Retirement http://www.wisebread.com/taxonomy/term/417/all en-US Bookmark This: A Step-by-Step Guide to Choosing 401(k) Investments http://www.wisebread.com/bookmark-this-a-step-by-step-guide-to-choosing-401k-investments <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/bookmark-this-a-step-by-step-guide-to-choosing-401k-investments" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/real_estate_agent_working_with_client_online.jpg" alt="Real estate agent working with client online" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>It's no secret that 401(k) fund options are notoriously opaque. While target-date funds provide convenience to investors, they often come with higher fees than alternative investment vehicles, have highly variable returns, and aren't a good fit for many retirement savers. Let's simplify things, and review a low-stress strategy for building a solid two-to-three-fund portfolio for your 401(k).</p> <h2>The downsides to target-date funds</h2> <p>Designed to gradually adjust your investment mix as you approach retirement age, target-date funds have exploded in popularity since their designation as qualified default investment alternatives by the 2006 Pension Protection Plan. The upsides of target-date funds are that they're easy to select (96 percent of Vanguard plans make it the default investment option), they automatically rebalance, and they offer appropriate investment diversification. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-you-need-to-know-about-the-easiest-way-to-save-for-retirement?ref=seealso" target="_blank">What You Need to Know About the Easiest Way to Save for Retirement</a>)</p> <p>However, all that convenience comes at a high price. A 2015 review of over 1,700 target-date funds by FutureAdvisor determined that their average expense ratio (the annual fee charged to shareholders to cover operating expenses) was a relatively high 1.02 percent, meaning that you'd pay $51 every year for every $5,000 in your balance. Assuming an average investment return of 7 percent per year, you would miss out on an extra $4,998 in retirement savings over a 30-year period.</p> <p>On top of high fees, some target-date funds' returns barely cover their high annual expense ratios. The same review of 1,700 target-date funds pointed out that the lowest five-year average annual returns were 2.9 percent. (Returns are expressed net of expense ratios.) As of September 2017, 2.9 percent is not that much higher than the rate of a five-year CD at a credit union.</p> <p>Here's a better alternative to target-date funds.</p> <h2>Your guide to choosing your 401(k) investment options</h2> <p>In his 2013 letter to Berkshire Hathaway shareholders, Warren Buffett (aka The Oracle of Omaha) provided an investment strategy that would &quot;be superior to those attained by most investors who employ high-fee managers.&quot; Buffett recommended putting 90 percent of one's investments in a very low-cost S&amp;P 500 index fund, and the remaining 10 percent in short-term government bonds. This is the same advice that he has set in his will. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-5-best-pieces-of-financial-wisdom-from-warren-buffett?ref=seealso" target="_blank">The 5 Best Pieces of Financial Wisdom From Warren Buffett</a>)</p> <p>More and more 401(k) plans are offering passively managed index funds that track a benchmark, such as the S&amp;P 500. And for good reason: The Vanguard 500 Index Investor Shares Fund [Nasdaq: VFINX] has an annual expense ratio of 0.14 percent, just a $7 annual fee for a balance of $5,000. That's $44 in annual savings when you compare it to a target-date fund with a 1.02 percent annual expense ratio.</p> <p>Worried that this approach doesn't provide you enough diversification? Think again: An index fund tracking the S&amp;P 500 is investing in 500 large-cap companies. That's as diversified as you can get. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-too-much-investment-diversity-can-cost-you?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How Too Much Investment Diversity Can Cost You</a>)</p> <p>Let's use Buffett's advice to build your 401(k) plan's portfolio.</p> <h3>Step 1: Check your plan for a U.S. equities index fund</h3> <p>There is a good chance that your 401(k) plan offers a low-cost S&amp;P 500 index fund. Buffett personally recommends an S&amp;P 500 Vanguard index fund. Vanguard is an investment management company known for having very low fees compared to competitors, especially on its index funds. In 2016, close to 60 percent of Vanguard plans offered an index core giving you access to broadly diversified index funds for U.S. stocks. In truth, you can do just as well with other index funds tracking the S&amp;P 500, such as the Fidelity 500 Index Investor [Nasdaq: FUSEX] and the Northern Stock Index [Nasdaq: NOSIX].</p> <p>In the event, that you don't have access to a low-cost index fund tracking the S&amp;P 500 through your workplace 401(k), you have two action items. First, see if your plan offers another large cap index fund (one investing in large U.S. companies based on a market index). This type of fund normally invests at least 80 percent of its assets in securities within its benchmark index, such as the Fidelity Large Cap Stock Fund [Nasdaq: FLCSX] and the Vanguard U.S. Growth Fund [Nasdaq: VWUSX]. Second, contact your plan administrator and request adding a low-cost S&amp;P 500 index fund.</p> <h3>Step 2: Check your plan for a fund of short-term investment-grade bonds</h3> <p>Just like there are index funds for investing in equities, there are also index funds for investing in bonds. For example, there is the Vanguard Short-Term Investment-Grade Fund [Nasdaq: VSFTX], which has an annual expense ratio of 0.20 percent, or $10 in fees for a balance of $5,000.</p> <p>Don't have access to such a fund? Look for a low-cost fund giving you the most exposure to high- and medium-quality, investment-grade bonds with short-term maturities, including corporate bonds, pooled consumer loans, and U.S. government bonds. Why short-term maturities? Short-term bonds tend to have low risk and low yields, ensuring that one portion of your nest egg remains stable at all times &mdash; something you'll really benefit from during any recessions.</p> <p>Then, request that your plan administrator add a low-cost index fund for domestic bonds.</p> <h3>Step 3: Allocate 90 percent to the equities index fund and 10 percent to the bonds index fund</h3> <p>Now you're ready to rebalance your portfolio. Using your online portal, look for an option that says &quot;exchange funds&quot; or &quot;transfer money between funds&quot; to move your nest egg dollars from your existing investments into the equities index fund and bonds index fund. (Note: Depending on your plan rules, including vesting rules, you may not be able to move 100 percent of your balance until a certain date. In that case, move everything that you can and the remaining once it becomes eligible.)</p> <p>Exchange your entire 401(k) balance and allocate 90 percent of that amount to the equities index fund and 10 percent to the bonds index fund. Confirm your transaction.</p> <h3>Step 4: Adjust your future contributions</h3> <p>To keep future contributions going into the right place, adjust your paycheck investment mix so that 90 percent of withholdings go to the equities index fund and 10 percent go into the bonds index fund.</p> <p>If your 401(k) offers an automatic rebalance feature, opt-in for it so that your portfolio is automatically readjusted to the 90/10 without you moving a finger. If your 401(k) doesn't offer that feature, plan to manually rebalance your account once a year.</p> <h3>Step 5: Revisit the 90/10 allocation at important life changes</h3> <p>Marriage. Birth of your first child. Purchase of your first home. Being able to start making catch-up contributions. Reaching age 59 1/2. These and more critical milestones in your life may require you to adjust your 90/10 allocation. As you get closer to retirement age, you should gradually shift from a growth strategy (selecting funds that exhibit signs of above-average growth) to an income strategy (picking funds that provide a steady stream of income) so that you hold fewer stocks and more bonds. The beauty of a target-date fund is that is does all of this for you automatically as you age. Without one, you'll need to stay on top of this occasional rebalancing yourself.</p> <h2>The bottom line</h2> <p>One of the main reasons that your 401(k) will perform better is that you're minimizing fees. If you were to allocate 90 percent of a $5,000 401(k) balance into the Vanguard 500 Index Investor Shares Fund [Nasdaq: VFINX] and 10 percent into the Vanguard Short-Term Investment-Grade Fund [Nasdaq: VSFTX], you would just pay $7.30 in annual fees. That's $43.70 in annual savings over putting the entire $5,000 in a target-date fund with a 1.02 percent annual expense ratio. It doesn't sound like a large amount of savings, but compounded over the years it can add up to thousands of dollars more in your retirement fund.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/damian-davila">Damian Davila</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/bookmark-this-a-step-by-step-guide-to-choosing-401k-investments">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-3"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-warren-buffett-says-you-should-invest-in-index-funds">Why Warren Buffett Says You Should Invest in Index Funds</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-make-sure-you-dont-run-out-of-money-in-retirement">How to Make Sure You Don&#039;t Run Out of Money in Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-traps-to-avoid-with-your-401k">7 Traps to Avoid With Your 401(k)</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-save-for-retirement-when-you-are-unemployed">How to Save for Retirement When You Are Unemployed</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-you-need-to-know-about-the-easiest-way-to-save-for-retirement">What You Need to Know About the Easiest Way to Save for Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Investment Retirement 401(k) bonds equities expense ratios fees index portfolio rebalancing s&p 500 short-term bonds target-date funds Warren Buffett Thu, 21 Sep 2017 08:31:06 +0000 Damian Davila 2023013 at http://www.wisebread.com What to Do If You're Retiring With Debt http://www.wisebread.com/what-to-do-if-youre-retiring-with-debt <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/what-to-do-if-youre-retiring-with-debt" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/old_couple_having_problems_with_their_home_finances.jpg" alt="Old couple having problems with their home finances" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>For a growing number of older Americans, the golden years have been tarnished by debt. If you're retired or will be soon, and too much debt is weighing you down, here are three common sources of senior debt, along with some suggestions for breaking free.</p> <h2>1. Mortgage debt</h2> <p>One of the tenets of wise money management is to be mortgage-free by the time you retire, ridding yourself of what is likely your biggest expense as you enter what may be a lower- and fixed-income season of life. However, for a growing number of older people, that is not the case.</p> <p>According to the Federal Reserve, about 42 percent of households where the head of household is 65 to 74 years old had mortgage debt (a mortgage or home equity loan) in 2013 &mdash; up from 32 percent in 2004 and just 19 percent in 1992. Many such borrowers refinanced their mortgages in order to take advantage of low interest rates, but in doing so, reset the 15- or 30-year mortgage clock.</p> <p>What to do? If your overall housing costs, including taxes and insurance, take up more than 25 percent of your monthly gross income, consider downsizing. Reducing or eliminating your mortgage and lowering what you pay for property taxes, homeowners insurance, utilities, and maintenance could do wonders for your financial peace of mind. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-you-can-cut-costs-right-before-you-retire-0?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Ways You Can Cut Costs Right Before You Retire</a>)</p> <h2>2. Student loan debt</h2> <p>Much has been made of how indebted today's college graduates are. What's less well known is that the fastest-growing segment of the population with education debt is the 60-plus crowd. Most such borrowers took out loans for their kids or grandkids via Parent PLUS loans, or they co-signed on a student loan and now find themselves responsible for the payments.</p> <p>According to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, the number of people age 60 or older with student loans quadrupled between 2005 and 2015 to 2.8 million.</p> <p>What to do? Look into loan consolidation or rehabilitation (if you're behind on the payments). Both are preferable to default, in which case the government could reduce your Social Security benefits in order to collect.</p> <h2>3. Credit card debt</h2> <p>The overuse of plastic isn't just something that plagues the young. According to the National Council on Aging, in 2012, nearly one-third of households headed by someone age 60 or older carried a credit card balance. Are these older households simply living beyond their means? Some probably are, but an AARP survey found that over half the older households with credit card debt put their medical care on plastic.</p> <p>What to do? If your credit card debt is unmanageable, consider contacting a local affiliate of the <a href="https://www.nfcc.org/" target="_blank">National Foundation for Credit Counseling</a>. They may be able to negotiate lower interest rates. In addition, if you haven't done so already, don't put medical bills on your credit card. Instead, see if you can work out a payment plan directly with the medical provider, which may offer more favorable terms. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-fastest-method-to-eliminate-credit-card-debt?ref=seealso" target="_blank">The Fastest Method to Eliminate Credit Card Debt</a>)</p> <h2>Other ways to ditch your debt</h2> <p>No matter how old you are, an important key to getting out of debt is margin &mdash; creating a gap between your income and expenses so you've got the money to make extra payments on your debts. There are only two sides to the margin equation: income and expenses.</p> <h3>Increase income by picking up a part-time job</h3> <p>By definition, retirement means not working anymore, so the idea of going back to work may not fill your heart with joy. However, even a temporary part-time job can make a big difference in how quickly you get out of debt. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-great-retirement-jobs?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Great Retirement Jobs</a>)</p> <p>Start thinking of where you could work. How about consulting with your former employer, hanging out a shingle as a sole proprietor, or simply picking up some hours at a local retailer?</p> <p>Keep in mind that if you started claiming Social Security benefits before your normal retirement age, earning too much from a part-time job may reduce those benefits. Learn more on the <a href="https://www.ssa.gov/oact/cola/rtea.html" target="_blank">Social Security Administration's website</a>.