h3> <p>This is a bacterium found in the intestines of animals, and in the soil. It will most likely cause a urinary tract infection, which is easily treatable.</p> <h2>Your Money Is Downright Disgusting</h2> <p>It's filthy. It's teaming with bacteria. It's infested with germs. And it really can make you sick. If you handle money on a regular basis, it's advisable to wash your hands regularly, and use hand sanitizers as often as you can. Don't lick your fingers to count money, as that can obviously have nasty results. You should also avoid touching money and then eating food with your hands, but as that is something that happens often (restaurants, bars, food carts, football games) you should carry a pocket hand sanitizer and apply that before you eat. Also, don't put money in your mouth, not even for a bet, and don't put your hands near your mouth after touching money.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-dirty-is-your-money-really">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/would-you-accept-200000-if-you-didnt-know-where-it-came-from">Would You Accept $200,000 If You Didn&#039;t Know Where It Came From?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/when-greed-backfires-an-iphone-story-1">When greed backfires - an iPhone story.</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/germs-dirt-bacteria-infection-immune-system-antibiotics-disease">Are we too clean for our own good?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-booze-teaches-us-about-money">What Booze Teaches Us About Money</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/in-times-like-these-separate-the-want-from-the-need">In times like these, separate the want from the need.</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Frugal Living Consumer Affairs bacteria cash cleanliness dirty money germs money Spending Money Fri, 17 Feb 2017 11:00:13 +0000 Paul Michael 1893507 at http://www.wisebread.com Are we too clean for our own good? http://www.wisebread.com/germs-dirt-bacteria-infection-immune-system-antibiotics-disease <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/germs-dirt-bacteria-infection-immune-system-antibiotics-disease" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/soil.jpg" alt="" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="322" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>A friend of mine has three daughters, all under 6 years old. Recently, she was at the supermarket with her youngest. Her daughter dropped her pacifier on the ground. My friend picked it up, wiped it on her shirt, and handed it back to her daughter.</p> <p>An elderly gentleman approached her a few seconds later. Chuckling, he patted her child on the head. &quot;This must not be your first kid, then,&quot; he said with a grin,</p> <p>&quot;Why do you say that?,&quot; my friend asked nervously.</p> <p>&quot;Well, with the first child, if they drop their binkie, you&#39;d be more likely to boil it before letting your baby touch it again. By the time you get to your second, you get over it.&quot;</p> <p>My friend smiled. &quot;Yeah, that pretty much sums it up.&quot;</p> <p>There are probably a few of you reading this who think my friend is a horrible mother. I can assure you that she is not. Yes, supermarket floors are dirty. Yes, her daughter was probably exposed to germs. But according to many scientists, <a href="http://www.livescience.com/health/070914_too_clean.html">germs may be exactly what we need more of</a>.</p> <p>Building up a healthy immune system is one of the most important things that we can do for our health. It&#39;s the reason that people try to make sure that their children get chicken pox at a young age; they hope to inoculate their babies against the disease, which is much more serious if experienced at an advanced age. Taking your kid to a Pox Party is like a cheap vaccination. Viruses are serious things, and we believe in inoculating our kids against them, for the most part. </p> <p>However, we don&#39;t feel the same way about bacteria and other bugs. In fact, we do our utmost to avoid contact with bacteria, and when we do experience it, we zap the hell out of it with antibiotics and antibacterial ointments. The result? Our bodies don&#39;t know how to deal with bacterial infections, and the bacteria that we do come into contact with is getting stronger and stronger as we continually do our damndest to kill it off. Not only that, but when an immune system with too much free time on its hands comes into contact with innocuous but foreign substances (like cat dander), it over reacts, causing us to suffer from allergies.