</p> <h3>Decrease expenses by taking your kids off the payroll</h3> <p>It's common for parents to help their adult children with everything from health insurance premiums to cellphone bills. According to a Merrill Lynch study, nearly 70 percent of people age 55 or older with adult children are doing so.</p> <p>Wouldn't it be easier for you to cut them off if you realized that doing so would not only benefit you, but it would benefit them as well? That's one of the key messages in the classic book, <em>The Millionaire Next Door</em>. Authors Thomas Stanley and William Danko found that adults who receive &quot;financial outpatient care&quot; from their parents tend to become dependent on such help and end up saving and investing less than those who do not receive money from their parents. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/are-you-ruining-your-retirement-by-spoiling-your-kids?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Are You Ruining Your Retirement by Spoiling Your Kids?</a>)</p> <h2>There's plenty of time to retire debt</h2> <p>It may be discouraging to find yourself buried in bills at a time of life when you had hoped to slow down and enjoy the fruit of all your years of labor. However, increases in longevity mean you probably still have plenty of time to reap those rewards. What'll make all the difference is how quickly you implement the ideas mentioned above.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/matt-bell">Matt Bell</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-to-do-if-youre-retiring-with-debt">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-of-the-fastest-ways-to-go-broke-in-retirement">4 of the Fastest Ways to Go Broke in Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-red-flags-that-your-retirement-plan-may-be-off-track">4 Red Flags That Your Retirement Plan May Be Off Track</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-retiring-with-debt-isnt-the-end-of-the-world">Why Retiring With Debt Isn&#039;t the End of the World</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/refinance-these-4-common-debts-before-year-ends">Refinance These 4 Common Debts Before Year Ends</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/depressed-it-could-be-your-debt">Depressed? It Could Be Your Debt</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Debt Management Retirement adult children co-signed credit card debt expenses giving money increasing income kids mortgages student loans Tue, 19 Sep 2017 08:00:07 +0000 Matt Bell 2021474 at http://www.wisebread.com Why Your Daily Latte Won't Sink Your Retirement Savings http://www.wisebread.com/why-your-daily-latte-wont-sink-your-retirement-savings <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/why-your-daily-latte-wont-sink-your-retirement-savings" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/women_friends_enjoyment_coffee_times_concept.jpg" alt="Women Friends Enjoyment Coffee Times Concept" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>If you pay attention to personal finance literature, you have undoubtedly come across some iteration of the &quot;latte factor&quot; &mdash; the idea that forgoing a daily small luxury will add up to big savings over time. Financial author David Bach coined the term over a decade ago to help consumers better understand the high costs of little luxuries. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-ways-to-save-money-on-your-cup-of-coffee?ref=seealso" target="_blank">9 Ways to Save Money on Your Daily Cup of Coffee</a>)</p> <p>The personal finance sphere has taken Bach's idea and run with it. In fact, you can't swing a bag of artisan coffee on the internet without hitting an editorial, think piece, or other article explaining how the latte factor is costing you your future.</p> <p>But giving up your daily coffee will not mean the difference between enjoying a comfortable retirement and working until you're 80. There is a lot more going on than just the fact that $5 per day adds up to a great deal of money per year.</p> <p>Here's what most latte factor articles fail to take into account.</p> <h2>Financial shaming can make savers give up before they've started</h2> <p>While David Bach's original intent with the latte factor was to empower consumers to make more mindful choices with their money, his idea has often been used to <em>shame </em>people for their financial choices.</p> <p>Shaming is an unproductive way to motivate a person because it generally backfires. The constant drumbeat of the latte factor can make it sound like the only way to save for retirement (or any other big investment) is to give up daily luxuries. Individuals who feel guilty about their latte habit might decide that it's not worth trying to save for retirement if it means giving up their favorite luxury.</p> <p>The fact of the matter is that people can save money for their futures while also enjoying a daily latte. But the use of shaming language about having little luxuries can make it sound like these financial priorities are mutually exclusive.</p> <h2>Your money psychology can make it tough to see these savings</h2> <p>The latte factor math is unassailable. If you purchase a $5 latte every work day for 50 weeks out of each year, that adds up to $1,250 &mdash; which could certainly be a nice addition to your retirement account.</p> <p>The problem is that the latte factor math assumes that you can keep track of the daily $5 that you are spending. Most people's brains don't work like that. A cognitive bias known as the <em>denomination effect</em> makes people less likely to spend big bills compared to small ones. Five dollar bills can be quite difficult to hold onto, because they seem to be worth so little &mdash; even though the end result of $1,250 is quite big.</p> <p>Adding up those unspent five-spots to put them into a retirement account requires a certain type of money psychology that is exceedingly rare. For most people, refraining from buying a $5 coffee would just mean you spend the money on something else, rather than putting it aside for retirement savings.</p> <h2>It's easier to save money on big costs</h2> <p>People who actually spend $5 every single day on coffee are probably not paying close attention to where any of their money goes. If you are spending money every day on a small luxury, you are probably also spending money regularly on big luxuries &mdash; and those are a great deal easier to cut out than the small ones.</p> <p>Rather than focus on the difficult-to-track $5 holes in your budget, start with ways to reduce the bigger line items in your budget. Are you overspending on housing, food, transportation, entertainment, or utilities? Making a cut in one of those areas will not require you to keep track of small amounts of money to see a big difference, which make them a much smarter place to find extra funds to send to your retirement account.</p> <p>Even if you are a generally frugal person, you don't need to ax your beloved small luxuries to find extra money in your budget. Instead, spend some time thinking about which purchases and experiences are the most enjoyable or meaningful for you. Deciding what you want to spend your money on makes it easier to let go of the spending that doesn't matter as much to you. You'll enjoy your spending more that way, while still having savings to send to your retirement accounts.</p> <h2>Automating your savings allows you to have your latte and drink it, too</h2> <p>One aspect of David Bach's advice that often gets lost in discussions of the latte factor is the importance of automating. Bach suggests cutting out your daily indulgence and setting up an automatic transfer of the savings to your retirement or savings account &mdash; which would solve the whole problem of trying to keep track of those saved $5 bills.</p> <p>However, you don't need to give up your daily luxuries to be able to harness the power of automation. Once you have identified any spending items you're willing to cut, funnel the savings into your retirement account. If a daily latte is your favorite part of your morning ritual, then feel free to keep it and cut something else to automate that savings.</p> <h2>Daily luxuries can help keep you motivated to save</h2> <p>Living on a shoestring is exceedingly difficult. You have to say no to yourself constantly, which can lead to something called the &quot;what the hell&quot; effect. This effect describes how we tend to believe that refraining from spending money is an all or nothing proposition, so the moment we give in to temptation a little bit, we might as well throw our own guidelines out the window: &quot;What the hell, I've already bought myself a latte, I might as well go buy some new shoes!&quot;</p> <p>It's easier to go the distance while saving for retirement if you let yourself have some indulgences. You will no longer feel like the slog to retirement is going to be a daily misery that you might as well rebel against. Instead, your daily latte can make any other sacrifices easier to bear, and help you adjust to a new savings normal. Cutting out the latte on top of anything else can trigger the &quot;what the hell&quot; effect and make it even harder for you to save.</p> <h2>Enjoy your simple pleasures</h2> <p>The latte factor is an important thought exercise, but it should never become a hard-and-fast rule for how to live your life. Building daily luxuries into your life is an important part of enjoying your time, both during your career and after you retire. As long as you are willing to be mindful about your spending in general, you don't need to sacrifice small pleasures to afford retirement.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fwhy-your-daily-latte-wont-sink-your-retirement-savings&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FWhy%2520Your%2520Daily%2520Latte%2520Wont%2520Sink%2520Your%2520Retirement%2520Savings.jpg&amp;description=Why%20Your%20Daily%20Latte%20Wont%20Sink%20Your%20Retirement%20Savings"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;<img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/Why%20Your%20Daily%20Latte%20Wont%20Sink%20Your%20Retirement%20Savings.jpg" alt="Why Your Daily Latte Wont Sink Your Retirement Savings" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/emily-guy-birken">Emily Guy Birken</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-your-daily-latte-wont-sink-your-retirement-savings">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-find-the-savings-strategy-that-works-for-you">How to Find the Savings Strategy That Works For You</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-you-can-cut-costs-right-before-you-retire-0">6 Ways You Can Cut Costs Right Before You Retire</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-save-for-retirement-while-caring-for-kids-and-parents">How to Save for Retirement While Caring for Kids and Parents</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-signs-its-time-to-retire">8 Signs It&#039;s Time to Retire</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-red-flags-that-your-retirement-plan-may-be-off-track">4 Red Flags That Your Retirement Plan May Be Off Track</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Retirement automated savings cognitive bias cutting costs daily latte expenses Latte Factor psychology saving money shame small luxuries Fri, 15 Sep 2017 08:00:05 +0000 Emily Guy Birken 2019385 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Save for Retirement While Caring for Kids and Parents http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-save-for-retirement-while-caring-for-kids-and-parents <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-save-for-retirement-while-caring-for-kids-and-parents" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/three_generations_women_laughing_in_the_kitchen.jpg" alt="Three generations women laughing in the kitchen" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>As a member of the sandwich generation, you're not only raising your children, you're also caring for your aging parents. The financial burden, not to mention the daily responsibilities, can leave you struggling to invest in your own financial future. Here are some ways you can still save for your retirement while caring for those who depend on you. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-money-strategies-for-the-sandwich-generation?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Money Strategies for the Sandwich Generation</a>)</p> <h2>1. Make your financial future a priority</h2> <p>Your financial future matters as much as the current responsibilities you have. Consider the stress you experience as you try to navigate life while being a parent and caring for your own aging parents. Do you want to repeat the cycle of stress by failing to plan for your retirement? No, of course you don't. However, by letting guilt and the needs of the moment dictate your financial choices, you may end up in that place. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-financial-steps-to-take-when-your-aging-parents-move-in?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Financial Steps to Take When Your Aging Parents Move In</a>)</p> <p>When you're juggling medical bills and child care costs, retirement may seem far away and unimportant. It isn't. You deserve to have your financial needs met in the future as much as your children and parents deserve to have good care now.</p> <h2>2. Take advantage of employer programs</h2> <p>If your employer offers any sort of matching contribution to your 401(k), take full advantage of that opportunity.</p> <p>As you're able, increase the amount of money you're putting into your 401(k) from each paycheck. Having it automatically deducted &mdash; which is how most employers handle contributions &mdash; will keep you from depending on these savings for your daily expenses. Your goal is to bring your savings amount to the point of maximum matching contributions from your employer. It's an easy win, as those matching contributions double your savings.</p> <h2>3. Take advantage of tax-free savings</h2> <p>If you don't have a 401(k), now is the time to set up a traditional IRA. It's another way to maximize your retirement savings, as a traditional IRA will generally allow you to defer taxes on the money you save until much later &mdash; when you start withdrawing it. Deferring taxes enables you to save more now, while you're living in the sandwich generation budget crunch.</p> <h2>4. Find and apply for available tax benefits</h2> <p>Some additional tax breaks exist for adult children who are providing full-time care for their aging parents. Talk to your CPA about the requirements for claiming your elderly parents as a dependent.</p> <p>Additionally, examine your options for claiming tax deductions for medical care and other dependent expenses such as transportation, food, and supplies. Not all costs will qualify for tax deductions, but those that do can save you a good chunk of money that can go straight into your retirement savings.</p> <h2>5. Liquidate the assets your parents no longer need</h2> <p>It can be difficult to work through big financial decisions with your aging parents, but doing so can help you both navigate the somewhat rough financial waters of elder care. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-things-youll-encounter-when-taking-over-a-loved-ones-finances?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Things You'll Encounter When Taking Over a Loved One's Finances</a>)</p> <p>Identify the assets that are used very little but require ongoing maintenance, such as a house that's not lived in, or a boat or car that sits unused. These unused assets are financial drains. Work together to come up with a plan for liquidating them. Then put the money gained from their sale into an account that pays for your parents' monthly expenses. This relieves the financial burden you're carrying so that less of your income is required for your parents, and more of your income can go to your retirement savings.</p> <h2>6. Reduce a big, ongoing expense</h2> <p>The goal here isn't to come up with a one-time win, but to find a monthly cost that eats up your income and find a way to reduce it. Then you'll take that difference and add it to your monthly savings.</p> <p>Make a list of your monthly expenses, rank them from most to least expensive, and start going down the list with your goal in mind. You can shop for better insurance rates and a cheaper cellphone plan. You can sell the expensive car you're still making payments on, buy a cheaper one outright, and put the amount you used to spend on a car payment directly into your savings. The key is to make sure that the amount you save goes into savings; don't let it get absorbed into your budget and spent on other things.</p> <h2>7. Take a money challenge</h2> <p>A <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/7-smart-money-challenges-you-can-totally-do?ref=internal" target="_blank">money challenge</a> is a fun but temporary way to reduce your costs and increase your savings by cutting an expense for a short amount of time. It's doable because it's temporary, which also makes it fun. You might not want to haggle over expenses or shop from thrift stores all the time; however, you can do it for a month or so and use what you save to add to your retirement.</p> <h2>8. Invest in a hobby that makes money</h2> <p>Taking on yet another responsibility may seem impossible. However, prioritizing your own interests &mdash; in this case, one that can make you some money &mdash; is a good idea. You need time to dedicate to your own interests in this time of intense caregiving. If you put time into developing a <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-awesome-money-making-hobbies?ref=internal" target="_blank">hobby that has income potential</a>, you'll be able to add to your retirement fund.</p> <p>If finding the time is an issue (and of course it is!), don't be shy about asking family members and friends to pitch in on child care and parent care. You may handle most of the responsibility for your aging parents, but you don't have to do everything yourself. Set up a schedule so that adult siblings, cousins, and community members take on caregiving for a day or afternoon out of the week. Use that time to work on your side hustle, and funnel the money you make from it straight into your retirement savings.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fhow-to-save-for-retirement-while-caring-for-kids-and-parents&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FHow%2520to%2520Save%2520for%2520Retirement%2520While%2520Caring%2520for%2520Kids%2520and%2520Parents.jpg&amp;description=How%20to%20Save%20for%20Retirement%20While%20Caring%20for%20Kids%20and%20Parents"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/How%20to%20Save%20for%20Retirement%20While%20Caring%20for%20Kids%20and%20Parents.jpg" alt="How to Save for Retirement While Caring for Kids and Parents" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/annie-mueller">Annie Mueller</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-save-for-retirement-while-caring-for-kids-and-parents">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-help-your-parents-retire">How to Help Your Parents Retire</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-your-daily-latte-wont-sink-your-retirement-savings">Why Your Daily Latte Won&#039;t Sink Your Retirement Savings</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-you-can-cut-costs-right-before-you-retire-0">6 Ways You Can Cut Costs Right Before You Retire</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-age-milestones-that-impact-your-retirement">6 Age Milestones That Impact Your Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-questions-financial-advisers-hear-most-often">8 Questions Financial Advisers Hear Most Often</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Family Retirement aging parents caregiving cutting costs extra income IRA raising kids sandwich generation saving money taxes Thu, 14 Sep 2017 08:31:09 +0000 Annie Mueller 2019188 at http://www.wisebread.com 8 Signs It's Time to Retire http://www.wisebread.com/8-signs-its-time-to-retire <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/8-signs-its-time-to-retire" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/senior_woman_relaxing_0.jpg" alt="Senior woman relaxing" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>There will come a time when you consider making the shift from worker bee to retiree. But knowing the best moment to stop working is not always easy to determine. How do you know whether your money will last once you stop earning a salary? Is there a &quot;magic age,&quot; when retiring makes sense, or do you just go with a gut feeling?</p> <p>There's no science to knowing when to retire, but there may be some signs to follow. If most or all of these apply to you, maybe it's time to submit that resignation and begin the next chapter of your life.</p> <h2>1. You have enough money for the retirement you want</h2> <p>It's impossible to know precisely how much you'll need in retirement, but there are some basic calculations you can make to see how long your money will last if you stop working.</p> <p>You must first calculate what your annual living expenses will be. Research shows that people tend to spend less as they get older, but be sure to factor in the potential costs of new activities like travel, eating out, and caring for grandchildren. Then, examine how much money you have saved, and what the return on that money might be as you age. Match those numbers up with your expected life span. There are other things to consider, such as whether you plan to draw equity from your home. There are many online calculators that can help you with these figures.</p> <p>Generally speaking, if you take the annual expenses you expect and multiply them by 25, you'll be in the ballpark of what you need to retire comfortably. Once you are approaching this number, it may be a sign that you can stop working. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-you-can-cut-costs-right-before-you-retire-0?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Ways You Can Cut Costs Right Before You Retire</a>)</p> <h2>2. You must collect distributions from your retirement plan</h2> <p>If you have a 401(k) or IRA, there comes a point at which you are required to take distributions. For most people, this age is 70-&frac12;. You can delay taking 401(k) distributions until after you stop working, but not for the money in a traditional IRA. If you are being forced to take distributions, there's not much incentive to continue working.</p> <h2>3. You can collect the maximum in Social Security</h2> <p>The government incentivizes people to retire later by offering them more money from Social Security if they wait longer to collect it. You can begin collecting benefits as early as age 62, but those benefits will be higher if you wait longer. Those approaching retirement age can get full benefits if they wait until age 67, and may get additional credits if they wait until age 70. If you're already getting the maximum benefit from the government, perhaps it's a sign that you're ready to retire for good. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-smart-ways-to-boost-your-social-security-payout-before-retirement?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Smart Ways to Boost Your Social Security Payout Before Retirement</a>)</p> <h2>4. Your expenses are the lowest they've been in years</h2> <p>Your house is completely paid off. The kids are out of the house and college is paid for. You're not yet at the point where you have high medical expenses. Your cost of living hasn't been this low in decades. Sure, you may have big ticket things you want to pay for (travel, for example), but your day-to-day existence no longer requires a bi-weekly paycheck. It's still important to assess whether you have enough saved to last, but if you've downsized your lifestyle to a super-low level, it may no longer be necessary to keep working.</p> <h2>5. You no longer get any pleasure from work</h2> <p>We've all heard stories about older people who continue working simply because it makes them happy. Often, working gives them purpose and a sense of satisfaction that can't be replaced in retirement. But what if you're not one of these people? What if the work itself isn't rewarding, and you find yourself drained rather than energized by it? Then it may be time to consider retiring, assuming that your financial ducks are lined up well. Life is too short to work at an unsatisfying job if you don't have to.</p> <h2>6. Your health is starting to decline</h2> <p>In a perfect world, you will be healthy and spry enough to take advantage of all that retirement can offer. You will be perfectly able to handle that long bike tour through the south of France, and those backpacking trips on the Pacific Crest Trail. You'll have energy to spend time and keep up with your grandkids. But, if you are starting to see your health fade, perhaps it's time to stop working before you're unable to enjoy retirement the way you wish.</p> <h2>7. Your spouse wants you to</h2> <p>If your significant other is done working and has an urge to begin the next chapter of their life, perhaps it's that time for you as well. Many of the happiest retired couples are those that retire at the same time, and make post-work plans together. How fun is your spouse's retirement going to be if you're still schlepping into the office every day? (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-money-conversations-couples-should-have-before-retirement?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Money Conversations Couples Should Have Before Retirement</a>)</p> <h2>8. You are confident in your post-work plans</h2> <p>Many people continue working because they honestly don't know what they'd do otherwise. But if you have mapped out your retirement life, have a good sense of how you'll fill your days, and feel excited about what you want to do, that's a sign you may be ready to retire. If work is actually preventing you from moving forward on your plans, maybe it's time to think seriously about stopping work, assuming you are also ready financially.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F8-signs-its-time-to-retire&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F8%2520Signs%2520Its%2520Time%2520to%2520Retire.jpg&amp;description=8%20Signs%20Its%20Time%20to%20Retire"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/8%20Signs%20Its%20Time%20to%20Retire.jpg" alt="8 Signs It's Time to Retire" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/tim-lemke">Tim Lemke</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-signs-its-time-to-retire">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-age-milestones-that-impact-your-retirement">6 Age Milestones That Impact Your Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-expensive-mistakes-of-the-newly-retired">9 Expensive Mistakes of the Newly Retired</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-enjoy-retirement-if-you-havent-saved-enough">How to Enjoy Retirement If You Haven&#039;t Saved Enough</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-reasons-why-your-retirement-cost-calculations-may-be-wrong">8 Reasons Why Your Retirement Cost Calculations May Be Wrong</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/these-5-expenses-will-probably-cost-you-a-lot-less-in-retirement">These 5 Expenses Will Probably Cost You a Lot Less in Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Retirement 401(k) downsizing expenses Health leisure required minimum distributions saving money social security working Thu, 14 Sep 2017 08:00:06 +0000 Tim Lemke 2020506 at http://www.wisebread.com How to Help Your Parents Retire http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-help-your-parents-retire <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/how-to-help-your-parents-retire" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/all_grown_up_but_still_her_mother's_daughter.jpg" alt="All grown up, but still her mother&#039;s daughter" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>One of the toughest transitions into adulthood is when you realize that you need to help your parents instead of the other way around.</p> <p>Add money into the mix, and that can make an already awkward transition feel even more uncomfortable. Money is often a taboo topic in families, and parents sometimes have trouble letting go of the idea that you are a child rather than someone who can help them with financial planning. It may feel easier to just assume Mom and Dad have everything covered for their financial future, and let the chips fall where they may.</p> <p>But helping your parents prepare for retirement is one of the best gifts you can give the people who raised you. That's because even the most financially savvy planners may run into issues, questions, or problems that they are not sure how to handle. You can help your parents get ready for retirement, and grow closer in the process.</p> <p>Here's what you need to know about helping your parents retire.</p> <h2>Prioritize your own retirement savings</h2> <p>Most parents know that it's smarter to save for retirement before putting money into the kids' college funds. After all, students can take out loans for school, but there are no loans for retirement. Adult children should prioritize retirement savings over paying for their parents' retirement needs.</p> <p>It may seem strange to prioritize your own retirement as a part of helping your parents retire, but it's an important first step in financially protecting your entire family. Taking care of your parents' retirement instead of saving for your own means that you will simply be passing money problems from one generation to the next. By putting your own retirement savings first, you are teaching your kids how to responsibly plan for their own financial futures.</p> <p>Being prepared to have your parents use their assets for as long as they last will also allow you to make the best use of programs like Medicaid, which requires long-term care recipients to have exhausted their own assets before it kicks in. Rather than exhaust your own finances, plan to protect your future retirement so your kids are not left with another tough decision in 30 years.</p> <h2>Introduce the initial conversation</h2> <p>To be able to help your parents retire, you need to know where they stand financially so you can best help them fill in the gaps and prepare for that major transition. If you're lucky, your parents have already looped you in on what they have saved, where it is, what plans they have for the future, and who they trust as their financial adviser to make the decisions. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-things-youll-encounter-when-taking-over-a-loved-ones-finances?