</p> <p>You&#39;ve probably heard that certain conditions that seem endemic to Americans, such as hayfever, <a href="http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9F05EFDE1330F93AA2575AC0A9649C8B63">asthma</a>, and <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2007/HEALTH/03/23/allergies.kids/index.html">food allergies</a>, are not as common in the developing world. People infected with hookworm, for instance, have fewer asthma attacks and allergies (the hookworms trigger and immune system response, it is thought, that causes the body to concentrate on the worms, rather than triggering wheezing asthma attacks). By the way, do not Google &quot;hookworm&quot; unless you want to spend the rest of the day fighting the heebie jeebies. </p> <p>The point is, exposure to other germs, especially those found in soil, are <a href="http://www.realage.com/parentingcenter/articles.aspx?aid=10326">beneficial in preventing all kinds of autoimmune diseases</a>. With that in mind, consider letting go of your germ phobic ways. You&#39;ll save some money on the plethora of cleaning supplies that promise to nuke every single bacterium within a hundred-mile radius, and just may find that your kids grow up healthier.</p> <ul> <li>There&#39;s certainly nothing wrong with washing your hands, but skip the anti-bacterial soaps. Also, hand sanitizer is good in a bind, but if you apply it several times a day (and don&#39;t work in a hospital), you might have bigger issues than germs.</li> <li>Nobody wants salmonella poisoning, but using the appropriate tools when preparing raw chicken (plastic or glass cutting boards that can be run through the dish washer) and cleaning the kitchen with normal soap and water afterwards can do the trick - no need to break out the Clorox wipes.</li> <li><a href="http://www.slate.com/id/2175569/">Slate.com</a> believes that Americans should eat sh*t and NOT die. Provocative, but also, ew. They also mention the importance of breast feeding as a method for transferring antibodies from mother to child, even though most mothers today also lack crucial antibodies, having also been raised in sterile environments.</li> <li><a href="http://www.cnn.com/2006/HEALTH/conditions/04/05/cohen.allergies/index.html">Let your kids get dirty</a>. They will survive. I suppose it&#39;s possible, but it&#39;s fairly uncommon to hear of children who have been hospitalized because they accidentally ingested a little dirt.</li> <li>Ladies, your ladybits are self-cleaning, like an expensive oven! Unless it has been recommended by your gynecologist, do not feel the need to rinse them out from the inside (click <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/mrbill/37387729/sizes/l/">here</a> to see a really odd add for Lysol ladybit cleaner). Remember, douchebag is a better insult than it is an invention. Too much rinsing will actually CAUSE infections.</li> </ul> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/andrea-karim">Andrea Karim</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/germs-dirt-bacteria-infection-immune-system-antibiotics-disease">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-high-cost-of-catching-a-cold-or-the-flu">The High Cost of Catching a Cold or the Flu</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/oprah-asks-a-great-question-what-can-you-live-without">Oprah Asks A Great Question; What Can You Live Without?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-big-of-a-house-do-you-really-need">How Big of a House Do You Really Need?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/save-some-cash-with-these-6-clever-cleaning-hacks">Save Some Cash With These 6 Clever Cleaning Hacks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/alternative-uses-for-everything-in-your-bathroom">Alternative Uses for Everything in Your Bathroom</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Frugal Living Green Living Home Lifestyle Allergies antibiotics bacteria chidren clean cold Dirt disease flu germs hand washing hookworms illness immune system infection lactose intolerance Overly Clean soap wash hands Mon, 17 Nov 2008 22:27:20 +0000 Andrea Karim 2585 at http://www.wisebread.com I'll take a slice of lemon with fecal bacteria please. http://www.wisebread.com/ill-take-a-slice-of-lemon-with-fecal-bacteria-please <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/ill-take-a-slice-of-lemon-with-fecal-bacteria-please" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/461525292_1344fb943e.jpg" alt="Bad Lemon" title="Bad Lemon" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="187" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>I’ve never thought twice about the humble lemon slice. I’m sure most of you haven’t either. And as I’m partial to a slice of lemon in my water or iced tea, for added flavor, I usually request it at restaurants. After seeing this video, I think I’d be safer asking for slice of raw chicken in my drink. </p> <p>A study brought to light by <a href="http://healthinspections.com/">healthinspections.com</a> reveals that those innocent lemon slices you get in restaurants are loaded with bacteria, fecal matter and all sorts of other nasties. </p> <blockquote><p><em>&quot;It was like they had dipped it in raw meat or something; it was gross!” exclaimed Anne LaGrange, a microbiologist who tested several lemons from various restaurants and was shocked at the results. &quot;The very first sample that we took was loaded with fecal bacteria.