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Things You'll Encounter When Taking Over a Loved One's Finances</a>)</p> <p>Where it gets tricky is if your parents shut down any money conversations and change the subject to &quot;something more pleasant.&quot; If you know your parents will not feel comfortable talking openly about their money planning with you, frame the conversation as an opportunity for you to learn together.</p> <p>For instance, you might mention that you want to look over your 401(k) information and would love to chat with them about how they handle their retirement accounts. In addition, you could invite them to read a book with you about financial planning so you can use the information as a jumping off point for personal discussion.</p> <h2>Talk about the day-to-day details</h2> <p>Knowing where your parents hope to live and how they intend to spend their time in retirement will give you (and them) a baseline understanding of how much they will need in retirement. Encourage Mom and Dad to talk about how they want their lives to look in retirement. Do they want to stay in place, move closer to grandchildren, or sell everything and live in an RV?</p> <p>In addition to helping you get a better sense of their financial needs in retirement, these conversations will also help your parents enjoy the anticipation of planning for retirement.</p> <h2>Learn more about Social Security and Medicare</h2> <p>While spending an afternoon navigating Social Security and Medicare's websites is no one's idea of fun, taking the time to determine your parents' eligibility for these programs can help you better understand what to expect from their government entitlements. You and your parents can check out the eligibility questionnaires at <a href="http://www.medicare.gov/" target="_blank">Medicare.gov</a> and <a href="http://www.benefits.gov/" target="_blank">Benefits.gov</a> to find out what benefits are available and whether your parents qualify.</p> <h2>Meet with a financial adviser</h2> <p>No one expects you (or your parents!) to know everything about the complexities of planning for retirement. Together with your parents, take the time to interview and hire a financial adviser to help with the details of building your parents' retirement.</p> <p>A financial adviser is also in a good position to help your parents make sure their estate planning is up-to-snuff and that all of their accounts have properly named beneficiaries. Even if Mom and Dad are uncomfortable talking about these issues with you &mdash; who wants to think about their own deaths, after all? &mdash; having a trusted financial adviser can help make sure they have all the necessary estate planning paperwork in place.</p> <h2>Keep talking</h2> <p>If money conversations are uncomfortable, you might feel like having that single afternoon of financial planning with your parents is sufficient. But checking in with your parents regularly is an essential part of helping them prepare for retirement. This lets them know you are there to help them with any difficult issues or decisions.</p> <p>Continuing the conversation can also help <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-protect-elderly-loved-ones-from-financial-scams?ref=internal" target="_blank">protect your parents against scams</a>. According to a 2015 True Link Financial report on financial elder abuse, annual losses from elder fraud totaled over $36 billion. By staying connected with your parents and offering to help them with financial decisions, they will be less likely to fall victim to a predatory scammer because you will be there to help sniff out anything untoward.</p> <h2>Paying it back to Mom and Dad</h2> <p>Your parents took care of you throughout your childhood (and maybe a little into adulthood, too). Now it's your turn to look out for them. Give your parents the gift of some help with retirement planning, so they can relax and enjoy the end of their career and the beginning of the next phase of their lives.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fhow-to-help-your-parents-retire&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FHow%2520to%2520Help%2520Your%2520Parents%2520Retire.jpg&amp;description=How%20to%20Help%20Your%20Parents%20Retire"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/How%20to%20Help%20Your%20Parents%20Retire.jpg" alt="How to Help Your Parents Retire" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/emily-guy-birken">Emily Guy Birken</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-help-your-parents-retire">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-4"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-save-for-retirement-while-caring-for-kids-and-parents">How to Save for Retirement While Caring for Kids and Parents</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-signs-its-time-to-retire">8 Signs It&#039;s Time to Retire</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-questions-financial-advisers-hear-most-often">8 Questions Financial Advisers Hear Most Often</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-single-parents-can-juggle-retirement-savings-too">How Single Parents Can Juggle Retirement Savings, Too</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-frugal-living-skills-i-wish-my-parents-would-have-taught-me">8 Frugal Living Skills I Wish My Parents Would Have Taught Me</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Family Retirement assistance caregiving financial help medicare parents saving money scams social security Tue, 12 Sep 2017 08:00:06 +0000 Emily Guy Birken 2019028 at http://www.wisebread.com Best Money Tips: 10 Ways to Increase Your Social Security Payout http://www.wisebread.com/best-money-tips-10-ways-to-increase-your-social-security-payout <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/best-money-tips-10-ways-to-increase-your-social-security-payout" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/older_couple_laptop_531418562.jpg" alt="Couple learning how to increase their social security payout" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Welcome to Wise Bread's <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/topic/best-money-tips">Best Money Tips</a> Roundup! Today we found articles on ways to increase your social security payout before you retire, ways to save at Dunkin&rsquo; Donuts, and how to take group vacations without losing friends.</p> <h2>Top 5 Articles</h2> <p><a href="https://shebudgets.com/personal-finance/retirement/social-security-payout/71372">10 Ways To Increase Your Social Security Payout Before You Retire</a> &mdash; Each year that you work increases your social security payout. If you continue working after your retirement age, your benefit amount will increase by 8% up to age 70. [SheBudgets]</p> <p><a href="https://www.moneytalksnews.com/7-ways-save-dunkin-donuts">7 Ways to Save at Dunkin&rsquo; Donuts</a> &mdash; Look for a survey code on your Dunkin' Donuts receipt. Fill out the online survey and you'll score a free doughnut when you buy a medium or larger drink. [Money Talks News]</p> <p><a href="http://money.cnn.com/2017/09/08/pf/vacation-with-friends/index.html">How to take group vacations (without losing friends)</a> &mdash; If you can't agree on where to stay, be open to splitting up the group so that everyone can have the accommodations they want. You can always meet up for activities and outings later. [CNN Money]</p> <p><a href="https://www.dumblittleman.com/dopp-kit/">The Secret To Packing The Perfect Travel Dopp Kit</a> &mdash; Here's what you need to assemble the perfect Dopp kit to help you stay prepared on your travels. [Dumb Little Man]</p> <p><a href="https://blog.cheapism.com/diy-projects-to-avoid-17573/">11 DIY Projects You Should Definitely Leave to the Professionals</a> &mdash; These projects are either too dangerous, too difficult, or simply too easy to mess up. [Cheapism]</p> <h2>Other Essential Reading</h2> <p><a href="https://www.popsugar.com/smart-living/Organizing-Tips-From-Professional-37761620">5 Lifesaving Habits of a Real-Life Professional Organizer</a> &mdash; Keep a magic eraser in the shower and wipe down your walls after turning the water off. This will keep your shower clean and mildew-free. [PopSugar Smart Living]</p> <p><a href="https://lifehacks.io/things-you-need-to-be-okay-with/">6 Things You Need To Be Okay With. Right Now.</a> &mdash; It's okay to cry. Crying is not a weakness, and emotional tears actually have special health benefits. [Life Hacks]</p> <p><a href="https://adebtfreestressfreelife.com/home-management/">9 Ways To Bring Your Home Management Skills To The Next Level</a> &mdash; Stay on top of household laundry by doing a load a day. [A Mess Free Life]</p> <p><a href="https://www.csmonitor.com/USA/Society/2017/0908/Amid-Harvey-recovery-small-businesses-roll-up-sleeves-and-get-back-to-work">Amid Harvey recovery, small businesses roll up sleeves and get back to work</a> &mdash; Houston's small businesses are providing helping hands in the rebuilding process as well as a sense of normality for the community. [The Christian Science Monitor]</p> <p><a href="https://due.com/blog/dont-work-freelance-client/">3 Signs You Shouldn&rsquo;t Work With That Freelance Client</a> &mdash; Some clients are more trouble than their worth. If you spot these three problematic signs in a potential client, it's probably a good idea to turn down the work. [Due]</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/amy-lu">Amy Lu</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/best-money-tips-10-ways-to-increase-your-social-security-payout">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-signs-its-time-to-retire">8 Signs It&#039;s Time to Retire</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-things-to-know-before-retiring-abroad">9 Things to Know Before Retiring Abroad</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-help-your-parents-retire">How to Help Your Parents Retire</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-retiring-with-debt-isnt-the-end-of-the-world">Why Retiring With Debt Isn&#039;t the End of the World</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/heres-how-you-should-budget-your-social-security-checks">Here&#039;s How You Should Budget Your Social Security Checks</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Retirement best money tips social security Mon, 11 Sep 2017 08:30:08 +0000 Amy Lu 2018089 at http://www.wisebread.com 9 Things to Know Before Retiring Abroad http://www.wisebread.com/9-things-to-know-before-retiring-abroad <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/9-things-to-know-before-retiring-abroad" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/senior_couple_on_a_vacation.jpg" alt="Senior couple on a vacation" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>For an increasing number of Americans, moving abroad to enjoy retirement is an enticing idea. There are lots of reasons that lead people to make this choice, including better weather, cheaper health care, and an increased standard of living at a lower cost. But it's not a decision to be taken lightly. There are a number of important considerations that retirees sometimes overlook. Here are nine things you must know before retiring abroad. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-countries-where-you-can-retire-for-1000-a-month?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Countries Where You Can Retire for $1,000 a Month</a>)</p> <h2>1. U.S. tax laws are still applicable</h2> <p>Some retirees are under the impression that if you skip the country, the IRS somehow magically stops requiring you to file your income taxes. However, regardless of where you decide to live in the world, if you remain a U.S. citizen, your worldwide income is subject to U.S. taxes. Failing to pay your taxes is a serious offense with sometimes dire consequences that aren't worth risking, and ignorance is not a mitigating factor. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dont-let-these-expenses-spoil-your-retirement-abroad?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Don't Let These Expenses Spoil Your Retirement Abroad</a>)</p> <p>If you are a U.S. citizen or green card holder who lives outside of the U.S. for 330 days during any period of 12 consecutive months, you may be able to apply for the Foreign Earned Income Exclusion. This allows you to exclude from your taxable income a certain amount of income that you earn abroad. The exclusion amount changes each year as it adjusts for inflation. For 2017, the amount is $102,100.</p> <p>So, if you live abroad for 330 or more days in 2017 and earn under $102,100, you may not have to pay taxes. This exemption is not automatic and you must apply for the exclusion. Check the <a href="https://www.irs.gov/individuals/international-taxpayers/foreign-earned-income-exclusion" target="_blank">IRS website</a> for more details. Keep in mind that even if you don't owe any money, you are still required to file a U.S. tax return every year.</p> <p>In addition to U.S. taxes, you'll need to find out if you're subject to taxes in the country you move to. Check with local tax authorities to learn more. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-countries-that-welcome-american-retirees?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Countries That Welcome American Retirees</a>)</p> <h2>2. Medicare doesn't cover you outside the U.S.</h2> <p>The first thing to be aware of is that, except in rare instances, any medical expenses you incur when you're not in the United States cannot be paid for with Medicare. That said, it may still be worthwhile to sign up for Medicare Part A (hospital coverage) because it is free. If you plan to move back to the U.S. or make frequent trips back, it may also be worth paying the premium for Medicare Part B, which covers doctor visits and outpatient care. To determine whether this will be of benefit to you, you should thoroughly check the information provided on the <a href="https://www.medicare.gov/people-like-me/outside-us/outside-us.html" target="_blank">Medicare website</a>.</p> <p>Keep in mind that health care is often much less expensive in other countries. Mexico, for example, is more than 50 percent cheaper for doctor visits, prescription drugs, and health insurance. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-almost-anyone-can-afford-to-retire-in-mexico?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How Almost Anyone Can Afford to Retire in Mexico</a>)</p> <h2>3. Currency fluctuations may affect your bank balance</h2> <p>Even if your monthly income remains the same, the amount that this translates to in your local currency may go down. This is entirely dependent on the strength of the U.S. dollar at any given time, which could have a large impact on your finances, particularly if you're on a fixed income.</p> <p>Remember, however, that this could also work in your favor if the dollar strengthens against your local currency, allowing you to purchase more of the local currency. Though you can't control currency fluctuations, you should have a contingency in place for if and when they do happen. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/retire-for-half-the-cost-in-these-5-countries?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Retire for Half the Cost in These 5 Countries</a>)</p> <h2>4. You can probably get Social Security &mdash; and maybe more</h2> <p>You can still receive Social Security payments in most countries around the world but it's important to check the <a href="https://www.ssa.gov/pubs/EN-05-10137.pdf" target="_blank">list of excluded countries</a> before settling on a location. If you've lived and worked abroad for part of your career, you may also be able to combine retirement credits from the U.S. and another country where you worked, for a larger benefits payout. The other country must be among more than two dozen that has a <a href="https://www.ssa.gov/international/" target="_blank">reciprocal agreement</a> with the U.S.</p> <h2>5. You need to put a plan in place for when you die</h2> <p>There are two main considerations for putting a plan in place for the event that you pass away while you're abroad. First, you should know that the U.S. State Department will not pay for the return of your remains or ashes. Second, different countries have different regulations around what happens to your assets.</p> <p>You need to have funds in place if your wish is to have your remains repatriated to the U.S., as this can be a costly and time consuming process. You should make yourself familiar with local succession rules, as some countries won't automatically honor your wishes for assets that lie within them unless you have an eligible will.</p> <h2>6. You can probably still vote in the U.S.</h2> <p>Just because you no longer live in the U.S. doesn't mean you don't take an interest in the U.S. political situation. In the vast majority of circumstances you are still eligible to vote absentee in federal primary and general elections. In some states, you're even able to vote for state and local office candidates and referendums.</p> <p>You will need to <a href="https://travel.state.gov/content/passports/en/abroad/legal-matters/benefits/voting.html" target="_blank">submit a new Federal Post Card Application</a> each year in order to qualify, and you should do so at least 45 days before an election. But from there it's a simple process. You'll be able to submit your vote either by mail or electronically depending on where you're registered.</p> <h2>7. You might not like it</h2> <p>Unfortunately, the reality doesn't live up to the dream for some retirees relocating abroad. There are so many factors to consider that it's almost certain that issues will arise that you've not even thought about, from financial problems to culture shock.</p> <p>It's best to try a place out for a while before taking the plunge and relocating your whole life. Even if it's a location you know well from having visited over the years, residing somewhere permanently is different from vacationing there. Just bear in mind that it may not work out as you hoped.</p> <h2>8. Relocation can be extremely expensive</h2> <p>When it comes to calculating just how much it's going to cost you to live in a foreign country, it's important to include relocation costs. Shipping possessions like furniture can be costly, but not transporting them may also be expensive if you have to buy new items when you arrive.</p> <p>If you have pets there may be <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/features/travelwithpets/index.html" target="_blank">vaccinations and quarantine</a> periods that you have to shell out for, as well as separate transport costs. In addition, your own visa application could be expensive and complicated depending on the location. Look out for those hidden costs.</p> <h2>9. Things will be different</h2> <p>It's stating the obvious, but no matter how familiar the country is that you're retiring to, things will be different from the U.S. Everything from the local customs, to what groceries you can get in the supermarket will be new.</p> <p>You'll more than likely be away from close friends and family and there will probably be a sharp adjustment period. It's important not to underestimate the effects this could have on your happiness when making what will be one of the most significant decisions of your life.</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/nick-wharton">Nick Wharton</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-things-to-know-before-retiring-abroad">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-countries-where-you-can-retire-for-1000-a-month">5 Countries Where You Can Retire for $1,000 a Month</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-questions-financial-advisers-hear-most-often">8 Questions Financial Advisers Hear Most Often</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dont-let-these-expenses-spoil-your-retirement-abroad">Don&#039;t Let These Expenses Spoil Your Retirement Abroad</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-age-milestones-that-impact-your-retirement">6 Age Milestones That Impact Your Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/the-best-airline-rewards-programs-for-trips-to-europe">The Best Airline Rewards Programs for Trips to Europe</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Retirement Travel abroad currency estate planning international laws mediare overseas politics social security taxes voting Mon, 11 Sep 2017 08:30:05 +0000 Nick Wharton 2017865 at http://www.wisebread.com Best Money Tips: 12 Ways to Make Money in Retirement http://www.wisebread.com/best-money-tips-12-ways-to-make-money-in-retirement <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/best-money-tips-12-ways-to-make-money-in-retirement" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/woman_retired_laptop_495393236.jpg" alt="Woman making money in retirement" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Welcome to Wise Bread's <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/topic/best-money-tips">Best Money Tips</a> Roundup! Today we found articles on ways to generate income in retirement, cheaper alternatives in your daily life, and one big investing mistake you need to avoid.</p> <h2>Top 5 Articles</h2> <p><a href="http://www.kiplinger.com/article/retirement/T023-C000-S002-12-strategies-to-generate-income-in-retirement.html">12 Strategies to Generate Income in Retirement</a> &mdash; Use these strategies to ensure you don't outlive your money. [Kiplinger]</p> <p><a href="https://shoppingkim.com/better-cheaper-alternatives-daily-life/">Better, Cheaper Alternatives to Your Daily Life</a> &mdash; Disposable products are cheaper upfront, but you'll spend more in the long run to replace them. [Shopping Kim]</p> <p><a href="http://moneyminiblog.com/investing/expensive-mistake/">One Big Expensive Investing Mistake to Avoid</a> &mdash; This investing mistake can open you up to huge risks. [MoneyMiniBlog]</p> <p><a href="https://www.popsugar.com/smart-living/How-Save-Money-Wedding-23603315">130 Ways to Save Money and Still Have the Wedding of Your Dreams</a> &mdash; Stick to in-season blooms for your flower arrangements. [PopSugar Smart Living]</p> <p><a href="https://blog.cheapism.com/emergency-preparedness-essentials-checklist-14349/">16 Cheap Emergency Essentials You Don't Want To Be Without</a> &mdash; Keep pre-moistened towelettes or baby wipes on hand so you can clean yourself without water. [Cheapism]</p> <h2>Other Essential Reading</h2> <p><a href="https://www.biblemoneymatters.com/top-places-to-sell-your-old-smartphone-cell-phone/">20 Places To Sell Your Old Smartphone For Top Dollar</a> &mdash; These are the best places to go to sell your old &mdash; or even broken &mdash; electronic devices. [Bible Money Matters]</p> <p><a href="https://www.csmonitor.com/Environment/2017/0829/How-can-cities-better-address-urban-water-crises">How can cities better address urban water crises?</a> &mdash; Cities around the world are teaming up with private companies to address urban water crises such as declining water quality, drought, and flooding. [The Christian Science Monitor]</p> <p><a href="http://www.financiallypoor.com/insurance/six-top-tips-to-help-younger-drivers-reduce-car-insurance-payments/">Six Top Tips to help Younger Drivers Reduce Car Insurance Payments</a> &mdash; Sign up for a &quot;black box&quot; policy. You'll get a discount for installing a device that monitors your driving and lets the insurer know how responsible a driver you are. [Financially Poor]</p> <p><a href="https://www.daveursillo.com/be-more-creative/">1 Surprising Thing You Can Do to Be More Creative Today</a> &mdash; Nourishing yourself gives you more energy to channel creativity. [Dave Ursillo]</p> <p><a href="http://www.lifehack.org/627954/why-people-make-decisions-that-they-will-regret-later">How People Make Decisions That Are Bad For Them</a> &mdash; We make bad decisions all the time, but understanding ourselves can help us make better decisions. [Lifehack]</p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/amy-lu">Amy Lu</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/best-money-tips-12-ways-to-make-money-in-retirement">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-your-daily-latte-wont-sink-your-retirement-savings">Why Your Daily Latte Won&#039;t Sink Your Retirement Savings</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/what-to-do-if-youre-retiring-with-debt">What to Do If You&#039;re Retiring With Debt</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-signs-its-time-to-retire">8 Signs It&#039;s Time to Retire</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-save-for-retirement-while-caring-for-kids-and-parents">How to Save for Retirement While Caring for Kids and Parents</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-money-conversations-couples-should-have-before-retirement">5 Money Conversations Couples Should Have Before Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Retirement best money tips retirement income Thu, 07 Sep 2017 08:31:07 +0000 Amy Lu 2016721 at http://www.wisebread.com 5 Money Conversations Couples Should Have Before Retirement http://www.wisebread.com/5-money-conversations-couples-should-have-before-retirement <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-money-conversations-couples-should-have-before-retirement" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/budgeting_works_better_when_we_do_it_together.jpg" alt="Budgeting works better when we do it together" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Retirement for you and your spouse is just a few years away. Maybe you're both eagerly awaiting the days when you no longer must commute to work, sit in long meetings, and turn in reports.</p> <p>But retirement does come with its own challenges, many of them financial. It's important for spouses to have the same expectations of what their retirement years will look like. And it's equally important for each spouse to understand where their income will be coming from and how much money there will be.</p> <p>Here are five key conversations that couples must have before retirement arrives.</p> <h2>1. What kind of retirement do you both want, and how expensive will it be?</h2> <p>There are many different ways to spend your retirement years. Maybe you want to travel the world. Maybe you'd prefer spending more time with your grandchildren. Your version of a dream retirement might consist of days on the golf course or fishing on the lake.</p> <p>But what if you have the travel bug, and your spouse would prefer to sit home and catch up on some reading? These are two radically different versions of retirement. And, when it comes to your retirement finances, one is far more expensive than the other.</p> <p>It's important for you to share your retirement expectations with your spouse before you actually leave the working world. If you both agree that plenty of travel is in your future, you'll need to work hard to make sure you'll have enough retirement dollars to fund these trips. If only one of you wants to spend time traveling or pursuing a more expensive hobby, you'll have to craft a compromise.</p> <h2>2. Where will the money come from, and how much will you have?</h2> <p>As retirement nears, couples must work together on a new household budget tailored to their new life after work. You won't be able to rely on that steady work income after retirement, and Social Security payments probably won't cover all your daily living needs. This makes writing a household budget &mdash; and agreeing to stick to it &mdash; more important.</p> <p>Your new budget should list all of your sources of monthly income and all of your expected monthly expenses, including mortgage payments if you still have them, car payments, utility bills, groceries, and entertainment. Once you've listed your income and expenses, including how much of your retirement savings you'll need to dip into each month to cover these expenses, you'll have a clearer picture of how much you can spend each month after leaving the working world. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-you-can-cut-costs-right-before-you-retire-0?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Ways You Can Cut Costs Right Before You Retire</a>)</p> <h2>3. Where will you live?</h2> <p>Housing expenses can be a challenge after retirement. It's important for couples to discuss where they'll live after leaving the working life behind. Do you want to stay in your current home for as long as possible? The financial ramifications of this will vary depending on whether you've paid off your mortgage or not. It might make more sense to sell your home and move into a smaller condo or apartment. Or maybe you're ready to move into a senior housing facility.</p> <p>Don't put off conversations about housing. This is one of the most important issues couples face after retirement. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/retire-for-half-the-cost-in-these-5-countries?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Retire for Half the Cost in These 5 Countries</a>)</p> <h2>4. Will one of you take on a new job or career?</h2> <p>Retirement doesn't always mean that you or your spouse won't continue to work in some way. Some people take on part-time jobs to occupy their time and earn a bit of extra spending money. Others start the new careers that they've always desired. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-great-retirement-jobs?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Great Retirement Jobs</a>)</p> <p>It's important for couples to discuss their plans for working after retirement. One spouse &mdash; or both &mdash; holding down a part-time job can make a significant difference in your income and budget after retirement, even if this income isn't essential to covering your daily living needs.</p> <h2>5. How will you handle unplanned expenses?</h2> <p>Unexpected expenses aren't unusual while you're working, with everything from burst water heaters to serious medical problems eating away at your savings. The same unexpected expenses can pop up when you're retired, too. When they do, how will you pay for them?</p> <p>Talk with your spouse about maintaining an emergency fund that can cover at least six months' worth of your daily living expenses after retirement. If you don't maintain this fund &mdash; which you should have had while you were working &mdash; one big unexpected expense could wreak havoc on your budget. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-unexpected-expenses-for-retirees-and-how-to-manage-them?ref=seealso" target="_blank">9 Unexpected Expenses for Retirees &mdash; And How to Manage Them</a>)</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F5-money-conversations-couples-should-have-before-retirement&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F5%2520Money%2520Conversations%2520Couples%2520Should%2520Have%2520Before%2520Retirement.jpg&amp;description=5%20Money%20Conversations%20Couples%20Should%20Have%20Before%20Retirement"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/5%20Money%20Conversations%20Couples%20Should%20Have%20Before%20Retirement.jpg" alt="5 Money Conversations Couples Should Have Before Retirement" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dan-rafter">Dan Rafter</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-money-conversations-couples-should-have-before-retirement">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/heres-how-you-should-budget-your-social-security-checks">Here&#039;s How You Should Budget Your Social Security Checks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-couples-are-shortchanging-their-retirement-savings">4 Ways Couples Are Shortchanging Their Retirement Savings</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-you-can-cut-costs-right-before-you-retire-0">6 Ways You Can Cut Costs Right Before You Retire</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-retiring-with-debt-isnt-the-end-of-the-world">Why Retiring With Debt Isn&#039;t the End of the World</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dont-start-a-family-before-reaching-these-5-money-goals">Don&#039;t Start a Family Before Reaching These 5 Money Goals</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Retirement career conversations couples emergency funds expenses housing income jobs marriage spouse Tue, 05 Sep 2017 09:00:06 +0000 Dan Rafter 2013258 at http://www.wisebread.com 4 Red Flags That Your Retirement Plan May Be Off Track http://www.wisebread.com/4-red-flags-that-your-retirement-plan-may-be-off-track <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/4-red-flags-that-your-retirement-plan-may-be-off-track" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/piggy_bank_and_house_model_for_finance_and_banking_concept.jpg" alt="Piggy bank and house model for finance and banking concept" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>If you're 55 or 60 years old, the end of your working days may be in sight. After all, most people retire somewhere around age 65, so you may assume you will also. But how prepared are you?</p> <p>Take a look at the following potential <em>unpreparedness </em>indicators. After reviewing them, if you don't see any concerns, you may, indeed, be headed down the right path toward retirement. However, if you <em>do</em>, it'll be far better to address them now while you're still gainfully employed. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-financial-moves-you-should-make-five-years-before-retirement?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Financial Moves You Should Make Five Years Before Retirement</a>)</p> <h2>1. You haven't run the numbers</h2> <p>Ignorance may be bliss when it comes to the latest neighborhood gossip, but not when it comes to preparing for retirement. Now is the time to estimate your post-career income and expenses.</p> <p>Start with your anticipated monthly expenses. Some of your outgo categories may disappear in retirement, such as contributions to your retirement plan, commuting, and other job expenses. Others may at least decline, such as how much you spend on clothing. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-much-can-you-afford-to-spend-in-retirement?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How Much Can You Afford to Spend in Retirement?</a>)</p> <p>However, some expenses might actually go up, at least temporarily. Many retirees find that they spend more on travel and entertainment initially, but less as they get older.</p> <p>Next, add up the monthly income you expect to receive. How much is your Social Security benefit likely to be? Find out through the <a href="https://www.ssa.gov/oact/quickcalc/" target="_blank">Social Security Administration's estimator</a>. How much are you likely to have in your retirement account by the time you retire? The <a href="https://www.fidelity.com/calculators-tools/fidelity-retirement-score-tool" target="_blank">Fidelity Retirement Score</a> calculator will give you a ballpark idea.</p> <p>What's a conservative estimate for how much you could withdraw from your retirement nest egg each month? One popular rule of thumb is that you should be able to safely take 4 percent of the balance each year without having to worry about running out of money.</p> <p>What other sources of income will you have?</p> <p>Planning future income and expenses isn't a perfect science, but running some estimates may help you avoid unpleasant surprises. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-unexpected-expenses-for-retirees-and-how-to-manage-them?ref=seealso" target="_blank">9 Unexpected Expenses for Retirees &mdash; And How to Manage Them</a>)</p> <h2>2. You haven't saved enough</h2> <p>One of the most unpleasant facts you may discover by taking the step above is that you <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-signs-you-arent-saving-enough-for-retirement?ref=internal" target="_blank">haven't saved enough</a>. According to the Employee Benefit Research Institute, almost half of workers ages 55 or older have less than $100,000 set aside for retirement. That won't go very far.</p> <p>Let's say you're in better financial shape and are on target to have a $250,000 nest egg by the time you retire. Using the 4 percent rule mentioned above, even that amount will allow you to withdraw just $833 per month. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-retirement-rules-of-thumb-that-actually-work?ref=seealso" target="_blank">4 Retirement &quot;Rules of Thumb&quot; That Actually Work</a>)</p> <p>What to do? Plan to stay on the job longer. Doing so will increase your Social Security benefits (when I checked my benefits, I found that waiting until age 70 would boost my monthly benefit amount by 28 percent vs. taking benefits beginning at age 67). Plus, that will give you more time to build a larger retirement nest egg. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-you-can-cut-costs-right-before-you-retire-0?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Ways You Can Cut Costs Right Before You Retire</a>)</p> <h2>3. You still have a mortgage</h2> <p>For most people, a mortgage is their biggest monthly expense. Making sure your mortgage is retired by the time <em>you</em> retire is ideal. However, a growing number of older homeowners are bringing mortgages into their retirements. Many of them refinanced into a lower interest rate in recent years, but reset their 15- or 30-year mortgage clock in the process. If that's you, here are some options to consider:</p> <p>If you're planning to move after you retire, and especially if you'll be able to downsize into a home you could buy outright with the equity in your current home, no problem. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-countries-where-you-can-retire-for-1000-a-month?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Countries Where You Can Retire for $1,000 a Month</a>)</p> <p>If you're planning to stay put, you might consider paying extra on your mortgage in order to wipe it out by the time you retire. But you'll have to weigh that against the potentially better benefits of using that money for added contributions to your retirement plan.</p> <p>Keep in mind that this isn't a strictly mathematical exercise. Many people argue that it would be more profitable to invest more through your workplace retirement plan than accelerate payments on a low-interest mortgage. However, you may decide that the emotional benefit of being out from under your mortgage is more valuable. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/is-it-safe-to-re-finance-your-home-close-to-retirement?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Is it Safe to Re-Finance Your Home Close to Retirement?</a>)</p> <h2>4. You still have student loan debt</h2> <p>A surprising number of older people have education debt, usually because they co-signed on a loan for a child or grandchild who is unable to make the payments or because they took out a Parent PLUS loan. If that's you, consider consolidating your loans to a lower interest rate (you can even &quot;consolidate&quot; a single loan). Then put your loan payoff on a faster track by paying more than the required amount each month.</p> <p>This list isn't meant to discourage you; it's meant to help you prepare to retire <em>successfully</em>. Where else do you need to shore up your retirement plan?</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F4-red-flags-that-your-retirement-plan-may-be-off-track&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F4%2520Red%2520Flags%2520That%2520Your%2520Retirement%2520Plan%2520May%2520Be%2520Off%2520Track.png&amp;description=4%20Red%20Flags%20That%20Your%20Retirement%20Plan%20May%20Be%20Off%20Track"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/4%20Red%20Flags%20That%20Your%20Retirement%20Plan%20May%20Be%20Off%20Track.png" alt="4 Red Flags That Your Retirement Plan May Be Off Track" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/matt-bell">Matt Bell</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-red-flags-that-your-retirement-plan-may-be-off-track">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-retiring-with-debt-isnt-the-end-of-the-world">Why Retiring With Debt Isn&#039;t the End of the World</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-signs-its-time-to-retire">8 Signs It&#039;s Time to Retire</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-your-daily-latte-wont-sink-your-retirement-savings">Why Your Daily Latte Won&#039;t Sink Your Retirement Savings</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-you-can-cut-costs-right-before-you-retire-0">6 Ways You Can Cut Costs Right Before You Retire</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/half-of-americans-are-wrong-about-their-retirement-savings">Half of Americans Are Wrong About Their Retirement Savings</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Retirement expenses mortgages owing money preparedness red flags saving money student loans unprepared Thu, 31 Aug 2017 08:00:07 +0000 Matt Bell 2012369 at http://www.wisebread.com Why Retiring With Debt Isn't the End of the World http://www.wisebread.com/why-retiring-with-debt-isnt-the-end-of-the-world <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/why-retiring-with-debt-isnt-the-end-of-the-world" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/calculating_our_day_to_day_living_cost.jpg" alt="Calculating our day-to-day living cost" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>In a perfect world, you'll retire with no debt at all. But that might not be realistic. Most U.S. adults carry at least <em>some </em>debt with them into retirement. A majority even die owing money. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/who-pays-when-loved-ones-leave-debt-behind?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Who Pays When Loved Ones Leave Debt Behind?</a>)</p> <p>The good news is while retiring with debt might not be uncommon today, it's also not a financial disaster. It mostly depends on the type of debt you bring with you into retirement.</p> <h2>The numbers</h2> <p>In a 2016 study, credit bureau Experian found that 73 percent of consumers died with debt. And these consumers didn't die with just a little debt: Experian reported that these individuals had an average debt of $61,554 when they died. Without counting mortgage debt, that figure fell to a still high $12,875.</p> <p>As you near retirement, you might worry that you'll be saddled with too much debt after you leave the workforce. It's important to realize, though, that there are different types of debt, some better than others. Your monthly income in retirement matters, too: If you can easily cover your debts, and still cover your other expenses, your debt won't be as much of a financial burden.</p> <h2>Start with a budget</h2> <p>You won't know how bad your retirement debt might be until you first draft a household budget for your after-work years. This budget should include all of the money you expect to flow into your hands after you retire, including Social Security payments, pensions, and the income you'll be drawing each month from your retirement savings vehicles.</p> <p>You should then list your monthly expenses, both fixed and estimated. This should include your housing costs, food, utilities, entertainment expenses, medical costs, and, of course, the money you'll have to spend each month to pay off your debts.</p> <p>Once you have your expenses and your income listed, compare the figures. Will you have enough money to cover everything each month? Or will you be short?</p> <p>If you have enough, that's good, though you'll still want to reduce your debt as much as you can before you leave the workforce. The less debt you enter your retirement years with, the better.</p> <p>If you'll be short, it's time to make changes. Figure out ways to reduce your expenses, such as trading in a costly car or maybe selling your expensive home and making the move to a less costly condo or smaller residence. You might also have to scale back your plans for retirement; instead of traveling the world, you might have to be content with catching up on your golf game in your own community.</p> <h2>Good vs. bad debt</h2> <p>Once you've determined your budget, it's time to look at your debt.</p> <p>You might think that all debt is the same. That's not true. Some debt is considered &quot;good debt,&quot; while <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-signs-youve-crossed-from-healthy-debt-to-problem-debt" target="_blank">other debt is considered bad</a>.</p> <p>Good debt is debt you owe for something that can grow in value and provide you with financial benefits in the future. A mortgage is the most common form of good debt. If you're fortunate, the house that your mortgage is financing will grow in value while you own it. When you sell it, you might make a profit. Mortgage debt has the added benefit of coming with low interest rates and some tax benefits.</p> <p>The most common form of bad debt is credit card debt. This debt grows over time and doesn't provide you with any possible financial benefits. It also often comes with sky-high interest rates. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-to-pay-off-high-interest-credit-card-debt?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Ways to Pay Off High Interest Credit Card Debt</a>)</p> <p>If you're nearing retirement and you have both mortgage and credit card debt, it makes financial sense to spend any extra dollars you have to reduce your credit card debt. Your mortgage debt, as long as you can afford the monthly payment in retirement, should not be a priority.</p> <h2>Attack your bad debt</h2> <p>If you want to eliminate your credit card debt &mdash; or at least a chunk of it &mdash; before retirement, you'll have to send extra money each month to your credit card providers.</p> <p>Generally, financial experts recommend two main approaches here. You can follow the debt snowball strategy, in which you pay extra each month on the credit card that has the lowest balance. Once you pay off that card, you pay more each month on the card with the next lowest amount of debt, working your way through all your cards.