&quot;</em> </p> </blockquote> <p>Here&#39;s the <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Dmcfcd9v24">full video</a> : </p> <p><object classid="clsid:D27CDB6E-AE6D-11cf-96B8-444553540000" codebase="http://download.macromedia.com/pub/shockwave/cabs/flash/swflash.cab#version=6,0,29,0" width="425" height="355"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/3Dmcfcd9v24&amp;rel=1" /><param name="quality" value="high" /><param name="menu" value="false" /><param name="wmode" value="" /><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/3Dmcfcd9v24&amp;rel=1" wmode="" quality="high" menu="false" pluginspage="http://www.macromedia.com/go/getflashplayer" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="425" height="355"></embed></object></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>In fact, from the 21 restaurant samples they tested, a staggering 77% of the wedges, 3 out of 4 (not 2 out of 3 as pointed out by an eagle-eyed reader), contained disease-causing bacteria. Yuck.</p> <p>Why is this happening? In simple terms, a mix of poor hygiene and cross-contamination. Restaurant workers should use tongs or gloves when they slice and serve the wedges, but they usually don’t. And often, the only explanation for the amount of bacteria found is that the lemons are being sliced using a knife and/or cutting board that was used for preparing raw meat. </p> <p>So, by all means add a slice of lemon at home. But now, when you’re out and about you may want to skip the lemons. This is definitely one of those cases where you can’t quite make lemonade out of the lemons life serves you.</p> <p><em>Thanks go to Skip Koebbeman for bringing this one to my attention. </em></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/paul-michael">Paul Michael</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/ill-take-a-slice-of-lemon-with-fecal-bacteria-please">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-secrets-restaurants-dont-want-you-to-know">6 Secrets Restaurants Don&#039;t Want You to Know</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/avoid-these-fast-food-items-say-fast-food-employees">“Avoid These Fast Food Items,” Say Fast Food Employees</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/do-you-agree-with-the-new-standards-of-restaurant-tipping">Do You Agree With the New Standards of Restaurant Tipping?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-most-unhealthiest-restaurants">10 Unhealthiest Restaurants</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/40-restaurants-that-offer-senior-discounts">40 Restaurants That Offer Senior Discounts</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Consumer Affairs Food and Drink bacteria hygiene lemons meat raw restaurants Wed, 20 Feb 2008 18:14:19 +0000 Paul Michael 1822 at http://www.wisebread.com Germ Killin' Machine http://www.wisebread.com/germ-killin-machine <p><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/wisebread_imce/sinksponge.jpg" alt=" " width="325" height="185" /></p> <p>Guarding against germs doesn&#39;t have to be a chemical-filled experience. To get rid of <a href="http://news.ufl.edu/2007/01/24/microwave-sponges-2/">germs in your kitchen sponge</a> (and there ARE germs in you kitchen sponge), do the following:</p> <ol> <li>Soak the sponge with water (this is <strong>key</strong> - not doing so poses a <a href="http://abcnews.go.com/Health/wireStory?id=2822160http://abcnews.go.com/Health/wireStory?id=2822160">significant fire risk</a>).</li> <li>Place the sponge on a microwave-safe plate.</li> <li>Stick it in the microwave on HIGH for 2 minutes.</li> <li>Don&#39;t even TRY to pick it up with your fingers. Use a pair of tongs to remove it from the microwave and leave it to cool or soak it in cold water before using.</li> </ol> <p>*Make sure the sponge doesn&#39;t contain metal, even though lots of modern microwaves don&#39;t mind metal.*</p> <p>If nuking the sponge kind of creeps you out or creates so nasty smells (if it does, stop the heating immediately), try boiling it in a little clean water instead. I don&#39;t keep a sponge for more than three weeks anyway, but I boil it at least twice a week to kill germs. </p> <p>AND I use a different sponge for my dogs&#39; dishes. </p> <p>(Photo by <a href="http://www.flickr.com/people/dalasie/">dalasie</a>)</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/andrea-karim">Andrea Karim</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/germ-killin-machine">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/we-do-the-math-when-is-it-worth-hiring-household-help">We Do the Math: When Is It Worth Hiring Household Help?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-many-uses-for-empty-plastic-bottles">The many uses for empty plastic bottles</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-dirty-is-your-money-really">Do You Know How Dirty Your Money Is?</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/shoveling-snow-and-5-other-things-robots-can-do-for-you">Shoveling Snow and 5 Other Things Robots Can Do for You</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/germs-dirt-bacteria-infection-immune-system-antibiotics-disease">Are we too clean for our own good?</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Life Hacks bacteria chores disinfect environmentally friendly germs housework microwave nuke sponge Tue, 17 Apr 2007 22:33:11 +0000 Andrea Karim 522 at http://www.wisebread.com