</p> <p>You can also go with the debt avalanche approach. This method works the same way, only you pay extra on your card with the highest interest rate first instead of the lowest balance. This method will save you the most money because you'll be eliminating your highest-interest debt first. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/snowballs-or-avalanches-which-debt-reduction-strategy-is-best-for-you?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Snowballs or Avalanches: Which Debt Reduction Strategy Is Best for You?</a>)</p> <p>Again, to free up enough money to pay down your debts &mdash; no matter which debts you choose to tackle &mdash; you might have to make lifestyle changes, such as cutting down on your meals out or your entertainment and travel expenses.</p> <p>You'll have to determine how much of a financial burden your debt will be after you retire. The debt you bring into retirement might not scuttle your after-work plans. But if it might, that's why a bit of sacrifice now can really pay off later. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-you-can-cut-costs-right-before-you-retire-0?Ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Ways You Can Cut Costs Right Before You Retire</a>)</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fwhy-retiring-with-debt-isnt-the-end-of-the-world&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FWhy%2520Retiring%2520With%2520Debt%2520Isnt%2520the%2520End%2520of%2520the%2520World.jpg&amp;description=Why%20Retiring%20With%20Debt%20Isnt%20the%20End%20of%20the%20World"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/Why%20Retiring%20With%20Debt%20Isnt%20the%20End%20of%20the%20World.jpg" alt="Why Retiring With Debt Isn't the End of the World" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dan-rafter">Dan Rafter</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-retiring-with-debt-isnt-the-end-of-the-world">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/heres-how-you-should-budget-your-social-security-checks">Here&#039;s How You Should Budget Your Social Security Checks</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-red-flags-that-your-retirement-plan-may-be-off-track">4 Red Flags That Your Retirement Plan May Be Off Track</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/10-things-people-without-debt-do">10 Things People Without Debt Do</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-signs-its-time-to-retire">8 Signs It&#039;s Time to Retire</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-money-conversations-couples-should-have-before-retirement">5 Money Conversations Couples Should Have Before Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Debt Management Retirement bills budgeting expenses income mortgages owing money social security Wed, 30 Aug 2017 09:00:06 +0000 Dan Rafter 2011955 at http://www.wisebread.com Here's How You Should Budget Your Social Security Checks http://www.wisebread.com/heres-how-you-should-budget-your-social-security-checks <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/heres-how-you-should-budget-your-social-security-checks" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/united_states_treasury_government_check.jpg" alt="United States Treasury government check" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>The average retired worker earns a monthly Social Security check of $1,360, according to the U.S. Social Security Administration. And for most retirees, Social Security benefits are just one source of income, with many supplementing their checks with money that they've saved in 401(k) plans, IRAs, and other savings vehicles.</p> <p>This doesn't mean, though, that these Social Security dollars aren't important. The administration says that Social Security benefits represent about 34 percent of the income of the elderly. That's why it's so important for retirees to create a budget for their Social Security benefits and determine the best way to spend such a significant portion of their monthly earnings. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-smart-ways-to-boost-your-social-security-payout-before-retirement?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Smart Ways to Boost Your Social Security Payout Before Retirement</a>)</p> <h2>There's always a need for a budget</h2> <p>The first step in determining how to best spend Social Security benefits is to calculate your monthly income from all sources. Then, determine how much of this income comes from Social Security benefits alone. If Social Security accounts for 70 percent of your monthly income, you'll have to be especially careful how you spend it. If it accounts for just 20 percent, you'll have a bit more leeway.</p> <p>Once you determine how important your benefits are to your monthly income stream, it's time to calculate how much of your Social Security check you should devote to each of your main expenses. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-you-can-cut-costs-right-before-you-retire-0?ref=seealso" target="_blank">6 Ways You Can Cut Costs Right Before You Retire</a>)</p> <h2>Housing</h2> <p>Ideally, you'll enter retirement without a mortgage payment. But that doesn't always happen. You might choose to rent during your retirement years. Or, maybe you'll spend your retirement years in assisted living.</p> <p>Housing often remains a significant expense for retirees, with the Bureau of Labor Statistics reporting in March 2016 that seniors age 55 and older spend an average $16,219 a year on housing. Seniors from the ages of 65 to 74 spend an average $15,838.</p> <p>If you receive the average Social Security check of $1,360 a month, you'll receive $16,320 a year. This means that the average amount that retirees spend on housing would consume most of your Social Security income each year.</p> <p>It might make sense to devote a set percentage of every Social Security check to help cover your housing expenses. How much that percentage is will depend on how much you are spending on housing. If you live in a home with a mortgage that's been paid off, you obviously won't need to spend as much of your checks on housing as you would if you were still paying a mortgage. If housing is a significant expense, though, you might consider devoting 60 percent or more of your Social Security check to covering it. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-countries-where-you-can-retire-for-1000-a-month?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Countries Where You Can Retire for $1,000 a Month</a>)</p> <h2>Food</h2> <p>The Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that seniors from the ages of 65 to 74 spend an average $6,303 a year on food. This makes sense: You have to eat, whether you're working or not. Make sure, then, to reserve part of your Social Security check for groceries and meals out.</p> <p>You do have control over this expense, of course. You can eat out less often and cook at home more, which would reduce your food expenses. But setting aside 20 percent or so of your monthly Social Security check for food should suffice.</p> <h2>Medical expenses</h2> <p>Depending on your health, medical costs could be a significant expense as you age. The numbers from the Bureau of Labor Statistics bear this out. According to the Bureau, adults from the ages of 65 to 74 spend an average $5,956 a year for medical care. The Bureau says that adults 74 and older spend an average $5,708 a year on health care. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-an-hsa-could-help-your-retirement?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How an HSA Could Help Your Retirement</a>)</p> <p>Health expenses are one cost you have little control over. Sure, you can exercise and eat well. But you might still suffer health setbacks. It's important to reserve at least some of your Social Security check to cover these sometimes unexpected costs.</p> <p>Consider saving an additional 20 percent of your Social Security benefits for medical spending.</p> <h2>Other costs</h2> <p>If you've been keeping track, those three expenses might eat up your entire Social Security check. Again, this depends on how much Social Security income you receive each month and how much you actually spend on housing, health care, and food. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-much-can-you-afford-to-spend-in-retirement?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How Much Can You Afford to Spend in Retirement?</a>)</p> <p>If you find that these three big expenses do swallow most or all of your expenses, you'll have to dip into your retirement savings and other income vehicles to cover costs such as travel, transportation, entertainment, and any other monthly bills.</p> <p>Budgeting your Social Security check highlights just how important it is to have multiple income sources at your disposal after retirement. As you can see, Social Security doesn't go that far when it comes to covering the basic living expenses of many seniors.</p> <p>You do have options, of course. You can scale back your retirement plans, perhaps choosing to travel less and eat in more often. You can also take on a part-time job. That extra income could come in handy to cover the smaller, unexpected expenses that tend to come up. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/9-easy-ways-retirees-can-earn-extra-income?ref=seealso" target="_blank">9 Easy Ways Retirees Can Earn Extra Income</a>)</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Fheres-how-you-should-budget-your-social-security-checks&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2FHeres%2520How%2520You%2520Should%2520Budget%2520Your%2520Social%2520Security%2520Checks.jpg&amp;description=Here's%20How%20You%20Should%20Budget%20Your%20Social%20Security%20Checks"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/Heres%20How%20You%20Should%20Budget%20Your%20Social%20Security%20Checks.jpg" alt="Here's How You Should Budget Your Social Security Checks" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/dan-rafter">Dan Rafter</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/heres-how-you-should-budget-your-social-security-checks">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-2"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/4-ways-couples-are-shortchanging-their-retirement-savings">4 Ways Couples Are Shortchanging Their Retirement Savings</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-money-conversations-couples-should-have-before-retirement">5 Money Conversations Couples Should Have Before Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-american-cities-where-you-can-retire-on-just-social-security">5 American Cities Where You Can Retire On Just Social Security</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-ways-you-can-cut-costs-right-before-you-retire-0">6 Ways You Can Cut Costs Right Before You Retire</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-retiring-with-debt-isnt-the-end-of-the-world">Why Retiring With Debt Isn&#039;t the End of the World</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Budgeting Retirement beneficiaries benefits expenses food costs health care housing income medical costs social security Wed, 23 Aug 2017 08:30:05 +0000 Dan Rafter 2007581 at http://www.wisebread.com 6 Age Milestones That Impact Your Retirement http://www.wisebread.com/6-age-milestones-that-impact-your-retirement <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/6-age-milestones-that-impact-your-retirement" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/piggy_bank_with_happy_birthday_party_glasses.jpg" alt="Piggy bank with Happy birthday party glasses" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>Legally significant ages seem to cluster early in life &mdash; you can drive at 16, vote, smoke, and enlist at 18, and drink at 21. After that, you might think that there are no more important age milestones to reach.</p> <p>But there <em>are</em> more important milestones you'll reach as you near retirement. Here are the important ages that can impact your retirement, and the reasons why they were chosen.</p> <h2>Age 50 &mdash; Take advantage of catch-up contributions</h2> <p>IRAs and 401(k) retirement plans are tax-advantaged, which means you receive a tax-break by contributing to them. For traditional IRAs and 401(k)s, you contribute pretax income, which means you lower your overall tax burden for the year, and the money grows tax-free. With Roth IRAs and 401(k)s, you contribute post-tax dollars, and the money still grows tax-free. Since high income earners could potentially avoid paying any taxes at all if they simply contributed a large enough portion of their income, there are limits to the amount of money you can contribute each year. As of 2017, you can contribute an annual total of $5,500 to an IRA and $18,000 to a 401(k).</p> <p>However, there is something called a catch-up provision for anyone over age 50. If you've reached your half-century mark, you can contribute an additional $1,000 to an IRA (for a $6,500 total contribution) and an additional $6,000 to a 401(k) (for a $24,000 total contribution). Taking advantage of these catch-up provisions can help you to make sure your retirement is more secure.</p> <h2>Age 59&frac12; &mdash; Take penalty-free withdrawals from tax-sheltered accounts</h2> <p>Since you fund traditional IRAs and 401(k)s with pretax income, every withdrawal you make will be taxed at your ordinary income tax rate. But if you try to withdraw money from either of these types of accounts before you have reached age 59&frac12;, then you will also owe a 10 percent early withdrawal penalty on the amount you withdraw, in addition to the ordinary income tax.</p> <p>You are not required to take withdrawals as of age 59&frac12; &mdash; that is just the earliest age that you are allowed to do so without incurring a penalty.</p> <p>You might be wondering why 59&frac12; is the magic number. Congress decided to use this age because life insurance actuarial tables consider you to be 60 years old once you have reached age 59 and six months, and at the time that the rules were put in place, 60 was a relatively common age for retirement.</p> <h2>Age 62 &mdash; Take early Social Security retirement benefits</h2> <p>Social Security beneficiaries reach eligibility as of age 62. This is the very earliest that you can access your benefits from Social Security, although taking your benefits the moment you've blown out 62 candles is not necessarily a good idea.</p> <p>Social Security changes the benefit amount based on whether you retire before or after your full retirement age. This means the longer you wait, the more money you will see in your benefit checks &mdash; to the tune of about an additional 8 percent per year. If you take benefits before hitting your full retirement age, your payments will be permanently reduced. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-questions-to-ask-before-you-start-claiming-your-social-security-benefits?ref=seealso" target="_blank">5 Questions to Ask Before You Start Claiming Your Social Security Benefits</a>)</p> <p>These early benefits have been around for quite some time. Early retirement at age 62 was introduced for women only in 1956, and the option was extended to men in 1961. Women were offered this benefit first because of the concern for widows without an income, although it became clear that men were also very interested in the option of taking early benefits.</p> <h2>Age 64 and 9 months &mdash; Enroll in Medicare</h2> <p>The initial seven-month enrollment period for Medicare spans from the three months before your 65th birthday, through the month of your birthday, and the three months following your birthday. Enrolling during this period means you will pay no fees or penalties for enrollment, and enrolling within the three months before your 65th birthday means that you will have Medicare coverage starting on the first day of your birthday month. Enrolling during your birthday month or afterward will result in a delayed start for coverage.</p> <p>If you miss the initial enrollment period for Medicare, you can still sign up during the general enrollment period between January 1 and March 31 of each year, and your coverage will begin July 1 of that year. However, there is a late penalty for missing your initial enrollment period. For Medicare Part A, your monthly premium will increase by 10 percent for twice the number of years that you could have had Part A but didn't sign up.</p> <p>If you miss the initial enrollment period for Part B, you will have to pay the late enrollment penalty for as long as you are a Medicare beneficiary. The monthly premium will increase by 10 percent for each full 12-month period that you were eligible for Part B but did not sign up.</p> <h2>Age 66 or 67 &mdash; Reach full Social Security retirement age</h2> <p>Your full retirement age is the point at which you receive your full benefits from Social Security. When Social Security was first enacted, 65 was chosen as the retirement age. In 1983, to deal with the coming demographic shift that would occur when baby boomers started to retire, Congress gradually increased the full retirement age from 65 to 67, based on birth year:</p> <table> <tbody> <tr> <td> <p><strong>Birth Year</strong></p> </td> <td> <p><strong>Full Retirement Age</strong></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <p>1943-1954</p> </td> <td> <p>65</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <p>1955</p> </td> <td> <p>66 and 2 months</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <p>1956</p> </td> <td> <p>66 and 4 months</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <p>1957</p> </td> <td> <p>66 and 6 months</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <p>1958</p> </td> <td> <p>66 and 8 months</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <p>1959</p> </td> <td> <p>66 and 10 months</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <p>1960 and later</p> </td> <td> <p>67</p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <h2>Age 70&frac12; &mdash; Begin taking required minimum distributions</h2> <p>When you put money into a tax-deferred account like a traditional IRA or 401(k), you don't have to pay taxes on that money until you withdraw it. While this helps your tax burden during your career, you do need to remember that Uncle Sam will want his cut eventually.</p> <p>This is why the IRS requires each account holder to begin withdrawing money during the year he or she reaches age 70&frac12;. There is a minimum withdrawal you must take, and failing to take out the minimum means the IRS will take 50 percent of the amount you should have withdrawn.</p> <p>To figure out your required minimum distribution (RMD), you need to calculate it based upon the balance of each of your tax-deferred accounts as of December 31 of the previous year, and the correct IRS distribution table. These tables calculate life expectancy based upon your age and give you a number (corresponding to the number of years they expect you to live), by which you will divide your balance to determine your RMD.</p> <p>It may seem that 70&frac12; is an arbitrary number, but there is a lot of thought put into this milestone age. The IRS makes a distinction between people born in the first half of the year, and those born in the second half. If your birthday falls between July 1 and December 31, you don't officially have to take an RMD until the year you turn 71. This means that those with birthdays in the first half of the year take their first RMD the year they turn 70, and those with a later birthday take their first RMD the year they turn 71 &mdash; which averages out to 70&frac12;.</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F6-age-milestones-that-impact-your-retirement&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F6%2520Age%2520Milestones%2520That%2520Impact%2520Your%2520Retirement.jpg&amp;description=6%20Age%20Milestones%20That%20Impact%20Your%20Retirement"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/6%20Age%20Milestones%20That%20Impact%20Your%20Retirement.jpg" alt="6 Age Milestones That Impact Your Retirement" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/emily-guy-birken">Emily Guy Birken</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/6-age-milestones-that-impact-your-retirement">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-tax-day-is-april-15-and-other-weird-financial-deadlines">Why Tax Day Is April 15 and Other Weird Financial Deadlines</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-signs-its-time-to-retire">8 Signs It&#039;s Time to Retire</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-face-4-ugly-truths-about-retirement-planning">How to Face 4 Ugly Truths About Retirement Planning</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-things-you-didnt-know-about-retirement">12 Things You Didn&#039;t Know About Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/if-you-want-your-401k-to-grow-stop-doing-these-6-things">If You Want Your 401K to Grow, Stop Doing These 6 Things</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Retirement 401(k) ages catch-up contributions fees IRA milestones penalties required minimum distributions rmd social security taxes Wed, 23 Aug 2017 08:00:08 +0000 Emily Guy Birken 2007140 at http://www.wisebread.com 5 Actions Women Can Take Right Now to Get Their Retirement On Track http://www.wisebread.com/5-actions-women-can-take-right-now-to-get-their-retirement-on-track <div class="field field-type-filefield field-field-blog-image"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/5-actions-women-can-take-right-now-to-get-their-retirement-on-track" class="imagecache imagecache-250w imagecache-linked imagecache-250w_linked"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/imagecache/250w/blog-images/portrait_of_three_young_adult_female_friends_in_the_street.jpg" alt="Portrait of three young adult female friends in the street" title="" class="imagecache imagecache-250w" width="250" height="140" /></a> </div> </div> </div> <p>I have female friends who range in age from their 20s to their 70s. When I talk to them about retirement, most of them share a striking similarity: They don't think about it until they have to think about it.</p> <p>Truthfully, we <em>must</em> think about and actively plan for retirement long before we actually retire &mdash; decades before, actually. This is true for everyone and it's especially true for women. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/12-surprising-things-women-should-know-about-retirement-planning?ref=seealso" target="_blank">12 Surprising Things Women Should Know About Retirement Planning</a>)</p> <p>As a woman, there are several actions you can take right now to get your retirement on track.</p> <h2>1. Plan for a long life</h2> <p>There are a number of retirement factors that women must consider more seriously than men. For example, the average life span for men in the U.S. is about 78 years. The average life span for women in the U.S. is 81 years. Since women tend to live longer, they must account for this and plan to have more money saved for retirement. Because of this longer average life span, it's also important for women to consider long-term care, the likelihood of chronic conditions and illnesses related to aging, and disability in their retirement planning. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/is-long-term-care-insurance-worth-it?ref=seealso" target="_blank">Is Long Term Care Insurance Worth It?</a>)</p> <h2>2. Don't procrastinate</h2> <p>Several unfortunate facts for working women also increase the urgency and need for deliberate planning in retirement. There is no denying that a wage gap exists for women. Simply stated, women <a href="http://www.aauw.org/research/the-simple-truth-about-the-gender-pay-gap/" target="_blank">earn an average 20 percent less</a> than men, and this gap exists in nearly every professional field. The gap is wider for women of color and working mothers. In some states, the gap is higher still.</p> <p>Apart from dealing with a wage gap, women also often leave the workforce early, whether to raise a family or act as caregivers for an aging spouse or relative. These combined factors mean that women quite literally can't afford to waste time in their approach to retirement planning. They must work harder to match the retirement savings of men &mdash; in addition to having to save more money overall to support a longer life span. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/this-is-why-you-cant-postpone-planning-for-your-retirement-and-how-to-start?ref=seealso" target="_blank">This Is Why You Can't Postpone Planning for Your Retirement</a>)</p> <h2>3. Take control</h2> <p>Retirement can be, and often is, a complicated subject &mdash; so don't feel badly about not having all the answers about what you need to do and when you need to do it. There are people who spend their entire careers learning the ins and outs of retirement planning, and helping people toward a brighter future. The right adviser can be exceedingly helpful and supportive. No matter who you turn to for retirement planning advice, make sure you feel comfortable asking them questions and feel confident in their responses. The important step is to decide to take control of your financial planning. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/this-is-the-basic-intro-to-having-a-retirement-fund-that-everyone-needs-to-read?ref=seealso" target="_blank">This Is the Basic Intro to Having a Retirement Fund That Everyone Needs to Read</a>)</p> <h2>4. Create a plan</h2> <p>Now it's time to put an actionable plan in place. Your advising firm can help you set up the best retirement savings strategy, including finding the best possible tax advantages for you. Your workplace may be able to help, too. Some advisement companies also have online portals that give you a snapshot of your accounts, telling you if you're on track or not. These tools are invaluable in your retirement planning. Take advantage of all of them. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-face-4-ugly-truths-about-retirement-planning?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How to Face 4 Ugly Truths About Retirement Planning</a>)</p> <h2>5. Track your progress</h2> <p>In an effort to begin your retirement savings early, and to save as much as you can for all the reasons mentioned above, you want to automate your retirement savings whenever possible. For example, your workplace may offer Bi-Weekly deductions from your paycheck that go directly into your retirement accounts. You can personally set regular contributions from your bank account.</p> <p>To stay motivated, it's important to track your progress. Take a look at your accounts once a month or once a quarter to see your savings growing. What gets measured gets done, and seeing your accounts grow will give you the confidence and encouragement to stay on your plan. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-signs-your-retirement-is-on-track?ref=seealso" target="_blank">8 Signs Your Retirement Is on Track</a>)</p> <p>There's no denying that women face an uphill battle when it comes to retirement savings. With the gender-based wage gap, fewer years in the workforce, and a longer average life span, it's critical for women to start their retirement savings as early as possible and to put away as much money as they can. With careful planning, focus, and diligence, women can rise and meet their goal of a healthy, happy retirement. (See also: <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-every-woman-can-take-control-of-her-finances?ref=seealso" target="_blank">How Every Woman Can Take Control of Her Finances</a>)</p> <h2 style="text-align: center;">Like this article? Pin it!</h2> <div align="center"><a data-pin-do="buttonPin" data-pin-count="above" data-pin-tall="true" data-pin-save="true" href="https://www.pinterest.com/pin/create/button/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2F5-actions-women-can-take-right-now-to-get-their-retirement-on-track&amp;media=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.wisebread.com%2Ffiles%2Ffruganomics%2Fu5180%2F5%2520Actions%2520Women%2520Can%2520Take%2520Right%2520Now%2520to%2520Get%2520Their%2520Retirement%2520On%2520Track.jpg&amp;description=5%20Actions%20Women%20Can%20Take%20Right%20Now%20to%20Get%20Their%20Retirement%20On%20Track"></a></p> <script async defer src="//assets.pinterest.com/js/pinit.js"></script></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://wisebread.killeracesmedia.netdna-cdn.com/files/fruganomics/u5180/5%20Actions%20Women%20Can%20Take%20Right%20Now%20to%20Get%20Their%20Retirement%20On%20Track.jpg" alt="5 Actions Women Can Take Right Now to Get Their Retirement On Track" width="250" height="374" /></p> <br /><div id="custom_wisebread_footer"><div id="rss_tagline">This article is from <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/christa-avampato">Christa Avampato</a> of <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-actions-women-can-take-right-now-to-get-their-retirement-on-track">Wise Bread</a>, an award-winning personal finance and <a href="http://www.wisebread.com/credit-cards">credit card comparison</a> website. Read more great articles from Wise Bread:</div><div class="view view-similarterms view-id-similarterms view-display-id-block_2 view-dom-id-1"> <div class="view-content"> <div class="item-list"> <ul> <li class="views-row views-row-1 views-row-odd views-row-first"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-are-people-retiring-in-their-30s">How Are People Retiring in Their 30s?!</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-2 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/5-ways-to-handle-a-forced-early-retirement">5 Ways to Handle a Forced Early Retirement</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-3 views-row-odd"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/8-questions-financial-advisers-hear-most-often">8 Questions Financial Advisers Hear Most Often</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-4 views-row-even"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-save-for-retirement-while-caring-for-kids-and-parents">How to Save for Retirement While Caring for Kids and Parents</a></span> </div> </li> <li class="views-row views-row-5 views-row-odd views-row-last"> <div class="views-field-title"> <span class="field-content"><a href="http://www.wisebread.com/why-your-daily-latte-wont-sink-your-retirement-savings">Why Your Daily Latte Won&#039;t Sink Your Retirement Savings</a></span> </div> </li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> </div><br/></br> Retirement disability early retirement financial advisers forced retirement life span long-term care longevity saving money wage gap women Tue, 22 Aug 2017 08:30:10 +0000 Christa Avampato 2006371 at http://www.wisebread.com